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I never had any kind of substance addiction, so I can't really relate to people that abuse their body, much less blame others.

But when it comes to my people, I empathize and try to see how I could advocate for wrongs being righted.

What do you think of this:

quote:
Dedicated to the Memory of my Father
Ernest Randall
1916-1995
My great-grandfather, Manlis Randle, lived to be ninety-four years old; my grandfather, Tom Randall,(2) the youngest child of slaves, lived to be ninety-seven years old. My father, an educated black man of the twentieth century, lived only to seventy-nine. He died of cancer after smoking cigarettes for over sixty years. He tried to quit smoking many times. He tried to quit smoking after developing throat cancer at sixty-two years old; he tried to quit after his brother, Arthur Randall, died of lung cancer; he tried the patches; he tried cold turkey; he tried hypnosis; he tried every smoking cessation known to man (or woman); he wanted to quit; he wanted a long life; but no matter how hard he tried, he always returned to his mentholated cigarettes. The first thing in the morning, (a smoke), the last thing at night (a smoke). My father smoked himself into an early grave. Cigarettes deprived me of a father and deprived my children of a grandfather. Who knows--with the longevity in my family, they probably deprived my grandchildren of a great-grandparent.



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All I can say is that I was a smoker for over 20 years and I feel for anyone struggling to quit. It is a powerful addiction; stronger than heroin, I have read. Over the years, I was able to quit when ever I wanted, once for almost 2 years, until the early '90's when I believe the tobacco companies got wise. They knew that we (smokers) could quit whenever we had the notion, so they increased the nicotine level and took the ingredient labling off the package. Blinded by the smoke in our eyes, we kept right on puffing and when we wanted to quit found it not so easy anymore. It was almost impossible. Once the desire to be free for all time set in, it still took me six years to quit. And you know what,after two years, there are still times when I want to smoke.

If you don't smoke, don't start. Ever.
isistah-what did u do to quit? I have been trying to get my mom to quit now for about 17 years(which is a long time considering I am only 21) She is thinking about taking some new thing called, "Smoke Away" they have a infomerical that is always on.

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The Lord is on my side;I will not fear:what can man do unto me?
(Psalms 118:6)


If God brings you to it - He will bring you through it.

quote:
Originally posted by msprettygirl:
isistah-what did u do to quit? I have been trying to get my mom to quit now for about 17 years(which is a long time considering I am only 21) She is thinking about taking some new thing called, "Smoke Away" they have a infomerical that is always on.





Before your Mom wastes $300 on Smoke Away, tell her to see her doctor and ask him for a prescription for Zyban or Wellbutrin. My doctor, knowing that I was trying to quit, never suggested that I try it, but did give it to me when I asked for it (?). Three weeks after starting the prescription, I was an ex-smoker and have not picked up a cigarette since. I didn't have any cravings or nervousness. I did gain weight, but have since taken it off. The prescription cost me $3.
I am empathetic to all smokers trying to quit. I have to sign-on as an ex-smoker. When I quit I was smoking a carton from 5PM on Friday to 8Am on Monday. I played music over the weekend. I finally was able to quit after smoking 23 years. I don't know the mechanics of addiction, but I cannot begin to imagine addiction to harder drugs. Nicotine is a drug folks!! I thank God that I never got involved with THAT.

How to quit? Personal resolve. And all the help you can get. I was motivated when I began to literally see stars when I began coughing after taking a "drag." Stars like sparklers on the 4th of July. My 9-year old ask me to quit for his birthday. It was like a stab in the heart.

I need to be more clear about the coughing. I always coughed after taking a "drag." It was just that now I began to see stars when the coughing began.

I QUIT!! But not right away. After all, I had four cigarettes left in the pack. I tried two more. I couldn't finish the first because of unstoppable coughing. But it did stop. And, I did have three cigarettes left. So I smoked another. I really thought the coughing would never stopped those around me began to try to help. Scared me almost to death. No pun intended.

THEN I QUIT!!! Cold Turkey.

Thank God!!

PEACE

Jim Chester

P.S. I dreamed about smoking for 15 years!!! I mean literally DREAMED about it.

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.

[This message was edited by James Wesley Chester on October 15, 2003 at 07:22 AM.]

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