Slavery Payments?

Thursday, July 14, 2005

This is a partial transcript from "The O'Reilly Factor," July 13, 2005, that has been edited for clarity.

Watch "The O'Reilly Factor" weeknights at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET and listen to the "Radio Factor!"

BILL O'REILLY, HOST: In the "Unresolved Problems" segment tonight, does corporate America owe African-Americans money because of slavery?

TheNAACP is holding its annual connection in Milwaukee this week. And the group is targeting some corporations that may have benefited from slavery. So far, J.P. Morgan (search) has ponied up $5 million for a scholarship program, and other big businesses may follow suit.

Joining us from Washington is Keith Watters, a civil rights attorney. And from Albany, New York, Debra Dickerson, the author of the book, "The End of Blackness."

Ms. Dickerson, what's wrong if a company did profit by slavery "” I don't know if J.P. Morgan did or not, we don't know what the connection there is "” but J.P. Morgan seems to think that they owe the African- American community some payback. And a scholarship fund for $5 million, what would be wrong with that?

DEBRA DICKERSON, AUTHOR, "THE END OF BLACKNESS": Well, I don't think there's anything necessarily wrong with that. I think the problem is the murkiness around what "” what is the impulse behind this?

If the impulse is just sort of, "Nyah, nyah, nyah, nyah, nyah, stick to it white people," I have a problem with that. If we're talking about justice. If we think that there's some relationship between the past and the present, then what we need is a truth and reconciliation process.

If that leads to some money changing hands at the end of the day, that's fine. If it leads to apologies back and forth, fine. If it leads to a mutual understanding that we thought something happened here, but it didn't, so you people need to let it go.

So it's not the question of whether or not money should change hands. The question is how we achieve truth and reconciliation all over the country.

O'REILLY: Yes, you don't want to do it through blackmail. And I would oppose, Mr. Watters, as you know, any kind of taxation of me or you or any American in reparations for slavery. That's what John Conyers, a congressman from Michigan, wants. And that's insane.

KEITH WATTERS, CIVIL RIGHTS ATTORNEY: Well, Bill...

O'REILLY: Let me get my question in. Individual Americans owe nobody anything for what happened in the past. We didn't do it. However, if somebody stole land in a slave state and that can be proven, I think reparations there, if you can prove it at that level that that specifically, I am for that. What say you?

WATTERS: I say that America owes African-American as great deal. This country was built on slavery. As Jews around the world...

O'REILLY: You're saying the Northeastern part of the United States was built on slavery?

(CROSSTALK)

O'REILLY: That is fallacious and it wasn't.

WATTERS: Slavery existed everywhere in the initial phases, and the north phased it first before the South. But my point is, Bill, you said you don't believe tax-payer money should be paid for that, but Japanese- Americans rightly received compensation for being incarcerated during World War II.

O'REILLY: Yes, because they could prove "” they could prove specific damages, that "They rounded me up. I had nothing to do with it. I was an American citizen. They threw me in a camp and I got damaged." That's in any kind of a tort, you would get damages.

And I submit to you that any kind of extortion of the American public along these racial lines of slavery is absolutely immoral.

WATTERS: But Bill, when you use the word "extortion," that's an inflammatory phrase.

O'REILLY: Because it's an inflammatory subject. If you're going to take my money for something that happened 150 years ago, that's inflammatory, sir.

WATTERS: You pay taxes all the time, and I'm sure some of your tax money, you don't like the way it's spent.

O'REILLY: Absolutely.

WATTERS: And by the Republicans.

O'REILLY: I don't pay "” I don't pay a specific punitive tax because my great-great-great-great-grandfather might have done something, which by the way, he didn't, because he came over in the famine and didn't own any slaves.

Look, Mr. Watters, corporate misdeeds during slave-time, I understand that they can be pinpointed, and I have no problem with it. Personal taxpayer, I've got a big problem with that.

Do you, Ms. Dickerson?

DICKERSON: Again, we have to take a step back. I think that one of the sticking points is you make that point, which I think is an amazing concession in your point, that where specific harm can be shown, specific restitution ought to be made.

But the problem comes in a situation like Tulsa, where "” which had a state commission that said, yes, this happened. The white people rampaged and they destroyed this very prosperous black area, and yes, there are living victims of that. But here. Here's a commemorative coin. That's all we are going to do about it.

So that's the kind of thing that breeds the kind of animus and lingering resentment that I think fuels this reparations movement.

O'REILLY: Absolutely. But the people of Tulsa "” the people of Tulsa that you referred to, I believe should have some kind of recompense. If I were the governor of Oklahoma I would say...

DICKERSON: Right. They got coins; they got commemorative coins.

O'REILLY: I would say, I "” if your children need state assistance to go to college, we're going to make a special fund available to them. Because I think that's fair, Mr. Watters.

I think that if you deal with it at that level...

DICKERSON: And that's fair, I think.

O'REILLY: ... fair-minded Americans are going to say, "OK, cause and effect, we can see." But if you come into my house and want some of my money and property because of something that happened I had nothing to do with, forget it, sir.

WATTERS: Bill, I think "” I think I could reason with you on this topic. And I think you're open to reasonable solutions. And that's all we want.

We'd like to get a study. There's been a bill in Congress lingering for many years to get a study so we can get the facts and where we can prove a direct nexus, we all agree let's compensate those people. Where the evidence is not so clear, maybe we can come up with another solution such as educational funds.

O'REILLY: See, I would be against "” I would be against that study.

WATTERS: Why?

O'REILLY: I would say if you and the NAACP are interested in this, then you raise the money, you do the study, you hire the attorneys. You're an attorney. They can hire you pro bono. You'll do the work. And then you file whatever you want to file. And I'm for that. But I don't want to be paying for any study that has an agenda written all over it.

WATTERS: No. I'm talking about an objective study, Bill, not...

O'REILLY: Yes, but do it in private hands. Let private people fund that. Let lawyers like you do it.

DICKERSON: I have to change sides here, Bill.

O'REILLY: Uh-oh. Uh-oh.

DICKERSON: I think that truth and reconciliation, we need to "” we need to move on in the country. This is a question of justice and injustice. And if the "” if the problem in the inner cities is not as a result of racism or slavery, fine. Let's figure out what the problem is and address it.

O'REILLY: I know what the problem is.

DICKERSON: So I really have a problem with the black-white thing. It's got to be about America and about justice.

(CROSSTALK)

O'REILLY: Ms. Dickerson, as you and Mr. Watters know, because you're both self-made people, as you both know better than anyone else, all three of us have something in common. We're all self-made people.

You know what the inner city problem is. It's lack of discipline. That's what it is. It's bad families, families that are fractured.

DICKERSON: That's not all it is.

O'REILLY: Drugs and alcohol, and chaos. That's what it is. And to punish the rest of America for that is absolutely unfair.

I'll give you the last word.

DICKERSON: OK, I changed sides again. Lack of discipline is one problem. But if you send to school "” a kid to a substandard school with teachers who don't know how to teach and then say it's a lack of discipline that keeps him uneducated, no.

O'REILLY: No, that's the teacher's fault. I agree with that. But that's over the umbrella of the whole thing. That there's got to be a standard set in those neighborhoods of schools and personal behavior to allow people to advance in a very competitive society.

Counselor, Ms. Dickerson, very interesting conversation.

WATTERS: Thank you.

O'REILLY: Thank you. Pleasure.

© MBM

Original Post
On this issue, Bill O'Really is an asshole.

This is the dialogue I say should not take place.

There is no need to mount a proof that slavery, AND Jim Crow happened.

There is no doubt the United States, as an entity, endorsed, protected, and enforced them.

The ONLY determinant to be resolved is the amonunt.

This asshole is saying 'If an African American-American child in Tulsa needs an education, call me. That's fair and sufficient exchange for rape, murder, destroying not only a community, but the economic and political future of that community.'

As to who did it...the United States did it.

The United States pays.

If he doesn't want any of his money to be a part of the payment, he should stop benefiting from the deed.

Which by the way is STILL in progress.

There are 'boats' leaving hourly.

PEACE
Keith Watters. LOL!!! What an idiot! Every time I see him on the tube, defending all manner of bad black behavior, I get a good laugh. He's the same clown who got his ignorant ass involved in the incident six years ago where the D.C. mayor's assistant used the word "niggardly" in a meeting. The blacks in the meeting, always on the lookout for something new to be offended by and thinking the guy had used a racial slur, left the room in a self-righteous huff.

Turns out, "niggardly" is an Old Norse word dating from at least the 14th century and meaning stingy or miserly.

Oh well, that didn't stop a black media whore like Watters from asking, in his best-affected black scholarly manner, "But do we really know where the Norwegians got the word?"

Gee, I don't know, Keith... Do you think the Vikings might have sailed down to Africa a thousand years ago, met up with some tightwad black locals who never left a tip for the waiter, so they called these cheap bastards "niggards" and their behavior "niggardly"?

Yet another "fact" to be taught in African history courses!
man....i never knew white people were so insecure and inadequate that they would have to resort to antagonistic measures on a black message board....eggy...look at what kind of white guy you have become....the whole country is biased in your favor and look how you decided to spend your life anyway....look at who you are in this day and age.......one sorry specimen of a wasp......
"Keith Watters. LOL!!! What an idiot! Every time I see him on the tube, defending all manner of bad black behavior, I get a good laugh. He's the same clown who got his ignorant ass involved in the incident six years ago where the D.C. mayor's assistant used the word "niggardly" in a meeting. The blacks in the meeting, always on the lookout for something new to be offended by and thinking the guy had used a racial slur, left the room in a self-righteous huff.

Turns out, "niggardly" is an Old Norse word dating from at least the 14th century and meaning stingy or miserly.

Oh well, that didn't stop a black media whore like Watters from asking, in his best-affected black scholarly manner, "But do we really know where the Norwegians got the word?"

Gee, I don't know, Keith... Do you think the Vikings might have sailed down to Africa a thousand years ago, met up with some tightwad black locals who never left a tip for the waiter, so they called these cheap bastards "niggards" and their behavior "niggardly"?

Yet another "fact" to be taught in African history courses!"

You need to take you condescending, rightious ass and find something else to talk about because you are totally ignorant to this subject. How many slaves did your ancestors own?
quote:
Originally posted by Kevin41:
man....i never knew white people were so insecure and inadequate that they would have to resort to antagonistic measures on a black message board....eggy...look at what kind of white guy you have become....the whole country is biased in your favor and look how you decided to spend your life anyway....look at who you are in this day and age.......one sorry specimen of a wasp......



Gee, Kevin Boy, I didn't know a "wasp" like me could be so irritating to an insignificant pissant like you. GO F**K YOURSELF.
.
.
quote:
Originally posted by chill:
How many slaves did your ancestors own?


That's a good question - one that every negro should ask every white person three times a day and especially after meals.

I was kind of hoping I did have some slave-owning ancestors. Alas, so far, my research has come up empty.

My father is pure Irish-American and his family didn't get to the United States until well into the last century. Many of his ancestors perished in the Irish famine in the mid-1800s. Before that, it's doubtful my Irish ancestors owned slaves of any color since St. Patrick had outlawed slavery in the 5th century AD. Any true Irishman worth his barley tax and a chance to get to heaven wouldn't allow himself to be involved with that devil's work called slavery.

My mother is a mixed Chamorro (Guam) and Palauan islander (as in the recently-concluded CBS series 'Survivor-Palau'). Back when the black slavery thing was in full swing, I doubt my mother's ancestors even knew there were "islands" named America and Africa. Both the Chamorro and Palauan people, and indeed most islands of the Pacific, had their own local versions of slavery until the white missionaries squashed the practice. However, we were told by our Peace Corps teachers that the islanders' brand of slavery wasn't as "bad" as white folk enslaving blacks in the American south. - whatever that's supposed to imply. Maybe us islanders allowed our slaves an extra coconut before bedtime. I don't know.

Anyway, I'm still hunting for my slave-owning ancestors. I will not give up until I find one!
Egbert, A better question would be how often did your "pure Irish-American" father, and you're less than pure Irish self benefit from the vestiages of slavery? You know, like, how many jobs were GrandPappy-Soused and Pappy Soused able to apply for that posted signs saying, "Coloreds need not apply."
quote:
I was kind of hoping I did have some slave-owning ancestors. Alas, so far, my research has come up empty.



**And that is why their day is coming....where the wrath of all they have wronged.....will come back to haunt their azzes.....it is just not happening fast enough....i live for that day..............
Yeah, Bill was a total jerk on this issue.


I agree with one thing he said though. We should fund our own research. The reason is. Whites will not. Because they have an agenda. Their agenda is to erase slavery's damages from the minds of America. They've probably covered many of their tracks. But with all of the injustices they commited I'm sure we can gather substantial evidence that Reparations is a bill that will reach far more people than they want to.
Again, it baffles me ...

How with HBCU's most on the policy studies and analysis is performed by non-HBCU institutions.

If one wants the definitive word on Catholics, one goes to St. Johns or Notre Dame .... the definitive word on Mormonism, one goes to Brigham Young ... the definitive word on Jewish issues, one goes to the Yashiva ... But for information on Black folk, one goes to Harvard or Princeton.

Why can't Gates and Ogletree and Dyson and all the other "Black Thinkers" get togather and set up the premier Black policy analysis and thinktank at, say, Howard or Tuskagee or any of the other HBCU's?

Maybe it's the white validation thing at play?
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:

Why can't Gates and Ogletree and Dyson and all the other "Black Thinkers" get togather and set up the premier Black policy analysis and thinktank at, say, Howard or Tuskagee or any of the other HBCU's?

Maybe it's the white validation thing at play?


No. It's all about money!! Those premier institutions can afford to pay them the six figure salaries that they deserve. To your point though, if Oprah and Michael Jordan and Shaquile O'Neil and the CEOs of Merril Lynch and Time Warner etc, all got together and really endowed an HBCU - then we could get something like that - which not would would be great, but would make ALL the sense in the world! tfro
If one wants the definitive word on Catholics, one goes to St. Johns or Notre Dame .... the definitive word on Mormonism, one goes to Brigham Young ... the definitive word on Jewish issues, one goes to the Yashiva ... But for information on Black folk, one goes to Harvard or Princeton.---K4R

No. It's all about money!! Those premier institutions can afford to pay them the six figure salaries that they deserve. To your point though, if Oprah and Michael Jordan and Shaquile O'Neil and the CEOs of Merril Lynch and Time Warner etc, all got together and really endowed an HBCU - then we could get something like that - which not would would be great, but would make ALL the sense in the world!---MBM

I hear ya, MBM.

But one would think that if "our Black Thinkers" truly believe that which they write and were committed to Black progress, they would sacrifice the 6 figures from Harvard and Yale, and live off their 6 figure book deals/royalties/speaking deals.---K4R

There is something at work that prevents this from happening.

We need a Bryan 'whathisface' that had the vision, dedication, and drive to create C-SPAN.

Clearly, the money is there. The 'know-how' is there.

We need that nucleus around which the embryo can form; which itself requires funding.

I strongly disagree that our 'thinkers' should give up a dime. Well...maybe demand a little less.

Please notice that those who are out there fueling the voice against us (African America) work for European-based institions, as noted by K4R.

We need to find that advocate who has access to the needed money.


PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
I hear ya, MBM.

But one would think that if "our Black Thinkers" truly believe that which they write and were committed to Black progress, they would sacrifice the 6 figures from Harvard and Yale, and live off their 6 figure book deals/royalties/speaking deals.

td6 bang giveup

With respect to endowments, if you are talking Ivy League you are talking billions of dollars. That would take quite a few Oprah's, Shaq's, et. al. to get that kind of money.

On the issue of African American intellectuals, Cornel West was asked at Prairie View A & M when he was here this spring, why he did not teach at a HBCU. It appears that he has been asked this question numerous times in the past. His response was that if he were at an HBCU, he would not be able to do all that he does now. He would not have the access to the numbers of people that he has now, i.e. he would not have the time to write, lecture, and make all the appearances that he currently does. Being at a large research institution inables him to do this. Most HBCU are teaching institutions which require essentially the full-time presence of the faculty on the campus, in the classroom. While some academics, such as one day yours truly, feel a calling to be first and foremost a college professor, many academics understand their vocation as first and foremost about scholarship.
quote:
While some academics, such as one day yours truly, feel a calling to be first and foremost a college professor, many academics understand their vocation as first and foremost about scholarship.



I am sure you will do just great as a professor Kresge, but the time constraints do vary.....I may go full time one day in the future....my colleagues who have gone full-time online and in-class say the teaching experience/career alone is much better than chasing the industry career also..and these people were not slouches...they had careers that were great.....being an adjunct is not too bad...but in the on-campus environment, you tend to get the less desirable course schedules when starting out. Sometimes you will also get a large section due to the university not wanting to split into a second section. I have been at it since 1994 and since 1998 online...it has been very rewarding and more of a learning experience than a teaching experience....and it provides continuous immersion in theory that is the most current........
quote:
On the issue of African American intellectuals, Cornel West was asked at Prairie View A & M when he was here this spring, why he did not teach at a HBCU. It appears that he has been asked this question numerous times in the past. His response was that if he were at an HBCU, he would not be able to do all that he does now. He would not have the access to the numbers of people that he has now, i.e. he would not have the time to write, lecture, and make all the appearances that he currently does. Being at a large research institution inables him to do this. Most HBCU are teaching institutions which require essentially the full-time presence of the faculty on the campus, in the classroom.


I, respectfully, submit that West's response is practiced, though reasoned, bs

I would respect the man far more if he would've said, flat out, it's about the $$$.

West's "teaching" commitment at Princeton (is it?) can easily be met by a HBCU, albeit at a undoubtedly much lower salary. West is not at Princeton to "teach", nor would he be at a HBCU to "teach." He could/would be there to do as he does at Princeton, research, write and lecture.

He can conduct the same research at Princeton as he can at Prairie View. He can launch speaking tours from Prairie View, just as easily as he can from Princeton, and I'm sure Prairie View has access to lecture halls from which he can speak. He can write in his office at Prairie View, just as easily as he can from Princeton.

So again, excepting the money, I believe that our Black Thinkers are banking on a "white man's ice is colder" white validation, i.e., West's research, findings and analysis is valid, not because of West's work, but rather BECAUSE the work was done at Princeton.

And I submit, that's straight up bs
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
quote:
On the issue of African American intellectuals, Cornel West was asked at Prairie View A & M when he was here this spring, why he did not teach at a HBCU. It appears that he has been asked this question numerous times in the past. His response was that if he were at an HBCU, he would not be able to do all that he does now. He would not have the access to the numbers of people that he has now, i.e. he would not have the time to write, lecture, and make all the appearances that he currently does. Being at a large research institution inables him to do this. Most HBCU are teaching institutions which require essentially the full-time presence of the faculty on the campus, in the classroom.


I, respectfully, submit that West's response is practiced, though reasoned, bs

I would respect the man far more if he would've said, flat out, it's about the $$$.

West's "teaching" commitment at Princeton (is it?) can easily be met by a HBCU, albeit at a undoubtedly much lower salary. West is not at Princeton to "teach", nor would he be at a HBCU to "teach." He could/would be there to do as he does at Princeton, research, write and lecture.

He can conduct the same research at Princeton as he can at Prairie View. He can launch speaking tours from Prairie View, just as easily as he can from Princeton, and I'm sure Prairie View has access to lecture halls from which he can speak. He can write in his office at Prairie View, just as easily as he can from Princeton.

So again, excepting the money, I believe that our Black Thinkers are banking on a "white man's ice is colder" white validation, i.e., West's research, findings and analysis is valid, not because of West's work, but rather BECAUSE the work was done at Princeton.

And I submit, that's straight up bs


You are correct....PVA&M is a premier school there in the state of TX (my first alma mater bsm) and it has asserted itself by offering a multitude of Masters & PhD programs in education, engineering and other areas...and in addition have accreditation's that no other university in Texas has. Black people one day will see the adequacy in their own that they see in others...but you are right...money and the perception of a white school (which Texas A&M is trying to make PV become)is the only discerning difference.....that was kind of a lame azz response on his part......
Does this sound like Slick Willie hinting towards reparations with this statement?

Clinton fielded questions from reporters in the audience. When asked about his position on apologizing for wrongdoings against blacks, such as slavery and lynchings, he replied, "While these apologies are important, they need to be accompanied with a consistent level of conduct in the present."



Clinton Talks Voting Rights, Reparations and Health at NABJ
Compiled by the DiversityInc staff

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August 04, 2005

Analysis of today's diversity news from the Los Angeles Times, Radarmagazine.com, the New York Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and more:



President Clinton shared his thoughts on the country's healthcare crisis, the Voting Rights Act and reparations during the opening keynote address at the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Convention in Atlanta, Ga.



"Your right to vote is endangered in many states," said Clinton, referring to the debate over whether certain provisions of the Voting Rights Acts that are set to expire in 2007 will be renewed. He implored the journalists in the audience to expose the tactics in some areas to restrict access to voting polls. "It's wrong, it's un-American and it's a violation of the Voting Rights Act."



Clinton fielded questions from reporters in the audience. When asked about his position on apologizing for wrongdoings against blacks, such as slavery and lynchings, he replied, "While these apologies are important, they need to be accompanied with a consistent level of conduct in the present."



He added, "I don't think it makes sense to apologize for the lynching and then try to deny them the right to vote," referring to the recent apology issued by the U.S. Senate. However, when queried about why he apologized for slavery in Africa but not in the United States, he replied, "I don't think it ever occurred to me to apologize for slavery." But he said if asked, he would have.



Clinton was also questioned about the importance of diversity within the media. He described members of the White House press during his terms as "overwhelmingly white."



"I was struck by the lack of diversity," he added, which had an impact on how the White House was covered. "You get different and therefore better questions ... You really do get a whole different take. Everyone filters the world through the prism of their own experience ... [Members of the media] need to look like the country they are reporting to."



Clinton also talked about his eponymous foundation, which has been his focus since exiting the White House. The foundations' areas of interest include economic empowerment of the poor, healthcare, AIDS and religious and racial reconciliation in the Middle East.



When asked what blacks can do to improve their situation, he encouraged them not to place all the blame on racism. "Nobody can save us from self-destruction but ourselves."
Just some thoughts;

First I don't know where i was when this discussion was taking place, and was of more immediate focus, but it was. and is one that demands constant vigilance in the pursuit of economic, social, and human parity of Afrimericans not only as American citizens, but also as human beings.

The first post on this topic made mention of how the NAACP insisted on some type of financial recompense, and how JP Morgan ponied up 5 million dollars.

That 5 million is like 1/5th of one cent of the JP Morgan fortune that is one of, if not the oldest, and largest fortunes in America. In fact, during reconstruction, and during the depression, JP Morgan loaned the United States Government money to support the whole nation, thus that amount is nothing to be gaga over.

Secondly, about the NAACP, I have attended a couple of NAACP Conventions, and after the opening ceremonies, and the keynote speaker, various NAACP representatives get up and announce the various Corporate donations with said donations being between 1 and 5 million to start, then it trickles down to 50, 000. here, 20, 000 there, and so on. All told, at one convention I actually tried to add up all the donations, including the various chapter donations, and I got to about 50,000,000, and was shocked, and appalled because that kind of money being raised year after year begs the question of where is that money going.

They, nor can anyone else say it's being spent in the various Afrimerican communities, cause it's not, and believe you me, if you go to them with an issue that is race related they are not going to help you unless they can pimp the situation, fatten up their pockets, and then pay lip service to the issue, and or assign an NAACP attorney already on the NAACP payroll to create a public image that they are concerned, and in the long run its all for show. It's so much of a show that many good attorneys quit the NAACP in the 1980, and 90's because the organization does nothing but get by on what they did thirty, forty, fifty years ago.

The only thing they have done lately is create an image award show, and that's all they are about, selling the NAACP image, and the prominent members are no more than bonafide, certified, and self glorified house negroes, selling out the race at the direction of their white masters(Corporate America), and their Jewish Handlers.(The NAACP Executive Board)

Don't be fooled, that was all a show.

I don't subscribe to any of the present methods suggested for reperations because they are all at least 100 years old, and have been attempted enough times to where the white powers that be have create rules, regulations, and laws to circumvent any new attempts, thus the reperations actions presently in vogue are moot, and serve to do nothing more to appease the race, while members of the race who sell the reperations ideology get theirs and mislead their own people because they know nothing is going to happen to fully address the matter.

Another fallacy is people seem to be relying on the people that made and prosper(still) from the Enslavement of Africans, and later, their descendants, to undo the resulting situation, and thats insane. Especially when the masses aspire to be just like the oppressor, and or to be accepted by the oppressors to the degree that they abandon their own culture.

I could go on and on, but the point would be lost because most have already bought the lies, so I sound like a fool to them.

The best option I see to address the issue of reperations is to demand sovereignty.

Afrimerican sovereignty will allow Afrimericans to be a nation within a nation, to be self administared, and self participatory in creating our own infrastuctures of manufacturing, foodservice/agriculture, media production, etc..., and lessen, our reliance on the present establishment to give us something owed that they are'nt going to give.

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