Skip to main content

The following article is proof how how far the White media will go to try to inflict damage on Sharpton's campaign even though they claim he hasn't got a chance.

I only read three-quarters of it, it's far too long, but I share it unabridged because I wanted you to see, paragraph by paragraph, and in some cases, sentence by sentence how the White media took pop shots, dished dirt, issued enuendo,(sp) raised retoric, mislead, minumpulated and lied in order to put distance between Sharpton and the Black community. [it's an additional shame that I got the article from Blackvoices.com, I rarely read White media anymore, too many viable alternatives]


IMO to truly understand the level of hate, I submit to you that many reporters beg their editors for assignments that will enable them to cover people who they like. But when it comes to Sharpton, (the proof is the written articles) it would appear that the reporters were ordered to a n assignment because the reporter was being disciplined for something. Or in the opposite direction, the reporter's hate for Sharpton was so high that the reporter just seemed to be let loose on Sharpton like a mad dog.

The funny part is, Sharpton reads all of the articles about him, and he makes sure to issue retrobution in a public way, ie: making he/she/them sit in a corner, or behind everyone else (harder to hear, see, and everyone one knows youre in the spit house). On reporter mentioned in her article that she was upset because she was sent to cover a dinner event featuring Sharpton and she didn't get any food because she didn't pay the per-plate-fee, and had to say there and watch everyone else eat infront of her for 2 hours. hahahahah, Ain't that some spit, she expected to talk bad about him, then walk in to his place, eat his food, then write more trash about him. See how they are?

Anyway, ....

quote:
Al Sharpton: Reinventing himself
On the campaign trail, he has lowered his volume, moved closer to the mainstream. But at other times, the firebrand has resurfaced. So, which is the real Al Sharpton?

NEW YORK -- As political theater goes --political theater of the absurd, that is -- you could not make this up.

Sharing a Manhattan stage are Buddhism's most venerated holy man, the Dalai Lama, and presidential candidate Rev. Al Sharpton, the noisy civil rights provocateur not usually associated with ancient prescriptions of meditative calm.



The strange celebrity vibe of this New York gathering is nudged further into The Land of Odd by the presence on stage of an authority on Tibet and Buddhism, Columbia University professor Robert Thurman, father of actress Uma.

And if your cup of surreality doesn't already runneth over, hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons is in the house, waiting his turn on the $70-a-ticket lecture program.

Based on his reputation for bullying and bombast, you might imagine Sharpton, big chest heaving, rousing the crowd with his rafter-rattling mantra: "No justice. No peace."

In a quarter century of the reverend's racial agitation, civil disobedience and artful media manipulation, this is the Sharpton we have come to know, to expect and, in many circles, to detest.

But it is a different and less familiar Rev. Al Sharpton on stage with the Dalai Lama.

It turns out, for better and for worse, we hardly know him at all.

It has been 16 years since Sharpton's high-decibel burst into the national consciousness in the Tawana Brawley case.

For many people, that racially divisive fiasco is all they know -- all they need to know -- about Sharpton. But in the post-Brawley years, beginning in the early '90s, Sharpton gradually has been lowering his volume, broadening his message, moving closer to the mainstream.

He's even worked on his appearance as he tries to reinvent himself as the nation's preeminent civil rights leader.

The result is that Rev. Sharpton no longer can be dismissed as merely a loudmouth New York pariah. Today, his home state politicians seek his endorsement, an often-public courtship that strokes Sharpton's considerable ego.

Since he's gone national, traveling the country in his presidential bid, Sharpton works hard to curb his excesses, although recent examples show that the old Sharpton lurks just beneath the surface.

With no chance of winning the nomination, a well-executed Sharpton campaign could secure his place in the civil rights pantheon and the national Democratic Party. Not to mention gaining the respect and positive attention he has been looking for all his life.

Conjure up, for a moment, the image of Al Sharpton. Peace and love don't exactly spring to mind. Yet here he is, a portrait of introspective repose.

With one hammy thigh crossed over the other, hands in his lap like a choirboy, Sharpton listens raptly to the world's most famous living Buddhist, a winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.

And when it is the reverend's turn to speak, there is no bellow. No flapping arms. Instead, he's talking about -- say what? -- "The love ethic."

Just a few days shy of his 49th birthday, Sharpton addresses this mellow crowd:

"As I got older [I] . . . began to understand that Dr. King, using the love ethic, using the power of forgiveness, using the power of sacrificing one's self for a greater cause, did more to change America for people like me than anybody that had money or military power."

The mostly white audience, abundantly harmonious, applauds with Buddhist abandon.

All done, Sharpton approaches the Dalai Lama, who drapes an ethereal silvery white silk scarf around the reverend's neck. With the stubby antenna of his cell phone poking out of his left fist, Sharpton extends his other hand to the Tibetan spiritual leader, does a respectful bow and exits stage right.

Now he's hustling along West 43rd Street, back to the office, Dalai scarf billowing, pumping his bulging black briefcase. Down 85 pounds from his top weight of 303, he's still a hefty package. But he can really move it. "How you doin', Al?" hollers a guy from across the street. "Reverend Al," says another. "Wazzup?" Sharpton asks, whizzing by.

Whether it's the streets of Harlem or Houston, Sharpton can't walk 100 yards without someone -- white, black, rich, poor -- giving him a big hello.

There is no doubt about it: Rev. Alfred Charles Sharpton Jr. is somebody. But who?

'To somebody white, I'm controversial, a troublemaker. To somebody black, I'm fighting for justice and freedom," Sharpton writes in his 2002 book, "Al on America."

For many years, Sharpton didn't discourage this dichotomy. But this began to change in January 1991, he says, after he was stabbed in the chest and seriously wounded by a drunken white man.

When he was attacked, Sharpton was in his signature protest uniform -- jogging suit, golden medallion and flowing bouffant hairdo, the getup that launched a thousand parodies. He was just emerging from his car in a playground staging area to lead yet another march in the white Brooklyn neighborhood of Bensonhurst, his 29th demonstration against the racially motivated 1989 killing of a black youth, Yusuf Hawkins, 16.

"The stabbing 12 years ago kinda sobered me in many ways, matured me in many ways," he said in one of a series of interviews. "I decided I wanted to make everything I did count."

Dark suits with a subtle stripe replaced the jogging outfits. The Martin Luther King Jr. medallion was packed away. The air went out of his hair. He started his National Action Network (NAN), a civil rights and voter registration group, to provide him with a base. He ran in New York Democratic U.S. Senate primaries in 1992 and 1994 and for mayor in 1997.

What clarified his thinking further, he says, was time to reflect during a 90-day sentence two years ago for trespassing in a protest of U.S. naval bombing exercises on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques.

"I didn't change my views in jail. I decided on a focused agenda."

The agenda? Oh, to run for president of the United States.

He came to a worldview more nuanced than black and white, one as he puts it, with "many shades of gray."

Some people believe him.

Sharpton will be the first one to point out that he comes to the presidential race with a truckload of baggage. Over the years, he has been accused of being a divisive racist, an anti-Semite and a homophobe. Some black political leaders are as contemptuous of him as whites.

A Newsday investigation in 1988 revealed Sharpton had been an FBI informant in cases involving drugs, prominent blacks and the mob. In 1993 he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor for failing to file a tax return for 1986. Other tax issues for other years are still unresolved.

Sharpton has been publicly elusive about his personal financial affairs. However, under oath in a deposition in December 2000 (portions were leaked to The New York Times) he admitted only to owning a $300 Wittnauer wristwatch and a wedding ring. He said he didn't even own the suits he wears but merely had "access" to them. In the deposition, Sharpton said he hadn't filed tax returns since 1998.

A mere two years later, his income was $381,900, as reported on the required Federal Election Commission filing covering 2002. NAN paid him $78,000. Another $75,000 came from his book publisher. The single largest item, $120,000, is in unspecified speaking and consulting fees paid to "Rev. Al Productions."

The day after he announced he was forming a presidential exploratory committee last January, fire destroyed Sharpton's NAN offices in Harlem. Investigators blamed an extension cord.

Six years before the NAN fire, another fire destroyed another Sharpton Harlem office and files, this one the headquarters of his 1997 campaign for mayor of New York. Investigators said a nearby beauty shop was the intended target.

Meanwhile, some of the candidate's individual consulting client records were destroyed in the NAN fire, attorney Michael Hardy wrote the FEC in a letter dated last June 30. The Hardy letter also says Sharpton is "presently under a civil audit" and could owe federal, state and city income taxes. Hardy says that under a New York amnesty program, Sharpton now has paid all back state taxes. City and federal taxes are still at issue.

But his convoluted personal finances, the cooperation with the FBI and his vituperative public feuds over the years with a wide array of New York politicos, black and white, Democrat and Republican, all are sideshow to the main event that made Sharpton known beyond the boroughs.

Sharpton repeatedly has refused to repudiate his involvement in this most infamous of cases when he rushed to the defense of the girl who said she had been beaten, raped and degraded by a gang of white men, a story that a grand jury found to be a hoax.

"I believe Tawana Brawley," he said in a recent Tribune interview. "I believe today something happened to her. . . . I put it to you this way, I ask a lot of people who disagree with me on Brawley, `Do you believe O.J. was guilty?' They say, `Yeah.' I say, `If you have a right to disagree with a jury, why don't I have the right to disagree with a jury?'"

Sharpton said his support for Brawley won him a following because he "stood up" for the teen. "It's according to who you talk to," he said.

If you talk to Michael Meyers, executive director of the New York Civil Rights Coalition and a former NAACP executive, you will hear that Sharpton is a shameless self-promoter, a "buffoon," and "a racial demagogue."

Yet even former New York Mayor Ed Koch, who once famously dismissed him as "Al Charlatan," lately has expressed admiration.

Unashamedly liberal and outspoken, Sharpton's campaign has the potential to mobilize young blacks to vote--many of them have never heard of Brawley--and to force the party to address issues of special concern to African-Americans.

But, "He has problems in the black community. He doesn't have a unified base yet," says Ron Walters, director of the African American Leadership Institute at the University of Maryland.

Sharpton's group, NAN, whose big golden logo pin he wears on his lapel, has 35 chapters and activity in 120 cities, including Chicago, but not enough true believers for a meaningful national campaign.

The NAN headquarters, the "House of Justice" as it's called, has not been replaced since the fire. Sharpton's current office is an 8-by-10 foot room on the 13th floor of a greenish high rise between the Port Authority bus terminal and a post office facility on West 42nd Street in Manhattan. The modest temporary space for Sharpton and four NAN staff is courtesy of Dennis Rivera, head of the state's largest health-care workers' union, the 250,000-member local 1199 Service Employees International Union which is sharing its offices. Both the local and the international union last week endorsed former Vermont governor Howard Dean.

Among the photos undamaged by the fire and displayed on a littered bookshelf in Sharpton's office is one of Dr. King and Jesse Jackson taken the day before King was killed in 1968 and autographed by Jackson in 1996: "The struggle has continuity. Keep Hope Alive JJ." On the campaign trail, Sharpton styles himself as the successor to Jackson, whose reputation as the top national civil rights figure the reverend admires, envies, and, views as declining.

Sharpton's more seasoned, and reasoned, approach in his presidential bid has been exhibited at presidential debates. The legendary agitator even chastised protesters during a debate in Baltimore.

But late last month his old self was again on display, raising anew the question of which is the real Al Sharpton. In a blistering press release, Sharpton played the race card as he took on another black leader, this one Jackson's namesake son.

"It got messy," as one Sharpton staffer put it, after U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. (D-Ill.) endorsed Dean. Blasting both Dean and Rep. Jackson, Sharpton denounced "any so-called African-American leader that would endorse Dean despite his anti-black record."

Rep. Jackson replied that he did not understand "Rev. Sharpton's attempt to introduce `race' into the campaign by using such rhetoric as `anti-black.'"

Sharpton essentially concedes he has no chance to win. "The question is, you have to define win," he says. "I'm the only cat talk about running who will have ramifications other than just me," he says. The implication: "I lose, you still win" by attracting new Democratic voters who can elect progressive Democrats in local elections around the country.

The first real test of Sharpton's vote getting will be in the Feb. 3 South Carolina primary, where 40 percent of Democratic primary voters are black. Of all the states, he has spent the most time, organization and money there in a campaign where the last two are in extremely scarce supply.

Sharpton's voter registration effort, set to begin later this fall, has a goal of signing up one million new voters by next summer.

The plan relies heavily on a $250,000 donation from billionaire Black Entertainment Television CEO Robert Johnson, a Sharpton supporter, and another $1 million in donated airtime on BET.

"Reverend Al's the only voice in the Democratic Party that is keeping in the forefront the issues that are important to one of the most loyal constituent groups within the Democratic Party: African-Americans," says Johnson. "Too often during the primary season, the African-American vote is taken for granted."

Sharpton repeatedly has promised to launch a voter registration bus tour with hip-hop artists aboard to draw crowds, but it has yet to come off, a lot like Sharpton's often postponed official presidential announcement.

At the center of this tornado of disorganization and delay is Sharpton, fittingly known to friends and staff as, simply, "Rev."

Revved up, energetic, a serial talker, Sharpton is constantly on the road, changing plans, running late. It's pedal to the metal, plenty of engine noise, spinning wheels and spitting gravel. But he's having trouble getting the campaign into second gear.

Two of Sharpton's four campaign staffers, manager Frank Watkins and South Carolina coordinator Kevin Gray, quit in late September, frustrated by trying to create order out of the candidate's chaos. In the most recent candidate financial filings, Sharpton was at the bottom in every category, raising only $113,089 in the three months ending Sept. 30.

Discounting the importance of campaign cash, Sharpton says, "A lot of people have to buy a reputation and a constituency. I came with both."

"I never had a commercial when I ran for mayor of New York and I got one of every three Democratic votes," says Sharpton.

Sharpton's sketchy campaign platform is to move the party back to its liberal roots and away from the moderate center embraced by Bill Clinton. Only then can Democrats "galvanize" voters and "bring out those who have been negatively affected by [Bush] policies, economic policies, foreign policies."

To those he would "galvanize," like churchgoers at the Life Center Cathedral in Algiers, La., his voter registration pitch can be riveting.

"If you're not registered to vote, you really don't have the right to complain about nothin'. . . . Folk don't care you sittin' up mad in the middle of the 'hood. What they care is when you organize and do somethin' about it. You just havin' a ghetto fit don't mean nothin' to nobody," he says.

"Un hunh. You know that's right," hollers a congregant.

On the stump, Sharpton luxuriates in saying what he thinks, advocating policies sometimes simplistic, often costly and always geared to attract voters who feel locked out of the American dream.

"This is about power sharing," he tells a Latino voter registration dinner in Houston, part of Sharpton's effort at broadening his appeal beyond his African-American constituency. "Why are we always assigned to do the street work and get-out-the-vote money while everybody is at the table cutting up the real contracts and the real things that matter?"

`Sharpton, Kenneth (brother/nephew)" reads an entry in the index on the last page of Sharpton's 1996 autobiography, "Go and Tell Pharaoh." That four-word reference is shorthand for the most cataclysmic event in Sharpton's complicated story.

When Sharpton was only 10, his father abandoned the family. Bad as that was, the reason was worse. His father, Alfred Sr., had impregnated his stepdaughter, Tina, his wife's child from an earlier marriage. Dad moved out. Tina had a son, Kenneth, who was at once Al Sharpton's half-brother and his nephew.

The Sharpton family's middle class life evaporated and the riches to rags story -- whether it's the strength of a single mom, the family's plunge into poverty or the fatherless child finding his way -- comes up in nearly every speech.

A search for a dadlike figure has been a central element in Sharpton's development.

That search has led him to flamboyant, high profile mentors and surrogate fathers, among them Harlem Democratic Rep. Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Rev. Jackson and soul singer James Brown.

Plus, of course, the most high profile One of all:

"Daddy left 'long time ago," Sharpton preaches to a wailing, rocking, congregation. "But I had another Father."

"All right, preacher."

From the pews at the Life Center Cathedral in Algiers, La., they are speaking up, speaking out, shouting and interrupting.

"I've been up. I've been down. I've been leveled to the ground . . . " says Sharpton arms thrown back, on one leg now, the other lifted, foot shaking in the quintessential James Brown stage dance.

"I, I, I, I, I've learned to trust in Jesus. I've learned to trust in God."

Anyone who has ever watched Al Sharpton preach will see why he so often emerges as the clear audience favorite in the debates. In a sense, he's been training for them his whole life.

Sharpton recalls a time when his family was intact, living a bougie black life in Brooklyn -- with a nice home and his and her Cadillacs in the driveway.

Long before his father's perfidy, Sharpton was working on connecting with an audience and being embraced and endorsed by the crowd.

"I used to come home from church. I was 3 years old, 3 1/2, I'd line my sister's dolls up and put my mother's bathrobe on, which was my way of wearing the clergy garment that the pastor wore, and actually preach almost word for word what the bishop had prayed that morning."

"They always liked my sermons," he deadpans.

The dolls of that era were all white, and Sharpton now laughs about the implication. "You just brought something to mind. No wonder I'm doing well in Iowa" -- he's not -- "My first congregation was all white!"

Sharpton soon preached his first public sermon at Brooklyn's Washington Temple Church of God in Christ. He was 4. "It was from St. John, 14th chapter, first verse, `Let not your heart be troubled,'" he recalls.

By 10, he was an ordained minister in the Pentecostal Church, a cute chunky fellow with soulful brown eyes and a prodigy ego that had him signing his fourth grade compositions "Reverend Al Sharpton."

It was at this time that his father left. Dad had been a successful landlord ("slumlord" Sharpton revises). Soon after Alfred Sr. walked out, the family he left behind spiraled into welfare and public housing.

Sharpton's mother, Ada, went to work as a domestic.

Fatherless, poor, precocious, Sharpton tells the story of searching out one of his idols, Adam Clayton Powell. While others knew Sharpton as "Wonderboy" or "Boy Preacher," Powell called his adoring acolyte "kid" and Sharpton was there when Powell would hold forth at the back of the Red Rooster in Harlem.

When Sharpton was 14, his mother introduced him to another mentor/father figure, the Rev. Dr. William Augustus Jones, Jr. of Brooklyn's Bethany Baptist Church.

Jones, head of the New York branch of the civil rights organization Operation Breadbasket, made Sharpton head of Breadbasket's youth division and introduced him to Rev. Jackson.

Says Rev. Jones, "You know, kids like that appreciate love and respect where they can find it. Especially, when they find it in people of some prominence."

Looking back on his career of battling for the poor, disaffected and downtrodden, "I think we all know things we could have done better," Sharpton says. "Things we might have done out of vanity. Things we might have done out of emotions rather than thinking it out as best we could. Things like getting into personal disputes at the cost of the bigger picture."

Asked for specifics, this before his latest set-to with the Jacksons, he came as close to an apology as he is likely to get. "I've been quoted saying things critical of Rev. Jackson which was more out for a protege upset with the teacher than something I should have done publicly." About the latest dispute, Sharpton says, "Down the road, I'm sure there will be a reconciliation."

Of all Sharpton's surrogate fathers, the one who has had the most enduring influence is James Brown. They got to know one another when Brown volunteered to perform for a fundraiser for the now defunct National Youth Movement Sharpton founded.

Sharpton says that Brown "raised me" though that's a stretch. They did not become close until Sharpton was well on his way to adulthood. Around this time, in 1973, Brown's own son, Teddy, was killed in a car accident. Sharpton and the singer became even more like father and son.

In what is surely the most unique resume entry among the presidential contenders, Sharpton signed on as road manager to the Godfather of Soul. Sharpton carried the money -- sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars, since Brown insisted on cash up front. "I'm a kid, flying around in a private plane with James Brown, the emperor of blackness," writes Sharpton.

Though he carried the bags, Sharpton said his real job was to be Brown's son. "James Brown taught me about being a man. He gave me life skills that I never got from my own father. He taught me about self-respect, dignity and self-definition," Sharpton says in "Al on America."

At 20, Sharpton married recording artist Marsha Tinsley but it lasted less than a year. Later, Sharpton met Kathy Jordan, a Brown backup singer. They were married in Las Vegas on Halloween, 1980. They have two daughters, Dominique, 17 and Ashley, 16, who, like their mom, keep a low profile. Kathy Jordan Sharpton rarely grants interviews.

Sharpton says he adopted his bouffy, chemically processed hairdo as "my bond" with James Brown in 1981 at Brown's request before Sharpton accompanied the singer to the Ronald Reagan White House. He promised Brown he wouldn't change his hairstyle while the singer is alive.

In fact, the current version of the hair, like Sharpton himself, is inching toward mainstream, a modified, streamlined, comparatively toned-down affair.

Even so, Sharpton remains the most memorable and least predictable of the nine Democrats in the race for president. As one after another is eliminated, drops out, goes broke, Sharpton promises this: He will not go away.


<>

... its time for Prosperity


<>  



An African American Board Game Of Wealth & Success.

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

The paper that you found this article in must be a New York paper, right? The journalists for the white papers here seem to have a joy in knocking Rev. Al on anything he does. I wouldn't be surprised if it were the Times.

Our people have made the mistake of confusing the methods with the objectives. As long as we agree on objectives, we should never fall out with each other just because we believe in different methods, or tactics, or strategy. We have to keep in mind at all times that we are not fighting for separation. We are fighting for recognition as free humans in this society
Malcolm X, 1965
Can you all point out what you find to be so offensive? IMO that was a pretty balanced expose on Sharpton. In any article on his life, of course they are going to mention things that a supporter of Sharpton might perceive to be negative. For better or worse, those things exist in Sharpton's past. Remember, Sharpton is running for president. He signed up for this. Would you expect any different?

I don't see a problem with this at all. In fact, it's probably a pretty good article! You should go to Newsmax or something if you want to see real vitriol.


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
Hmmm ... yeah, I think I can rustle up a couple of derogatory things ...

1) Let's consider the opening statement, "NEW YORK -- As political theater goes --political theater of the absurd, that is -- you could not make this up.

(Oh yeah ... this is something you could definitely consider flattering!!) Eek


2) There is the matter of how the author chooses to refer to his weight with words such as, "With one hammy thigh crossed over the other," or "he's still a hefty package."

3) It definitely strikes me as a thorough expose, but, where in there is there mention of any of the good things any of his organizations or his ministry has done? You mean to tell me that someone who "can't walk 100 yards without someone -- white, black, rich, poor -- giving him a big hello" there has never been any man, woman or child who has gained anything, who has gotten themselves together, who has prospered or made a better life for themselves, found their way out of the ghetto, gotten a job, gotten out of bad relationship, made a better home for their children, finished high school, went to college, developed more respect for themselves, their family, mankind in general ... or any other positive step or influence? Oh yeah, that's pretty balanced!! Eek The man has been a minister for 39 years, the founder of an organization for civil rights and voter registration for 12, but the reporter can find every investigation he's ever been under, but can't investigate and find one person whom Al has helped to better him/herself? Should we assume, then, that there aren't such people? Or just that it's not newsworthy? Confused

Also, I find it kind of disheartening that the author can term Sharpton as a "loudmouth" yet, not lament how the loud that comes from his mouth is so much the truth!! For instance, he can quote his statement towards Jackson, Jr. "any so-called African-American leader that would endorse Dean despite his anti-black record." But, did he bother to mention that in the past, Dean has, at times, done things (votes on certain issues, for example) that were not necessarily in the best interests of the African-American community? Funny, other news media and other candidates have!

Overall, I found the article to be informative, but definitely one-sided and inflamatory. If nothing else, I'd like to know if this reporter has delved into any other candidate's personal life and dragged out his/her negative qualities and press? He could start with all those Senators that voted to give Bush our blank check to spend in Iraq ... or to send our soldiers into the war they are dying in daily. That should keep his typewriter busy for a few weeks!

BLACK by NATURE, PROUD by CHOICE.
Free your mind, and the rest will follow.
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:

1) Let's consider the opening statement, "NEW YORK -- As political theater goes --_political theater of the absurd, that is_ -- you could not make this up.


My read of that is that the author is talking about the event itself and not just Sharpton. He's talking about the fact that Al and the Dalai Lama and Uma Thurman's father all found themselves on the same stage.

In general, though, I agree with your comments and stand corrected.


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
Amen,

The Sister from Houston has spoken with clearity of mind, and have enabled me to see further than my on vision would allow.

This part in particular
quote:
... It definitely strikes me as a thorough expose, but, where in there is there mention of any of the good things any of his organizations or his ministry has done? You mean to tell me that someone who "can't walk 100 yards without someone -- white, black, rich, poor -- giving him a big hello" there has never been any man, woman or child who has gained anything, who has gotten themselves together, who has prospered or made a better life for themselves, found their way out of the ghetto, gotten a job, gotten out of bad relationship, made a better home for their children, finished high school, went to college, developed more respect for themselves, their family, mankind in general ... or any other positive step or influence? Oh yeah, that's pretty balanced!! The man has been a minister for 39 years, the founder of an organization for civil rights and voter registration for 12, but the reporter can find every investigation he's ever been under, but can't investigate and find one person whom Al has helped to better him/herself? Should we assume, then, that there aren't such people? Or just that it's not newsworthy?


Upon reading that, I immedately recalled that even the racist man that stabbed Sharpton reportedly changed his life from complete hate to one of tolerence as a direct result of Sharpton's visit to him, during which Sharpton issed the racist forgiveness of the crime (face to face).


Ebonyrose, you might want to send a version of this message to a few of the New York newspapers because, to me, it reaches a place that very, very few people could see much less vocalize.

New York Amsterdam News (Black Newspaper)
New York Daily Challenge (Black Newspaper)
New York Daily News (White media paper)
New York Times (White media paper)
New York Post (White racist media paper)


I'm confident that the first three would print it in their 'letters to the editor' columns in the respective papers.

Thanks again for your insigtfulness.
MBM,

What I look for in a balanced accounting/report is NOT a bunch of over-laden adjectives/descriptors and more or less straight Walter Cronkite "Here's the facts" which may very well reflect how [White] Americans view Sharpton but 100% less of this authors creative flair for how to further characterize Sharpton and re-create the impression some have of Sharpton.... just in case you forgot.

That's kind of the first thing. "Sharpton *re-creating* himself"

Unless Sharpton himself or his campaign has publicly said that he needs to do that that whole thing there sets the table that says.... JUST IN CASE YOU FORGOT... Sharpton's a bad guy.

The thing that kills me is White politicians are analyzed for their STYLE vs. SUBSTANCE. Which ever one appeals the best style-wise is deemed the one with the best chances. Oh... But when it comes to a Black candidate and those damn preachers, style is out of the question there is way more attention to the way they are perceived, not so much in terms of policy-substance but all things relate to what type of nightmare they would be if they made it. Hence the emphasis on things that offend Whites.

There's a difference and no Black candidate (liberal, especially) can be trusted no matter how many style-points they rack up... well because White America is not going to deal with a Negro that might actually have a mind of his/her own, let alone actually oppose policy positions of Whites in their parties.

So you won't see that kind of creative writing to half the extent on even the most "odd-ball" White candidate (Dan Qualyle)...

It all has to do with what race means in America. I mean... if they have to ask is America ready for a Black president when it comes to Colin Powell, a professional order-follower (with no disrespet to him), then there is something very wrong with this country.

Anyway... MBM,

I'm immediately turned off when any writer overdoes it with the descriptors. It's an insult to my intelligent or rather an assault on it because their goal is not to inform but to shape opinion.

______________________________________________________________
There's a world of difference between truth and facts.
Facts can obscure truth.
- Maya Angelou

quote:
Originally posted by Nmaginate:

What I look for in a balanced accounting/report is NOT a bunch of over-laden adjectives/descriptors and more or less straight Walter Cronkite "Here's the facts" which may very well reflect how [White] Americans view Sharpton but 100% less of this authors creative flair for how to further characterize Sharpton and re-create the impression some have of Sharpton.... just in case you forgot.


I hear you, but how does one do a profile of someone without including adjectives that describe how the author perceives the candidate? Isn't all of the media reporting the facts - as they see them; this despite the huge variance in what one reads about things. Anyway, just arguing the point a bit.

I did not initially perceive the piece as "inflammatory" or "over-the-top" negative. Since Sharpton does not have a legislative record, I understand why the focus was on the major events in his life that made the news. To press this just a bit further, no one forced Al to be as flamboyant as he is - being 300 lbs., wearing jogging suits, and keeping his hair like he does/did. No one forced him to sit across from an FBI plant and discuss buying/selling cocaine. No one forced him to handle the Brawley and other cases in the matter that he did. I'm not sure it's fair to not shed light on those events now when Al's primary purpose in handling himself in those events was, seemingly, to bring attention to himself. Or, more charitably, to use the press/media to further his purposes. Now, to be clear, I don't fault him for that. That's politics. But so is what we read above. He's chosen to run for president, to expose himself to THE most unrelenting scrutiny possible. No. To bastardize a phrase, "It's not personal. It's just politics". brosmile


quote:
So you won't see that kind of creative writing to half the extent on even the most "odd-ball" White candidate (Dan Qualyle)...


While I, of course, buy your over-all point, you don't think our president has had his share of critical character/style pieces done about him? You should check out Michael Moore's last couple of books!

Like I said, though, I stand corrected after rereading the article. I just am not in the least suprised by it within the context of someone putting themself out as a potential president of the United States. You do remember Gennifer Flowers? White Water? And whatever the other woman with the nose who said Bill "took advantage" of her? It's all the nature of the beast. Right or wrong, Al's just provided quite a large inventory of "stuff" for folks to write about.

BTW - can anyone share what Al has specifically done on a positive note to counter the negativity written above?


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
MBM,

As far as I know Michael Moore isn't a newpaper columnist. All I'm saying is every line in a article doesn't have to reflect an authors disdain or even their favorable opinion of a person. It's pretty simple. I understand Al is probably not the best example of someone to defend but the treatment of him and say Bush on personal issues are different at least in degree.

Where exactly was the outright disdain of Bush pre-election? Yes, people raised questions but none of that went to the core of labeling him among the most filtiest creatures to walk the earth.

You know the difference whether you like Sharpton or not.

______________________________________________________________
There's a world of difference between truth and facts.
Facts can obscure truth.
- Maya Angelou

quote:
You know the difference whether you like Sharpton or not.


I've said consistently that I like Sharpton. That has no impact on my comments here though.


quote:
Where exactly was the outright disdain of Bush pre-election? Yes, people raised questions but none of that went to the core of labeling him among the most filtiest creatures to walk the earth.


There was plenty of disdain for Bush. There was a near industry created on calling him dumb, on talking about how he was an alcoholic and cocaine abuser, about how he had numerous DUI's/arrests, about how we was AWOL from the National Guard, about how he was living off of his father's and grandfather's coattails, etc., etc. How else would I know those things? Further, I've not seen anyone characeterize Sharpton in the way you suggest.

The bottom line for me is that the article, while perhaps negative over-all vis-a-vis Sharpton, is not a character assassination piece in the way that is common in presidential politics.


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
Never accused you of not liking Sharpton. "Whether or not"... I think you know that you know what that means and I really wasn't insinuated you did not.

I think there's just something different when it comes to race. Despite all the negative press Bush got he was never deemed illegitimate, neither was Quayle. The opposition to them were more "academic" in nature rather than sure gut repulsion.

Jesse Jackson didn't have Sharpton's "checkered" past but was he ever a legitimate candidate?

That's all I'm saying and Al's rep only adds fuel to the fire for proclaiming his [Black] illegitimacy, IMO.

______________________________________________________________
There's a world of difference between truth and facts.
Facts can obscure truth.
- Maya Angelou

quote:
Originally posted by Nmaginate:

Jesse Jackson didn't have Sharpton's "checkered" past but was he ever a legitimate candidate?



First, again, I agree with your assessment about the degree to which race plays a part in perception and press coverage.

To what degree, though, would any candidate running to be the head of government be "legitimate" with no experience in government? Wesley Clark only has credibility because, like Eisenhower, he was a general in the largest bureacracy of our government. Was Ross Perot considered a "legitimate" candidate?

If Billy Graham ran for president I imagine similar questions would be asked. Because he, perhaps, has a different "inventory" of items to write about - I imagine the coverage would therefore be different than Al's. Perhaps if Jerry Falwell or Jimmy Swaggert ran, the coverage would be more similar.

Listen, if someone wanted to do a hatchet job on Al, IMO they'd be much more straightforward about it. If anything, they'd show a clip or publish a transcript of that exchange with the FBI plant when Al appears to be facilitating a drug buy of some kind. They showed it on HBO a couple of years ago in connection with something having to do with Don King, I believe. Honestly, I have yet to hear anything about that incident. Why not?

BTW - as I pondered in another thread, I wonder to what degree Al is really working the agenda of black America anyway. When Howard Dean has to introduce race into the debates, it makes me wonder what Al's real objectives are. If it's OK for Carol Mosely Braun to openly carry the agenda for women (the former NOW president just joined her campaign as chair), why is it not OK for Al to be outspoken about the agenda of black Americans - who represent the most loyal core that the Democratic party has?


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
quote:
BTW - as I pondered in another thread, I wonder to what degree Al is really working the agenda of black America anyway. When Howard Dean has to introduce race into the debates, it makes me wonder what Al's real objectives are. If it's OK for Carol Mosely Braun to openly carry the agenda for women (the former NOW president just joined her campaign as chair), why is it not OK for Al to be outspoken about the agenda of black Americans - who represent the most loyal core that the Democratic party has?

I think I posted an article about the limits of party politics with respect to democrats and the black liberal "compromise"...

I have to wonder the same thing myself. I won't say that's why I'm fundamentally opposed (in principle) to "system" politics. But I guess I did.

There's definitely a huge difference in appealing to women voters and Black ones. Blacks are a "special interest" group to a lot of "Americans". Women, on the other hand, besides their sure numbers can have their agenda legitimized because their issues are seen as less antagonizing. Yet, there again, Mosely-Braun has gov't experience and is seen as less of an option despite women org.s backing here. Not that I think she's done herself any favors in the debates but she's never been on the radar before or after.

So what really does gov't experience count for and I think Sharpton's rebuttal to that argument about organizing a national organization has some merits, maybe not a whole lot but some... but Jesse Venutra or Ross Perot really only got casual resistance on that front it seemed. Because of their style and what substance that came out of their platform as "outsiders" their gov't experience did not hinder their ability to be seen as legitimate.

I have no problem with the digging for dirty but just tell what the dirt is and spare me the English Composition Literary Award for Creative Writing. IMO, that detracts from a story... those adjective-laden - as in too many - don't do it for me even against someone whom I feel my be fitting of all them.

I'm just saying I can think of my own ways to characterize what I think of someone. Okay, maybe two or three things are alright but every sentence or every other sentence is like man... "I Should Have Had A V-8!" Big Grin
You know, MBM, I can understand what you are saying. As I've even stated here on this board in the past, I have not always thought very highly of Rev. Al!! I've described him at times as 'opportunistic' 'attention-grabbing' 'camera-chasing' and probably 3 or 4 other unflattering things!! LOL And at times, I think he has been all of those things and more ... But, and I guess in addition to that, there has been another side shown. Runnin' for president is serious business, and anybody that thinks they can do it, I think, should be given a fair hearing and opportunity to prove it!

I don't know if I've done a full 360 on Sharpton, but I find myself turning 90-degrees every now and then ... and in recent times, I've actually considered voting for him in this primary election (the reasons of which I think I'll write in a Member's Editorial Smile).

But anyway, in answer to your second question, I've yet to be able to find any of the positive advancements that I asked about ... I'm still searching, though, but in the meantime, I did run across this article which (especially compared to the little expose above) is what I would call a much more flattering editorial on Mr. Sharpton ... and from a place I am surprised to find it, but an interesting website, nonetheless!!

Article From Marketing Opportunities in Business and Entertainment

REV. DR. AL SHARPTON
NATIONAL ACTION NETWORK





He is one of America's foremost leaders for civil rights and he leads the ongoing battle against economic injustice, political inequity and corporate racism. For more than two decades he has played a major role in virtually every significant move for civil liberty, community empowerment, and economic equality. Time Magazine asserted that he has emerged as the most important black leader in the city of New York.

As founder and president of the National Action Network (NAN), Sharpton heads an organization that fights for progressive, people-based policies against the rising conservative trend of cutting human services and balancing budgets at the expense of the working class people.

Sharpton has risen as a pivotal spokesperson against police brutality in America, and he has shed light on the travesty by forcing political figures and City leaders across the United States look closely at the issue. Of the country's leaders with whom he has met to discuss racial profiling and police brutality, includes the United States Attorney General Janet Reno.

On the eve of the "Redeem the Dream" 37th Anniversary March on Washington this past August, Sharpton met with Reno at the White House to discuss an executive order being issued from the nation's capitol penalizing offenders of racial profiling and police brutality. The following day, Saturday, August 26th, Sharpton, along with Martin Luther King, III, Sharpton co-convened the "Redeem the Dream" 37th Anniversary March on Washington to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s March on Washington in 1963. The March was the largest march in history to address the issue of racial profiling and police brutality.

Sharpton has stayed in the forefront of the political movement to bring justice to victims of police brutality as well as for families who have lost family to police brutality. He has mobilized countless rallies across the country and is the first person victims' call when they have been subjected to the violence of police officers.

His is a voice of the people. All people. He stands for those who have been unjustly accused or wrongfully brutalized. He makes the call for economic empowerment, fair labor practices, and partial business policy.

His successful calling this year for the first - ever presidential debate in Harlem, New York, between candidates Al Gore and Bill Bradley has further accentuated Sharpton's role as a leader in the community, and helped illustrate the importance of political candidates addressing the concerns of minority communities.

Sharpton's other efforts include the Invitational Summit on Multicultural Marketing and Media, which for the second year in 2000 brought together more than 300 advertising, marketing and media leaders in New York City at the Millennium Hotel.

The event was a historic collaboration of advertising agencies, major corporations, and trade organizations, and featured some of the top business leaders in the country. The event provided a unique learning opportunity for the executives who must start strategic courses to grow brands and profits in a dramatically changing demographic environment.

Sharpton said during his Summit, "All statistics indicate that African-American, Hispanic-American and Asian-American populations are increasing, and so is their buying power. Collectively we form a trillion-dollar consumer base. But, some advertisers still do not know this information, and they should."

In 1999, Sharpton joined forces with former New York City Mayor Ed Koch and Harvard Law School professor Charles Ogletree to form "Second Chance," a program for non-violent felony offenders who have served their prison sentences. The recently-formed project will offer training, counseling and support for ex-convicts with non-violent records and will be available to all without regard to race or gender

Such are the efforts of Rev. Dr. Al Sharpton. They have been unflagging, his voice unwavering, and his actions have caused change--a change for the better in this multicultural age.

The story of Rev. Al's career--recounted in his 1996 autobiography, " Go and Tell Pharaoh"- begins not long after his birth in 1954 in Brooklyn, New York. Raised by his mother, Sharpton began his ministry at the remarkable tender age of four when he preached his first sermon to hundreds at Washington Temple Church in Brooklyn. Throughout his adolescent years, the legendary Bishop F.D Washington mentored "The Wonder Boy Preacher." By the age of 9, Sharpton was licensed and ordained by Bishop Washington and appointed Junior Pastor of the 5,000-member Washington Temple congregation.

At age 12, Sharpton became interested in politics, mesmerized by Harlem Congressman Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. In one of his first forays into the public arena, Sharpton founded the National Youth Movement in 1971. Under his 17-year leadership, the NYM registered thousands of young people to vote, won hundreds of job opportunities, and led the fight to put the first Black on the New York State Metropolitan Transit Authority Board.

He also spearheaded the campaign that resulted in the first minority School Chancellor of the New York City Board of Education. During this time Sharpton led the now-famous marches against "crack" houses, exposing them to law enforcement agencies.

Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s Sharpton led a series of direct-action campaigns and crusades to fight racism in the criminal justice system--from Howard Beach and Bensonhurst, to Wappinger Falls and Los Angeles. As one writer said during the time, "Sharpton is literally reviving a Civil Rights Movement." In 1991, Sharpton formed the National Action Network. The NAN, formed to combat racial and civil rights violations, fights for progressive, people-based social policies by providing extensive voter education and registration campaigns, economic support for small community businesses and confronting corporate racism.

His runs for political office in 1992, 1994 and 1997 shook the New York State political establishment. His first campaign for a seat in the U.S. Senate garnered him 70% of the state-wide Black vote and helped three Black legislators achieve victory. His challenge of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan astounded the pundits, who were quieted when Sharpton tallied more than 80% of the statewide African-American vote and 26% of the general vote. And in his 1997 run for New York City Mayor within 1% of forcing a Democratic Primary run off.

Sharpton has been married to singer Kathy Jordan for almost twenty years. The couple has two daughters, Dominique and Ashley, and reside in Brooklyn, New York.

BLACK by NATURE, PROUD by CHOICE.
Free your mind, and the rest will follow.
quote:
Originally posted by Nmaginate:

I have no problem with the digging for dirty but just tell what the dirt is and spare me the English Composition Literary Award for Creative Writing.


fro


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
quote:
Originally posted by shebakoby:
Notice it's the _liberal_ media that is terrified of Sharpton. Wink


quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
The liberal media ... and whole damn Conservative party!!


Left wing, right wing, there's no real difference, their both on the same bird (a White Chicken)! Big Grin

___________________________

Now bro MBM, it's time to give thanks to sister EbonyRose for the quick response for the requsted information.

Sharpton is credited (via his slate) for the election of the highest number of Black City Councilman (people) and the only Black Comptroler for the City of New York, in NYC history. All having a lot to do with Sharpton's mayorial 'coat tail effect'.

In most cases (like most politicians and ministers) his efforts go unseen, and unless documented are quickly forgotten.

Have you every heard the phrases:'No Justice, No Peace' and 'racial profiling', according to him, he /his organization is credited with coining those phrases.

Racial profiling as a term is now main stream because Sharpton and many NJ protesters shut down a vital part of NJ's casino throughways which resulted in millions of dollars lost for the casinos.

By the way, that drug thing that you mentioned, I believe had nothing to do with buying or selling and only to do with 'rating', I think Sharpton wore a wire and had convo with drug dealers in order to get incriminating info. That was foolish of him to do. I'm not surprised, however, that MTV lead you to believe that Sharpton was involved with drug buying or selling.

As for he and don king, they are tight, I think King gave NAN about a million dollars within its first 5 years.

The White media does not want Sharpton to convert his grassroots movement, multi-million dollar connections, sharp intellect, and Black power agenda into 'legitimate' political clout. But it's way too late, he's legit, and the greater the number of Black folk that support him the better are our chances of relizing our empowerment.

--------------------------

Oh, EbonyRose: it might interest you to know Sharpton might agree with some of your earlier assertions ('opportunistic' 'attention-grabbing' 'camera-chasing'), not only because that's who he is, but because he throght at the time, and in some cases even now, that that is the most effective way to achive our (Black) objective faster.

So yes, he did 'chase' cameras, but now they chase him; and yes he did 'grab attention', but now he's holding it longer; and yes he was (and is) an 'opportunist', simply because he knows opportunities don't last always, so as a wise man he seizes them when available.
quote:
Originally posted by Our Empowerment:

The White media does not want Sharpton to convert his grassroots movement, multi-million dollar connections, sharp intellect, and Black power agenda into 'legitimate' political clout.


In your opinion, why does the "white media" have an interest in Al Sharpton's politics?


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
NY Post, up to more of the same tricks,

quote:

November 29, 2003 -- The Rev. Al Sharpton's long-shot presidential campaign is sparing no expense when it comes to travel and dining - even though it's nearly broke.

Despite having just over $24,000 on hand and owing more than $177,000, Sharpton is touring the country in style, according to the most recently available campaign financial data.

In the month of June alone, Sharpton spent more than $15,000 on swank hotels from Columbia, S.C., to Scottsdale, Ariz.

A single July jaunt to the luxury Four Seasons in Los Angeles cost $7,343.27 - more than 5 percent of the total $121,314.60 campaign cash Sharpton raised in the third quarter.

Other hotels benefiting from the reverend's run for the White House include the ultra-posh Phoenician in Arizona; the Mansion on Turtle Creek in Dallas; the Ritz Carlton in Dearborn, Mich.; and Miami's world-famous Mandarin Oriental.

Sharpton told The Post he is on a $200-a-day stipend from his campaign for hotel expenditures.

The Democratic White House hopeful also said many of the hotel stops coincided with various events sponsored by organizations that will reimburse him later.

A campaign source told Sharpton is fond of saying he "grew up living with cockroaches, and he doesn't want to live with them anymore."

The campaign also spared no expense on food and transportation.

Two charges at the city eatery Harry Cipriani ran nearly $700, and the campaign shelled out almost $1,700 for a single limousine service in Chicago.

Sharpton is expected to request public matching funds in which taxpayers match up to $250 per individual contribution to the campaign, though he hasn't yet filed the appropriate paperwork with the Federal Election Committee.

The campaign's spending habits on travel are particularly striking when compared to the front-running Democratic primary candidate.

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean - who had $12 million on hand as of Oct. 15 and is not accepting public financing - often stays with his mother when in New York and always puts his staff up at non-luxury hotels, according to a campaign source.

Hotels listed in Dean's financial statements include Howard Johnson's, the Comfort Inn and the anything-but-glamorous Franklin Hotel on the Upper East Side.
quote:
Originally posted by Our Empowerment:

NY Post, up to more of the same tricks,



What exactly do you find objectionable about this? Again, I'll admit that perhaps I am not as sensitive to this stuff as you are, but I read no "over the top" characterizations or comments. If it's true that Sharpton is staying at the Four Seasons yet Dean stays with his mom - then that would seem to be a valid fact to report. No?


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by Our Empowerment:

The White media does not want Sharpton to convert his grassroots movement, multi-million dollar connections, sharp intellect, and Black power agenda into 'legitimate' political clout.


In your opinion, why does the "white media" have an interest in Al Sharpton's politics?



Earlier on, prior to his first bid for elected office (I believe), he told the media in no uncertain terms that his constituency is made up of only grassroots people, and as such he could not be cow-tied by any political machine, party, party boss, or individual (of course later he listened to Jessie many times, to his fault, he should have taken his own advice, but I think he was really talking about White folk).

For hundreds of years free thinking Negros, with or without guns put lots of needless fear into White people. I believe it was for the exact same reasons they chose to buy the rights to enslaved Africans in the first place. They were very large, very strong, and at times unpredictable. So they treated them like the only other 'properity' they felt was the same -- the horse.

White folk [the ones in/with power not the ones without power] continued to do things to 'keep negros in check', knowing that the negros were not animals, knowing that they had the mental capacity for 'normal American living', but thinking that an educated negro, may result in the White man's demise they feared the negro, noteable the negro man.

As long as Black looking people are doing the obvious will of the White man the White man is comfortable with giving that negro trinkets and toys. When Black looking people do the will of the White man due to systemic conditioning, one must dig deeper than the surface to know if that is a Black person in fact or just a Black looking White man.

Once a Black man identifies himself as Black, White folk take their first step back. Seeing this, if the Black man fails to placate the White man's fears such as to result in the White man drawing forward towards the Black man, then the White man begins to turn around to go in another direction. This was very much the way life went for all aspects of American life (jobs, housing, etc...), with regard to Blacks, immigrants, those who did not speak english, as well as women. Actions during last 40years have remedies most of those problems.

Although the recent past has resulted in some gains for us, it is only in the context of the hugh negative gains we posted just prior to the recent positive direction gains.

Every time the White man sees the Black man excel he fear us, the more that we excel the greater his foolish fear. Supposidly we started off with only one monopoly -- sex, and of course they still have not gotten over that. But now, according to their rules, we have also monopolized music, dance, and sports. So they are foolishly furious.

But notice carefully, 99.9% of the Black looking men that have "made it", within the White man's system, regardless of catagory [with only one execption] appears to be trying to fit into the White man's contrived framework.

Hip Hop is the only industry that Black people own. Black hair care as an industry use to be ours, but we foolishly let it go, Black TV use to be ours, but again we foolishly let that go too. However, rap is squarely in the hands of Black folk, it is still systemically controled by Blacks; Blacks generally set the tone, those seeking to make a mark agressively seek the blessings of those Blacks in powerful positions, although Whites are supposidly the largest revenue resourse (particularly the music).


Although he dresses in conservative suits, frequents White hotels and resturants, and although he fails to keep a 'natural', for the most part Sharpton represents, to the White man, one of their greatest fears, Black Power controling a White system.

They will do their very best to try to erase the very thought of such a thing, hence all of their jealous rantings, fits, and tira[i]des.

As I said in other posts: Sharpton's 'coat-tail' effect will help elect many local Black candidates nationwide during the next two years; and Powell's presidential bid gets a boost, since he is still viewed by the White man as a 'good negro'.

If Sharpton accepts the FOI security, that would complete the picture.
quote:
Originally posted by Our Empowerment:

Although he dresses in conservative suits, frequents White hotels and resturants, and although he fails to keep a 'natural', for the most part Sharpton represents, to the White man, one of their greatest fears, Black Power controling a White system.


Either that, or they just think he's a buffoon and enjoy being entertained by him.


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
I doubt very seriously that they regard him as a buffoon MBM. After the trent lott episode, their conservative core agreed to meet with him the next day.....so obviously they have some apprehension of the amount of political havoc he may cause. If he were a buffoon, they would have not given him the time of day.

BTW, I agree with those who see this as a usual attack on any black candidate who is not a cow-towing establishment negro. Hell, it was a black candidate that I have only ever of being referred to as "unelectable". It was Jesse Jackson....but once he won that Iowa primary....they got really really quiet....hmmm....
quote:
Originally posted by Our Empowerment:
quote:


Founding Father MBM:

In your opinion, why does the "white media" have an interest in Al Sharpton's politics?




If you're asking me a question, I think Sharpton is entertaining. He makes for interesting reporting. I don't believe that anyone takes him seriously vis-a-vis presidential politics. They may be apprehensive about him with regard to potential "shake downs" as some on this site might describe it. Nevertheless, IMO, I think the media has no vested interest one way or the other in Sharpton - other than making money (selling papers/advertising) through him.

BTW - I don't think the media is "scared" of anyone. If you think about it, they create and destroy people every day. If they wanted to collectively "eliminate" Sharpton from the race it would seem to be pretty easy for them to do.

There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela


[This message was edited by MBM on December 01, 2003 at 08:20 AM.]
Very interesting, they said the same thing about Jessie, and MLK (while he was living).

I'd bet, those sentiments are just generic for any, and perhaps all, Black leaders that have Black grassroots support.

BTW, no one is more entertaining than Bush, and had he been a Black man, he would not have made it to any elected office.

In other words, if you let the media mold your mind you will speak their words on cue, the cue being "what do you think about [place grassroots leader's name here]?"

<>

... its time for Prosperity


<>  



An African American Board Game Of Wealth & Success.

quote:
Originally posted by Our Empowerment:

Very interesting, they said the same thing about Jessie, and MLK (while he was living).

I'd bet, those sentiments are just generic for any, and perhaps all, Black leaders that have Black grassroots support.

BTW, no one is more entertaining than Bush, and had he been a Black man, he would not have made it to any elected office.

In other words, if you let the media mold your mind you will speak their words on cue, the cue being "what do you think about [place grassroots leader's name here]?"



I don't understand your response. Why would anyone in the press "fear" Al Sharpton? What on earth does the press have to be "scared" of Al Sharpton about?


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
"I don't understand your response. Why would anyone in the press "fear" Al Sharpton? What on earth does the press have to be "scared" of Al Sharpton about?" --MBM

The fear is not by "anyone". The fear is in the owners of the press. The exercisers of the power of the press. The writers get told what the position of the organ is. I believe the institution of the press is fearful of Al Sharpton. More accurately, the institution of the press is fearful of the effect Al Sharpton can have on the power of the vote of African America.

Al Sharpton doesn't HAVE TO WIN. He can enable others. He can squeeze primaries to achieve credibility. If he finishes in the top four, THE TOP FOUR, in Iowa. LOOK OUT!!! If he finishes in the top four in New Hampshire, it's "cheek squeeaing" time. Each performance reshapes the demographics of the succeeding primary.

Yes, THE PRESS fears Sharpton. He is feared because while he may not change the balance of power, he can defintitely change the shape of power. Sharpton has hands-on impact with the major sector of the Democratic voting base. This attraction to the Republicans. It is a great fear of the Democrats.

Sharpton's profile in the Democratic Party grows daily. Every day he is still there, his leverage increases.

Who do you think has greater leverage in Democratic primaries. Kucenich? Moseley-Braun? Edwards? Lieberman? Gephardt?

Of the remaining nine candidates, who do you think has greater leverage with African American voters?

That's what the press has to fear in Sharpton.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.
Any time Blacks get ready to elevate in any way on any level, the White media and every other White entity gets scared!! Has since the Emancipation. Because there is even the possibility that Sharpton may mobilize Blacks and awaken their spirits for justice and equality (as should be), the media is definitely "scared" of him, and more than likely with good reason.

It's one thing if we as a people actually start listening to what Al has to say. But, whoa, if we start to actually act upon it and do something about it .... all that messy business called the Civil Rights Movement could start all up again ... and if that's not a "scary" thought for the White establishment, I don't know what is! Eek

BLACK by NATURE, PROUD by CHOICE.
Free your mind, and the rest will follow.
White folks may be apprehensive, but IMO the media has no interest or concern with Al other than using him to make money. Again, the media can take a president down (Nixon? Clinton?) what does it have to "fear" of Al? (Al doesn't even have united support throughout black America. What is there to fear?) With one or two articles Al is done. It would be fairly easy for them to attack him.

If they are so scared, why haven't they attacked him in a serious way?


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
Also, for the press to fear Sharpton implies that he, in some way, can affect their interests. How can Al prevent "the media" from selling advertising and making money?

I'm only pressing the point for the sake of clarity. IMO the Democratic party (and even corporate America), for example, has MUCH more to fear from Al than the media.


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
"If they are so scared, why haven't they attacked him in a serious way?" -- MBM

The media is in a quandary. They need to hurt Sharpton without making him look good. They can't simply attack him. Why? A viable and independent African American vote is not good for the media. What would they manipulate with that? No, no. The media needs this behemouth of voter power to be headless. The media knows how to "guide" and focus that kind of power. The media has been doing for generations.


"Also, for the press to fear Sharpton implies that he, in some way, can affect their interests. How can Al prevent "the media" from selling advertising and making money?

I'm only pressing the point for the sake of clarity. IMO the Democratic party (and even corporate America), for example, has MUCH more to fear from Al than the media.' --- MBM

A strong and independent African American vote IS against the interests of the media. The reason rich people buy media outlets in not SIMPLY to make money. The media has an unfettered voice to the American public. It is a bully pulpit. It is power. It can shape the thought and policy of a nation.

To believe Rupert Murdock wants more media outlets SIMPLY to make more money is very idealistic. Rupert Murdock already has money. Lots of money. Rupert Murdock wants power in the American political arena. Rupert Murdock now has the ability to shape public opinion --- nationwide, and unfettered. Corporate America IS the media.

PEACE

Jim Chester

You are who you say you are. Your children are who you say you are.

[This message was edited by James Wesley Chester on December 02, 2003 at 01:47 PM.]
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:

Rupert Murdock now has the ability to shape public opinion --- nationwide, and unfettered. Corporate America IS the media.



Shape public opinion for what purpose? And further, how does Al Sharpton prevent Murdoch from doing that?


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
Okay, MBM ... I get your point now! Smile And I think you're right ... the media really doesn't have anything to "fear" from Al in that context!

For the media, they would love to see him do something over the top ... for sensationalism putposes if for nothing else. And I guess that's not really just for Al ... but that's what they are all about! They want to exploit, and so, of course, anything good or dynamic doesn't count!! Eek

But I guess what I'm thinking is not so much the "media" itself is afraid of him, as are those who "are" the media ... b/k/a/ corporate America!! Do you have any idea what kind of havoc would be created if Al were to actually win the Democratic nomination?? Eek Eek Or, at the very least, actually mobilize Black Americans through his candidacy or grow big enough $@(%*#% to want to do something politically about our situation? Eek Eek I'm talkin' mass craziness here!! And if he were to start making those kinds of waves, the "media" would have no choice but to capture it and I can tell you none of them want to deal with that! The reporters would have a field day!! But the changes that could/would be made would be something mgmt would be/is definitely "afraid" of!

But you're right. Media as we know it can't touch Al Sharpton or anyone else. As you say ... it can bring down presidents ... so they'd definitely be the ones with the absolute power.

BLACK by NATURE, PROUD by CHOICE.
Free your mind, and the rest will follow.
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:
"I don't understand your response. Why would anyone in the press "fear" Al Sharpton? What on earth does the press have to be "scared" of Al Sharpton about?" --MBM

The fear is not by "anyone". The fear is in the owners of the press. The exercisers of the power of the press. The writers get told what the position of the organ is. I believe the institution of the press is fearful of Al Sharpton. More accurately, the institution of the press is fearful of the effect Al Sharpton can have on the power of the vote of African America.

...Each performance reshapes the demographics of the succeeding primary.

Yes, THE PRESS fears Sharpton. He is feared because while he may not change the balance of power, he can defintitely change the shape of power....

Sharpton's profile in the Democratic Party grows daily. Every day he is still there, his leverage increases....

... That's what the press has to fear in Sharpton.

PEACE

Jim Chester




Dammmmmmmmmmmmmm .... better yet, AMEN!
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
White folks may be apprehensive, .
Apprehension, fear; tomato, to-ma'to.


quote:
Originally posted by MBM: Again, the media can take a president down (Nixon? Clinton?)

Did the media take them down or did they go down and the media had fun with it. Don't forget Nixon rose because of the media, but fell on his own. Had Nixon been a Black man you would have hear the WHOLE story.

quote:
Originally posted by MBM: ... what does it have to "fear" of Al? (Al doesn't even have united support throughout black America.

Who has united support throughtout Black America?

Who has united support throughout White America?

Who has united support in any kind of America?

So let's be fair, and keep one standard to measure all by.

quote:
Originally posted by MBM: What is there to fear?[)] With one or two articles Al is done.

What would the articles say that has not been said already, who would the articles appeal to that the present dribble doesn't already appease.

For me it would just remain fodder for this thread. Then after they have shown all of their 'cards' what else have they got to play?

So what would they say?

quote:
Originally posted by MBM: It would be fairly easy for them to attack him.

They have done so already, they have even tried the ignore button for a while, but he kept on 'going and going'.

So just how 'fairly easy' is it?

quote:
Originally posted by MBM: If they are so scared, why haven't they attacked him in a serious way?

Again, what do you mean by 'serious', do you think they are joking in their articles, do you think this is just some kind of freakish lover's squabble?

If you call or write the NY Post and tell them that their articles on Sharpton are 'not serious' trite, weak, and need more bite; all they would do is give you the same information ("no news", as excellently stated earlier) but give you more pictures that make it look like he is a wild man.

Let's flip the script:

If the media isn't scared of Sharpton, why don't they do 'puff' (happy, nice, gooddie-good) pieces on him? Better yet, why don't they get two reporters (one white one black) and they both write stories on his good and bad in the same paper, that would sell far moe papers?

Or from a different perspective: ask yourself the question, "If Sharpton were President, how would the media be effected, especially considering how they have treated him?"

The fact is the major media only has power when you vest your trust in them, if you don't believe what they say, you don't subscribe to it, then they become powerless, just like anyone else.
more of the same, but down towards the middle they begin to show their hand, see if you could see some of the cards that I see they are trying to play (the 'heartless joker with a knife' card).

This article attacks Harlem, Sharpton, Black leadership, and Blacks all at the same time. But it's unmistakenly aimed squarely at Sharpton.

"Dean could try to strike a deal with Sharpton, but that's risky. Sharpton is very unpopular with a lot of voters." [can you just see ytmedia sweating on this thought, having to negotiate with Sharpton? They didn't go to Harlem because they were looking for cheese and Crackers at Sylvia's. They went there as a prelude to a deal.]




quote:
Invading Harlem with Gore was
part of plan to woo black voters



Last Saturday night, Al Sharpton hosted "Saturday Night Live" and charmed the nation by singing "I Feel Good" and busting some very fine James Brown moves. But yesterday, Howard Dean went up to Harlem and did a political shuffle that left Sharpton looking leadfooted.

Dean's partner was Al Gore. They appeared together at a breakfast meeting at the National Black Theatre, where the former vice president called for Dean's nomination.

A lot of attention has been devoted to the obvious anti-Clinton symbolism of staging the summit on 125th St., where the former President has a rarely used but highly visible office.

Doubtless, both Dean and Gore were happy, each for his own reasons, to declare their independence from both Hillary and Bill.

Still, Bill Clinton only rents in Harlem. Sharpton is supposed to own it.

But when Dean raided his turf yesterday, Sharpton was off somewhere else, running.

Not, of course, for President. The Rev. Al knows perfectly well he's not White House material.

He's not going to be on the Democratic ticket, either. In Iowa and New Hampshire, he's not even a blip on the screen.

No, Sharpton has a different goal: To move the political headquarters of black America from Chicago toNew York, with himself replacing the Rev. Jesse Jackson as theman in charge.

That's a huge thing, and there's a lot more involved than ego. Anybody can be a Democratic candidate, but no one can actually dominate the party without control over its biggest reliable constituency, black voters.

Sharpton's strategy for replacing Jackson has been to emulate him. He's the first black Democratic presidential aspirant since Jackson ran in 1988. Jackson's candidacy undermined Michael Dukakis' popularity and credibility with black voters.

After the Rev. Al went after Dean for courting Jefferson Davis Democrats, Dean must have seen that the same could happen to him.

In fact, with Southern primaries coming up, the pummeling could get worse.

This could be fatal to Dean's presidential chances, even if he ultimately gets the nomination.

No Democrat can possibly beat President Bush in November without a massive black turnout, and Dean won't get one if he has spent a year as Sharpton's yuppie punching bag.

Dean could try to strike a deal with Sharpton, but that's risky. Sharpton is very unpopular with a lot of voters.

And, in the unlikely event of a Dean victory, Dean doesn't want to turn the White House into a time-share with Tawana Brawley's mentor.

And so Dean decided on a Harlem two-step. Bringing Gore uptown got all the attention, but that was actually step two. Step one, less publicized but more crucial, took place in Chicago on Sunday, when Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. formally endorsed Dean.

Without the Jacksons, father and son, Dean would not have dared invade Sharpton's turf. But embracing them changes the dance. Dean can afford to step all over Sharpton - and even be rewarded for it by the Confederate flag-wavers Dean covets - as long as he has someone else on his arm.

Gore had his own reasons for coming up to Harlem, and for the moment they are the talk of the town.

But ultimately, Gore's endorsement won't matter, because Gore no longer matters.

Dean brought him uptown to make an unspoken announcement of real significance: In his Democratic Party, the black political headquarters stays in Chicago.

As for the Rev. Al, he can have Harlem back now. Dean is finished with it.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×