Hi everyone.

I’d like to tell you about my SOUL FOOD Project.
What could an Australian know about Soul Food I hear you ask? I know the history, but not the real flavors. So there’s only one way to find out – travel from the east coast of Australia to the east coast of the USA.

Hoe Cakes, Hush Puppies, Fried Catfish, Chitterlings and Hog Maws...
What does Soul Food mean to you? To me it’s a huge part of the history and heart of America.

In 2011 my question is: ‘Has Soul Food lost its soul?’
Starting on the East Coast I will interview cooks in home kitchens and Soul Food cafes, cookbook authors, and consumers – for a book I am writing about Soul Food.

Maybe you know the ideal person to interview, or have some stories of your own?
I want to record these stories, recipes and memories before they are lost in the fast food landscape of burgers and curly fries. Yes, I am for real.
This project combines my passions for people, African American history and culture, and food.

If you want to know more or suggest anyone I need to contact please PM me.
This is a labour of love not a commercial venture. Thank you.
<small>"Follow the grain in your own wood.” ~ Howard Thurman</small>
Original Post
Soul food has not changed really at all, the only thing that has changed is the fact the a lot of people no longer use hog fat/pork fat in their Soul Food dishes, a lot of people have replaced pork fat with olive oils or margarines or butter.  But, I've gotta tell you girl, if you want to learn about Soul Food, you really need to come down South.  However, I'm sure there are Southern-transplants on the West Coast that may be just as knowledgeable, but . . .
The word Memphis looms large...   Where else do you suggest?

Been looking at the Southern States but will depend on my funding. No way will I be able to do a definitive book - unless I win the lottery - it will be a small window - but I figure better to try to record some voices and stories (and recipes) in depth, and build from there.
Any suggestions on people to interview and places to visit are appreciated. Thank you. More soon.
Thanks Roarin1, I found the restaurant online - it's had some good reviews, I may have to try the menu there if I get as far as Georgia - which I hope I do !
Yes, I'm sure the cooks will have a tale or two, about the customers AND the kitchen
Thanks for your input.
Hey Ms. Fly!!  Long time, no font!! 

Well ... I would definitely have to agree with Sunnubian that if you're looking for the real origins of soul food, your journey and research would have to begin in the South.  Soul food IS Southern cuisine.  

So ... if you're gonna be on the East Coast interviewing and talking to people/cooks down there ... one of the first questions you want to ask them is 'where'r your people from?  " (and just like that so they think you know what you're talking about!! )  If they don't answer with somewhere south of the Mason-Dixon Line such as Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, the Carolinas ... and maybe Kentucky ... then you might wanna be a little suspicious about the authenticity of their knowledge and expertise!!

I can tell you, though, that soul food has certainly NOT lost it's soul!  At least not anywhere around here!!    You should see how crowded the grocery stores get around here at Thanksgiving (and Christmas time) ... which is when we really get our soul food eatin' ON ... if you know what I mean!  We stuff ourselves with it ... travel hundreds of miles in bad weather to get to it!! 

'Cause it's REALLY good!!  And .. they say it's made with things that we aren't supposed to have ... like, seasoning your vegetables with pork or ham ... or some other salt-meat for flavor; using entirely too much butter, sugar, eggs, etc., in our baked goods; and probably eating a little too much red meat and/or meat in general.  But that's what makes it taste good!   It makes 'soul food' what it is!!  So that's how you gotta cook it!!

The Best Soul Food Restaurants in Atlanta

Justin's Restaurant aand Bar
Celebrity sightings - Eat here, see the celebs or been seen by them. You choose.

Sylvia's Restaurant in Atlanta
Now you can experience a taste of Harlem with a southern twist.

Thelma's Kitchen
Inexpensive down home southern cooking. The owner and staff will make you feel welcomed.

New Pascals Restuarant
Pascal's Southern Delight located at Hartsfield International Airport is serving up wholesome soul food for weary travelers.

Gladys Knight and Ron Winans Chicken and Waffles
Chicken and Waffles have never tasted better due two Gladys and Ron's southern hospitality.


Best "Soul Food" Restaurants in America

Alcenia's Desserts & Preserves Shop 317 N Main St Memphis, TN 38103 [901) 523-0200

Alcenia's Desserts & Preserves Shop

BEST SOUL FOOD

Top 100 Selections

317 N Main St
Memphis, TN 38103
(901) 523-0200

Categories: Breakfast, Dessert, Home-style, Soul Food

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $10.00

Army & Lou's [CLOSED) 422 E 75th St Chicago, IL 60619 (773) 483-3100

Army & Lou's (CLOSED)

422 E 75th St
Chicago, IL 60619
(773) 483-3100

Categories: Breakfast, Home-style, Soul Food

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $25.00

Johnson's Diner [CLOSED) 595 W Church St Orlando, FL 32805 (407) 841-0717

Johnson's Diner (CLOSED)

595 W Church St
Orlando, FL 32805
(407) 841-0717

Categories: Breakfast, Diner, Home-style, Soul Food, Southern

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $10.00

Mama Dip's Kitchen 408 W Rosemary St Chapel Hill, NC 27514 [919) 942-5837

Mama Dip's Kitchen

BEST HOME-STYLE

Top 100 Selections

408 W Rosemary St
Chapel Hill, NC 27514
(919) 942-5837

Categories: Breakfast, Home-style

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $10.00

Mrs White's Golden Rule Cafe 808 E Jefferson St Phoenix, AZ 85034 [602) 262-9256

Mrs White's Golden Rule Cafe

BEST SOUL FOOD

Top 100 Selections

808 E Jefferson St
Phoenix, AZ 85034
(602) 262-9256

Categories: Fried Chicken, Home-style, Soul Food, Southern

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $25.00

Praline Connection, The 542 Frenchmen St New Orleans, LA 70116 [504) 943-3934

Praline Connection, The

BEST SOUL FOOD

Top 100 Selections

542 Frenchmen St
New Orleans, LA 70116
(504) 943-3934

Categories: Cajun, Creole, Home-style, Soul Food, Subs/Hoagies/Po-boys

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $25.00

Prince's Hot Chicken Shack 123 Ewing Dr Nashville, TN 37207 [615) 226-9442

Prince's Hot Chicken Shack

BEST HOT CHICKEN

Top 100 Selections

123 Ewing Dr 
Nashville, TN 37207
(615) 226-9442

Categories: Hot Chicken, Soul Food

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $10.00

Roscoe's House of Chicken 'n Waffles 1514 N Gower St Los Angeles, CA 90028 [323) 466-7453

Roscoe's House of Chicken 'n Waffles

BEST SOUL FOOD

Top 100 Selections

1514 N Gower St
Los Angeles, CA 90028
(323) 466-7453

Categories: Breakfast, Fried Chicken, Home-style, Late-Night Dining, Soul Food

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $25.00

Sweetie Pie's 9841 W Florissant Ave St Louis, MO 63136-1429 [314) 521-9915

Sweetie Pie's

BEST SOUL FOOD

Top 100 Selections

9841 W Florissant Ave
St Louis, MO 63136-1429
(314) 521-9915

Categories: Home-style, Soul Food

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $10.00

Swett's 2725 Clifton Ave Nashville, TN 37209 [615) 329-4418

Swett's

BEST SOUL FOOD

Top 100 Selections

2725 Clifton Ave 
Nashville, TN 37209
(615) 329-4418

Categories: Fried Chicken, Home-style, Soul Food

Price Range: Most Entrées Under $10.00



________________________________________________________________-

Just a little sample list, but I think you have a lot of research on your hands because there are so many good soul food restaurants and a lot of them don't have big advertising dollars or the advertising is only local.  You also have to keep in mind that it's all slightly different by region and/or by influence, i.e., soul food in New Orleans has been influenced by the the French/Creoles.  I think personally, that the most authentic is going to be found in Georgia and South Carolina, where it all started and there has not been influenced too much by other ethnic cuisines; (and maybe Mississsippi and Alabama).
I'm getting hungry just thinking about . . .

Fried chicken
Barbequed Chicken
Fried corn
Fried okra
Turnip Greens
Collards
Cornbread
Sweet Potato Pie
Macaroni and Cheese
Green beans
Fried Green Tomatoes
Sliced red tomatoes with sliced cucumbers and onions
Fried Croakers (or any fish)
Grit, Cheese Grits
Coleslaw
Rice and Gravy
Roasted Turkey
Giblet Gravy 
Pan Dressing
Potato Salad
Homemade Cakes
Homemade Pies (Blackberry, Apple, Peach Cobbler) . . .
Sweet Ice Tea

Pinto Beans
Black-eye Peas
I personally, don't eat pork, but . . .

Smothered Pork Chops
Baked Ham
Barbecue Ribs 
Gumbo
Hopping Jon

. . .
Firefly, you must put the low country on your list.  I was there this summer and fell in love with the people, history and cooking.  One word, Gullah!  The food was excellent and there are still Gullah folks around too.  Low country South Carolina and the islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia.  Check out Paula Deen's Restuarant in Savannah, Georgia - Lady and Sons Restuarant.  You have to make reservations in advance.
@ sunnubian... LOL I'm getting hungry myself! Looks like there'll be no dieting on this trip!
I hear you about the research - like all deadlines, I have a finite time for this - to research, raise funds, interview, compile it all with a team of one
One could say biting off more than I could chew ha! I plan to focus on 3 states. Thanks for your links
Originally Posted by EbonyRose:
Hey Ms. Fly!!  Long time, no font!! 

Well ... I would definitely have to agree with Sunnubian that if you're looking for the real origins of soul food, your journey and research would have to begin in the South.  Soul food IS Southern cuisine.  

So ... if you're gonna be on the East Coast interviewing and talking to people/cooks down there ... one of the first questions you want to ask them is 'where'r your people from?  " (and just like that so they think you know what you're talking about!! )  If they don't answer with somewhere south of the Mason-Dixon Line such as Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, the Carolinas ... and maybe Kentucky ... then you might wanna be a little suspicious about the authenticity of their knowledge and expertise!!

I can tell you, though, that soul food has certainly NOT lost it's soul!  At least not anywhere around here!!    You should see how crowded the grocery stores get around here at Thanksgiving (and Christmas time) ... which is when we really get our soul food eatin' ON ... if you know what I mean!  We stuff ourselves with it ... travel hundreds of miles in bad weather to get to it!! 

'Cause it's REALLY good!!  And .. they say it's made with things that we aren't supposed to have ... like, seasoning your vegetables with pork or ham ... or some other salt-meat for flavor; using entirely too much butter, sugar, eggs, etc., in our baked goods; and probably eating a little too much red meat and/or meat in general.  But that's what makes it taste good!   It makes 'soul food' what it is!!  So that's how you gotta cook it!!

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