Zara Employee Files Complaint After Managers Ask Her to Take Down Braids: ‘It was Humiliating’

 
 

cree-ballah

The Toronto Spanish retailer  Zara, received heat from an employee Friday, after she was told by managers that her braided hairstyle didn’t comply with the company’s brand.

Cree Ballah, 20, said she showed for work at Zara’s Scarborough Town Centre location in Scarborough, Canada on March 23 with her hair in box braids gathered in the back, according to CBC News.

Two managers asked the Zara employee to take down the set of braids because it was “not the look for Zara,” or the look that the retail chain wanted employees to display.

“They took me outside of the store and they said, ‘We’re not trying to offend you, but we’re going for a clean professional look with Zara and the hairstyle you have now is not the look for Zara,’ ” Ballah said.

Ballah said she she left the mall hurt and upset after she was taken to an area of the mall where other Zara employees could see the managers attempting to do what they called fixing the young employee’s hair.

“It was very humiliating… it was unprofessional,” she told CBC News.

As the natural hair trend grows, there are more cases of discrimination in the work place. The Atlanta Black Star shared a similar case of waitress who was allegedly fired from her job in March because of her natural hairstyle .

The 20-year-old, Akua Agyemfra, told Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News that she was sent home from the Toronto-area restaurant Jack Astor’s because her natural hair was put into a bun. She was told that she was terminated because her hairstyle wasn’t “down or straight.”

Ballah filed an official complaint with the company’s human resources department, claiming discrimination.

“My hair type is also linked to my race, so to me, I felt like it was direct discrimination against my ethnicity in the sense of what comes along with it,” said Ballah, who describes herself as bi-racial.

In a written statement, the retailer said it “engaged directly the employee on this matter and respect the privacy of those discussions,” and that Zara has no formal policy regarding employees’ hairstyles but prefers professionalism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I'm just trying to make a way out of no way, for my people" -Modejeska Monteith Simpkins

 

AFRICAN AMERICA IS AT WAR

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICA

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICANS

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

AMERICA'S RACISTS HAVE INFILTRATED AMERICAN POLICE FORCES TO WAGE A RACE WAR AGAINST BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

THE BLACK RACE IS AT WAR

FIRST WORLD WAR:  THE APPROXIMATELY 6,000 YEAR WORLD WAR ON AFRICA AND THE BLACK RACE

Original Post

Wow, it's humiliating reading the kinda shyt gaddam racists do and them same muggafuggas would swear they are not hate filled crackas. From that odd angle you know that girl is pretty and her braided hair is gorgeous. I don't know why they think their gaddam stringy dog hair looks "clean and professional", it's nothing special about their goddam hair. I hope she sues the hell out of them, we need our own shyt! She is probably the most beautiful woman in the store, they are jealous and trying to hurt her.  Her are some more images of her....

Image result for Cree BallahImage result for Cree Ballah

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Photos (2)

*[THOSE RACIST 'ITCHES WERE PROBABLY JUST JEALOUS OF THAT BEAUTIFUL BLACK GIRL AND WERE TRYING TO BREAK HER SPIRIT OR USE THAT RACIST PLANTATION PSYCHOLOGY ON HER TO MAKE HER HATE HER BEAUTIFUL BLACK SELF]

[I HOPE SHE SUES THE HELL OUT OF THEM!]

 

Yet, these are pics of models from Zara's website:

STUDIO POPLIN DRESS

LONG DRESS

 

CHECK DRESS

TWO-TONE DRESS

STRIPED MIDI DRESS

JACQUARD DRESS

OPENWORK BOHO TUNIC

LINEN TROUSERS WITH BELT

 

 

DRESS WITH CAPE SLEEVES

 

DRESS WITH SLITS

 

 

 

 

GoodMan posted:

 

 The mulatto girl should look more like Zoe Saldana less like Harriet Tubman.

What is that supposed to mean?

This "mulatto" girl, [assuming] or any other Black girl/woman should not feel OBLIGATED to slather gobs of cancer-causing, toxic chemical LYE on their heads, or have to run burning hot combs through their their hair, merely to please White people or anyone else.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with this girl's hair just the way it is, natural and/or in braids.  

Hell, if the White women can wear their hair in pony-tails or buns, then Black women can wear their hair in braids or buns.  

And we really don't know anything about Harriet Tubman's hair, but I'm sure it was just fine just the way it was, and Harriet Tubman shouldn't be invoked to be any negative comparison of any kind by ANYONE Black, a woman, a female that escaped decades of living hell and torture, and still went back hundreds of time to help people she could have just as well forgot about.  

[BLACK PEOPLE NEED TO STOP LOOKING IN THE MIRROR AND INSULTING, DENIGRATING, AND DISRESPECTING THE REFLECTION LOOKING BACK AT THEM].  

 

 

 

sunnubian posted:
GoodMan posted:

I see someone missed the sarcasm lmao...

 I am the last person that would actually want a person of African descent to fry their hair. 

Wow.  Sorry about that.  I was like, oh, no, not Goodman, too.  

My bad.  

 

I was like...

 

I bet someone gonna really think I mean this...I should put it in italics or something...

 

Then I was thinking, nah, I wanna see who really think this isn't sarcasm...

 Oh and I actually find myself staring at Black women with long natural hair or big puffy natural hair.

 If I saw that sista with her braids, I would have the puppy eyes.

 

Damn, I feel like finding her facebook or something.

 

GoodMan posted:
sunnubian posted:
GoodMan posted:

I see someone missed the sarcasm lmao...

 I am the last person that would actually want a person of African descent to fry their hair. 

Wow.  Sorry about that.  I was like, oh, no, not Goodman, too.  

My bad.  

 

I was like...

 

I bet someone gonna really think I mean this...I should put it in italics or something...

 

Then I was thinking, nah, I wanna see who really think this isn't sarcasm...

 Oh and I actually find myself staring at Black women with long natural hair or big puffy natural hair.

 If I saw that sista with her braids, I would have the puppy eyes.

 

Damn, I feel like finding her facebook or something.

 

You know an incident like this could get Cree Ballah noticed and parlay into something good, she got that sparkle.  Like I said, I bet this is more of an inner office jealousy drama and they did not expect the unintended exposure and consequences. White ppl do shyt like this all the time, love to play head games and hurt you, try to make you feel bad, typical white hate shyt.

Health Risks Linked To Black Hair Products

 
Health Risks Linked To Black Hair Products
Black women spend billions yearly on unhealthy haircare products

AFRICANGLOBE – A new five-year study into Black women’s hair products has found that a significant number contain ingredients that can increase the risk of miscarriage, uterine fibroids, cancers and respiratory problems.

The report, called Natural Evolutions – One Hair Story was produced by Los Angeles based not-for-profit organisation Black Women for Wellness (BWWLA) and was compiled by collecting health data, specialist reports, conducting focus groups of Black women who used hair products as well as interviews with product manufacturers and over 100 hair salon professionals.

Nourbese Flint and Teniope Adewumi – co-authors of Natural Evolutions – One Hair Story said they decided to compile the report because of the seeming lack of knowledge and research about the potential health risks of using hair products aimed at Black women in the US, the UK, Caribbean and parts of Africa.

Among some of the key concerns found by the report were the presence of chemicals such as formaldehyde, used in many hair straightening products, ammonia, which is used in hair dyes and bleaching agents all of which have been known to cause breathing difficulties and occupational asthma.

Risk

The report also cites research published in the International Journal of Cancer that deep-coloured dyes used over long periods are thought to increase the risk of both non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and multiple myeloma and also increase the risk of bladder cancer.

Other research included in the report is a recent study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology which showed that the use of hair relaxers is linked to the incidence of uterine fibroids in Black women and girls.

The BWWLA report lists over 40 products most commonly used by hair care professionals, which feature a hazard rating given by Skin Deep, an online database created by non-profit organisation Environmental Working Group. The products listed range from those that are chemically synthesised to raw natural products.

 

Among them are popular products such as Luster’s Pink, Tigi Bed Head Self Absorbed Mega Nutrient Shampoo, and Organic Root Stimulator Olive Oil Sheen Spray.

Adewuni told reporters: “Though many of the salon workers we interviewed had gone to cosmetology school, very few had learned about the negative impacts that chemicals in products could have on their health. There is a great need to have products that Black people use assessed for health impacts.”

She added: “We believe that the onus should not be on consumers and workers to have figure out what is safe or not. Toxic personal care and cosmetic products should not be in on the shelves.”

Market research firm Mintel estimated the size of the Black haircare market in the US at $946 million in 2015. The market figure for the UK is harder to pin down, but according to some estimates African Caribbean women spend up to six times more on hair and beauty products than women of other ethnicities.

Tested

Yet the report found that products marketed at this group are the least tested of all hair and beauty products.

Ignorance

South-east London based Sandra Pinnock-Brown, sales & marketing director of Hair Everlasting Wholesale Hair Manufacture and distributor of Xsandy’s Brand said she was not surprised by the report’s findings.

She said: “The attitude of some manufacturers appears to be that they can sell anything to Black women and they will buy it. A more robust testing regime would cost more but they appear reluctant to incur greater expenses for this customer group.”

Rachael Corson, CEO and co-founding director of ethically-sourced haircare brand Afrocenchix , also based in London, agreed.

She said: “Sadly, those who gain financially from filling shelves with cheap chemicals promising beautiful, shiny hair are unconcerned with the health risks.They are not made by the Black women who use such products themselves.”

According to Irene Shelley, editor of Black Beauty & Hair magazine, lack of willingness and possibly funds on the part of manufacturers and retailers to conduct research are likely reasons for the continued availability of harmful products in the market.

“We read stories about Black women who have ended up in hospital on respirators because they had adverse reactions to products like hair dyes or hair glues,” she said.

Shelley added that more women are now talking about their experiences, and boosting knowledge and awareness of natural haircare.

“Black Beauty & Hair has a natural hair section and we’ve found that the natural hair movement has made women look closely at the products that they are using on their skin and hair,” she said.

 

By: Kirsty Osei-Bempong

 

Who Controls The Black Haircare Industry?

 
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  I used to get my head permed back in the day..and it was just awful.  During those times, didn't have much of a choice.  I stopped and began wearing my hair short to the head.....for years!  It was liberating.  Then the braids trend came on the scene and my hair was home.  It could now expressed itself  in the African way it always wanted.   Although through the years, I've had me some hairstyles. Ha!  But it's a new day cuz now we can really take good care of our hair.  We don't need to perm, if we don't want to.  Now we can go to work with any hair style....except at that place I heard about just recently.  But!  

I get mine relaxed every 3 to 4 months, just to get the comb through it easier. I don't wear weaves or wigs and don't color it. It's getting grayer by the minute and I have a slightly witchy look; keeps folks from fuckin' with me; you know how scared they get. I have a head full, it has a mind of it's own; keep it clean, it won't hold curls, my hubby loves it, and it's OK by me.

I use mostly oils on it to keep it moisturized; Tresemme shampoo & conditioner or sometimes Pantene and I'm good to go. I've never seen a Korean anything in my life, just the "Un" dude from North Korea every time he decides to send a missile flying into the Pacific Ocean every 5 days or so on my TV.

It was not a relaxer that sent my behind to the doctor yesterday; it was from those damned cigarettes I thought were so cool lookin' back in the day, to be puffin' on aftereffects. They aren't cute.

Norland posted:

I get mine relaxed every 3 to 4 months, just to get the comb through it easier. I don't wear weaves or wigs and don't color it. It's getting grayer by the minute and I have a slightly witchy look; keeps folks from fuckin' with me; you know how scared they get. I have a head full, it has a mind of it's own; keep it clean, it won't hold curls, my hubby loves it, and it's OK by me.

I use mostly oils on it to keep it moisturized; Tresemme shampoo & conditioner or sometimes Pantene and I'm good to go. I've never seen a Korean anything in my life, just the "Un" dude from North Korea every time he decides to send a missile flying into the Pacific Ocean every 5 days or so on my TV.

It was not a relaxer that sent my behind to the doctor yesterday; it was from those damned cigarettes I thought were so cool lookin' back in the day, to be puffin' on aftereffects. They aren't cute.

I was planning to stop relaxing my hair for years but kept putting it off. Then, one day I relaxed my hair, and had a scratch or something in my scalp that I had forgotten about.  After putting that relaxer in my hair that day, I was extremely sick for about two weeks, I even vomited.  

So, I think that the toxins and chemicals in the relaxer penetrated into my system and made me sick.  That was my last relaxer.  

I like my hair just the way it is now, and I too, feel liberated; and if I ever have any desire to have "straight" hair, I will flat iron it [thought, I doubt I'll even do that again].  

Also, as I became more conscious of my own "carbon footprint", I also felt like I was 'giving back to the green', so to speak, by not washing those toxic, poisonous, man-made chemicals down the drain.  

My daughters stopped and their hair's beautiful. I don't know, maybe I'll stop. Too lazy to tackle it natural, I believe. I'm not trying to impress anyone, I just throw it up on 5 minutes hot curlers and I'm good to go, when I go, which isn't often by choice, these days. I don't accept change easily at all.

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