Will Justice for Trayvon Martin End Up Like Latasha Harlins?

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Will Justice for Trayvon Martin End Up Like Latasha Harlins?.

On March 16, 1991, a 15 year old African-American girl named Latasha Harlins - enter Empire Liquor Market store in Compton, California and proceeded to grab an orange juice – and place it in her back pack. Before she could pay for the item, Korean store owner Soon Ja Du confronted her – and accused her of stealing, even though Harlins was carrying the money to pay for the juice in her hand. Du grabbed Harlins’ sweater and tried to grab her back pack, and she fought back by punching Du in the face. The juice fell to the ground during the initial struggle. Harlins picked it up, placed it on the counter – and turned away to leave the store. Du took out her handgun and fired, hitting Harlins in the back of the head. Harlins died instantly – still clutching 2 dollars in her hand.

Du concocted a story that the store was being robbed, which is the reason why she used deadly force. Two eye witnesses and a video were presented to dispute those claims. Du was arrested and charged with voluntary manslaughter. Du claimed it was self-defense (sounds familiar) and was afraid for her life. Her defense counsel went on to say that the handgun used in the crime, was altered and had a hair trigger. The jury of her peers did not buy the story and convicted her of voluntary manslaughter, which the recommended sentence at the time was 16 years in prison.  The Judge, Joyce Karlin who is white, presided over the case and gave Du 5 years probation, community service and a $400 fine. Karlin claimed that she elected to give Du probation because she had a clean record at the time and did not demonstrate any violence in the past. According to this judge she was indicating that Harlins’ death was worth a $400 dollar fine and community service. As a result, of her ruling in the Du case District Attorney Ira Reiner disqualified her from trying anymore felonies. In all honesty, Karlin should have never been given this case in the first place – due to her lack of experience. Looking back, I also think Karlin is just another judge who viewed the death of a Black person as a nonentity. Once you review the video, it is absolutely incomprehensible how this judge can come to the conclusion that this crime was worth probation and a fine. Read more at For-the-Masses.com.

Latasha Harlins 
July 14, 1975 – March 16, 1991

Entrapment: NYPD Plants Cash In Parks, Subways To Catch ‘Lucky Criminals’

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In this Monday, April 8, 2013 photo, Deirdre Myers poses for a picture near her home in New York. Police took Myers and her teen daughter into custody in 2010 in what's known as a "bait car" operation. It involved leaving a wad of cash in an unattended car and seeing if a would-be thief would take advantage. The dismissal of the case against the single mother has drawn attention to police tactics that a judge ruled went too far. [AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

<noscript>&amp;amp;amp;lt;img class="aligncenter" title="In this Monday, April 8, 2013 photo, Deirdre Myers poses for a picture near her home in New York. Police took Myers and her teen daughter into custody in 2010 in what's known as a &amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;bait car&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; operation. It involved leaving a wad of cash in an unattended car and seeing if a would-be thief would take advantage. The dismissal of the case against the single mother has drawn attention to police tactics that a judge ruled went too far. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)" alt="In this Monday, April 8, 2013 photo, Deirdre Myers poses for a picture near her home in New York. Police took Myers and her teen daughter into custody in 2010 in what's known as a &amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;bait car&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; operation. It involved leaving a wad of cash in an unattended car and seeing if a would-be thief would take advantage. The dismissal of the case against the single mother has drawn attention to police tactics that a judge ruled went too far. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)" src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/L.WBUd3bt.V5uv2DnwTXew--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Y2g9MzQ1Njtjcj0xO2N3PTUxODQ7ZHg9MDtkeT0wO2ZpPXVsY3JvcDtoPTQyMDtxPTg1O3c9NjMw/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/f6146d4f906f050c2f0f6a7067006d49.jpg" width="630" height="420" /&amp;amp;amp;gt;</noscript>

NEW YORK (AP) — Sometimes the bait is a small amount of cash in a stray wallet. Or a credit card. Even a pack of cigarettes can do the trick.

Police in New York City leave the items unattended — on subway platforms, on park benches, in cars — and wait to see if someone grabs them.

The New York Police Department says the practice has been a valuable tool for catching career criminals and deterring thefts in public places. But a recent court ruling throwing out a larceny case against a Bronx woman cast a harsh light on a tactic critics say too often sweeps up innocent people.

Judge Linda Poust Lopez found that there was no proof Deirdre Myers (picture above) tried to steal anything — and that she was framed by a sting that took the tactic way too far.

Upholding the charges “would greatly damage the confidence and trust of the public in the fairness and effectiveness of the criminal justice system, and rightly so,” the judge wrote.

Myers, a 40-year-old single mother with no criminal record, has since sued the city, claiming she and her daughter were traumatized by a wrongful arrest in 2010.

“You know how embarrassing and humiliating this was?” Myers said. “I’d never been stopped by the police for anything in my life.”

The city Law Department is still reviewing Myers’ lawsuit, city attorney Raju Sundaran said in a statement. But, he added, “undercover sting operations are lawful and help reduce crime.”

The judge suggested that Myers’ brush with the law had its roots in the so-called lucky bag operation that the NYPD began in 2006 to deter thefts of wallets, shopping bags, smartphones and other valuables in the subways.

A typical scenario was for a plainclothes officer to place a handbag with cash on a train platform and briefly look or step away. Anyone who took the bag, then passed up chances to return it to the undercover cop or to report it to a uniformed officer posted nearby could be locked up.

At the time, police credited the subway operation with driving down crime there. They say they still use the tactic when they see a spike in thefts of personal property in public places such as Grand Central Terminal or Central Park. But they now require more evidence of intent — a suspect trying to hide a wallet or taking cash out of it and throwing it away — before making an arrest.

Last year, police arrested a tourist from Atlanta in Central Park after he picked up a purse and took out $27 stashed inside, according to court papers in another pending civil case. He ended up paying a $120 fine as part of a plea bargain.

Authorities began using “bait cars” about six years ago in the Bronx to combat a chronic problem with car thefts and break-ins in working-class neighborhoods. In most cases, police plant property — an iPad, a pack of cigarettes — in plain sight as the bait for thieves but make sure the car is locked so that a suspect would have to take the extra step of breaking in before being arrested.

But the strategy used in the Myers case “was certainly the most extreme version of the operation that we’ve seen,” said her attorney, Ann Mauer.

According to court papers and to Myers’ account, she and her daughter Kenya, then a 15-year-old high school student, were sitting on the stoop of their building when the sting unfolded

“It seemed like everybody in the Bronx was out that night,” she said in an interview monitored by Vik Pawar, her attorney in her federal lawsuit.

The summer scene was interrupted by a bit of theater staged by police: A dark car raced down the block before stopping. Another vehicle carrying plainclothes officers wasn’t far behind. When the driver got out and ran, the officers gave chase, yelling, “Stop! Police!” her suit says.

Myers’ daughter, seeing that the driver left the car door open, went over and peered inside to see personal items that included what looked like a bundle of cash — in reality, a dollar bill wrapped around pieces of newspaper. The girl had called her mother over when another set of police officers suddenly pulled up in a van and forced them to the ground, according to Myers’ account.

“Get on the floor? For what?” Myers recalled telling the officers.

The officers took them into custody, even though they never touched anything inside the car, the suit says. While entering a stationhouse in handcuffs, Myers spotted the driver of the car standing outside, smoking a cigarette. It dawned on her that he was an undercover with a starring role in the sting — a suspicion supported by the court ruling.

“I thought I was in ‘The Twilight Zone,’” she said.

The girl ultimately wasn’t charged. But her mother spent more than two years fighting charges of petty larceny and possession of stolen property.

A spokesman for the Bronx District Attorney’s office conceded that the bait car had been left unlocked and said prosecutors would not appeal the judge’s ruling. He declined to comment further.

Though defense attorneys in the Bronx say there have been a few other cases involving bait cars and pretend police pursuits, the tactic hasn’t drawn much attention outside the borough.

Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union and a lucky bag critic, said she wasn’t aware that police were using decoy cars until asked about the Myers case.

“It’s such a bizarre and extreme attempt to set somebody up,” Lieberman said. “It’s like lucky bag on steroids.”

 

 

 

 

 

25 Shot, 4 Killed In Chicago as Gun Control Stalls In Congress

Filed under: Featured,Headlines |
Chicago violence National Guard photo

Chicago still has one of the highest homicide rates

AFRICANGLOBE – Chicago’s unrelenting shooting spree continues as up to 25 people were shot and four killed over the last three days.

The mayhem occurred even as protesters gathered in Chicago’s Federal Plaza on Saturday to hold a vigil to end gun violence.

“We need a background check,” Garrett Evans, a South Side Chicago native and survivor of the Virginia Tech massacre, told Fox News. “That’s the reason I was shot, there was no background check, the guy who shot us had a history of mental illness and since he wasn’t red-flagged he was able to buy a gun off the Internet.”

But as violence rages in Chicago, there are reports that Congress will likely be unable to pass a bill expanding mandatory background checks for gun purchases — a provision supported by at least 90 percent of the American public, according to polls.

Chicago State student and activist Dennis Johnson appeared on Melissa Harris-Perry’s MSNBCshow and introduced an intriguing proposal.

“Violence will never cease until we find a way to make money out of peace,” said Johnson, a member of the Black Youth Project. Harris-Perry asked him about the role guns play in his life. He said they’re readily available and cheap – but come in from  outside of the black community.

“I don’t know one black supplier, or engineer, or creator of guns,” he said.

By some estimates, the gun industry raked in almost $32 billion last year alone.

The Chicago shootings spanned the entire weekend. On Sunday, there were shootings on the South Side that were just 30 minutes apart, leaving four people in critical condition.

“I never seen nothing like this in my life. I never grew up around this,” Lora Quarles, who recently moved to the South Side, told DNA info, “We were just talking, not expecting shots to go off.”

Larry Ranole, 28, was fatally shot on the 1200 block of West 97th Street on Saturday afternoon, according to the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office, while Jonathan Santiago, 19, was shot and killed in the Humboldt Park neighborhood at about 2:45 a.m. on Saturday, authorities said.

Police said Santiago was standing in a group in the 3300 block of West Beach Avenue when two males came out of a nearby gangway and opened fire, striking him in the chest.

Miguel Cancel, 19, was shot and killed when a gunman opened fire on the car he and two others were traveling in early Saturday, authorities said, while 34-year-old Kevin Sanders was fatally shot in the South Chicago neighborhood on Saturday night, police said.

Sanders was found about 11:10 p.m. in the 8700 block of South Burley Avenue with multiple gunshot wounds to the abdomen, authorities said.

One person is in custody in connection with the shooting, police said.

....More likely, the Black community is kicking itself to plenty of curbs and beyond and sending itself to the gallows......

 

YouTube: "Black People Were Never Citizens Of Amerikkka" - Dr. Umar Johnson

 

http://www.drumarjohnson.com/#!shop

 

Dr. Umar Johnson must be finding it easy to separate all the "fools" from his or her money.

 

It is truly disturbing that university educated black professors in this country who teach blacks to be stupid, teach them that they are not U.S. citizens, that U.S. born Blacks,  namely U.S. born descendants of the Vestibule of Slavery in the U.S., do not have any rights.   It is definitely moving fast in the wrong direction to accept nonsense that is not true.   The sad thing is that far too many U.S. born blacks accept this and are willing to finance ignorance at their own demise.  Any perpetrator guilty of stealing from, maiming or killing law, unlawfully violating the rights of Blacks abiding U.S. born descendants of slavery such as rogue police officers, unethical city prosecutors, other agents and officials of government, the KKK, the Aryan Nation, bigots from everywhere, the Mexican Mafia, etc., etc., are probably "High Fiving" Dr. Omar Johnson, because swallowing the garbage being disseminated by Dr. Omar Johnson guarantees there will be no will to fight back, stand up for your own best interests, and will make it true that U.S. born descendants of slavery don't have rights, namely because the individuals who fit the description have given their own rights away by being submissive, gullible, weak, ignorant, un-American, etc.

 

http://ros-lehtinen.house.gov/...-and-jay-z-trip-cuba  -April 5, 2013

 

The Honorable Adam J. Szubin

Director Office of Foreign Assets Control

Department of Treasury

1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, D.C. 20220

 

Dear Director Szubin:

 

We write to express concern and to request information regarding the highly publicized trip by U.S. musicians Beyoncé Knowles-Carter (Beyonce) and Shawn Carter (Jay-Z) to Cuba. We would like to respectfully request, within all applicable rules and guidelines, information regarding the type of license that Beyoncé and Jay-Z received, for what purpose, and who approved such travel.

 

http://www.treasury.gov/servic...Travel-Licenses.aspx

 

http://www.treasury.gov/resour...ents/cuba_tr_app.pdf

 

As you know, U.S. law expressly prohibits the licensing of financial transactions for “tourist activities” in Cuba (Section 910(b)(1) of the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act).  If these individuals were given people-to-people licenses, we would like to bring to your attention the Cuba Travel Advisory issued by OFAC on July 25, 2011 which states, “OFAC only licenses People-to-People Groups that certify that all participants will have a full-time schedule of educational exchange activities that will result in meaningful interaction between the travelers and individuals in Cuba.” These restrictions are in place because the Cuban dictatorship is one of four U.S.-designated state sponsors of terrorism with one of the world’s most egregious human rights records.  Cuba’s tourism industry is wholly state-controlled; therefore, U.S. dollars spent on Cuban tourism directly fund the machinery of oppression that brutally represses the Cuban people.   Despite the clear prohibition against tourism in Cuba, numerous press reports described the couple’s trip as tourism, and the Castro regime touted it as such in its propaganda. We represent a community of many who have been deeply and personally harmed by the Castro regime’s atrocities, including former political prisoners and the families of murdered innocents.  The restrictions on tourism travel are common-sense measures meant to prevent U.S. dollars from supporting a murderous regime that opposes U.S. security interests at every turn and which ruthlessly suppresses the most basic liberties of speech, assembly, and belief.  We support the Cuban people by refusing to sustain their jailers.

Thank you very much for your assistance in this important matter and look forward to

your response.

 

Sincerely,

 

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen    Mario Diaz-Balart

 

Member of Congress         Member of Congress

******************************************************************

http://www.buzzfeed.com/hunter...eyonce-and-jay-zs-cu

 

Jay-Z and Beyoncé are now experiencing the nature of "backstabbing/cutthroat/sleazy Barack "Abba-dabba/Hocus Pocus"  Obama.  Obama and/or a high ranking official in the Obama Administration gave clearance/OK to Jay-Z and Beyoncé to travel to Cuba.

 

http://ros-lehtinen.house.gov/...-and-jay-z-trip-cuba

 

http://outfront.blogs.cnn.com/...-bus-over-cuba-trip/

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-893985

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-858150

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-769637

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-278743

 

BO is a liar and a hypocrite.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfxVkLhlu5s

 

I'm willing to bet my last dollar that Jay-Z and Beyoncé are no longer fans of Barack "the Magic Negro" Obama.

*****************************************************

 

https://www.africanamerica.org/...e#319361141260925602

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-941757

 

https://www.facebook.com/max.cheney.1/posts/329700703818496?comment_id=1493446&offset=0&total_comments=4

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-953247

 

Max Schlagzeuger:  I would suggest an attorney, but after 37 years, I'm sure there is some statute of limitations... I still think this is a matter for the media.

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-936676

 

The Statute of Limitations doesn't apply here because serious Constitutional violations have taken place, all being related, that have taken place since then, and this is also

court documented.

 

Finally the defendants in Los Angeles Superior Court Case 895188 have also admitted guilt.  I was banned from African America.org a few years ago.

I just replanted the seed.  Now I'll watch from a distance to see what develops.

 

https://www.africanamerica.org/...t/319642616250393654

Selected comment:

 

Are you a CIA or FBI plant Michael Lofton?         

 

-Yemaya

Not I.  I'm Just a loyal taxpaying U.S. citizen who happens to be Black who has not been duped like perhaps you or other race card playing misguided Blacks!  

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-955888

Being connected with or employed by the CIA, FBI or any other Federal Government Agency would mean that I have a connection or affinity to President Barack "the Magic Negro Obama" and/or the ObamaCrap Administration.

Selected comment:  "Oh wait, I know Michael Lofton is a Republican plant" by

 

sunnubian        

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-941757 

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-936676

 

Sunnubian

Without regard to political Party affiliation, ethnicity, educational achievement, etc., etc., it is more or most important to vote for an elected official based upon his or her duty to uphold the oath of office, and respect the U.S. Constitution, a set of standards that are not a reality in most any relationship betray elected Black leaders, and law abiding U.S. born descendants of slavery like me.   Anything less is commonly called just a "low information" voter.

*************************************

http://www.ceyseauinc.com/

 

 THE JOB OF A CONGRESSMAN

 

“There are cases where an individual has been wrongfully treated by his government and about the only way, unless the individual resorts to

court, and even in some cases the courts are not able to give proper relief, the only area or avenue open to the individual is through his representative. When you find a bona fide error has been made, I suggest that you make a maximum effort to remedy it. This I feel is a vital and important function of those of us in the House of Representatives”.

 

Authors: Donald G. Tacheron and Morris Udall, from the book entitled, “The Job of the Congressman”, pages 65 and 66.

 

(The above excerpt “The Job of the Congressman” holds true for all elected office officials)

 

Article VI, USC:  This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding. “……Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and Members of several State legislatures (all elected officials), and all executive and judicial Officers of the United States and of the several states, Shall be bound by oath of affirmation, to support this Constitution. 14th Amendment, USC, Section 1:   “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” 14th Amendment, USC, Section 4:   “……But neither the United States public debt of the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave: but all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void.”

****************************************************

Oath of Office,: "I, (President, Supreme Court Justice, Congressperson, Assemblyman, Mayor, City Councilperson, Judge, ), during such times as I hold the office, I, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States (the Constitution of the State of California, Maryland, Illinois, etc., etc.), against all enemies foreign (terrorist enemies of the U.S., illegal immigrants, un-American or un-Constitutional anything and everything, etc.) and domestic (treasonous individuals or organizations, any Police Chief who condones this and the Police Chief's rogue police officers, unethical or criminal elected officials or public servants, illegal aliens or his or her advocates, un-American anything and everything), and that I will bear true faith and allegiance, to the Constitution of the United States , (State Constitution), and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties upon which I am about to enter."

http://www.senate.gov/artandhi...fing/Oath_Office.htm

U.S. Senate and Congressional Oath of Office: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God."

 

 

His name is Kendrick Kj Johnson he was beaten to death at his High School here in Valdosta Ga the police is covering up his story by saying there was no foul play but clearly you can see its a lie. They have yet to give the Johnson/Tooley family any answers. Im only asking for a minute of your time to plz share his story we need all the support we can get. Please support the Kendrick Kj Johnson movement— with <input name="tag[]" type="hidden" value="100002505271849" />Tesha Tooley.

 

Central Park Five: Heartbreaking Documentary Revisits Rush to Judgment

Filed under: Featured,Headlines |
Central Park Five photo

The five African-American teenagers robbed of their youth by a White lynch mob

AFRICANGLOBE – Around 9 p.m. on April 19, 1989, a 28 year-old White female jogger was brutally beaten, sexually assaulted and left for dead in an isolated wooded area of Central Park.

Because she was an investment banker with an Ivy League pedigree, the NYPD felt the pressure to apprehend the perpetrators of the heinous crime ASAP.

Within hours, cops had extracted confessions from Anton McCray, Kevin Richardson, Korey Wise, Yusef Salaam and Raymond Santana Jr., teenagers who had been denied their right to an attorney. Although none of the five had ever been arrested before, they were all convicted of rape and attempted murder on the strength of those incriminating admissions alone.

Part of the explanation for the legal lynching was that the victim was a wealthy White female while the accused were poor African-american kids from Harlem. The press was all too willing to exploit the hot button issues of color and class, and the media sensationalized the case’s lurid details, coining the term “wilding” to describe the alleged behavior of the defendants.

Real estate magnate Donald Trump even took out full-page ads in every New York City daily newspaper, calling for the death penalty and saying that the boys “should be executed for their crimes.” In the face of the vigilante-like demand for vengeance, no one seemed concerned that the suspects’ DNA failed to match the only semen found at the scene.

Sadly, they were only exonerated in 2002 after having completely served sentences ranging from 6 to 13 years when Matias Reyes, a serial rapist whose DNA was a match, confessed to the crime because of his guilty conscience. This gross miscarriage of justice is recounted in The Central Park Five, a riveting documentary co-directed by the father-daughter team of Ken and Sarah Burns, along with her husband, David McMahon.

The film features reams of archival footage, including videotapes of the framed quintet’s coerced confessions. Mixed in are present-day reflections by them, their lawyers, and relatives, as well as by politicians, prosecutors and other pivotal players.

It is a heartbreaking expose’ about a rush to judgment which ruined five innocent young lives.

 

 

 

Jim Jones Racism

<noscript>&amp;lt;img src="http://ionenewsone.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/jim-jones-341x478.jpg" style="width: auto; height: auto; max-width: 315px; max-height: 189px;" alt="Jim Jones Racism" title="Jim Jones: &amp;amp;#8216;White Cops Harassed Me Because I&amp;amp;#8217;m&amp;amp;nbsp;Black!&amp;amp;#8217;" class="ione-315" /&amp;gt;</noscript>

Entertainment

Jim Jones:  ‘White Cops Harassed Me Because I’m Black!’

By

 

 

 
 

http://www.ceyseauinc.com/

 

http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-182700

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-961198

 

"There is no doubt that racism exists. Just as it always has, and always will.

 

And a perfect example is Ome's claim that unless you are black you can't understand what the black race has been through. I agree with his statement. I also believe it is inherently racist. That statement indicates that any individual's life experience will largely be shaped by their race. And the ability of an individual to relate to certain experiences is determined by their race. Arguments predicated on race are inherently racist because they dismiss the ability of people of other races to share similar experiences."- CKThompson

 

-CKThompson

 

 

There are university educated individuals teaching Black men, women, and children that he or she are not U.S. citizens.  More astonishing is that far too many U.S. born Black men and women, including university educated Black men and women are or have given this idiot a forum, support, and/or are even buying his books.

 

RE: YouTube: "Black People Were Never Citizens Of Amerikkka" - Dr. Umar Johnson

 

Selected comment:

 

"The Constitution was written by SLAVEHOLDERS.  Africans weren't on their minds when it was written.  All my days on this planet, I have never been referred to as an American.  I hear MINORITY (lesser than) all the time, and behind closed doors, I imagine it gets worse than that.  When the African goes wrong, it's not the AFRICAN who handles the situation, It's the CAUCASIAN.  Had we all been born in Japan or China, would we be calling ourselves African-Japanese or African-Chinese?  If we did, how dumb would we be and how dumb would we appear??  Just asking!! by Norland

 

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/...rdocs/DredScott.html

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dred_Scott_v._Sandford

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-949295

 

http://www.ceyseauinc.com/

 

This is not 1865, and the Dread Scott decision has no bearing on what happens today.  

 

The only enslavement that U.S. born Blacks face today are the obstacles that he or she place on themselves and/or any treasonous misfit from within the Black community itself who contributes to disparaging Constitutional protections.

 

Slim chance exists that any of these individuals, as it concerns Dr. Umar Johnson, any loud mouth and misguided Black nationalists talking against the merits of the Constitution and the value of American citizenship racing to relocate to any other part of the planet to make a living, to raise their families, relocating once and for all to leave the U.S. for Cuba, the Sudan, Somalia, Pakistan, South Africa, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, Mexico, Kenya, Nigeria, North Korea, China, Japan, Brazil, Afghanistan, Iraq, Palestine, Belize, etc., etc.

 

Clearly, Illegal aliens and his or her lawyers have a better understanding of how best to hold a public servant or anyone else accountable to the Constitution, the "Oath of Office", and/or the "Rule of Law" than far too Many U.S. Born Blacks!

 
 
 
RE:  "Ex-officers get probation in Houston teen beating" by JUAN A. LOZANO, Associated Press | April 24, 2013
 
Here again, when U.S. born Blacks place no value in Constitutional protections for U.S. citizens, and when there are no civil lawsuit mega-buck penalties on the back end, to hold public servants or anyone else financially liable for damages in the City (Houston, TX), County, State, or Federal jurisdiction where this beating, "Cruel and Unusual Punishment....a police officer is not the judge, jury, and executioner" of a Black teen took place it will be business as usual. 
 
Furthermore, U.S. born black men, women, and minors must stop committing or being involved in criminal activity.   
 
 
The Clean Hands Doctrine should send a strong message to anyone who seeks redress for wrongdoing of another individual, a government or private business entity.  The individual making any claim for redress must first be law abiding before he or she can demand redress from anyone else who violates the law, the Constitution, the property rights of another individual, etc., etc..
 
Just think how strong this teen's legal claim for damages/redress would be, had he been innocent, not involved in an alleged burglary, etc., etc., leaving the police officers with "no probable cause" or means to explain or to justify the arrest, assault/battery on the teen in the first place.
 
 

http://www.ceyseauinc.com/

 

http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-182700

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-961198

 

 

http://www.ceyseauinc.com/

 

This is not 1865, and the Dread Scott decision has no bearing on what happens today.  

The only enslavement that U.S. born Blacks face today are the obstacles that he or she place on themselves and/or any treasonous misfit from within the Black community itself who contributes to disparaging Constitutional protections.

 

https://www.africanamerica.org/...t/320346378732483837

 

Clearly, Illegal aliens and his or her lawyers have a better understanding of how best to hold a public servant or anyone else accountable to the Constitution, the "Oath of Office", and/or the "Rule of Law" than far too Many U.S. Born Blacks!

 
Originally Posted by TheRealDeal:
 
 

http://www.ceyseauinc.com/

 

http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-182700

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-961198

 

"There is no doubt that racism exists. Just as it always has, and always will.

 

And a perfect example is Ome's claim that unless you are black you can't understand what the black race has been through. I agree with his statement. I also believe it is inherently racist. That statement indicates that any individual's life experience will largely be shaped by their race. And the ability of an individual to relate to certain experiences is determined by their race. Arguments predicated on race are inherently racist because they dismiss the ability of people of other races to share similar experiences."- CKThompson

 

-CKThompson

 

 

There are university educated individuals teaching Black men, women, and children that he or she are not U.S. citizens.  More astonishing is that far too many U.S. born Black men and women, including university educated Black men and women are or have given this idiot a forum, support, and/or are even buying his books.

 

RE: YouTube: "Black People Were Never Citizens Of Amerikkka" - Dr. Umar Johnson

 

Selected comment:

 

"The Constitution was written by SLAVEHOLDERS.  Africans weren't on their minds when it was written.  All my days on this planet, I have never been referred to as an American.  I hear MINORITY (lesser than) all the time, and behind closed doors, I imagine it gets worse than that.  When the African goes wrong, it's not the AFRICAN who handles the situation, It's the CAUCASIAN.  Had we all been born in Japan or China, would we be calling ourselves African-Japanese or African-Chinese?  If we did, how dumb would we be and how dumb would we appear??  Just asking!! by Norland

 

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/...rdocs/DredScott.html

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dred_Scott_v._Sandford

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-949295

 

http://www.ceyseauinc.com/

 

This is not 1865, and the Dread Scott decision has no bearing on what happens today.  

 

The only enslavement that U.S. born Blacks face today are the obstacles that he or she place on themselves and/or any treasonous misfit from within the Black community itself who contributes to disparaging Constitutional protections.

 

Slim chance exists that any of these individuals, as it concerns Dr. Umar Johnson, any loud mouth and misguided Black nationalists talking against the merits of the Constitution and the value of American citizenship racing to relocate to any other part of the planet to make a living, to raise their families, relocating once and for all to leave the U.S. for Cuba, the Sudan, Somalia, Pakistan, South Africa, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, Mexico, Kenya, Nigeria, North Korea, China, Japan, Brazil, Afghanistan, Iraq, Palestine, Belize, etc., etc.

 

Clearly, Illegal aliens and his or her lawyers have a better understanding of how best to hold a public servant or anyone else accountable to the Constitution, the "Oath of Office", and/or the "Rule of Law" than far too Many U.S. Born Blacks!

 

https://www.africanamerica.org/topic/time-to-remove-race-from-gun-debate?reply=321894581587619832&rl=true#321894581587619832

 

RE:  "Time to Remove Race From Gun Debate"

 

sunnubian and/or anyone else of anti NRA/Gun lobbyist expression

 

I support the NRA and unlike you I have no beef with the NRA and the Gun Lobbyists.  As a matter of fact, I'm on the side of the NRA, the gun lobbyists, and/or the gun owners.  I'm not against any American owning an assault weapon or any other weapon.  Again, a firearm, a military weapon, any weapon is not the problem.  The problem lies with the irrational/unstable individual or any individuals who pull the trigger, arm the weapon, etc.   The NRA and the gun lobbyists are not my enemies. 

 

My enemies, my beef is with agents and officials of government who have contempt for the Constitution, the "oath of office"  and the rule of law no matter who they are.   If the 2nd amendment has to be used to keep government in check, then so be it.  Since criminal and subversive individuals will always find a way to acquire any weapon no matter how many gun prohibition laws are passed,  no matter how politically strong the NRA or any gun lobbyist can be, then it is senseless to leave any American citizen at the mercy of government bureaucrats or leave any U.S. citizen in a vulnerable position.  

 

Police officers, agents and officials of government will not be there to protect your life or family members,  when your life, other family members, other law abiding community members and/or personal or real property are threatened by any criminal or subversive individual who possesses any type of firearm, and this is especially the case in the "inner-city".   No debate necessary. 

 

Last but not least, more so than any other ethnic group, the Black community has issues with having respect for life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness of its' community residents. 

 

http://www.wnd.com/2013/01/chi...hanistan-death-toll/

 

Caucasians, Hispanics, Koreans, etc., etc., are not senselessly killing their own people on the scale that commonly (Black on Black Crime) takes place on the streets of Chicago, Illinois, Detroit, MI, former predominately Black Compton, CA, South Los Angeles.  

 

http://www.lincoln.ne.gov/city/police/cbp.htm

 

No amount of police intervention or community based policing will stop this senseless Black on Black killing in any predominately Black community, because more times than not, policing authorities show up a "Day Late and a Dollar Short" and more so than the police, the community at risk, namely U.S. born Black men, women, and his or her siblings, must step up to plate to improve the quality of life to protect and defend the Black community against all enemies, foreign and domestic.    

 

The Black community must clean up its' own backyard, or the U.S. born descendant of slavery segment of the Black community will perish for failing to have respect for its' inhabitants.

 
Originally Posted by sunnubian:

The NRA and gun lobby control the gun laws.  Period.  And NOTHING meaningful in the way of controlling gun violence is, can or will happen .... as long as that is true.  Period.

 

ANY talk of "gun reform/control" has to begin with the serious contemplation of breaking the NRA's hold on our government and the elected officials whose re-election campaigns prominently depend on NRA campaign contribution support!!   

*******************************************************************

This is what the debate should be about. 

 

When Americans take our gun laws out of the hands of the Gun Lobby, then America's gun laws will be what they should be, without infringing on the Constitutional Rights of any American Citizen that is qualified and sane to own a gun.

 

Superintendent Implicated In Cover-Up of Oakland School Police Murder of Raheim Brown

Filed under: Featured,Headlines |
Raheim Brown Mother photo

Raheim Brown’s mother holding autopsy photos of her son after he was killed by Oakland School Police

AFRICANGLOBE – Perhaps you’ve heard or read the name Raheim Brown Jr. He’s the 20-year-old Black man who was beaten then shot and killed by Oakland School Police Department Sgt. Bhatt.

In January 2011 Brown and a female companion were parked in a vehicle in the Oakland Hills when they were approached by officers Barhin Bhatt and Jonathan Bellusa, who were working as hired security guards for an Oakland School District dance being held at Skyline High School.

The officers reported that they first approached the vehicle, which was not parked at the school or on campus, because the hazard lights were flashing. Brown and his friend didn’t need help. As a justification for questioning them, the officers claimed they smelled marijuana coming from the vehicle after approaching it. Other reports have claimed the officers thought the car was stolen. The officers also reported Brown threatened to stab Barhin with a screwdriver that he had in the car.

As Brown and his companion sat, buckled-up, in the car, the officers began beating them both.

What exactly happened next, no one is certain because the requests for the full reports of the shooting by Lori Davis, mother of Raheim Brown, and her attorney, John Burris, have yet to be fulfilled by the Oakland Unified School District.

What is known is that Bellusa, who was outside the car on the passenger side where Raheim Brown was sitting, ordered a first round of shots. The shots were fired by Bhatt, who was outside the car on the driver side near the female driver. Bhatt fired at Raheim Brown across the driver multiple times, but Raheim Brown remained living at this time. Bhatt’s gun jammed. He cleared it, then a second round of shots was fired, killing Raheim Brown.

Davis filed a wrongful death suit against OUSD, which operates and employs the district police officers who shot and killed Brown.

Breaking ‘Code Blue’

This case is highly suspicious for many reasons: 1) A complete report containing all the details has yet to be made available to the public, Ms. Davis or her attorney; 2) there was definite mismanagement on the part of OUSD Superintendent Tony Smith directly following the shooting, as well as by OSPD Chief Williams; 3) an Oakland School Police Department officer is calling foul against his own department.

What has come as a “whistle-blowing” effort by Bellusa has also rocked the community and the department’s claims.

Bellusa filed a federal complaint against the OSPD claiming retaliation for his refusal to lie about the second round of shots that killed Raheim Brown. In his complaint, Bellusa claims that the second round of shots weren’t necessary because Raheim Brown was no longer a threat, after being shot with the first round.

According to Davis, who cited testimony by former Sgt. Bellusa of OSPD, Superintendent Tony Smith was accompanied by some Oakland School Board members at the crime scene – directly following the shooting.

“Based on Bellusa’s testimony in his deposition,” said Davis, “Tony Smith came down there and tried to get him to do witness tampering. He tried to get their (Bhatt and Bellusa’s) stories together.”

Bellusa, who is now on paid administrative leave is accusing the OSPD of a pattern of corruption.

For the Davis wrongful-death case, the Bellusa complaint and the federal investigation underway bring light to the issue of a cover-up by the OSPD.

“You don’t get one officer to lie for the other one,” said Davis.

Raheim Brown and the Police’s Problem With Guns

Raheim Brown photo

Raheim Brown

Incidents like the Raheim Brown killing highlight a huge debate going on in America right now about the necessity of armed district staff in schools. This comes after the terrible December 2012 mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., where 20 children, six teachers, the shooter and his mother were shot and killed.

For African-Americans, the issue may be more of a concern regarding security officers being armed when working at schools with large numbers of African-American students. Black communities are extremely reluctant to put guns in the hands of those who terrorize Black children and youth the most: the police. To whites, police officers are there to protect civilians.

When asked whether OUSD needs a police department, Davis said; “They don’t need police – just regular security.”

The rate of officer involved shootings seems to be increasing.

In an update, posted July 16, 2012, to a report by the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement that was originally released April 6, 2012, MXGM wrote:

Invasive policing is only one aspect of the U.S. states’ comprehensive containment strategies to exploit Black people and to smother resistance … The U.S. state maintains and reinforces these economic injustices with the militarized occupation of Black communities by the police and a web of racist legislation like the ‘war on drugs,’ discriminatory policies like ‘three strikes’ and ‘mandatory minimum’ sentencing. The result is a social system that mandates the prison warehousing of millions of African-Americans and extrajudicial killings where the killers act with impunity and more often than not are rewarded and promoted for murder.

These views are backed by data tracking police killings, or “extrajudicial killings,” over many months. The latest data collected by MXGM shows that a Black person in the U.S. is killed every 28 hours by law enforcement.

 

The nearby Oakland Police Department is so plagued that it has been appointed a court monitor, former Baltimore commissioner Thomas Frazier, by U.S. District Court Judge Thelton Henderson to oversee mandated changes to the department.

What Post-Racial America?

What does this mean? It means that as the Black community and its organizers and leaders have justly claimed and proven, a post-racial society DOES NOT exist in America.

Blacks are still falling victim to racist law enforcement organizations intent on sending them to prison if not to the graveyard. Why is it that our Black youth must endure officers at their presumed “educational safe havens” or when they are merely enjoying some leisure?

What real justification can there be for officers – who were hired to secure a school dance on a school campus – to venture from their assigned duty posts and beat, shoot and kill innocent youth? Furthermore, what justification does Tony Smith have for not releasing the details of the incident as reported by his staff?

When Smith started as superintendent he was quoted in an Oakland North article as saying, “For me, you have to examine the effects of institutional racism, institutional classism, institutional bias, language bias and say, ‘At this point, the system that we have – even if we do it really, really well – isn’t going to close and transform that gap.’”

Apparently that was only talk and didn’t extend to his school police department. Not only has Smith championed school closures, he hasn’t brought in valuable resources such as librarians, music programs etc. In the same interview he said:

“I’m incredibly committed to thinking about new kinds of relationships with local communities. We have to become beacons and be able to infuse into those neighborhoods expectations and ways of being. That takes partnership and leadership and expectations and being honest about how hard it is.”

It is safe to say that the beacon light is out when it comes to Tony Smith and the Oakland Unified School District. His failure to demonstrate unwavering, transparent leadership has continued to damage Oakland schools and district departments – as evidenced with the OSPD.

Smith has only been in Oakland four years and he conveniently is moving to Chicago, just as a wrongful death suit surfaces and a federal investigation is taking place, with him as lead culprit.

In his letter to the Oakland School Board, he cited family illness as the reason for the move. That very well may be true.

What is also true is that, on Smith’s watch in Oakland, we have lost another young Black life.

 

Laura Savage is a graduating senior in journalism at San Francisco State University and is interning with the SF Bay View this semester. She can be reached at lsavage26@gmail.com.

 

 

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https://www.africanamerica.org/...unsialibya-situation

 

RE:  "US & France Intervene in Mali To Protect Land & Resource Grabs, Not Because of Al Qeda" by Bruce A. Dixon, 4-23-2013,  and uploaded by Yemaya

 

http://www.archives.gov/exhibi...tion_transcript.html

 

US Constitution, Article 2, Section 2:  

"The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offences against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment."

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-877741

 

Your buddy, President Barack Obama to whom, possibly a lot of you voted for is also the Chief executive. 

 

http://www.archives.gov/exhibi...tion_transcript.html

 

US Constitution, Article. II., Section. 1.

The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows:

......Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation:--"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-16804247

 

http://www.mediaite.com/online...ericans-on-u-s-soil/

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-899597

 

https://www.africanamerica.org/...operty-ownership-etc?

 

Since President Barack "the Magic Negro" Obama and his appointee U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder  have held office there have been more un-Constitutional infractions against U.S. citizens, more freedoms for illegal aliens, and you can forget Constitutional protections for any U.S. born descendant of slavery, because Barack Obama could care less, the unemployment rate of Black men and women is the highest it has ever been, more Drone strikes than ever, U.S. soldiers....U.S. Veterans are more vulnerable than during any previous U.S. President, or Presidential Administration.

 

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-955888

 

After all, more than any other U.S. President, President Barack Obama is more likely to be used, because as it stands Barack Obama will to throw anyone under the bus to promote himself, to make history to be the first Black President, to keep from being held accountable for unethical, criminal, illegal, un-Constitutional, inhumane, and treasonous decisions he has made, or will make. 

 

If former President George Bush were to give the order commit all the inhumane things in Sub-Sahara Africa that have occurred during President Barack Obama's tenure, U.S. born Black men and women would have been marching on the White House, protesting, condemning the President, you name it.

****************************************************

http://www.ceyseauinc.com/

 

THE JOB OF A CONGRESSMAN

 

“There are cases where an individual has been wrongfully treated by his government and about the only way, unless the individual resorts tocourt, and even in some cases the courts are not able to give proper relief, the only area or avenue open to the individual is through his representative. When you find a bona fide error has been made, I suggest that you make a maximum effort to remedy it. This I feel is a vital and important function of those of us in the House of Representatives”. Authors: Donald G. Tacheron and Morris Udall, from the book entitled, “The Job of the Congressman”, pages 65 and 66.

 

(The above excerpt “The Job of the Congressman” holds true for all elected office officials)

 

Article VI, USC:  This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding. “……Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and Members of several State legislatures (all elected officials), and all executive and judicial Officers of the United States and of the several states, Shall be bound by oath of affirmation, to support this Constitution. 14th Amendment, USC, Section 1:   “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” 14th Amendment, USC, Section 4:   “……But neither the United States public debt of the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave: but all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void.”

 

****************************************************

Oath of Office,: "I, (President, Supreme Court Justice, Congressperson, Assemblyman, Mayor, City Councilperson, Judge, ), during such times as I hold the office, I, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States (the Constitution of the State of California, Maryland, Illinois, etc., etc.), against all enemies foreign (terrorist enemies of the U.S., illegal immigrants, un-American or un-Constitutional anything and everything, etc.) and domestic (treasonous individuals or organizations, any Police Chief who condones this and the Police Chief's rogue police officers, unethical or criminal elected officials or public servants, illegal aliens or his or her advocates, un-American anything and everything), and that I will bear true faith and allegiance, to the Constitution of the United States , (State Constitution), and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties upon which I am about to enter."

 

http://www.senate.gov/artandhi...fing/Oath_Office.htm

 

U.S. Senate and Congressional Oath of Office: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God."

Justice In The Segregated South: A New Look At An Old Killing

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May 03, 2013 3:57 PM   

May 3, 2013

 
      
        

Listen to the Story

          13 min 0 sec         
      
      
                
When John Queen died in August 1965 in front of the Ice House [the building between the Standard Oil station and The Dollar Store), rules of racial inferiority were so entrenched in Fayette, Miss., that black residents felt they couldn't complain. But just four months later things changed and black residents marched on Dec. 24 as part of their boycott against white-owned businesses.Enlarge imagei      
      

When John Queen died in August 1965 in front of the Ice House (the building between the Standard Oil station and The Dollar Store), rules of racial inferiority were so entrenched in Fayette, Miss., that black residents felt they couldn't complain. But just four months later things changed and black residents marched on Dec. 24 as part of their boycott against white-owned businesses.

      
       Jack Thornell/AP
When John Queen died in August 1965 in front of the Ice House [the building between the Standard Oil station and The Dollar Store), rules of racial inferiority were so entrenched in Fayette, Miss., that black residents felt they couldn't complain. But just four months later things changed and black residents marched on Dec. 24 as part of their boycott against white-owned businesses.
      
      

When John Queen died in August 1965 in front of the Ice House (the building between the Standard Oil station and The Dollar Store), rules of racial inferiority were so entrenched in Fayette, Miss., that black residents felt they couldn't complain. But just four months later things changed and black residents marched on Dec. 24 as part of their boycott against white-owned businesses.

Jack Thornell/AP
      
   

This story contains language that some may find offensive.

In the segregated South in 1965, John Queen was about as insignificant as a man could be. He was black, elderly and paralyzed. His legs had been crushed when as a boy he fell off a roof. For the rest of his life, he pulled himself around with his hands.

In Fayette, Miss., he would shine shoes on Main Street for a few coins. People called him "Crippled Johnny" or "Shoe-Shine Johnny."

"He didn't have legs, so he walked like a rabbit," says Lillie Lee Henderson, Queen's great-niece. She remembers how her uncle used two wooden shoeshine boxes to push and pull himself along the pavement. "He would put his arm through the handles of the shoeshine boxes and then swing his body forward. That's how he moved. Like you would see a bunny rabbit hop."

When Queen was killed on Aug. 8 at the age of 65, it took just minutes for authorities to decide that he was the aggressor. That he shot first. And that the white man fired in self-defense.

But in 2007, the Queen case was put on an FBI list of what it called unsolved "racially motivated killings from the civil rights era." In February of that year, FBI Director Robert Mueller stood at a microphone with officials from major civil rights groups and announced that his agents would begin investigating about 100 such cases.

Today, the Queen case is one of just 27 cases that the FBI calls open. The vast majority of the 112 cases in the FBI's Cold Case Initiative have been closed without prosecution. Only two were successfully prosecuted.

Documents obtained by NPR via a Freedom of Information Act request show that the FBI began its active investigation into the Queen case in late 2008, but it stalled because agents found only two witnesses: the man who shot Queen and the man's sister.

The Search For Witnesses

NPR — working with Stanley Nelson of the Concordia Sentinel in Ferriday, La., who has written about the region's civil rights era violence — found several new witnesses who have never told their stories to the FBI. Their versions are often contradictory, however. There was little investigation by local authorities in 1965, and no evidence was saved.

As a result, NPR's investigation can't say with certainty how Queen died. This is a story about how justice worked — or didn't work — in a segregated world from the not-so-distant past.

Adam Lee with the FBI's Civil Rights Section says officials cannot talk about details of the case because it's still open. In a prepared statement, Lee says:

"We realize that the dearth of living witnesses and Queen's obvious physical disabilities invites speculation and suspicion as to the circumstances of his death. However, FBI investigations are driven by facts and evidence, not suspicions and speculation. While we have not yet closed this tragic case and thus cannot comment on the specifics of the investigation, we currently lack sufficient evidence to conclusively disprove the subject's claim of self-defense. The FBI will consider any additional evidence concerning this matter from a credible source."

The one thing the new witnesses found by NPR agree upon is that Queen was shot and killed after he cursed in front of a white man.

Martha Wallace was 18 when she witnessed the argument between Queen and Jasper Burchfield. "I just really heard one shot," she says. "Really like a firecracker."Enlarge imagei      
      

Martha Wallace was 18 when she witnessed the argument between Queen and Jasper Burchfield. "I just really heard one shot," she says. "Really like a firecracker."

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
Martha Wallace was 18 when she witnessed the argument between Queen and Jasper Burchfield. "I just really heard one shot," she says. "Really like a firecracker."
      
      

Martha Wallace was 18 when she witnessed the argument between Queen and Jasper Burchfield. "I just really heard one shot," she says. "Really like a firecracker."

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

Martha Wallace, who was then 18, says she was standing just a few feet away and heard the argument. "All I remember: I heard the word 's- - -' or 'damn,' or something like that. And I know the man said, 'Don't talk like that in front of my wife and daughter.' And John, you know, John had kind of a big mouth. John said, 'I can say s- - - whenever I get ready.' And that was it. And the next thing I heard was a shot."

It happened at the ice house on Main Street. A warehouse is there now, but back in 1965, the ice house was a place where people without electricity came to buy blocks of ice to keep their food cool.

On a steamy summer afternoon, people would hang out on its porch where cold air wafted from the ice-making machines.

Wallace and her sister, Hilda Johnson, who was then 12 , remember the dark sedan that drove up and the driver who got out — a white man with dark hair.

Jasper Burchfield was a part-time elected constable. He was off duty at the time he was driving north on Highway 61 to the Mississippi Delta with his family, including his mother and young sister. He was from the next county over, so he didn't know that Queen was a town character who was sometimes friendly, sometimes surly and would sometimes be drinking. And Burchfield didn't know that in Fayette, it was a kind of a sport to get Queen riled up because Queen could go off on one of his famous cursing streaks.

So when Burchfield drove up to get ice, Queen was hanging out with a few other men, laughing and joking. His voice was loud enough for Burchfield to hear him curse. Burchfield told him to stop, and Queen cursed again.

And that, as Johnson recalls, broke all the rules: "Back in them days, you know ... you had to watch what you say."

In August 1965, the civil rights movement was changing the country. Just two days before Queen was shot, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law.

Still, in Jefferson County, where Fayette is located, blacks outnumbered whites 3 to 1. But only one black person was registered to vote, according to a report by the U.S. Justice Department.

A black man still stepped off the sidewalk when a white person approached and always let a white customer go to the head of the line at the grocery store. If a letter to someone black was addressed to "Mr. and Mrs.," the postmaster took a pencil and crossed out that title.

What happened after Queen cursed is what is in dispute. Who had a gun? Was there more than one shot? Who pulled the trigger first?

This matters in this case because the Justice Department could still prosecute under civil rights law after all these years, but only if it could be shown that a law enforcement officer shot a defenseless paraplegic black man.

Walace and Johnson were sitting in different parts of the ice house. "I just really heard one shot," says Wallace. "Really like a firecracker to me." Then, she says, she saw Queen dead, his red blood running with the ice water.

Melissa Martin Wright, who was almost 8 when Queen died, says she saw him tumble after he was shot.Enlarge imagei      
      

Melissa Martin Wright, who was almost 8 when Queen died, says she saw him tumble after he was shot.

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
Melissa Martin Wright, who was almost 8 when Queen died, says she saw him tumble after he was shot.
      
      

Melissa Martin Wright, who was almost 8 when Queen died, says she saw him tumble after he was shot.

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

Another witness, Melissa Martin Wright, also remembers hearing a single shot. She was a few weeks shy of her eighth birthday and was walking directly across the street from the ice house.

"I just remember hearing a boom and turning and seeing someone tumble. ... It was a black man and he was crippled," she says. "It was like, 'Oh, what's wrong with him?' and then it was like, 'Oh my gosh, he was shot.' So I just ran."

Wright didn't see who had a gun; nor did Wallace and Johnson.

But here's where things get murky. NPR also found witnesses who say Queen had a gun, too.

"It was an old revolver of some type," says Charles Dawkins, who says he drove up to the ice house with his cousin just after the shooting.

Dawkins is one of four new witnesses, black and white, who arrived moments after the shooting and saw Queen with a gun in his hand. "He was laying on his back out there with his arm out with a pistol in his hand," says Iamon Dawkins. "Hell, it looked like he could shoot it. But he, of course, was dead."

Charles Dawkins arrived at the scene moments after the shooting. He says he saw Queen lying dead with a revolver in his hand.Enlarge imagei      
      

Charles Dawkins arrived at the scene moments after the shooting. He says he saw Queen lying dead with a revolver in his hand.

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
Charles Dawkins arrived at the scene moments after the shooting. He says he saw Queen lying dead with a revolver in his hand.
      
      

Charles Dawkins arrived at the scene moments after the shooting. He says he saw Queen lying dead with a revolver in his hand.

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

The Rev. Percy Turner, one of Queen's friends, says Queen once showed him how he kept a small old pistol for protection in one of his wood shoeshine boxes.

There are also witnesses who say they heard what sounded like multiple shots. Others say that a bullet hit the house across the street. It was Queen who was facing the house. Iamon Dawkins remembers the owner of that house, a local car dealer, making a fuss about the bullet that hit the wires to his television.

That man is no longer living, but his daughter remembers her parents talking about a bullet shot through the front of the house. She wasn't living there then, and she says she doesn't remember if it had anything to do with Queen's shooting.

Still, even if both Queen and Burchfield had guns, we can't know for sure who pulled a gun first. No one roped off the ice house or recovered the bullet (or bullets). There was no autopsy of Queen's body to confirm how many times he had been shot.

Instead, the story that was quickly accepted as the official truth was Burchfield's: that Queen shot first and Burchfield shot back in self-defense.

Tom Harper, who lived a block away from the ice house, recalls hearing what sounded like multiple gunshots. He says he jumped up from his parents' dinner table and ran past the Methodist church, the propane gas company, the newspaper office; he crossed Mead Street and ran past the gas station.

At the ice house, he saw Queen dead on the ground with a small, old pistol in his hand. And nearby, he saw Burchfield standing by his car.

"He was not as excited or as nervous as you might expect somebody to be that had just killed somebody," Harper remembers. "He was just, matter-of-fact, this is what happened."

Harper says Burchfield was eager to tell his version. He and other witnesses recall that Burchfield said Queen was on the ice house porch, about four feet off the ground, and that Burchfield was at street level. Burchfield was just 6 to 10 feet away when Queen fired his gun. But Burchfield ducked and Queen's bullet whistled past his head. Harper recalls how Burchfield described how he then reached into his car for his service revolver and fired, hitting Queen at the waist.

In Burchfield's account, Queen slumped over, then rose suddenly and aimed his pistol again. So Burchfield fired and hit Queen again.

"Johnny was still trying to aim his revolver at Burchfield, and that's when Burchfield fired the third shot that went right in the center of Johnny's forehead. And that was the fatal blow," Harper remembers Burchfield saying.

Wallace, who saw the argument, had run from the ice house, but as people in town rushed to the scene, she followed them back. She remembers seeing Jefferson County Deputy Sheriff Robert Pritchard drive up and shake Burchfield's hand in what she described as a friendly manner.

"I don't think if I had shot you, he would of came in and shook my hand, do you? I mean, I really don't," she says.

Jasper Burchfield was a 36-year-old part-time constable when he shot and killed Queen in 1965.Enlarge imagei      
      

Jasper Burchfield was a 36-year-old part-time constable when he shot and killed Queen in 1965.

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
Jasper Burchfield was a 36-year-old part-time constable when he shot and killed Queen in 1965.
      
      

Jasper Burchfield was a 36-year-old part-time constable when he shot and killed Queen in 1965.

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

In Burchfield's Words

NPR went searching for Burchfield to ask him about the day he shot and killed Queen.

Driving down a long gravel road toward a newly built wood house with a long front porch in Mississippi were two NPR journalists — myself and producer Amy Walters — along with Nelson of the Concordia Sentinel.

These days Burchfield runs a business cleaning out septic tanks. A couple of his white pumper trucks are parked in the yard.

As a young man, Burchfield worked at the International Paper plant in Natchez, Miss., by day, and as a constable at night.Enlarge imagei      
      

As a young man, Burchfield worked at the International Paper plant in Natchez, Miss., by day, and as a constable at night.

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
As a young man, Burchfield worked at the International Paper plant in Natchez, Miss., by day, and as a constable at night.
      
      

As a young man, Burchfield worked at the International Paper plant in Natchez, Miss., by day, and as a constable at night.

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

Burchfield answers the door dressed in stained khaki work clothes. He becomes angry when asked about the Queen shooting. "You ain't gonna talk to me about no s- - - like that," he says. But instead of going back inside his house, he leans against his door frame and continues yelling.

"I figure it ain't none of your damn business. Now that's how I feel about it," he says. "I'm 83 god- - - - years old. And I work every day, except Sundays. ... If you all can't do something beside pick on people like that, I'd quit if I was you. I'd find me something else to do."

Burchfield went from angry to ornery, but after more than an hour of prodding, he became friendly.

He tells personal stories — about being an Army machine gunner in the Korean War, where he hated the death he saw and how it haunted him after coming home.

"It takes a while to get over it. You jump at anything," he says.

He talks about his mean and quick-to-fight father, who he says taught him to be honest. And he talks about surviving cancer — the melanoma that left his face pockmarked and disfigured.

Burchfield, who is now 84, then tells the same version he's told over the years of what happened the day he drove his family in his Buick to the ice house in Fayette: Queen was the first to pull a gun and shoot, so he got his own gun from his car and fired back. "I tell you, if I hadn't of shot him," he says, "he would of killed my momma and daddy and probably my little sister."

Delores Mullins, Burchfield's sister, supports her brother's story only to a point. She was 14 then and in the back seat of the car. NPR obtained an FBI agent's notes and the write-up of two interviews with her.

In 2009, after the FBI reopened the case, she told the agents that Queen pulled his gun first. But then — contradicting her brother — she said Queen never got off a shot because his gun jammed.

The FBI then asked her to take a lie detector test. She refused on the advice of her attorney. That's where the FBI paused its investigation. She declined to speak to NPR. Family members said her health is too fragile for her to be interviewed.

A coroner's jury formed by the deputy sheriff quickly reached a conclusion in Queen's death. The official document reads that Queen died of "four gunshot wounds" fired by Burchfield "in self-defense."Enlarge imagei      
      

A coroner's jury formed by the deputy sheriff quickly reached a conclusion in Queen's death. The official document reads that Queen died of "four gunshot wounds" fired by Burchfield "in self-defense."

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
A coroner's jury formed by the deputy sheriff quickly reached a conclusion in Queen's death. The official document reads that Queen died of "four gunshot wounds" fired by Burchfield "in self-defense."
      
      

A coroner's jury formed by the deputy sheriff quickly reached a conclusion in Queen's death. The official document reads that Queen died of "four gunshot wounds" fired by Burchfield "in self-defense."

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

The Coroner's Jury

A little more than an hour after Queen was shot, Pritchard, the deputy sheriff, told County Coroner R.A. "Sonny Boy" Cupit to gather six respected men in the community to form a coroner's jury to rule on how Queen died. That was standard practice.

All of the members of the coroner's jury are dead now, except for Elmo Gabbert, who was a young doctor in 1965.

   

Gabbert remembers the coroner's jury met at the ice house and that the sheriff presented one piece of physical evidence: Queen's old revolver. "I remember vividly the gun, what it looked like to this day," he says. "It was silver-plated. It had a black handle. And I remember that it was loaded."

Outside the ice house, Queen's family and other black residents waited for the decision of the coroner's jury.

Henderson, Queen's great-niece, remembers that after about 20 minutes, the sheriff came out and said it was over and told everyone to go home.

"Everybody come away from the ice house upset," she recalls, "because the inquest ruled that it was Uncle John's fault and that this man had shot in self-defense."

The report from the coroner's inquest is the one existing court record. NPR found it in the dusty basement of the Jefferson County Courthouse.

It is one sentence long: "Johnny Queen, came to his death by reason to-wit: Four gunshot wounds (.38 S & W special pistol) fired by J.W. Burchfield, in our opinions, in self-defense."

A preliminary hearing before the justice of the peace reached the same conclusion the next morning. That hearing was so short that by the time an FBI agent arrived — he was driving from Natchez, a half-hour away — it was over.

Two local newspaper articles and a report to the State Highway Patrol quote the sheriff's version of things. They note that two black employees of the ice house testified, but there's no reporting on what they said.

Queen was buried the next day, but even though the FBI had already deployed scores of agents to stop racial violence in Mississippi by 1965, NPR found documents that show the FBI did not open an investigation that year.

Inside The FBI Files

The local newspaper reported that the dispute started when Queen used "vulgar and indecent language" and Burchfield asked him to stop. Then Queen pulled out a pistol and shot.Enlarge imagei      
      

The local newspaper reported that the dispute started when Queen used "vulgar and indecent language" and  Burchfield asked him to stop. Then Queen pulled out a pistol and shot.

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
The local newspaper reported that the dispute started when Queen used "vulgar and indecent language" and Burchfield asked him to stop. Then Queen pulled out a pistol and shot.
      
      

The local newspaper reported that the dispute started when Queen used "vulgar and indecent language" and  Burchfield asked him to stop. Then Queen pulled out a pistol and shot.

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

The Queen incident was not the first time Burchfield had been questioned by the FBI. Just six months before Queen's death, an FBI agent knocked on Burchfield's door. It was Feb. 9 and the agent was there because a police informant had identified Burchfield as a suspected member of the violent White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Around Natchez, Miss., the Ku Klux Klan had been terrorizing black communities with beatings, bombings and killings.

Burchfield responded angrily, according to the FBI agent's report. "Burchfield spoke in a very derogatory manner of what he referred to as the 'Nigger situation,' and talked at length about the manner in which the quote 'Jews' were handling the United States, and the effect they have had on the American dollar and the American economy," says the report, which was among about 300 pages of documents NPR received from the FBI via a Freedom of Information Act request filed about the Queen case.

In the interview with NPR, Burchfield denies ever being a member of the Ku Klux Klan or attending any Klan meetings. "I never been in nothing like that," he says. "I ain't never been in no Ku Klux Klan."

Information inside FBI files contradicts Burchfield. In the 1960s, an informant told the Adams County Sheriff's Department and the Mississippi Highway Safety Patrol that Burchfield was a Klansman. Those reports were sent to the FBI. The informant was a Klansman who was also Burchfield's neighbor. He said it's possible Burchfield may have quit once he was elected constable, which was shortly before he shot Queen.

NPR found these files in documents requested from the FBI. More documents were found at the National Archives in the files of a congressional investigative committee.

In February 1966, the House Committee on Un-American Activities, best known for its investigations of people and groups suspected of having ties to the Communist Party, released a list naming dozens of Ku Klux Klan leaders and members. Burchfield's name was on that list, which was published in newspapers in Mississippi and around the country.

Burchfield worked by day at the International Paper plant in Natchez and at night as the constable in nearby Fenwick. In one document in the FBI files, the Adams County Sheriff's Department — the county around Natchez — names Burchfield as a suspected member of a gang of hooded men who, at night, were abducting and whipping black men.

In one incident, the sheriff's office considered Burchfield a top suspect. One of the masked men brandished a distinctive pistol with a long barrel, and a sheriff's deputy said it resembled a similar weapon that belonged to Burchfield. No arrests were ever made in that case.

Today, Burchfield says he has never heard of the victim nor was he involved in beating him up or hurting any other black man. "Why I gonna do something like that?" Burchfield asks. "I never done nothing like that in my life. I get along with blacks myself. I never had no trouble with no blacks. Not a one."

Still, by the time Burchfield shot and killed Queen in Fayette, his name was already in the files of the local sheriff, the state police and the FBI as a suspected member of the KKK. There was no indication that police in Fayette knew or followed up on that fact.

Nothing about Queen's story seems set in stone. His grave marker includes the wrong birth date and the date of his death is off by a week.Enlarge imagei      
      

Nothing about Queen's story seems set in stone. His grave marker includes the wrong birth date and the date of his death is off by a week.

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
Nothing about Queen's story seems set in stone. His grave marker includes the wrong birth date and the date of his death is off by a week.
      
      

Nothing about Queen's story seems set in stone. His grave marker includes the wrong birth date and the date of his death is off by a week.

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

The Decision Not To Investigate For 43 Years

The morning after Queen was shot, Billy Bob Williams, the agent in the FBI's new office in Natchez, drove to Fayette.

Williams says he spoke to Pritchard, the deputy sheriff, who explained that this was not a racially motivated shooting. Williams trusted Pritchard and concluded that the shooting wasn't the kind of case the FBI was interested in. It wasn't a planned and organized killing by the Klan.

"It just seemed to be that this was a confrontation between two men," says Williams, who is retired and now lives in Oregon.

It took another 43 years before the FBI opened the Queen case as part of its initiative to investigate so-called "racially motivated" unsolved killings from the civil rights era.

So in 2009, FBI agents once again knocked on Burchfield's door. Burchfield repeated the story that he had shot Queen in self-defense.

Sparking Change

Henderson, Queen's great-nieces, remembers the shooting as a pivotal moment for black residents of Fayette. "The black citizens in Jefferson County had reached a peak," she says. "That old cliche: I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired."

Just three weeks after Queen died, the leader of the NAACP in nearby Natchez, Miss., was seriously injured in a car bomb. Charles Evers led protests, including this one in October 1965.Enlarge imagei      
      

Just three weeks after Queen died, the leader of the NAACP in nearby Natchez, Miss., was seriously injured in a car bomb. Charles Evers led protests, including this one in October 1965.

      
       AP
Just three weeks after Queen died, the leader of the NAACP in nearby Natchez, Miss., was seriously injured in a car bomb. Charles Evers led protests, including this one in October 1965.
      
      

Just three weeks after Queen died, the leader of the NAACP in nearby Natchez, Miss., was seriously injured in a car bomb. Charles Evers led protests, including this one in October 1965.

AP
      
   

The death of her great-uncle — and the inability to say anything about it —sparked that change, she says.

"The killing of John Queen was an in-your-face situation right on Main Street on a Sunday afternoon," Henderson says. "This wasn't behind the door. The Klan didn't have sheets over their face. This was a white man who killed a paraplegic black man. He killed him on Main Street."

Less than three weeks after Queen's death, the leader of the NAACP in nearby Natchez turned the ignition key in his Chevrolet and a bomb blew up. George Metcalfe was severely injured in the blast.

Charles Evers was then the NAACP's top official in Mississippi — a job he had taken over after the assassination of his brother, Medgar Evers.

Evers began organizing protests in Natchez, and on the way from his home in Jackson to Natchez, he drove Highway 61 through Fayette, right past the spot where Queen died.

"And I found out that Fayette was predominantly Negro," Evers recalls. So he started registering black residents to vote.

When Queen died in August 1965, it was too risky for black people to complain about it. But Evers challenged all that. In December, just four months later, he led hundreds in protest marches to demand jobs and the right to vote, and for basic respect — to be called Mr. and Mrs, not boy or girl, anymore.

"I went in there, wasn't afraid of white people," says Evers, who was known for his fearlessness and titled a memoir Have No Fear. "I went in there cussing 'em and calling 'em all kind of names. And they couldn't believe that."

It's an ironic twist given that Queen died after an argument that started when the black man cursed in front of a white constable.

Two years later in 1967, Fayette elected Early Lott Sr. as its first black constable. He was one of four black officials elected in Jefferson County and among 22 African-Americans elected that year to public office around the state, the first blacks elected since Reconstruction.

Lott told Phyllis Garland, a reporter for Ebony magazine, that Queen's death inspired him to run for office. The World War II veteran described seeing Queen's blood running on Main Street.

"It was then, when I saw that, I decided that if the time ever came when I'd have a chance to try and change things, I'd do it. That cripple had been killed because he felt the way I felt. He'd only tried to speak up for himself like a man," he said.

By 1969, Evers was elected mayor. Federal money and private money from the North flowed to Fayette. But the hope and prosperity didn't last, and today Fayette is again one of the nation's poorest places.

Family Memories

When Jim Crow laws ended, Shirley Cruel — Queen's great-niece — went back to school and became a social worker. Here, Cruel, who died at age 66 last April, is flanked by grandson Alvion Sampson and her daughter Kaye Sampson.Enlarge imagei      
      

When Jim Crow laws ended, Shirley Cruel — Queen's great-niece — went back to school and became a social worker. Here, Cruel, who died at age 66 last April, is flanked by grandson Alvion Sampson and her daughter Kaye Sampson.

      
       Joseph Shapiro/NPR
When Jim Crow laws ended, Shirley Cruel — Queen's great-niece — went back to school and became a social worker. Here, Cruel, who died at age 66 last April, is flanked by grandson Alvion Sampson and her daughter Kaye Sampson.
      
      

When Jim Crow laws ended, Shirley Cruel — Queen's great-niece — went back to school and became a social worker. Here, Cruel, who died at age 66 last April, is flanked by grandson Alvion Sampson and her daughter Kaye Sampson.

Joseph Shapiro/NPR
      
   

On a Sunday afternoon last year, Shirley Cruel's family — her daughter, a grandson and several nieces and nephews — came to see her at a nursing home on Main Street in Fayette. She's another of Queen's great-nieces.

In 1965, she was a high school dropout and unmarried mother. When things changed in Fayette, she got her GED, went to college and became a social worker.

"He was just a black man in the '60s," she says about her uncle. "And who cared about a black man in the '60s? No justice was given to him."

As Cruel talks, her 18-year-old grandson, Alvion Sampson, sits nearby listening, with a look of astonishment on his face.

He's never heard of Queen, his relative who died just a few blocks up the street.

"At my old school, we did Mississippi history and we read about Medgar Evers and then read about Emmitt Till," he says. But he had never heard about his family's history. "This is the first time I ever heard about it. The first time."

His grandmother says it was time for her grandson, for Mississippi and for the world to know about what happened to Queen.

Shortly after this interview, Cruel died.

That's one reason why civil rights advocates say it's important to know about these killings from the civil rights era. After 50 years, relatives, witnesses — and suspects — are dying. That makes it hard to get to the truth in these cases, but also easy to forget them.

NPR researcher Barbara Van Woerkom contributed to this story. Additional reporting was provided by Stanley Nelson of the Concordia Sentinel in Ferriday, La. Read more of Nelson's reporting on the John Queen case here.

Racial Profiling: Black Students Arrested White Students Party On

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Racial Profiling USC Students photo

African-American students harassed and arrested by the LAPD

AFRICANGLOBE – Some University of Southern California students say they were unfairly targeted Sunday morning when LAPD officers broke up a party and arrested several students.

However, police say they were attacked by the students, who maintain they are victims of racial profiling.

A YouTube video of the incident in the 1200 block of West 23rd Street published by student Lamar Gary shows police in riot gear, armed and ready for a confrontation.

“LAPD attempts to disperse USC students at a college party near the USC campus. Night sticks, Tasers, guns, 79+ LAPD Riot Sqaud Cops vs. USC students. LAPD stated that they were responding to a noise complaint,” he wrote.

Nate Howard, who hosted the party attended by minority students, said he planned the event not only to celebrate his four years at USC, but also for networking purposes.

“We had fun. We’re graduating, and we were having a good time. It was the last day of classes. We had sponsors here,” said Howard, who noted things got ugly around 2 a.m.

“Most people were dispersing and leaving. The police came back and told everyone to get out and that’s eventually what people started to do until they started to get crazy,” he said.

Howard was arrested and he believes it was because of his race. He says another party, attended by mostly white students, was going on across the street at the same time.

“There was also an event across the street. They told them to stay in the house and be safe, while us over here, majority African-American students, we were dispersed out of my house and everywhere,” he said.

Student Sarah Tither-Kaplan attended the other party, which was allowed to continue.

“Our party was predominately Caucasian students and their party was predominately Black students, and basically, DPS and LAPD didn’t stop our party at all. They had no problem with us; they didn’t shut us down,” she said.

An LAPD watch commander confirms the department received a noise complaint about Howard’s party. He said party-goers refused to leave and threw beer bottles at arriving officers, which prompted them to return in riot gear, a charge Howard denies.

The LAPD would not comment on the incident, which is under investigation.

In a blog post titled “I’m A Scholar, Not A Criminal: The Plight Of Black Students At USC,” student Makiah Green wrote, “Instead of studying for the last final of my undergraduate career, I am writing this letter in protest of the University of Southern California’s latest atrocity. Last night, students gathered at a house near campus to celebrate their completion of another rigorous school year. Many attendees were graduating seniors. Almost all attendees were minority students: African-American and Latino.”

She said six of her friends spent the night in jail. The entire incident, she charged, “reeks of racial profiling.”

Green is one of many students calling on her classmates to attend a sit-in at Tommy Trojan on Monday from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

The LAPD, USC’s Department Of Public Safety (DPS) and the student group SOLID USC announced a forum on racial profiling will be held Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the USC Ronald Tutor Campus Center Ballroom.

More than 1,700 students have also signed a petition to end racial profiling at the school.

 

 
 

Mom Of Son Jumped By Whites Writes Of Mother’s Day Without Brandon

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brandon fisher case

<noscript>&amp;lt;img class="alignnone size-large wp-image-2445788" alt="brandon fisher case" src="http://ionenewsone.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/fisher.jpg?w=1024&amp;amp;#038;h=403" width="1024" height="403" /&amp;gt;</noscript>

Last February, Brandon Jackson would be sentenced to 12 years in prison by a nearly all-White jury, after being jumped by a group of White males in Jackson, N.J.  Here, Brandon’s mother, Gloria Fisher, describes the void she has been experiencing each Mother’s Day without her son.

RELATED: Son Jumped By Whites, Sentenced To 12 Years: Mom Demands Justice! [VIDEO]

Mother’s Day with Brandon still incarcerated.

This is the second Mother’s Day I will spend without Brandon. This year, although I am carrying great sadness and heartbreak, I feel more encouraged.

Last year, Mother’s Day came a few weeks after Brandon was found guilty of a crime the prosecutor and judge know he did not commit.

I cried constantly — not sure if the heavy pain in my chest would ever go away.

I didn’t know who to turn to or what to do next. I kept asking, How could such obvious injustice happen? Why Brandon? Why me? How much more could I bear?

Last Mother’s Day, I went to church with my mother, as was expected. I sat numb, not hearing all of the praise and encouragement given to “good” Mothers. I felt that I had failed somehow. Somewhere along the way, I had not done whatever “it” is that makes a Mother “good.” After church, I returned home to spend the rest of that and the next few days in tears.

I cried so much that I became frustrated with my weakness.

I had considered myself a strong and fair Mother. I had been tough, but supportive. Brandon was raised to respect others. He was kind and considerate to his friends. He never had any problems with the police. Did I make him weak, easy prey? My emotions ranged between despair and rage.

Months passed before I could even open the door to his room.

So I have spent the last year trying to tell Brandon’s story. A story that too many Mothers of color share. I have a solid, strong family who have supported me emotionally, and as much as possible, financially. I have been somewhat fortunate because I have had access to the media.

How many Mother’s tears are shed alone, in silence? Mothers who are forced to accept that they can’t make a difference.

This Mother’s Day, I am encouraged.

I have spent the last year working on myself. I still cry sometimes, but I stand solid and confident in my faith. I have been broken and am renewed.  I understand how blessed I am to be a member of a strong family. I thank them often.

I am confident that Brandon will be free soon. I look forward to long talks about life, past, present, and future. I still ask why did he have to lose all these years to such foolishness.

But he will return home, stronger and wiser.

I can’t wait.

Bring added joy to Ms. Fisher by wishing her a happy Mother’s Day here.

 

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Courtesy Of - Your Daily N!@@a Wake Up Call: "Psssst........N!@@a, Wake Up!!
Of all things that i have researched and studied, this has to be one of the most heinous, gut wrenching stories that I've read so far! I apologize in advance if this disturbs or offends anyone by any means. I hesitated a while before posting this, until I decided that this IS a part of our history. Unfortunately, our past is not a colorful pretty picture. -Vida (page admin)
The Lynching of Michael Donald, 19 years old, in Mobile, Alabama, 1981 ... Earlier that week: a jury had been struggling to reach a verdict in the case of a black man accused of murdering a white policeman. NOT GUILTY. The killing had occurred in Birmingham, but the trial had been moved to Mobile. To Benny Hays - the second-highest Klan official in Alabama - and his fellow members of Unit 900 of the United Klans, the presence of blacks on the jury meant that a guilty man would go free. According to Klansmen who attended the unit's weekly meeting, Hays had said that Wednesday, ''If a black man can get away with killing a white man, we ought to be able to get away with killing a black man.'' They decided to retaliate.
On saturday, March 21, the same night other Klan members burnt a three-foot cross on the Mobile County courthouse lawn, Klansman Bennie Hays' son, Henry Hays (age 26), and James Knowles (age 17) drove around Mobile looking for a victim. They spotted Michael Donald walking home from getting his sister a pack of cigarettes. They attacked him and beat him with a tree limb before slitting his throat and hanging him from a tree across the street from Hays' house. Local police first stated that Donald had been killed as part of a drug deal gone wrong, despite his mother's insistence that he had not been involved in drugs. Beulah Mae Donald then contacted Jesse Jackson, who organized a protest march in the city and demanded police answers.
The FBI became involved, partly at the urging of Michael and Thomas Figures, local activists. Two and a half years later, Henry Hays and James Knowles were arrested. Bennie Hays was also indicted in Donald's murder but died before his trial began. Henry Hayes was the first Klans member to be sentenced to death due to the murder of an African American
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Courtesy Of - Your Daily N!@@a Wake Up Call: "Psssst........N!@@a, Wake Up!! Of all things that i have researched and studied, this has to be one of the most heinous, gut wrenching stories that I've read so far! I apologize in advance if this disturbs or offends anyone by any means. I hesitated a while before posting this, until I decided that this IS a part of our history. Unfortunately, our past is not a colorful pretty picture. -Vida [page admin) The Lynching of Michael Donald, 19 years old, in Mobile, Alabama, 1981 Earlier that week: a jury had been struggling to reach a verdict in the case of a black man accused of murdering a white policeman. NOT GUILTY. The killing had occurred in Birmingham, but the trial had been moved to Mobile. To Benny Hays - the second-highest Klan official in Alabama - and his fellow members of Unit 900 of the United Klans, the presence of blacks on the jury meant that a guilty man would go free. According to Klansmen who attended the unit's weekly meeting, Hays had said that Wednesday, ''If a black man can get away with killing a white man, we ought to be able to get away with killing a black man.'' They decided to retaliate. On saturday, March 21, the same night other Klan members burnt a three-foot cross on the Mobile County courthouse lawn, Klansman Bennie Hays' son, Henry Hays (age 26), and James Knowles (age 17) drove around Mobile looking for a victim. They spotted Michael Donald walking home from getting his sister a pack of cigarettes. They attacked him and beat him with a tree limb before slitting his throat and hanging him from a tree across the street from Hays' house. Local police first stated that Donald had been killed as part of a drug deal gone wrong, despite his mother's insistence that he had not been involved in drugs. Beulah Mae Donald then contacted Jesse Jackson, who organized a protest march in the city and demanded police answers. The FBI became involved, partly at the urging of Michael and Thomas Figures, local activists. Two and a half years later, Henry Hays and James Knowles were arrested. Bennie Hays was also indicted in Donald's murder but died before his trial began. Henry Hayes was the first Klans member to be sentenced to death due to the murder of an African American
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Brothers Arrested in Mother’s Day Parade Shooting

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Mothers Day Parade Shooting photo

Mother’s Day parade shooting suspect Akein Scott

AFRICANGLOBE –  Two brothers with a history of drug arrests and suspected ties to a neighborhood gang each face 20 counts of attempted second-degree murder in a shooting spree that brought a sudden bloody end to a Mother’s Day parade in a New Orleans neighborhood.

The arrests by city police and U.S. marshals came less than four days after gunfire scattered the crowd and wounded 20 people — 19 hit by bullets and one while trying to flee.

Akein Scott, 19, was arrested without incident late Wednesday at an eastern New Orleans residence. His brother Shawn Scott, 24, was arrested Thursday morning as he tried to flee another residence in the city, police said.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu and police Chief Ronal Serpas hailed the police work as proof of officials’ determination to end sporadic violence that mars the image of the tourism-dependent city.

“We will not let up,” Landrieu said. “We are demanding that the shooting stop. And we will make sure that we do everything in our power, which I hope people now see is substantial, to make sure that we protect the citizens of New Orleans.”

A magistrate judge on Thursday morning set bond for Akein Scott at $10 million in the attempted murder case. Another judge ordered him held without bond pending a later hearing on an unrelated gun and weapon charge.

Shawn Scott’s court appearances were not yet scheduled. His Thursday morning arrest was announced by Serpas, Landrieu and District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro at a news conference in the middle of the intersection where the shooting took place, off the beaten path for most tourists but less than two miles from the popular French Quarter. Surrounding the officials were dozens of uniformed officers and onlookers from the neighborhood.

Police said Akein Scott had been identified by an unnamed witness as the person seen on a surveillance video, appearing to fire into a crowd that immediately scatters as some fall. Shawn Scott’s role in the shootings remained unclear Thursday afternoon.

Police have yet to outline a motive, other than to say it appears related to gang activity, which Landrieu called a major factor in New Orleans street violence.

“This small number of people in gangs and groups are responsible for the overwhelming number of murders and shootings in this city. They are in fact terrorizing our streets,” Landrieu said.

Police said the Scotts are members of a gang called the Frenchmen and Derbigny Boys. Frenchmen and North Derbigny streets intersect a few blocks from the shooting site. Court records show Shawn Scott has a history of at least three drug arrests on one block of Frenchmen Street.

In addition to the brothers, police said they arrested four people who are accused of helping Akein Scott elude capture. Justin Alexander, 19; Brandy George, 28; Bionca Hickerson, 22; and Nekia Youngblood, 32, are charged with being accessories after the fact to attempted second-degree murder and obstruction of justice, according to a police news release.

At Thursday’s court appearance, Akein Scott, shackled and in an orange jumpsuit, stood calmly and silently as his court-appointed attorney handled proceedings in the shooting case.

Prosecutors said a witness picked out a photo of Akein Scott from a lineup. An arrest affidavit said the unidentified witness told investigators that Akein Scott was the person seen in a surveillance video that police released to the public as they searched for him. The witness also said Akein Scott was carrying a silver-and-black semi-automatic handgun at the shooting scene, according to the affidavit.

Magistrate Judge Gerard Hansen set Akein Scott’s bond at $10 million — $500,000 on each of the 20 counts in the Mother’s Day shooting case.

Police had been searching for Akein Scott since identifying him as a suspect Monday from the video.

Courtney Moles, whose apartment overlooks the shooting site, said Thursday that she didn’t feel her safety was in jeopardy while police searched the city.

“I didn’t really think he would come back. It’s more personal than that,” she said. “He wasn’t going to that second line to make national news. He was probably settling some kind of score.”

Edward Buckner, president of the Original Big 7 Social Aid and Pleasure Club, which sponsored Sunday’s second-line parade, said he was ecstatic at the news of the arrests.

“That’s the best thing that could ever have happened,” he said.

Police publicized a $10,000 reward in the case, and investigators received tips after images from the surveillance camera were released.

Gun violence has flared at two other city celebrations this year. Five people were wounded in a drive-by shooting in January after a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade, and four were wounded in a shooting after an argument in the French Quarter in the days leading up to Mardi Gras. Two teens were arrested in connection with the Martin Luther King Day shootings; three men were arrested and charged in the Mardi Gras shootings.

Mark Hertsgaard, a freelance writer who was shot in the leg Sunday, said in a phone interview from his home in San Francisco that he wouldn’t let the violence turn him against the city.

“I love New Orleans, and I love anything that helps to heal New Orleans from this event, including bringing justice to the perpetrators,” said Hertsgaard, who was stopping in the city on his way home assignment.

Hertsgaard said he still loves the people of New Orleans.

“Yes, there are pockets of idiots, and the other day one of them put a bullet in my leg,” he said.

“But let’s not let a few idiots tarnish the reputation of a great city that has great people in it.”

Why Isn’t New Orleans Mother’s Day Parade Shooting a ‘National Tragedy’?

Filed under: Featured,Headlines |
Mothers Day parade Shooting photo

A victim of the Mother’s Day parade shooting

AFRICANGLOBE – On 3 September 2005 – less than a week after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast – I began to understand that America cared little about what was happening in New Orleans.

I was an undergraduate at Davidson College in North Carolina at the time, worried out of my mind because my family in Mississippi was still without electricity and friends and family in New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast were still missing. The images of families stranded on rooftops were trickling in via news outlets, but it was obvious that the response from the government would be slow.

But it really hit me on 3 September. I was driving around and noticed all the American flags at half-mast. Because Supreme court chief justice William Rehnquist died.

At the time, the Gulf Coast death toll was rumored to be in the thousands with nobody knowing for sure. But flags stayed at full mast until a chief justice died. To me, this was a slap in the face to what was going on in New Orleans and a sign that the city just didn’t matter to the overall fabric of the country.

Year after year, I watched the anniversary for Katrina pass while people gathered around flagpoles two weeks later to mourn the deaths from 9/11. Both were horrible tragedies, but only one seemed to stay in the nation’s consciousness.

Years after Katrina, I lived in Evanston, Illinois and learned about the warm weather massacres in Chicago that happen every spring break or beginning of summer where dozens of high school kids get shot within matters of hours. And how nobody seemed to care. Living in New Orleans and near Chicago has left me jaded to what America prioritizes or chooses to ignore.

So I shouldn’t be surprised that the Mother’s Day Parade shooting has largely been forgotten. On Sunday, shots were fired into a crowd during a parade in the New Orleans 7th ward. Police said they saw three suspects running from the scene.

This is the largest mass shooting in the United States where the shooters were still at large after the crime was committed. Think about that for a minute. From Columbine to Virginia Tech to Fort Hill to Aurora, all the shooters were either killed or apprehended on site. But the person or people responsible for shooting 19 Americans are still free.

So why am I allowed to go outside? Where’s the city quarantine or FBI and Homeland Security presence for this act of “terrorism”?

Because this is an act of domestic terrorism right? Just because the alleged shooter was wearing a white tee and jeans does that suddenly make the shooting a gang-related affair? And we all know how irrelevant gang-related shootings are in America. The Mother’s Day shooting is so irrelevant that politicians haven’t even bothered to mention it to further their anti-gun agendas. If the shootings aren’t even important enough for politicians to spin, then it’s truly reached a black hole of irrelevance.

Did I mention the shooter is still on the loose? I have? Just checking. Police have released photos and video of one of the suspects, but he is still at large.

Now take a moment and imagine a Mother’s Day Parade in the suburbs of Denver, a neighborhood in Edina or a plaza in Austin where bullets rain down on civilians and even hit children. I can’t help but imagine the around-the-clock news coverage. And I can’t help but think it’s because most of America can identify with the fear of being bombarded with gunfire while just enjoying a parade in the middle of town. But America can’t identify with being at a parade in the “inner city” where “gang violence” erupts. The “oh my God, that could happen to me” factor isn’t present with a story about New Orleans or the Chicago southside.

But no matter where the incident occurred, the victims are still there. Victims like 10-year-old Ka’Nard Allen whose father was stabbed to death in October. Whose five-year-old cousin was shot to death at Ka’Nard’s birthday party last May (Ka’Nard was also shot in the neck that day). He was also grazed with a bullet in his cheek at the Mother’s Day parade. No matter what part of the country Ka’Nard is from, his story should linger in your heart.

But it hasn’t because you haven’t heard of him, and you’ve barely heard anything about what should be considered a national tragedy.

Unforunately, though, I’ve learned to redefine what constitutes an American tragedy. American tragedies occur where middle America frequents every day: airplanes, business offices, marathons. Where there persists a tangible fear that this could happen to any of us. And rightfully so. Deaths and mayhem anywhere are tragic. That should always be the case. The story here is where American tragedies don’t occur.

American tragedies don’t occur on the southside of Chicago or the New Orleans 9th Ward. They don’t occur where inner city high school kids shoot into school buses or someone shoots at a 10-year old’s birthday party in New Orleans. Or Gary, Indiana. Or Compton. Or Newport News. These are where the forgotten tragedies happen and the cities are left to persevere on their own.

So, once again, New Orleans will survive. And move on. Because, really, we’ve been here before

 

 

By: David Dennis

        

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