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What do you think about the pirates from Somalia who have been wreaking havoc with ships passing their coast of late? Interestingly, an African American woman I spoke to recently said that, essentially, she wasn't "mad at 'em". Her reasoning is that corporations all over the world rape and pillage with impunity. These brothers are out there merely trying to get their cut of some of it. Interesting perspective.

What do you think?

© MBM

Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
What do you think about the pirates from Somalia who have been wreaking havoc with ships passing their coast of late? Interestingly, an African American woman I spoke to recently said that, essentially, she wasn't "mad at 'em". Her reasoning is that corporations all over the world rape and pillage with impunity. These brothers are out there merely trying to get their cut of some of it. Interesting perspective.

What do you think?


Sounds like a reasonable rationale to me!

I'd feel a lot better if I knew they were using their ill-gotten gains to better their country and community.

And that nobody was getting hurt in the process.
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
I can understand that perspective, but the end result will be military intervention in that country. Do they really want USA or Russia or some other country with shipping interests dominating their government?


I dunno about that... Ever seen Blackhawk Down? Somali's are tuff and well armed. They'd make Iraq look like a freakin' vacation destination if they were invaded... The only way to successfully invade would be to do a total airstrike, pretty much wiping out everyone and everything. Their waters already aren't 'theirs' per say...

I don't take any issue with the Somali pirates... They are super poor fisherman who's waters ar being illegally fished in(commercially) and polluted with toxic dumping... If I was armed to the teeth and in their situation then...
From the little I know of Somalia, I would guess that this would not be a "robinhood" adventure. You know, steal from the rich and give to the poor. The bounty would probably finance another African country coup. You hear stories of military take overs, politcal group or clan take over and constant struggle with renewed violence and lack of progress in anything.
From my overstanding on this issue, the now-piracy initally was to protect Somali waters from foreigners who were polluting the coastal waters with no regard for the Somali people or their livelyhood. So now they resorted to extortion, the only language that foreign companies and nations seem to be able to communicate successfully in. Apparently its working because the pirates have been able to successfully get millions of dollars in ransom money. I ain't too mad at them either. Don't hate the player, hate the game.
quote:
Originally posted by Diamond:
From the little I know of Somalia, I would guess that this would not be a "robinhood" adventure. You know, steal from the rich and give to the poor. The bounty would probably finance another African country coup. You hear stories of military take overs, politcal group or clan take over and constant struggle with renewed violence and lack of progress in anything.


While watching international news this evening, it was reported that these more recent hijackings are taking place by pirates whose leader is tied to al Queda. Apparently, their leader runs training camps for them and is more of a 'wanna be' terrorist that would like to be accepted by the big time powers that be.

It's unlike they're doing the Robin Hood thing. Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
What do you think about the pirates from Somalia who have been wreaking havoc with ships passing their coast of late? Interestingly, an African American woman I spoke to recently said that, essentially, she wasn't "mad at 'em". Her reasoning is that corporations all over the world rape and pillage with impunity. These brothers are out there merely trying to get their cut of some of it. Interesting perspective.

What do you think?



I do not condone theft... however, wasn't the vessel carrying food? Was there a need for food?

I've also heard that piracy is the most lucrative economic activity in their country...
I think that the woman MBM spoke with is dead on in her observation, however, I must still say that it is wrong and these guys are putting Somalia in dangerous international perception.

Maybe the international community could get together to create money making ventures/livelyhoods for the people of Somalia.
They way I see it, from what they have been reporting as the booty these guys have been getting pirating these ships, they all would have/will come out cheaper by paying a "toll" fee to pass through Somalia's waters. This would bust the economy of Somalia and the money made from the tolls could be used to generate jobs in that country.

The only thing is, that Somalia is considered a 'failed state,' so, I guess the international community would have to come together somehow to either persuade or help Somalia re-form a legitimate government; and pray that a new government will not do what most African states(countries) usually do ---- hord all the money made in that country to be divided up amoung all the officials in charge.
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by Diamond:
From the little I know of Somalia, I would guess that this would not be a "robinhood" adventure. You know, steal from the rich and give to the poor. The bounty would probably finance another African country coup. You hear stories of military take overs, politcal group or clan take over and constant struggle with renewed violence and lack of progress in anything.


While watching international news this evening, it was reported that these more recent hijackings are taking place by pirates whose leader is tied to al Queda. Apparently, their leader runs training camps for them and is more of a 'wanna be' terrorist that would like to be accepted by the big time powers that be.

It's unlike they're doing the Robin Hood thing. Roll Eyes


I know times are tough, but unless they're trying to feed their families or neighborhoods, I say cap their asses. Pirates ain't nothing but gangbangers with a boat.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnubian:

Another thought on this situation: Why would 'cargo' ships be carrying loads of cash money on board in the first place?


Not sure that most do. Most are carrying products/goods.

quote:
And why are these cargo ship companies/owners so eager to 'pay a randsom'?


They are eager because they don't get paid until the goods are delivered - and time is money. For them, a ransom lowers the over-all profitability of that load, but they're still making money.
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnubian:

Another thought on this situation: Why would 'cargo' ships be carrying loads of cash money on board in the first place?


Not sure that most do. Most are carrying products/goods.

quote:
And why are these cargo ship companies/owners so eager to 'pay a randsom'?


They are eager because they don't get paid until the goods are delivered - and time is money. For them, a ransom lowers the over-all profitability of that load, but they're still making money.


I heard about this on the news. Has there been any lost of life (during the process) yet?
quote:
Originally posted by Fabulous:
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnubian:

Another thought on this situation: Why would 'cargo' ships be carrying loads of cash money on board in the first place?


Not sure that most do. Most are carrying products/goods.

quote:
And why are these cargo ship companies/owners so eager to 'pay a randsom'?


They are eager because they don't get paid until the goods are delivered - and time is money. For them, a ransom lowers the over-all profitability of that load, but they're still making money.


I heard about this on the news. Has there been any lost of life (during the process) yet?


Nope. The reports I've seen have said that there has been no loss of cargo nor lives out of these hijackings!!

I heard that there were approx. 100 *attacks* last year with about 40 actual hijackings taking place. The pirates generally pretend to be fishermen ... then, they arm themselves and get on smaller boats, ride out to the big cargo ships and then board them and take the crew hostage. The crew members are unarmed because a lot of these ships are simply carrying humanitarian aid. Others are just regular big company cargo ships of goods headed to different countries.

They said that reason the companies pay the ransom is because if they do, the pirates simply take the money and run. No loss of life, no loss of cargo. The companies are mostly concerned with freeing the ship's crew members unharmed ... and the ransom price they have to pay for that is worth it, all things considered.

They did say that insurance companies are starting to charge these shipping companies higher premiums for sailing in *high threat* areas. 19

They also said that it's almost impossible to stop because the area that needs to be watched is over 1 million square miles of ocean! Eek So, I'm thinking they would need Air Force-type surveillence to stop these hijackings from happening.
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
What do you think about the pirates from Somalia who have been wreaking havoc with ships passing their coast of late? Interestingly, an African American woman I spoke to recently said that, essentially, she wasn't "mad at 'em". Her reasoning is that corporations all over the world rape and pillage with impunity. These brothers are out there merely trying to get their cut of some of it. Interesting perspective.

What do you think?


Most Americans do not know the phrase 'shores of Tripoli' is referring to the piracy off the northern coast of Africa in the late 18th century even before the passage of a constitution for the fledgling United States.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/co...papers/mtjprece.html

I think the Somalian pirates have as much right to assault passing commerce as their sovereignty can defend.

I further think that appropriation of the commerce of others should, and can continue until some 'greater force' can cause it to stop.

Somalia is a signer of any treaty with any nation that I am aware of.

It is all about power...sovereign power.

This is exactly what all other nations do as is demonstrated all over the continent of Africa, throughout the Caribbean, Central America, and South America.

Somalia is NOT a participant of any international agreement in which there is agreement to not do this.

What law is being broken???

WHAT IS THE PROBLEM??????????


PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
What do you think about the pirates from Somalia who have been wreaking havoc with ships passing their coast of late? Interestingly, an African American woman I spoke to recently said that, essentially, she wasn't "mad at 'em". Her reasoning is......

.....some of it. Interesting perspective.

What do you think?


I think she is stupid......
quote:
Originally posted by sunnubian:
Another thought on this situation: Why would 'cargo' ships be carrying loads of cash money on board in the first place?

And why are these cargo ship companies/owners so eager to 'pay a randsom'?

Can you say Insurance scam?


Actaully... Some of the ship's cargos are weapons/arms shipments to Africa... Can you say 'hush money'?

Kenya maintains no negotiation policy with Somali pirates

... the hijack of a Ukrainian ship carrying military cargo entered its third week with no end in sight.

The ship is carrying tanks and other weapons which were destined for the port of Mombasa but the ultimate destination has been a source of controversy with suggestions that the arms were headed to southern Sudan and not Kenya.


Kenya is working with(and 'for' in this case) the Amerikkkan oil interests by allowing itself to be the 'back door entry' into Southern Sudan for the U.S. because they can't and don't want to tangle with the Chinese funded Sudanese/Janjaweed government's onslaught from the north for oil...

The U.S. plans on building a pipeline through Mombassa to Southern Sudan to bleed it from the South...

The Somali's know this, the Sudanese know this, the Kenyan's know this, The Tanzanians know this, the Ethiopians know this...

The mainstream coverage of what's going on is BS...
Hostage dies as French attack Somali pirates


(CNN) -- A French hostage and two pirates died Friday in a rescue operation off Somalia, the French president's office in Paris said Friday.

Four hostages, including a child, were freed from the hijacked yacht after almost a week of captivity, Nicolas Sarkozy's office said.

The French military decided to move in when pirates refused their offers and increased threats against the hostages, it said.

A defense ministry source told CNN the pirates were threatening to execute their captives.

The four adults and a child had been held aboard their yacht, the Tanit, since it was seized in the Gulf of Aden on Saturday, the president's statement said.

CNN Jim Bitterman in Paris reported the French military came under fire as they attacked Tanit using Zodiac motorized rubber rafts.

There has been a series of high-profile and increasingly sophisticated pirate attacks in recent months.

Also off Somalia this week, the cargo vessel Maersk Alabama was boarded by pirates, who briefly took control of the ship.

Although the crew retook the ship, its captain, Richard Phillips, was Friday still being held by the gang holed up in a lifeboat.

The Maersk was hijacked some 350 miles off Somalia's coast, a distance that used to be considered safe for ships navigating in the pirate-infested waters.

International navies have increased patrols in the area but the region is so large the pirates can still operate.

The U.S. military warned earlier this week that recent attacks have occurred hundreds of miles off the coast, suggesting that pirates are using "mother ships" -- a practice of using bigger boats with longer range to launch smaller pirate ships against targets further out to sea.

Last year, Somali pirates seized another French luxury yacht and the French military launched an operation that ended with them chasing the gang across the desert.



Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/...ia.france/index.html
Last night I was watching CNN where they had about four different people talking about the Somali pirates situation. One of the men happened to be a Somali (National?) and when it was his time to speak, he was trying to answer the questions of why this was happening, if it was just for the money, etc. He starting trying to explain that the Somali people are angry because some regime (probably an illegal one) made a deal with "Mafia" people to dump toxic waste all along the Somali coast line, and was going one to say how this or that entity ALSO dumped waste, etc., and this has killed all their marine life. Of course, the news host then claimed to not be able to hear him and that they would have to get back to him later in the show. By the time they did get back to this guy, he was not asked to reiterate what he had said previously; the conversations just flowed on past that particular subject. Not only that, but Black guy doing the interviews did not say anything to the effect of: "wait, hold up, now what was that you were trying to say about dumping toxic waste, or killing all of Somalia's marine life? Nor did he mention anything about doing a show, etc., later on the subject.

Another thing that I gathered form that segment was that these cargo ship captains DO NOT really want government interference. Two of the men being interviewed sounded suspiciously sympathetic towards the 'pirates.'

My main point is the information about dumping toxic wastes on Somalia coast, killing all their marine life (which IS the livelihood of nearly any and all people living on a coast line anywhere in the world).

Everyone has been wanting to know what President Obama is doing, saying, thinking about this pirate situation; I hope they will now start asking about what President Obama is doing, saying, thinking about foreign countries dumping their toxic was into so-called third world countries.

CAPT. Richard Phillips

CAPTAIN FREED FROM PIRATES.

US Navy in swift firefight with captors, leaving three of four Somali captors dead, one in custody after swift operation, captain safe.

MOMBASA, Kenya - An American ship captain was freed unharmed Sunday in a swift firefight that killed three of the four Somali pirates who had been holding him for days in a lifeboat off the coast of Africa, the ship's owner said.

A senior U.S. intelligence official said a pirate who had been involved in negotiations to free Capt. Richard Phillips but who was not on the lifeboat was in custody.

Phillips, 53, of Underhill, Vermont, was safely transported to a Navy warship nearby.

Maersk Line Limited President and CEO John Reinhart said in a news release that the U.S. government informed the company around 1:30 p.m. EDT Sunday that Phillips had been rescued. Reinhart said the company called Phillips' wife, Andrea, to tell her the news.

The U.S. official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. A Pentagon spokesman had no immediate comment.

When Phillips' crew heard the news aboard their ship in the port of Mombasa, they placed an American flag over the rail of the top of the Maersk Alabama and whistled and pumped their fists in the air. Crew fired a bright red flare into the sky from the ship.

Earlier negotiations had broken down
A government official and others in Somali with knowledge of the situation had reported hours earlier that negotiations for Phillips' release had broken down.

The district commissioner of the central Mudug region said talks went on all day Saturday, with clan elders from his area talking by satellite telephone and through a translator with Americans, but collapsed late Saturday night.

"The negotiations between the elders and American officials have broken down. The reason is American officials wanted to arrest the pirates in Puntland and elders refused the arrest of the pirates," said the commissioner, Abdi Aziz Aw Yusuf. He said he organized initial contacts between the elders and the Americans.

Two other Somalis, one involved in the negotiations and another in contact with the pirates, also said the talks collapsed because of the U.S. insistence that the pirates be arrested and brought to justice.

Phillips' crew of 19 American sailors reached safe harbor in Kenya's northeast port of Mombasa on Saturday night under guard of U.S. Navy Seals, exhilarated by their freedom but mourning the absence of Phillips.

Crew members said their ordeal had begun with the Somali pirates hauling themselves up from a small boat bobbing on the surface of the Indian Ocean far below.

Lifeboat closely watched by U.S. warships
As the pirates shot in the air, Phillips told his crew to lock themselves in a cabin and surrendered himself to safeguard his men, crew members said.

Phillips was then held hostage in an enclosed lifeboat that was closely watched by U.S. warships and a helicopter in an increasingly tense standoff.

Talks to free him began Thursday with the captain of the USS Bainbridge talking to the pirates under instruction from FBI hostage negotiators on board the U.S. destroyer.

A statement from Maersk Line, owner of Phillips' ship, the Maersk Alabama, said "the U.S. Navy had sight contact" of Phillips earlier Sunday -- apparently when the pirates opened the hatches.

Before Phillips was freed, a pirate who said he was associated with the gang that held Phillips, Ahmed Mohamed Nur, told The Associated Press that the pirates had reported that "helicopters continue to fly over their heads in the daylight and in the night they are under the focus of a spotlight from a warship."

He spoke by satellite phone from Harardhere, a port and pirate stronghold where a fisherman said helicopters flew over the town Sunday morning and a warship was looming on the horizon. The fisherman, Abdi Sheikh Muse, said that could be an indication the lifeboat may be near to shore.

Pirates threatened to kill captain
The U.S. Navy had assumed the pirates would try to get their hostage to shore, where they can hide him on Somalia's lawless soil and be in a stronger position to negotiate a ransom.

Three U.S. warships were within easy reach of the lifeboat on Saturday. The pirates had threatened to kill Phillips if attacked.

On Friday, the French navy freed a sailboat seized off Somalia last week by other pirates, but one of the five hostages was killed.

Early Saturday, the pirates holding Phillips in the lifeboat fired a few shots at a small U.S. Navy vessel that had approached, a U.S. military official said on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly.

The official said the U.S. sailors did not return fire, the Navy vessel turned away and no one was hurt. He said the vessel had not been attempting a rescue. The pirates are believed armed with pistols and AK-47 assault rifles.

Phillips jumped out of the lifeboat Friday and tried to swim for his freedom but was recaptured when a pirate fired an automatic weapon at or near him, according to U.S. Defense Department officials speaking on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to talk about the unfolding operations.

"When I spoke to the crew, they won't consider it done when they board a plane and come home," Maersk President John Reinhart said from Norfolk, Virginia before news of Phillips' rescue. "They won't consider it done until the captain is back, nor will we."

In Phillips' hometown, the Rev. Charles Danielson of the St. Thomas Church said before the news broke that the congregation would continue to pray for Phillips and his family, who are members, and he would encourage "people to find hope in the triumph of good over evil."


Reinhart said he spoke with Phillips' wife, Andrea, who is surrounded by family and two company employees who were sent to support her.

"She's a brave woman," Reinhart said. "And she has one favor to ask: 'Do what you have to do to bring Richard home safely.' That means don't make a mistake, folks. We have to be perfect in our execution."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30178013/?GT1=43001
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Action was not taken because:

"The negotiations between the elders and American officials have broken down. The reason is American officials wanted to arrest the pirates in Puntland and elders refused the arrest of the pirates," said the commissioner, Abdi Aziz Aw Yusuf. He said he organized initial contacts between the elders and the Americans."

If this was the Bush era it would have been "shoot first and ask questions later".

This rescue operation was done correctly and by the book. The navy's responsibility was to watch, observe the situation and take a defensive posture; if the Captain's life was in any way, shape or form threatened, the Navy had orders, by authority and command of President Obama, to resolve the situation by force and that's exactly what happened.

Hold negotiations between the principles first to peacefully resolve the situation. If talking doesn't work, use force as a last resort.

Something that our previous "Cowboy" President Bush would have never thought of or done in this situation.

This is how you handle your business. tfro
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fro I'm surprised they didn't do this earlier. I do understand they were negotiating...but! If this was the "hood"....a sniper would have put them out their misery fast. And who's to say it didn't happen that way? Cuz we know how gun crazy massa is in the state....and to shoot another "black" person is a no brainer. Now....not to say I'm on anybody's side...Somalia has been without law for YEARS....and! Pirates have been holding ships randoms [except for American ships of course] for YEARS... So what next? Are they [ships] gonna b escorted by the Navy from now on?19 To keep this from happening again? Interestin to see.

fro
quote:
Originally posted by sunnubian:
Last night I was watching CNN where they had about four different people talking about the Somali pirates situation. One of the men happened to be a Somali (National?) and when it was his time to speak, he was trying to answer the questions of why this was happening, if it was just for the money, etc. He starting trying to explain that the Somali people are angry because some regime (probably an illegal one) made a deal with "Mafia" people to dump toxic waste all along the Somali coast line, and was going one to say how this or that entity ALSO dumped waste, etc., and this has killed all their marine life. Of course, the news host then claimed to not be able to hear him and that they would have to get back to him later in the show. By the time they did get back to this guy, he was not asked to reiterate what he had said previously; the conversations just flowed on past that particular subject. Not only that, but Black guy doing the interviews did not say anything to the effect of: "wait, hold up, now what was that you were trying to say about dumping toxic waste, or killing all of Somalia's marine life? Nor did he mention anything about doing a show, etc., later on the subject.


CNN will never tell you the whole truth. Never. Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:
fro I'm surprised they didn't do this earlier. I do understand they were negotiating...but! If this was the "hood"....a sniper would have put them out their misery fast. And who's to say it didn't happen that way? Cuz we know how gun crazy massa is in the state....and to shoot another "black" person is a no brainer. Now....not to say I'm on anybody's side...Somalia has been without law for YEARS....and! Pirates have been holding ships randoms [except for American ships of course] for YEARS... So what next? Are they [ships] gonna b escorted by the Navy from now on?19 To keep this from happening again? Interestin to see.

fro

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This rescue operation was done professionally, correctly, with patience and by the book.

QUOTE: "The negotiations between the elders and American officials have broken down. The reason is American officials wanted to arrest the pirates in Puntland and elders refused the arrest of the pirates," said the commissioner, Abdi Aziz Aw Yusuf. He said he organized initial contacts between the elders and the Americans."

The Navy's role in this entire situation was to provide assistance, be on the ready, watch and observe and be in self defense mode and if, in any way, shape or form that CAPT Phillip's life was threatened, resolve the situation, per command authority and directive by President Obama.

Between the two principles, negotiate for release and identify the stated terms and objectives. If that fails, use force as a last resort to resolve the situation.

Skillfully done.

Something that our previous "Cowboy" President Bush would have not even thought of or even considered doing. With Bush, the "Decider" it was always agression first, shoot first and ask questions later.

The civilian company who owns these supply ships have the primary and overall responsibility to provide security for their ships, crew and personnel, either by training and arming their crew members or hire a contingient security agency to provide security.

The Navy can provide assistance, escort and cover if asked and approval granted via the military chain of command, but it's not the Navy's job to play ocean police in all civilian owned supply ship matters.

Blackwater, renamed Xe, comes to mind. They got kicked out of Iraq for being trigger happy and with proper supervision, this seems to be up their alley.

Now the U.S. has a negoiated (althought it failed this time) relationship with the Somilia government, a captured pirate to obtain information and the possibility of the U.S. and other nations to possibly consolidate & better protect themselves in international waters in the future and/or work with the Somilia government to deter/eliminate these actions.

And to complete the rescue mission, President Obama personally called CAPT Phillip's family in Vermont, notified them of their good fortune and offered his congratulations.

This is how a U.S. Commander-In-Chief handles his business. tfro
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quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:
fro I'm surprised they didn't do this earlier. I do understand they were negotiating...but! If this was the "hood"....a sniper would have put them out their misery fast. And who's to say it didn't happen that way? Cuz we know how gun crazy massa is in the state....and to shoot another "black" person is a no brainer. Now....not to say I'm on anybody's side...Somalia has been without law for YEARS....and! Pirates have been holding ships randoms [except for American ships of course] for YEARS... So what next? Are they [ships] gonna b escorted by the Navy from now on?19 To keep this from happening again? Interestin to see.

fro


Yep, Ms. Koco ... as soon as I read the words "swift firefight" ... I figured that was code for "picked off by snipers"!! Eek I wonder if any of the pirates even got off a shot? 19
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:
fro I'm surprised they didn't do this earlier. I do understand they were negotiating...but! If this was the "hood"....a sniper would have put them out their misery fast. And who's to say it didn't happen that way? Cuz we know how gun crazy massa is in the state....and to shoot another "black" person is a no brainer. Now....not to say I'm on anybody's side...Somalia has been without law for YEARS....and! Pirates have been holding ships randoms [except for American ships of course] for YEARS... So what next? Are they [ships] gonna b escorted by the Navy from now on?19 To keep this from happening again? Interestin to see.

fro


Yep, Ms. Koco ... as soon as I read the words "swift firefight" ... I figured that was code for "picked off by snipers"!! Eek I wonder if any of the pirates even got off a shot? 19

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Got off a shot?

Not a chance. It was three Navy Seal snipers in the middle of the night equipped with night vision goggles. Each sniper targeted & shot a pirate simultaneously. They were all head shots. The pirates never saw the snipers.

"Mission" accomplished. tfro
The media is having an orgasm because three pirates were killed by the mighty US Navy. WOW! Roll Eyes What about tomorrow, next week or next month? This gaping wound can't be fixed with a band aid. KILLING THREE PIRATES DOES NOT SOLVE THE UNDERLINE PROBLEM. Piracy will continue as long as there is no central government in Somalia to enforce maritime laws. Somalia was on it's way to forming a centralized government but guess which country interfered and screwed that up? Anyway I must ask who are the real criminals, the owners of the merchant ships that commit crimes such as illegal dumping of hazardous waste and illegal fishing within Somali waters or Somali fisherman turned outlaw "pirate"? These pirates are no more criminal than these scandalous shipping companies, which the media has obviously failed to address. One false action deserves another. If merchant companies can dump hazardous waste and steal valuable commodities such as fish off Somali waters then they must accept the consequence which goes along with it.

There were no Somali pirates until AFTER merchant companies began dumping and stealing fish off the coast of Somalia. So which negative action came first, the Somali pirate or the merchant company dumping and stealing? Like I said, one bad action creates another. The irresponsible and malicious actions of merchant companies provoked a negative response. Now the situation on the horn has gotten out of hand yet I find it disingenuous (but not surprised) all the blame goes to the Somali people. In short, international companies and arms dealers have taken full advantage of the social breakdown in Somalia. If you ask me there are elements that want to use this piracy issue as an opportunity to set up shop such as Africom - which is a front to monopolize and steal Africa's resources - more so than what they're currently doing.
MOGADISHU, Somalia – Somali pirates on Monday vowed to retaliate for the deaths of three colleagues who were shot dead by U.S. Navy snipers hours before in a daring nighttime assault that freed a 53-year-old American captain.

The Navy Seals late Sunday rescued freighter Capt. Richard Phillips, who had been held by pirates on a lifeboat that drifted in the Indian Ocean for five days.

"Every country will be treated the way it treats us," said Abdullahi Lami, one of the pirates holding a Greek ship anchored in the pirate den of Gaan, a central Somali town.

"In the future, America will be the one mourning and crying," he told The Associated Press by telephone. "We will retaliate for the killings of our men."

He gave no details and it was not clear in what way the pirates could retaliate, though some fear they could take their revenge on the hundreds of other foreign nationals they hold on seized ships.

The rescue dealt a blow to pirates who regularly seize passing ships and hold them captive until multimillion dollar ransoms are paid. But it is unlikely to help quell the region's growing pirate threat, which has turned the Gulf of Aden and the waterways along Somalia's coast into some of the most dangerous shipping lanes on the planet.

Pirates currently hold more than a dozen foreign ships, most moored along the Horn of Africa nation's long coast, with about 230 foreign sailors from Russia to the Philippines.

The American rescue followed a similar operation Friday carried out by French navy commandos, who stormed a pirate-held sailboat, the Tanit, in a shootout at sea that killed two pirates and freed four French hostages. The French owner of the vessel was also killed in the assault.

Residents of the Somali town of Harardhere said tensions were growing there.

Abdullahi Haji Jama, who owns a clothing store in the town, said: "We fear that the pirates may retaliate against the foreign nationals they are holding."

But he also said people feared "any revenge taken by the pirates against foreign nationals could bring more attacks from the foreign navies, perhaps on our villages."

Vice Adm. Bill Gortney, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, said the American operation "could escalate violence in this part of the world, no question about it."

Jamac Habeb, a 30-year-old self-proclaimed pirate, told The Associated Press that the three pirates' deaths were "a painful experience." Speaking from the pirate hub, Eyl, he added: "this will be a good lesson for us."

"From now on, if we capture foreign ships and their respective countries try to attack us, we will kill them," Habeb said. "Now they became our number one enemy," he said of U.S. forces.

So far, at least, it has been rare for Somali pirates to harm captive foreign crews.

Several years ago, a crew member of a Taiwanese fishing boat hijacked for six months was killed by pirates, but no reason was given but it appeared to be an isolated incident, according to Noel Choong, who heads the International Maritime Bureau's piracy reporting center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. No reason was given but it appeared to be an isolated incident, he said.

Somalia has been engulfed in fighting and anarchy since the 1991 overthrow of Siad Barre, and remains today a country with no effective government, a nation ruled by tribal clans.

The piracy scourge appears to have evolved partly out of an attempt by Somali fishermen to protect their waters against illegal foreign trawlers who were destroying their livelihoods. Some of the vigilantes morphed into pirates, lured by the large profits they could win in ransoms.

Somalia's prime minister welcomed the U.S. Navy's operation Sunday.

"The Somali government wanted the drama to end in a peaceful way, but anyone who is involved in this latest case had the choice to use violence or other means," Abdulkhadir Walayo, the prime minister's spokesman, told The Associated Press. "Anyway, we see it will be a good lesson for the pirates or anyone else involved in this dirty business."

Pirates were defiant though, vowing the events would not stop them form seizing more ships.

One pirate vowed the events would not stop them from targeting more ships.

"The mere killing of three and capturing one will not make us change our mind," said one pirate holding a German ship anchored in the Somali town of Harardhere who refused to give his name. "We are determined to continue our business regardless of the recent killings and arrests."
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/200...f/piracy_somali_view
I say put every one of those assholes back on another Somali pirate ship.


As they were being rescued they all screamed "Tell the President he needs to do something about this!!"


No 'Thank you for saving our lives, Mr. President'.

No 'If it weren't for you, Mr. President, nothing would have been done because no other president has ever ordered the Navy to snipe Pirates.'


PRESIDENT OBAMA MADE HISTORY AGAIN BY TAKING ACTION AGAINST PIRATES AND DID SO WITHIN HIS FIRST 100 DAYS!! AND YOU BASTARDS STILL COMPLAIN!!!!



AIN'T THAT A FUCKING BITCH!?!?!?!?!?
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:
fro I'm surprised they didn't do this earlier. I do understand they were negotiating...but! If this was the "hood"....a sniper would have put them out their misery fast. And who's to say it didn't happen that way? Cuz we know how gun crazy massa is in the state....and to shoot another "black" person is a no brainer. Now....not to say I'm on anybody's side...Somalia has been without law for YEARS....and! Pirates have been holding ships randoms [except for American ships of course] for YEARS... So what next? Are they [ships] gonna b escorted by the Navy from now on?19 To keep this from happening again? Interestin to see.

fro


Yep, Ms. Koco ... as soon as I read the words "swift firefight" ... I figured that was code for "picked off by snipers"!! Eek I wonder if any of the pirates even got off a shot? 19


The whole purpose is for them to "not get a shot" off, if they get a shot off its not a successful operation.
There is a large sentiment that "might makes right" and the ability to do something means that it is acceptable.

Many of the folks on this ship have done nothing related to anything negative in Somolia. I heard one ship has been held captive since november. That is almost half a year now.

Let's move it into a personal light. Most of you cats had nothing to do with Somolia, what if you were taken hostage doing your job, by someone who had a "justified" response to what America proper had done. Would you be cool being held captive?

We act as if these aren't real people from across the globe with mothers, sons, daughters, etc. be held captive at risk of death for long periods of time. How is that cool? Particularly if, for example the Philippine ship, the country is not a major western power?
That's what I got from the News Report, but what I don't fully understand is that the 3 Pirates was holding the Hostage inside the Covered Dingy. It's unstandable that they had Nightvision Gragles, but how did they see through the covered enclosure and to know where each one was located?

The Navy Seals had to have had a clear view of the inside that covered boat. Evidently everything else had to be as indicated, and all three were hit at the same time, otherwise at least one of them would have shot the hostage.

Maybe the Navy have some type of Xray Devise that they don't want to talk about, and they don't want it known, so they can suprise others in the fuure. Maybe it's an advancement of the Air Traffic Xray System. There was a devise demonstrated a year of two ago that allowed the user to put it on a home and view all articles inside.

There were some indication that it was being tested on Drug Houses to keep from getting warrants. I just saw that test on a News Report, but nohing about it since. But this Devise, if that is what was used, is maybe an advanced version or model.

leart



quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:
fro I'm surprised they didn't do this earlier. I do understand they were negotiating...but! If this was the "hood"....a sniper would have put them out their misery fast. And who's to say it didn't happen that way? Cuz we know how gun crazy massa is in the state....and to shoot another "black" person is a no brainer. Now....not to say I'm on anybody's side...Somalia has been without law for YEARS....and! Pirates have been holding ships randoms [except for American ships of course] for YEARS... So what next? Are they [ships] gonna b escorted by the Navy from now on?19 To keep this from happening again? Interestin to see.

fro


Yep, Ms. Koco ... as soon as I read the words "swift firefight" ... I figured that was code for "picked off by snipers"!! Eek I wonder if any of the pirates even got off a shot? 19

------------------------------------------------
Got off a shot?

Not a chance. It was three Navy Seal snipers in the middle of the night equipped with night vision goggles. Each sniper targeted & shot a pirate simultaneously. They were all head shots. The pirates never saw the snipers.

"Mission" accomplished. tfro
Mortars fired as U.S. lawmaker leaves Somalia.

Police: rockets were aimed at airport as N.J. congressman flew out.


U.S. Rep. Donald Payne arrives at the airport in Somalia's capital Mogadishu on Monday. Mortars were fired at the site as he flew out hours later.

MOGADISHU, Somalia - Assailants fired mortar shells at Mogadishu airport as a plane carrying a U.S. congressman took off, a police officer said. The plane departed safely, but 19 Somalis from surrounding residential areas were reported injured.

U.S. Rep. Donald Payne, chairman of the House of Representatives' Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Africa, was briefed before he left on the perils of visiting the lawless Somali capital described as one of the most dangerous places in the world, a State Department spokesman said. The U.S. Embassy in Kenya confirmed his safe arrival in Nairobi later Monday.

Nearly every building in Mogadishu is crumbling or pockmarked with bullet holes. Foreigners rarely travel there, and when they do they travel under armed guard and in convoys.

Payne told reporters he met with Somalia's president and prime minister during his one-day visit to the city to discuss piracy, security and cooperation between Somalia and the United States. The congressman held a news conference in the presidential palace, which itself has frequently been targeted in mortar attacks.

In 2007, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Jendayi Frazer became the highest-ranking American envoy to visit Somalia since 1993, when rebels brought down two U.S. Black Hawk helicopters in Mogadishu, and then engaged U.S. soldiers in a 12-hour firefight that left some 300 Somalis dead. The U.S. withdrew a year later.

But even she did not visit Mogadishu, instead landing in the government stronghold of Baidoa and leaving the same day.

Shells landed outside airport.

None of the six fired mortar shells landed in the airport and the plane carrying the New Jersey Democrat took off safely, said Col. Mohamed Idi, a police officer at the airport. He said no one was hurt in the airport, but said the shells landed in a nearby residential area.

Medina Hospital Administrator Ali Adde said 19 civilians, mostly women and children, were injured by the shells.

In Washington, State Department spokesman Robert Wood confirmed Payne was unharmed.

Wood said Payne received a security briefing before he went to Mogadishu and that the congressman chose to go anyway.

"We provided the congressman with a briefing and gave him a very frank and straightforward assessment of the security situation," he said.

Payne's brother William, in Newark, N.J., said he had heard about the mortar attack from his brother's congressional office in Washington and from the New Jersey Department of Homeland Security.

He said the congressman left the U.S. on Friday for Somalia, and that he was talking with leaders in Mogadishu about ways the U.S. can help stabilize Somalia. The war-ravaged country has lacked an effective government for 18 years and is split among competing militias.

The congressman would have been looking for ways to work with Somali leaders to help the U.S. ship and crew that were attacked by pirates off the coast of Somalia, William Payne said.

A five-day standoff over the hijacked ship ended late Sunday when U.S. Navy snipers killed three Somali pirates and freed the American sea captain being held at gunpoint.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30191400/?GT1=43001
quote:
Originally posted by leart:
That's what I got from the News Report, but what I don't fully understand is that the 3 Pirates was holding the Hostage inside the Covered Dingy. It's unstandable that they had Nightvision Gragles, but how did they see through the covered enclosure and to know where each one was located?

The Navy Seals had to have had a clear view of the inside that covered boat. Evidently everything else had to be as indicated, and all three were hit at the same time, otherwise at least one of them would have shot the hostage.

Maybe the Navy have some type of Xray Devise that they don't want to talk about, and they don't want it known, so they can suprise others in the fuure. Maybe it's an advancement of the Air Traffic Xray System. There was a devise demonstrated a year of two ago that allowed the user to put it on a home and view all articles inside.

There were some indication that it was being tested on Drug Houses to keep from getting warrants. I just saw that test on a News Report, but nohing about it since. But this Devise, if that is what was used, is maybe an advanced version or model.

leart


No, leart, they waited until the pirates put down the cover .. and then, when they had a clear visual of the 3 men + the captain, is when they fired the shots.

The main excuse/reason for shooting when they did is that they were able to see the Captain with an AK-47 pointed at his back. This became an indication that "the captain's life was in danger" which was the criteria by which President Obama gave his OK for "military action" to take place.

They were supposed to 'negotiate' until or unless there was reason to believe the Captain's life was at risk. A gun pointed at his back was adequate "reason". And the rest ... is history! Eek
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:
Mortars fired as U.S. lawmaker leaves Somalia.

Police: rockets were aimed at airport as N.J. congressman flew out.


It kind of disturbs me that Somalis would even try to wage any kind of battle with the U.S. It's like David and Goliath ... without even a possibility of the happy ending. Frown


Not when they have so many Somaliss in the USA. If terrorism is our main fear as a nation....then they just created some new ones...potentially already inside the USA.
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
I was wondering ... why is it the US's job to rescue the hostages and deal with the pirates? Since the "pirates" are really using 19th century strategies, why not just allow the merchant ships to arm themselves?


Insurance, litigation concerns and compliance with the varying weapons laws among port countries.

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