PLEASE, YOUNG BLACK PEOPLE GO OUT A VOTE WHEN THE TIME COMES AND VOTE WISELY. WE NEED A CHANGE FROM WHAT WE HAVE NOW. CRUZ BUSTAMANTES IS A RACIST HE HATES BLACKS. OVER A YEAR AGO HE MADE A PUBLIC SPEECH AND WHILE MAKING HIS SPEECH HE USED THE WORD THOSE NIGGERS. NOW IF HE CAN SAY SUCH A WORD IN PUBLIC. THEN I WONDER WHAT HE FEELS IN HIS HEART ABOUT US BLACKS. WE DON'T NEED HIM RUNNING THIS STATE. ARE GRAY DAVIS WHO APPOINTED HIM IN OFFICE IN THE FIRST PLACE. CRUZ BUSTAMANTES FEELS THAT WE BLACKS ARE LESSOR THEN HIS KIND WHICH IS THE HISPANIC RACE. HE FEELS THAT HIS KIND SHOULD ONLY LIVE HERE IN CALIF, HE ALSO BELONGS TO A RACIST GROUP THAT ONLY RESPECTS HISPANIC PEOPLE. THEY HAVE ALL THE BUSINESS AND HAVE TAKEN OVER ALL THE SCHOOLS. SO YOU ASK YOURSELF WHERE ARE WE AS BLACKS SUPPOSED TO LIVE IF HE GETS I OFFICE ARE IF GRAY DAVIS REMAINS IN OFFICE. argue
WE HAVE PUT A LOT INTO THIS STATE TO JUST LET HIS KIND CAST US OUT.

BETTY BROWN
Original Post
I, STRONGLY AGREE WITH WHAT YOU'RE SAYING ABOUT THIS MAN. BECAUSE I TO VIEWED IT ON TELEVISION A WHILE BACK WHEN HE MADE THAT REMARK ABOUT BLACK PEOPLE.THEIR'S A LOT OF HISPANIC PEOPLE WHO DISLIKE BLACKS. CRUZ BUSTAMANTES IS A RACIST HE SPEAKS ONLY FOR THE HISPANIC PEOPLE. AND SO DOES GOVERNOR GRAY DAVIS. I HAVEN'T VOTED IN A WHILE. BUT I'M GOING TO IN THE RECALL. BECAUSE THESE TWO MEN NEED NOT REMAIN IN OFFICE. ARE BE ELECTED IN TO OFFICE. IF WE BLACKS WANT A FUTURE WE BETTER WAKE UP NOW.CRUZ BUSTAMANTES SUPPOSED TO BE FOR THE DEMOCRAT PEOPLE WHICH MOST ARE BLACKS CITIZENS.BUT HOW COME I HAVE NEVER SEEN HIM AROUND ANY BLACKS ON THE NEWS DURING THIS RECALL ELECTION. I HAVE SEEN ARNOLD AROUND WHITES AND BLACKS ON THE NEWS. AND HE IS A REPUBLICAN. MMMMM, MAKES ME WONDER?
argue

JIM WILLIAMS

FROM CALIF
Out of curiosity, what is the African American sentiment towards Arnold, as opposed to Bustamantes and Davis in California. I just remember some years ago in my city we had only two Republican candidates running for a particular office and felt we had no choice but to vote for the lessor of the two evils; neither of which had our concerns at heart, but one was less likely to do anything to hurt us in this area, even if he was not going to do anything to help.
Hello Everyone,

As I type the political debate is being aired on KNBC, from 6-9:30 PM, Pacific Time. Very interesting session to which the question and answer session is very open, and frank. Don't care for Arnold Schwarzenegger or Bustamante. The Republican Tom McClintock appears to use common sense approach in reducing taxes, government spending, and improving the economy within California.

_______________________________________________

Of Course I Can't Speak for Everyone, but I'm Voting For Tom McClintock

McClintock Ignores Clamor to Quit Encouraged by his climb in the polls, the candidate vows to stay in the race despite calls to withdraw from some in the GOP. He is used to going it alone.

By James Rainey and Daryl Kelley,Times Staff Writers

September 24, 2003

State Sen. Tom McClintock has been hearing for weeks that he is fouling up Arnold Schwarzenegger's sprint to the California governorship "” splitting the Republican vote and costing his party its best chance at statewide office in years.

Now some GOP stalwarts have upped the ante, suggesting that McClintock could actually drag down the recall itself"”as Republican partisans rethink their plans to vote against Gov. Gray Davis for fear they might hand the office to a more liberal Democrat, Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante.

So where does all this pressure leave the conservative legislator from Thousand Oaks?

Unmoved, on message and driving hard toward an Oct. 7 election he insists he can win.

McClintock's commitment to staying in the race has been clear in his unyielding public statements. Those who might still doubt his willingness to go his own way might be swayed by reviewing his history"”one filled with lonely stands, often for lost causes.

The former assemblyman and now state senator, after all, campaigned for Barry Goldwater for president at age 8 and battled California's last two Republican governors, George Deukmejian and Pete Wilson, who helped push McClintock so far outside the party establishment that he received little formal GOP backing in his previous runs for statewide office.

The sometimes lonely backbencher, his ideas ignored in the Democrat-dominated Senate, suddenly finds himself the standard-bearer of true conservatives, perhaps paving the way for a future run for governor. Thrust into the public, he receives slaps on the back, shouts of "Beat Arnold!" and even tears of apparent devotion.

McClintock, 47, normally holds his narrow lips pressed tightly together. But, asked about the throng that greeted him enthusiastically at an anti-car-tax rally in Anaheim last Thursday, he broke into a wide smile and conceded: "It felt good."

"The emotion in people's eyes was very real," he went on. "It's something I've never seen in politics. It's people not just caring but riveted on the future. It really is democracy coming alive."

McClintock repeated again Tuesday that he is long past the point of leaving the race, having committed to thousands of donors and supporters to stay the course.

"I made a promise when I entered this race that I would be in it to the finish line," he said, "and I keep my promises."

Earlier, McClintock said in an interview that Schwarzenegger's beliefs are so unclear he could not, in good conscience, turn his support over to the actor.

"How can I get out of the race, when I don't even understand what he believes in?" he said. "I certainly don't know. Do you?"

Schwarzenegger on Tuesday suggested for the first time that McClintock should consider getting out of the race, lest he hand the election to the Democrats. And Senate Republican Leader Jim Brulte (R-Rancho Cucamonga) endorsed the actor, saying that a split GOP could even "put at risk" the recall itself, as conservatives might shy away from ousting the governor if they thought Bustamante would succeed him.

Although he insists he bears no ill will toward the GOP establishment, McClintock and party leaders have a somewhat rocky history. Last year, for example, McClintock was outspent 5-to-1 by Steve Westly in the race for state controller, and lost to Westly by fewer than 17,000 votes. The Republican party, focused more on the top of the ticket, came to his aid too late and cost him the election, some McClintock supporters believe.

And McClintock has particular animus for Wilson, whom he called "one of the worst" governors in state history, largely because he approved a record tax increase. Of Wilson's onetime staffers, now working for Schwarzenegger, McClintock says they support "bigger and ever-more-expensive government at a time when the growth of government can no longer be sustained by the economy."

Polls unconnected to the candidates have found McClintock lagging but gaining ground on Bustamante and Schwarzenegger, who lead the race to replace Davis if he is recalled. A survey by the Public Policy Institute of California, released over the weekend, found Bustamante backed by 28% of likely voters, Schwarzenegger favored by 26% and McClintock third at 14%.

Many analysts believe most of McClintock's votes would go to Schwarzenegger if the state senator dropped out. But the maverick lawmaker views the race differently. Because he moved up 9 percentage points from his showing in the institute's previous poll, McClintock said he was "on the move" while the actor's relatively stable support from about one-quarter of voters leaves him "dead in the water."

With only a fraction of Schwarzenegger's money, McClintock throws himself into multiple "free" media opportunities a day "” radio and television interviews. He believes that after polls show him moving even closer to the actor, Republicans will move to his column, realizing he can win.

Some analysts say that, even in defeat, McClintock's high profile this year as California's bellwether conservative could help him springboard into the 2006 governor's race.

Though McClintock insists he is concentrating on this campaign, even his supporters concede the recall could be a setup for the future.

"It's very possible" that McClintock could run for governor again in three years, said John Feliz, his top campaign strategist. "Didn't Ronald Reagan run for president in '76 and get elected in 1980? How did he do that? With the base he put together in 1976."

Reagan ran against a sitting Republican president, Gerald Ford, and the GOP establishment in 1976, Feliz noted. At first his positions seemed extremely conservative, Feliz said, but by 1980 the party had come to him.

"This whole thing is about ideas," Feliz said. "With Tom, the Republican Party is able to advance a coherent vision for California."

Indeed, even some Democrats have praised McClintock for having a firm set of convictions that he's able to present clearly to voters. As he heads into tonight's debate and his first face-to-face confrontation with Schwarzenegger, many of McClintock's stands set him apart from the field. He is anti-abortion, anti-gun control, against government recognition of gay partnerships and pro-death penalty.

He has pledged to oppose all new taxes and to try to eliminate the state Coastal Commission.

"McClintock's rise has been nothing short of remarkable: Here's a guy who potentially "” other than the winner "” may be the person who stands to gain the most out of the recall election," said Kam Kuwata, a Democratic consultant who is not involved in the recall race. "If he sticks it out, he will come out of this campaign as the leader of maybe a quarter of the electorate."

Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, a USC political analyst, agreed that a strong showing in the election, less than two weeks away, could position McClintock for the next gubernatorial election. But if McClintock pulls just enough votes to deny Schwarzenegger a victory this time, she said, "he could become a pariah among Republicans."

Schwarzenegger's increasingly contentious stance seems to only confirm to McClintock that he is scoring points, especially on days like the one late last week when he visited conservative radio talk show hosts John Kobylt and Ken Chiampou, who had gathered hundreds of supporters in an Anaheim hotel to sign petitions to abolish the state's car tax.

The raucous crowd cheered McClintock as he derided the tax as one of the worst on the books. As he worked a line of hundreds of fans who waited to sign petitions and meet the hosts of the "John & Ken Show" on KFI-AM (640), many urged him to "hang in there" and "keep going."

They said they were upset, not just by the tripling of the car tax but by other issues, including Davis' recent signing of a bill allowing illegal immigrants to apply for driver's licenses.

Kristen Scott, a 21-year-old in blond dreadlocks and a "Mommy's Little Monster" T-shirt, said she was sick and tired of illegal immigrants from Mexico getting special treatment, including junior college admission and tuition aid.

"They break the law and they get rewarded. What is that?" Scott said. "I think he is the one candidate who would do something."

To those who wanted to know how he would govern with all those Democrats controlling the Legislature, McClintock said he would simply send crucial measures "” reversing the driver's license law and reforming worker's compensation "” straight to the voters in the form of referendums.

That seemed to be good enough for many at the rally. Several told the candidate they had been backing Schwarzenegger but were switching allegiances.

McClintock said he thinks a lot of voters may finally be coming around to views he has espoused for 20 years. And no celebrity is going to push him aside now.

"If the most qualified candidate has to step aside every time a millionaire casts a lonely eye on a public office, then we've lost something very important in our democracy," he said. "This isn't a lark for me; it's what I've devoted my entire adult life to achieve for my state. And we've now reached a time when those reforms can no longer be postponed."

_______________________________________

....And Bustamante, Like the incumbent Governor Gray Davis, need to be put out to the pasture like a used up race horse! Besides Bustamante and Gray Davis support, various special groups, non U.S. citizens, and/or illegal and undocumented immigrants, at the expense of law abiding U.S. citizens

"Return of Donations Ordered Judge says Bustamante can't use millions from old campaign fund. An aide says it's been spent.
By Dan Morain

Times Staff Writer

September 23, 2003

SACRAMENTO "” A judge ruled Monday that Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante broke campaign laws by using about $4 million in six- and seven-figure donations to pay for an advertising blitz.

The judge ordered Bustamante to return the contributions. But, perhaps rendering the decision more political than practical, Bustamante's chief political consultant said all the money was gone.

In a 12-page order issued in response to a lawsuit by a Republican state senator, Sacramento Superior Court Judge Loren McMaster wrote that a fund-raising maneuver Bustamante had employed had violated the "plain and unambiguous language" of Proposition 34. That measure, passed by voters in 2000, caps political contributions at $21,200 in the recall race.

The lieutenant governor accepted donations far exceeding that sum "” including a $1.5-million gift from an Indian tribe "” in an old campaign fund established before Proposition 34 took effect. Then he shifted the money to a new fund, and used it for an ad campaign.

McMaster issued a preliminary injunction forbidding Bustamante to transfer any more of the disputed money to his current campaign.

But the judge also said Bustamante had probably "acted in good faith" and had not intentionally broken the law.

Bustamante initially planned to transfer millions from the old committee to his new "Bustamante for Governor" account.

But in the face of an outcry from other candidates, he changed strategy and moved the money to an even newer fund he set up to oppose Proposition 54, the measure that would restrict government's ability to gather racial and ethnic data. The measure shares the recall ballot and is the subject of the television ads paid for with the disputed cash.

Bustamante's donors are not seeking refunds; indeed, several continue to spend on his behalf.

But Bustamante's critics used McMaster's ruling to chastise the leading Democrat in the race to replace Gov. Gray Davis if Davis is recalled. Some called on the lieutenant governor to cancel the ads and to return the money.

"Mr. Bustamante and his campaign were in a rush to spend the money they've raised, knowing full well this action was pending," said state Sen. Ross Johnson (R-Irvine), who brought the suit and is one of Proposition 34's authors.

"He has an obligation to tell the people of California what he spent that money on and whether it was irretrievably spent."

At a San Francisco campaign stop Monday, Bustamante said the ads "” which feature the lieutenant governor at a campaign rally "” would remain on the air. And he repeatedly insisted that his campaign was blameless.

"The decision was a total vindication of Cruz Bustamante," the lieutenant governor said.

"The judge basically said that what we had done was exactly what we had been told to do. We'll follow whatever the judge says we're supposed to do."

Richie Ross, Bustamante's campaign strategist, said McMaster's comments "removed a dark cloud" that had been hanging over Bustamante's campaign.

And he said the judge's order would have little effect on the race, largely because Bustamante had ceased the practice that was the focus of the lawsuit.

"We would certainly return any money that we have," Ross said.

How much is left?

"None," Ross said, indicating that virtually all of it had been spent on the television ads, which began airing a week ago today.

Bustamante accepted the $1.5 million from the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians and $600,000 from the Sycuan Band of Kumeyaay Indians and $500,000 from the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians. The tribes own major Southern California casinos.

And the lieutenant governor took $700,000 from the labor union representing California state engineers, $200,000 from the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and $200,000 from carpenters' unions.

Proposition 54 promoter Ward Connerly said Bustamante should be required to pay back "every penny that he's spent."

"I felt from Day One that it was illegal" for Bustamante to handle the funds as he had, Connerly said, "and this certainly confirms that."

Independent gubernatorial candidate Arianna Huffington, who has sought to make fund-raising an issue in the recall campaign, praised the judge's ruling.

It "sends a strong message to politicians that they cannot get away with abusing our campaign finance laws," she said.

Bustamante's closest rival, Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger, said in a statement that the ruling amounts to "judgment day" for Bustamante's "skirting and violating the campaign finance laws."

Schwarzenegger, a multimillionaire, has spent $6 million of his own money on his campaign. Bustamante's major donors have said they gave the six- and seven-figure donations to help make the campaign fairer.

McMaster acknowledged in his decision that wealthy candidates "enjoy an advantage over candidates of modest means."

"However, that fact is not a basis to interpret Proposition 34 in such a manner that circumvents the expressed intent of the voters," McMaster wrote.

Proposition 34 imposed contribution limits to "minimize the potentially corrupting influence and appearance of corruption caused by large contributions," the judge's order said.

The Fair Political Practices Commission concluded in 2001 that Proposition 34 did not apply to accounts that existed before the limits took effect.

McMaster partially blamed the commission, which is responsible for interpreting and enforcing state campaign finance law.

In his opinion, the judge said the commission had "provided often conflicting advice" on this issue "” though the agency said it had explained its position on the issue in various public pronouncements.

"There has been no clear and straightforward interpretation of the provisions at issue by either the FPPC or the courts prior to the commencement of this action," McMaster wrote.

According to attorneys involved in the case, any penalty against Bustamante would be imposed, not by the judge, but by the commission, which is investigating a separate complaint by Johnson against Bustamante.

"The FPPC," said Sacramento attorney James. F. Sweeney, whose firm represented Johnson in the lawsuit, "faces a unique situation in which they failed to act in the face of a manifest violation of the political reform act, and now the matter is in front of them for enforcement."

McMaster's decision could affect other incumbents, particularly legislative leaders, who also have raised new money into old committees in excess of the $3,000 cap for legislative candidates.

Times staff writers Lee Romney, Rebecca Trounson and Matea Gold contributed to this report."

_______________________________________

The Print Version!

"Recall Candidates Challenge Each Other In Debate

From Associated Press

6:41 PM PDT, September 24, 2003

SACRAMENTO -- In the biggest debate of California's recall election, the five leading candidates seeking to replace Gov. Gray Davis clashed over the state's struggling economy and whether the circus-like recall process has been good for the state.

The unique debate format allowed candidates to see the questions in advance and imposed no time limit on answers, providing a spectacle in which candidates jumped on top of each other's answers and at times shouted to prevent being drowned out.

Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger, participating in his first and only debate so far, hailed the reformist governor who pushed through California's recall law in 1911, while fellow Republican state Sen. Tom McClintock said it was a necessary step when the voters made the wrong decision.

Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, who has strayed from his original message of "no on recall, yes on Bustamante," returned to his theme and said it was a "terrible idea" and bad for democracy. Independent Arianna Huffington criticized the recall, but said it was a historic opportunity to elect a progressive. Green Party candidate Peter Camejo criticized the unusual format that would allow someone to win with a minority of voters.

The stakes were high for the debate: One in five voters in a recent poll was undecided, and two-thirds said they would be swayed by the face-off, which could be the most-watched debate in California political history.

The debate was carried live on national cable networks including CNN, MSNBC and Fox.

Schwarzenegger set high expectations for his own performance by repeatedly calling the forum "the Super Bowl of debates," and his rivals in the Oct. 7 recall election were expected to try to challenge him or trip him up.

"This is the opening scene of the third act of the campaign, and it's a referendum on Arnold," said GOP strategist Allan Hoffenblum. "He needs to come across as competent, that he has command of public policy issues and that he appears qualified to be governor. If he does all that, he'll win."

The candidates were given a dozen questions in advance on such topics as how to balance the budget, the meaning of a colorblind society and services for senior citizens.

The campaign was put back on track Tuesday when a federal appeals reversed course and unanimously ruled the election could go forward next month despite the risk of confusion from the use of punch-card ballots in some counties.

At least 500 representatives from more than 100 media outlets around the world were expected to cover the debate, said the organizers, the California Broadcasters Association.

The scripted format prompted criticism, particularly among Schwarzenegger opponents who said he has been deliberately dodging more spontaneous candidate forums.

Schwarzenegger did not take part in debates held on Sept. 3 and Sept. 17. Although another major debate is set for Sept. 30, Schwarzenegger's campaign said the intention is to attend only Wednesday's.

In a poll last week by the Public Policy Institute of California, 67 percent of likely voters said the debate would influence their vote. The poll also showed that one in five voters remains undecided about who to support if Davis is recalled.

The debate comes as the campaign has taken a distinctly negative turn. On Monday, Schwarzenegger broke a vow to stay positive, and began airing a television commercial attacking Davis and another taking aim at the state's powerful Indian gambling tribes and implicitly criticizing Bustamante and McClintock for taking large tribal campaign contributions.

On Tuesday, Bustamante hit back, airing an ad that called Schwarzenegger an elitist outsider from "Planet Hollywood." Schwarzenegger released a new radio ad Wednesday attacking tribes that criticizes Davis, Bustamante and McClintock by name.

"If there is a real shootout at the debate, it can only help Davis," said Republican political strategist Arnold Steinberg. "Davis has to hope everyone does badly here, including Bustamante."

Davis, who is not participating in the debate, was the target of new attacks from Schwarzenegger as well. In an essay Wednesday on the editorial page of The Wall Street Journal, Schwarzenegger wrote that Davis "has created a counterproductive culture in Sacramento where businesses and entrepreneurs that dare make a profit are treated as if they are enemies of the state."

He referred to Bustamante as "Gray Davis -- The Sequel" and said the two Democrats have created "an endless litany of taxing schemes."

The Democratic Party is in trouble, when it must use former President Bill Clinton, and the very sacreligious Reverend Jesse Jackson as role models to advise Black voters to support Governor Gray Davis in his bid for re-election, inspite of the recall. The Democratic Party, used FAME, First African American Episcopal Church as a podium to gain a cheap note in behalf of Governor Gray Davis, during a Sunday church service, at FAME. The Democratic Party has a history of working through Black preachers to deliver the Black vote to the Democratic Party, while the Black community receives nothing in return for its votes. Preachers have no business in the political arena. This decision should be left to the individual voter to decide for themselves, rather than using "dummy ballots", "trickery", and/or using Sunday Church services to promote the political process.

Sincerely,

Michael Lofton

[This message was edited by Lofton on September 24, 2003 at 07:39 PM.]
debbiew20, everytime Bush makes a speech to the military, there's about 4 or 5 "blacks" sitting behind him too! So, what's that supposed to mean: Arnold has "blacks" beside him? Have you read any websites about Arnold?? I have, but I'm not in Caleefornia!! He wouldn't get my vote. I'm not Repub either; might not be Demo if those voting machines don't get to working and the votes counted as the populace intended.

Folks getting KICKED OUT of office before their term is over, because they're no longer liked is like 'BLACKS' being demonized because of their color. What's the difference here????

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×