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I watched the first installment earlier this week. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I saw several things that were interesting in the first one. Like the fife and drum players of Northern Mississippi which are almost identical to the ones in Africa. That really thrilled me. The various instruments that were made in the same exact way as they were in Africa. I thought that it was a great installment and I am going to pop that $400 one day to buy the series on religion in the Black community and the Blues. I can't wait to see what piece of art comes out of PBS next. They are doing a great job on getting these documentaries!

Our people have made the mistake of confusing the methods with the objectives. As long as we agree on objectives, we should never fall out with each other just because we believe in different methods, or tactics, or strategy. We have to keep in mind at all times that we are not fighting for separation. We are fighting for recognition as free humans in this society
Malcolm X, 1965
I'm really enjoying the whole series. Some of the footage is fantastic. I'd never actually seen some of the artists, like Mamie Smith or John Lee Hooker as a young man. Sister Rosetta Thorpe as a young woman! Even the background footage is great- the churches, juke joints, chain gangs - priceless. One really poignant moment was when B. B. King talked about how an audience of black teenagers booed him at a festival and how it hurt him, but white teens later gave him a standing ovation.
Here's the link to the page, if you all want to see it online.
The Blues

Our people have made the mistake of confusing the methods with the objectives. As long as we agree on objectives, we should never fall out with each other just because we believe in different methods, or tactics, or strategy. We have to keep in mind at all times that we are not fighting for separation. We are fighting for recognition as free humans in this society
Malcolm X, 1965
quote:
One really poignant moment was when B. B. King talked about how an audience of black teenagers booed him at a festival and how it hurt him, but white teens later gave him a standing ovation.

I've been watching, and that moment was indeed poignant. B.B.'s distress over that incident was almost tangible, still, as he recounted the events. He mentioned the transition that black America was undergoing at that time, which explained but did not excuse the audience's dismissive response. "Twice Black" was how he described the blues genre, and this stigma impacted emerging ideals concerning growing racial pride and uplift. So, as this shift was beginning to occur on a societal level, it also started to take hold musically, too.
The blues just reminded them of who they'd been...

calls to my mind Bill Cosby's high-on-attitude response to Wanda Sykes at the Emmy awards several Sundays ago.
quote:
Originally posted by isistah:
What did she do and what did he say?


Wanda Sykes, along with several other comedians, served as a roving in-audience reporter during the Emmy awards broadcast several weeks ago. During her interview segment with Bill Cosby (who later in the show was to be presented with the Bob Hope lifetime achievement/humanitarian award), Wanda who speaks in the colloquial tongue of so many others of our people, was chided and mocked by Mr. Self-Righteous because of her "type of comedy" and grammar.
................
Some people, however, disagree with my reaction"”I found him as offensive as he found Wanda"” to Cosby's responses.
quote:
Originally posted by bogles:
Wanda who speaks in the colloquial tongue of so many others of our people, was chided and mocked by Mr. Self-Righteous because of her "type of comedy" and grammar.
................
Some people, however, disagree with my reaction"”I found him as offensive as he found Wanda"” to Cosby's responses.


At least her routines aren't liberally salted with mf's and f's like some others. There are worse comedians/comediannes Dr. Cosby could pick on. I think she's the only funny female comedian out there.

The Blues was great last night! All the Eric Clapton you could want, and somebody finally mentioned Janis Joplin. This show is making me want to pick up my son's guitar and start fooling around. Tonight they focus on the piano with Clint Eastwood as director (I didn't know he was a piano player).
quote:
Originally posted by isistah:
I'm really enjoying the whole series. Some of the footage is fantastic. I'd never actually seen some of the artists, like Mamie Smith or John Lee Hooker as a young man. Sister Rosetta Thorpe as a young woman! Even the background footage is great- the churches, juke joints, chain gangs - priceless. One really poignant moment was when B. B. King talked about how an audience of black teenagers booed him at a festival and how it hurt him, but white teens later gave him a standing ovation.


In one of my "other lives", I was a "rocker" when that happened. When I heard what we did to B.B, I really felt ashamed of how African Americans tried, and tried hard, to throw the "Blues" away. We considered the "Blues" part of the "mud on our shoes," at least in "mixed" company.

Shame on us.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:

In one of my "other lives", I was a "rocker" when that happened. When I heard what we did to B.B, I really felt ashamed of how African Americans tried, and tried hard, to throw the "Blues" away. We considered the "Blues" part of the "mud on our shoes," at least in "mixed" company.

Shame on us.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.



Is it just me, or do black folk seem to want to discard anything that gives us value as human beings? Education, culture, dignity?
***sigh***
Is it just me, or do black folk seem to want to discard anything that gives us value as human beings? Education, culture, dignity?
***sigh*** - isistah

We allow ourselves to be persuade those things are of no value. Example:

"Jim, you shouldn't go to school to be an xxxxxx. Where will you work?"

Those "dirty" "blues". That's "black" folks music. Our music is real music. They can't even music. Listen to all that grunting and moanin'"

We sucked it up in true "wannabee" fashion. We damn near lost our culture and our dignity.

As I said, I was a rocker when B.B. suffered that indignity. A local rocker, years younger, stood in music store one day and said, "Eric Clapton is the greatest guitar pleyer in the world." In response to my saying, "No. He isn't." He said, defiantly, "Name one." I said, "George Benson." At time Benson's "Masquerade" was out and running "hot." He said, "See you don't know sh*t. George Benson's ainger."

The point being he didn't know Clapton was imitating "black" players. Further, he was so shallow in his knowledge, he didn't know Benson was a world-renown guitarist, and had been playing blues a world-class level longer than Eric Clapton has been alive.

By that time I was beginning to see that Europeans were trying to claim ownership of the blues. That was in the early 1970s.

I talk too much. You are right.

We are not confident in our culture. It leaves without dignity. And a lot of it is because of a lack of eduction.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.

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