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“But we have been, by our oppressors, despoiled of our purity, and corrupted in our native characteristics, so that we have inherited their vices, and but few of their virtues, leaving us in character, really a broken people.”
-Martin Delany












King Ezana's Stele. Ezana was a king of Axum (present day Ethiopia) during the 4th century. — with MsKim Maat Jones.






Amenemhat I was the founder of the 12th dynasty. Among his achievements include the expansion of Kemet’s borders. His mother was a Nubian woman.






The Medjay were a Nubian people who served as soldiers and the elite police force in Kemet.






Ganga Zumba was the first leader of Palmares, which was a settlement for escaped slaves in colonial Brazil. He was later overthrown and replaced by Zumbi, who felt that Zumba was too inept as a military leader and because Zumba signed a treaty with the Portuguese that would have forced all the runaway slaves on Palmares to return to the plantation.





A painting of Amenhotep III




Let us free Africa today so that the struggle will not fall upon another generation.








Fun Fact: The Afro Pick originated in ancient Egypt. 





Nana Olomu was an Itsekiri ruler and a wealthy trader. His power and influence was so great that British merchants were forced to trade on his terms. The British finally decided to attack Nana’s kingdom. Despite the British having superior weapons, Nana showed superior skill and strategy, making him much harder to defeat than originally expected. His kingdom was finally captured and he was exiled, like various other African rulers of this period.




Nehanda and her followers after being captured by the British for her rebellion against colonial rule.





Dutty Boukman was a Jamaican born slave. Because he was teaching other slaves how to read, he was sold from Jamaica to a plantation in Haiti. Boukman would later become an instrumental figure in starting the Haitian Revolution.




Queen Tiye was the wife of Amenhotep III and the mother of Akhenaten. Tiye was one of the most influential women in Egyptian history and was frequently depicted as the equal of her husband. She also served as an important advisor for both her husband and son during their respected reigns as pharaoh. — with Tanika Curtis.





“Yesterday we were kings. Can you tell me young ones who are we today?”
-Damian Marley






Rahotep was a Kemetic prince of the 4th dynasty.






Akhenaten. — with Thebe Isdatruth Tshupe.




A statue of Amenhotep III.






Hannibal was a general of Carthage who led his troops across the Alps to Rome where he laid siege to the countryside, but he was unable to conquer Rome because he lacked siege weapons. Out of desperation Rome attacked Carthage forcing Hannibal to return home where he was then defeated by a general known as Scipio Africanus. Although no authentic image of Hannibal exists, many historians believe that this coin is a true depiction of Hannibal.

Hannibal is generally considered to be one of the greatest military generals in history.
 — withReborn Afrikan.





Ethiopian king Endubis depicted on a coin.




Ay performing the opening of the mouth ceremony for Tutankhamun.









When will we teach our children the legacy of our struggle? Our struggles on the slave plantations of the New World and our struggles in the colonial governments of Africa. When will we teach our children to be proud of their Africaness and not to allow themselves to be exploited. When will our children stop degrading themselves and running away from themselves? When will we teach our kids the imp...See More

 — with Jahni Harris,Vincent Evans and Jahbeez Elliott.




A depiction of Sennedjem, a Kemetic worker, and his wife working in the afterlife. — with Vincent EvansErica Unique Trotter-Palmer and Yochanah Tsemach.




Kemetic soldiers on their expedition to Punt during the reign of Hatshepsut. — with Vincent EvansErica Unique Trotter-Palmer and Yochanah Tsemach.

 
 
 
 


The Independent Party of Color (PIC) of Cuba. It was a black independence party that fought for the rights of Afro-Cubans. The party was eventually crushed in a 1912 massacre in which thousands of black Cubans were killed, many of which had no affiliation with the PIC. — withDerek Richardson.



Victims in the Congo Free State.





Statues of the Nubian pharaohs that ruled Egypt.— with Erica Unique Trotter-Palmer and Vicky Rogers-Burks.




King Aspelta of Kush.






What about this image would make a person think that the Egyptians were anything but native African people? — with Erica Unique Trotter-Palmer and Sheila El Hilaly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I'm just trying to make a way out of no way, for my people" -Modejeska Monteith Simpkins

 

AFRICAN AMERICA IS AT WAR

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICA

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICANS

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

AMERICA'S RACISTS HAVE INFILTRATED AMERICAN POLICE FORCES TO WAGE A RACE WAR AGAINST BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

THE BLACK RACE IS AT WAR

FIRST WORLD WAR:  THE APPROXIMATELY 6,000 YEAR WORLD WAR ON AFRICA AND THE BLACK RACE

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If you can get your hands on it, I highly recommend the movie "Quilmbo" which is the story of Palmares. I've watched several times with my children. Highly recommend. I also recommend "Besouro", U.S. title "The Assailant" (dumb title IMO) it is on Netflix streaming right now. Again my children watched. They love it. Black Brazilian films are the best in the Americas.

You know .... as far back as I can remember - and that's getting to be a long time now! - it has always been one of the great mysteries of life to me how .... on ALL of the hieroglyphics found written in ancient Egyptian tombs the people are ALWAYS depicted as brown/black skinned ... purposely painted that way to reflect themselves!!!

 

Yet White people, when it comes to films or documentaries or recreations of that time in history, ALWAYS show the people of that time and region as light-skinned - if not straight-out White altogether - as if nobody could or would make that connection that .... DUH!!! .... these people were OBVIOUSLY .... OBVIOUSLY ... naturally African/Black/dark-skinned people!!!! 

 

I mean ... even as a child, it was the kind of thing that insulted my intelligence from the get-go!!!  And caused me not to believe in the things they called themselves trying to "teach" me .... 'cause it was just unbelievably ridiculous to me that such a notion could even be possible!!

 

If you looked at how those people themselves depicted their image to be .... how in the hell would you try to convince somebody that somebody that looked like Elizabeth Taylor was supposedly the real image of Cleopatra?? 

 

I mean ... I wasn't really old enough to understand that ... but, I knew it just didn't make any rational, common sense to me!!    Still doesn't!!!  'Cause for some reason, they're STILL try to shovel that crap as some kind of "reality." 

 

It's just baffling ..... and I truly just don't get it. 

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