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If you haven't read "No Disrespect" and "Coldest Winter Ever" please do so.

Three years ago there was talk of a movie to bring "Coldest Winter Ever" to the big screen.

I'm still waiting...



SHE THANG: PROFILES SISTAH SOULJAH

By: Tameeka Mitchem

Activist, Writer, and Rapper Sister Souljah was born Lisa Williamson in 1964 in the Bronx, New York.

Born into poverty and raised on welfare Sister Souljah knew what it was like to be underprivileged. She decided at a very young age to overcome her situation but never forget the circumstances that brought her and many others in her community to this some point. As a student she was excellent but disliked what she was being taught in school. She felt that she was being taught very little of her history. So she took a very active and special interest in learning everything she could about African history. Which she felt was purposely left out of the education curriculum in this country. While in high school, she interned in the House of Representatives for the Republican Party.

Sister Souljah was also the recipient of several honors during her teenage years. She won the American Legion's Constitutional Oratory Contest, A scholarship to attend Cornell University's Advanced Summer Program, and a chance to study aboard in Spain at the University of Salamanca. All before the age of 18, after which she attended Rutgers's University and double-majored in American History and African Studies. She became a well-known and outspoken voice on campus and active writer for the school paper. In the mid 1980's, while attending college, Reverend Benjamin Chavis of the United Church of Christ Commission for Racial Justice offered her a job. She spent the next three years developing, organizing, and financing programs like a sleep away camp called the African Survival Camp, located in Enfield, North Carolina for homeless families. Throughout the 1990's Sister Souljah continued her commitment to social injustice but it began to take a controversial stance.

As a political activist, Sister Souljah became angered by the condition of African people thought the entire world. Her strong dedication and reputation for being opinionated about this subject tended to get her into trouble. One such incident occurred in 1992, when Candidate for President, Bill Clinton admonished Sister Souljah at a Rainbow Coalition event for comments she made on her rap album 360 Degrees of Power. However, Sister Souljah has preserved and stays an activist for the people always. She even added the title of author to her resume having published two books No Disrespect and the NY Times bestseller The Coldest Winter Ever.

She is also the executive director of Bad Boy Records CEO, Sean "Puffy" Combs, non-profit organization for kids called Daddy's House. The program serves over 600 kids from ages 6 to 16 from the inner city neighborhoods of New York, New Jersey, and Philadelphia. By providing them with educational and mentor opportunities. She was also one of the founders of the 1999 Million Women March in Philadelphia. At the age of 36 Sister Souljah has come full circle and doesn't plan on turning back.

Always Remember that: "Anytime We As A People Are Not Having Our WaySomeone Else Is Having Theirs...And It's Never To Our Advantage."

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quote:
Originally posted by art_gurl:
I appreciate you posting this Fine. I knew 'our' Sis Souljah had borrowed the name from an author but never got around to following up info about her. tfro

...and before you shake your head that I hadn't heard of her... LOL!!


ACTUALLY I never knew a Sister Souljah existed...I didn't "borrow" her name (hence the different spelling). I've never read anything she's written and it was only very recently that I found out about her.

Just to clarify. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by SistahSouljah:

ACTUALLY I never knew a Sister Souljah existed...I didn't "borrow" her name (hence the different spelling). I've never read anything she's written and it was only very recently that I found out about her.

Just to clarify. Smile


No? ooops! bump
I must have connected-the-dots myself and thought we'd had a conversation about it. Wink
.
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quote:
ACTUALLY I never knew a Sister Souljah existed...I didn't "borrow" her name (hence the different spelling). I've never read anything she's written and it was only very recently that I found out about her.

Just to clarify.


I knew, SS! Wink -- thanks for your comments, though...!
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She came to speak at my undergrad school quite a few times but I always missed it. I always say I am going to buckle down and read the coldest winter ever but never get around to it. I grew up hearing about her from an aunt, who back in the day was very pro black and militant. i have seen her speak on tv several times but haven't gotten any of her literature as of yet.
I read the Coldest Winter Ever and didn't find it as profound as a lot of people make it out to be. It is an interesting read and Souljah makes some good points that promote interesting discussion, but before I read the book it was presented to me like: "Gurl, you have to read this. This is the best book I ever read. This book is deep. I think it should be required reading for all young Black women." Maybe it's just that I heard too much of the hype before actually reading the book and that tainted it for me? Whatever the case, personally, the book was a page turner, but not "deep". One thing that bothers me about the book: I am a teacher and a lot of these young girls read the book and they totally miss the point. They identify with Winter and don't get the message that the book so blatantly puts out there. It's almost baffling.

I was surprised to see people not knowing who she was. Y'all aren't up on your hip hop history sad I first remember Souljah when she was down with Public Enemy back in the day. How many of my ole heads out there remember that song "Slavery is Back in Effect" music I think I like her better as a hip hop activist than a novelist.
msprettygirl--I first heard about this fantastic black woman on Geraldo Rivera's Show in 1989.

She, Reverend Sharpton were pitted again a group of white supremist. SS held her own and stood up to those racist.

From that point on I saught to find out who this female was that stood up to racist with such vigor, strength and self assurance.

She attended Salamanca--that famous school of higher learning in Spain [i.e. founded, organized by the Moors]....
quote:
I first remember Souljah when she was down with Public Enemy back in the day. How many of my ole heads out there remember that song "Slavery is Back in Effect"???
I guess it was Terminator X's BUCK WHYLIN' where she thundered "WE ARE AT WAR!" that was the most memorable and defining lyrical statement I recall, knew and loved about Sister Souljah.

I was more heavily into the lyrics of X-Clan songs including ISIS and Queen Mother Rage as well as Brother J and Professor X. (And Professor Griff's album... That was one I played a lot. Being a country boy (rural actually) I can only guess what I missed in that era. I more or less had to be introduce to Hip Hop when I went to college.)

As for Sister Souljah, the title of the album says it all:360' Degrees of Power
Winter was recommended to me from so many Black ladies. They said it was so profound. The best read ever. Stuff like that.

I was in a small town library yesterday reading the back cover of the book when an old White woman ran up to me and said not to put the book down. She also said how profound and stuff.

Caught me of guard.

In this town? A White woman, an OLD White woman, is raving to me about a Black female author who is not Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, or Lorraine Hansberry?

I must be missing the boat, I figured. lol

I got a few pages in while at the library. I don't know what to think.

I'm uncomfortable at parts, but I'll push on.

I'm going to get the book. Soon, hopefully.

I hope that all of the hype I heard before hasn't created an unrealistic expectation.
quote:
Originally posted by powerflower:
I read the Coldest Winter Ever and didn't find it as profound as a lot of people make it out to be. It is an interesting read and Souljah makes some good points that promote interesting discussion, but before I read the book it was presented to me like: "Gurl, you have to read this. This is the best book I ever read. This book is deep. I think it should be required reading for all young Black women." Maybe it's just that I heard too much of the hype before actually reading the book and that tainted it for me? Whatever the case, personally, the book was a page turner, but not "deep". One thing that bothers me about the book: I am a teacher and a lot of these young girls read the book and they totally miss the point. They identify with Winter and don't get the message that the book so blatantly puts out there. It's almost baffling.


I have yet to read "Winter" however I felt the same way about "No Disrespect"...

sigh...

quote:
I was surprised to see people not knowing who she was. Y'all aren't up on your hip hop history sad I first remember Souljah when she was down with Public Enemy back in the day. How many of my ole heads out there remember that song "Slavery is Back in Effect" music


Yes! I am a little surprised to see others who have never heard of her... In fact I thought SistahSouljah (member of this site) got her name from her...

I almost darn near worshipped her back in the day, especially after I saw her interview with Clinton, where she ripped into him... her mind was fascinating to me! My ex knew this and arranged to have us meet at a DC function... I met her and her husband and we chatted for a while and exchanged numbers... never called her though, she never called me... though I was young at the time and became thoroughly immersed in NOI... she was cool... but not quite what I expected... I'd built up a fantastical image in my head about her...

but all in all she was cool... I bought her tape... and the one quote I remember that I used to repeat a lot, and it made my family refer to me as the militant midget sck was Stand up with authority and conviction and if not.. Sit down and SHUT UP!

quote:
I think I like her better as a hip hop activist than a novelist.


I agree with your assessment somewhat, she has done a lot of community work... she is more like a community activist, political critic and social commentator ...
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I read the book finally and I liked it. I didn't love it and think it was the best thing ever, but it's definetely a good page turner and worthwhile read. I would recommend it to someone. I would say don't judge the book on the first few pages because the first few pages or first chapter even is a bit whooooooa with language. (I remember when i read "...busting out my mama coochie..." I was like oh hell no this is one of those "sex in the hood" esque books but it wasn't)

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