I’m sure we have all heard many claims of the SAT test being racially bias. I've never taken the test so I don't have first hand information concerning this claim. I was wondering if anybody could give examples of some of the questions on the test that are racially bias.

 

K

Original Post
It has been a VERY long time since I took that test and I hear it has been revised a couple of times since then but I wonder if culturally biased would be more accurate than racially biased.

Take a vocabulary test for instance.  If a kid grows up in an environment where certain words are never used how is he supposed to answer a question correctly that uses those words, especially on a TIMED TEST?  Even if he has encountered them a few times in school how much will they slow him down compared to a kid that grew up in a home where they were used occasionally.

That is PARTLY why I talk about science fiction books.  The stuff I read in grade school was from the 50s and 60s by almost exclusively White men.  But they weren't your AVERAGE White American male.   It contained words and IDEAS that I never encountered in the hood.  And I was learning the stuff in grade school, long before I ever heard of SAT tests.

I scored in the top 2%.  If I had only learned what I was given by my grade school teachers I would have been in trouble by the time I started high school.

Xum

Vocabulary List:

100 Top SAT Words

http://www.vocabulary.com/lists/23400

It was easier to find that I thought.  Personally I consider the ideas about science more important than the vocabulary but there seems to be a lot of people making a big deal about vocabulary on the SAT.  Probably trying to make money on it too.  Searching on:

+SAT +vocabulary

got 373,000 hits.

Xum

I will admit many of those words are rather complex, and aren't used in casual conversation among blacks OR whites; but unless we have a situation whereas those words are being taught in white schools, and are NOT being taught in minority schools, how can the use of such words be considered biased? Do you suppose such words are'nt being taught in minority schools?

K

Reference:
Do you suppose such words are'nt being taught in minority schools?

I would say yeah.

They didn't even have SAT tests when I graduated from high school.    However ... I did my  10th grade at my local (primarily Black) high school ... was bussed 36 miles to a primarily White high school for my 11th grade year .. and then went back to my original school for my 12th. (Don't ask )

What I do know is that the "history" course that I was taught at the White school was different from the "history" that I learned at the Black one. The latter was more focused on things like the Founding Fathers and the formation of this country, where as the former actually taught me about the history of the world and other countries, as well. I also had a much bigger variety of gym/sports classes that I could take. (The White school had a volleyball team .. where as at the other school, we had 4 weeks of either that or badminton and then moved on to something else!).

I always just attributed it to different teachers having their own way of doing their jobs.  But, maybe it was a curriculum issue .. or a matter of different administrators deciding to set different criteria or course standards for the students under their charge.
I am a strong advocate of language.

I think language is the key effective communication...

..., and effective thought processes.

I took a quick look at the 'top 100'.

I think a person in 11th grade should be familiar with, not just heard of, 90% of them.

At least.

Great ideas communicated badly rarely get implemented properly.

PEACE

Jim Chester
Reference:
I will admit many of those words are rather complex, and aren't used in casual conversation among blacks OR whites; but unless we have a situation whereas those words are being taught in white schools, and are NOT being taught in minority schools, how can the use of such words be considered biased?
Reference:
I am a strong advocate of language.I think language is the key effective communication......, and effective thought processes.
That is why I emphasized cultural bias instead of racial bias.  This vocabulary crap filters out LOWER CLASS White kids also.

This society promotes the idea that the upper classes are more "intelligent" than the lower classes and controlling the distribution of knowledge and USING LANGUAGE TO CONFUSE PEOPLE is part of the game.

Using a $64 word when 3 50 cent words mean the same thing is not more intelligent but it is a way to exclude people that are not in THE CLUB.  Reading a lot of books is one way to encounter many words that are not part of ones cultural milieu.  But just because someone has a BIG vocabulary does not mean they understand much about science.  So that is why I pick SF.  Kill multiple birds with a single stone.  That is why I suggest this for grade school kids when their brains are very plastic and information can slip in without their even noticing especially if the reading is FUN.


http://sfgospel.typepad.com/sf...ia-and-progress.html

Both of these books are now free on the net.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files.../32390-h/32390-h.htm

http://www.gutenberg.org/files.../30639-h/30639-h.htm

These stories are from the early 60s and there is a third book to the trilogy that isn't available yet. But it is about Africa and Black Americans in Africa though it was written by a White man.  The trilogy is about technology and cultural change but involves power games against Europeans and Americans.

Since the stories are so old there are a number of aspects missing from the current world situation like the fall of Russian Communism, the rise of Chinese psuedo-Communism, Peak Oil and Global Warming.

It has been months since I mentioned these on various Black web sites.  Not one response about anyone having read any yet. 

Xum

PS - Should I talk about KNEEGROWS using BIG words and trying to sound "educated" and not getting it quite right?
Reference:
This society promotes the idea that the upper classes are more "intelligent" than the lower classes and controlling the distribution of knowledge and USING LANGUAGE TO CONFUSE PEOPLE is part of the game. Using a $64 word when 3 50 cent words mean the same thing is not more intelligent but it is a way to exclude people that are not in THE CLUB. Reading a lot of books is one way to encounter many words that are not part of ones cultural milieu.
To be honest, very few SAT vocabulary words are part of ANYBODY's "cultural milieu."  To say that the SAT vocabulary testing is "culturally biased" because the schools our kids go to don't teach that level of vocabulary is horribly off-base, because bad schools are not part of our culture.  It may be part of our condition, but it's not part of our culture. 

Perhaps making our kids read, outside of school, is not part of our culture.  If it's not, then it should be.  To blame the test as "culturally biased" because too many people in our "culture" don't prepare their kids well enough is backward, if you ask me. 

And for the record, "$64 words" very often express subtlely different shades of meaning, and different connotations.  Some people try to sound intellectual by using them, but they often misuse them, because they just assume the "bigger" words are just smarter-sounding synonyms of "smaller words."  But that's just not usually correct.  To teach kids the difference between a word like "acumen" and "insight" is to expand their ability to think.  There is nothing cultural about simple-mindedness.
Okay .... I hear what everybody's saying .... but .... Kevin's original statement/question did ask about the possibility of "racial" bias .... not our "cultural" misgivings.

"Racial" bias would indicate actions against us by somebody else - (due to skin color or discrimination) .... while any "cultural" shortcomings would indicate things caused more by/towards ourselves (and/or our children) as a people.
It could be seen as racially biased if black people were not able to prepare for such a test.  If there were laws in placed due to the color of our skin that would prevent us from learning what it takes to do well on the test.  There are no such limitations.  So the answer to the original question would have to be no.
If Kevin literally meant "racial" bias instead of cultural bias (I'm sure what he meant was cultural bias), then obviously the answer would be no.  I've never heard anybody argue that there's something about the SAT that needs changing because it has a bias against black people based on anything biological.
Reference:
"Racial" bias would indicate actions against us by somebody else - (due to skin color or discrimination) ....
I think a totally literal answer to the question would have to be NO.

But I would consider that to ba an oversimplification.  If race has secondary side effects and kids can be filtered out on the basis of the secondary side effects then the net result is the same.

People that believe in the vocabulary/intelligence crap support it.  The psychology book I had in college said, "Intelligence is what intelligence tests measure."  I laughed at that at the time.  We are dealing with circular logic that validates itself.  If you disagree then you are CRAZY.

Xum
Well let's see a study on the SAT was done by Princeton University's Jay Rosner by data he requested from the SAT, The data he received from them clearly shows racial bias FOR whites. Additionally the way the test is graded penalizes additional points for questions answered incorrectly based on the total number of questions answered. Say if you get answer 50 questions and get 35 right and 15 wrong and the total number of questions is 75, you will get points taken for only answering 50 questions out of 75 AND additional penalty for the 15 you answered incorrectly. Also when the SAT does their sample testing to formulate newer tests, they nearly always omit questions answered correctly by non-whites. From the  training I've had on this from the experts, Rosner, the SAT is absolutely biased in favor of whites.

FYI the college I am employed at is working with Mr. Rosner and alumni to help prospective non-white students raise their standardized testing scores through a tutoring program offered. So they 'studied' the test and there is little room for point improvement on the SAT, again by design.
Check out Jay Rosner's research for yourself.
Vox (quote)
“If Kevin literally meant "racial" bias instead of cultural bias (I'm sure what he meant was cultural bias), then obviously the answer would be no.  I've never heard anybody argue that there's something about the SAT that needs changing because it has a bias against black people based on anything biological.”

 (Reply)
Actually what I meant was racially biased. Mostly what I heard was that SAT tests were racist, but nobody ever explained how; that’s why I posted here.

 

Yemaya (quote)
Well let's see a study on the SAT was done by Princeton University's Jay Rosner by data he requested from the SAT, The data he received from them clearly shows racial bias FOR whites. Additionally the way the test is graded penalizes additional points for questions answered incorrectly based on the total number of questions answered. Say if you get answer 50 questions and get 35 right and 15 wrong and the total number of questions is 75, you will get points taken for only answering 50 questions out of 75 AND additional penalty for the 15 you answered incorrectly

 

(Repy)
I don’t understand how this puts whites at an advantage

 

(quote)
Also when the SAT does their sample testing to formulate newer tests, they nearly always omit questions answered correctly by non-whites.

 

(reply)
If this is purposely being done, it is definitely an example of the test being racist! And whoever is responsible for doing this should be publicly exposed

 

Kevin

Reference:
I've never heard anybody argue that there's something about the SAT that needs changing because it has a bias against black people based on anything biological.

I really don't see how you can separate the two?    Our cultural development is what it is because of our biological makeup .... and the environment we been brought up into.

"Race", in this instance, would encompass all of that.  So, I think the question really is, is the SAT bias against black people for reasons of the condition of them being "Black"? And that would include all the social, biological and historical issues all into the equation.  Wouldn't it? 

At any rate, I guess the bottom line as I see it is ... if you know that the conditions that a high percentage of Black and other minority children are learning under are inferior, then why give them the same test that  you know you're going to judge them by a higher standard on than you know they should be able to achieve?  And then pit their scores against the scores of those "other" children that you know are going to achieve higher marks ... because it's for THEM that you have set the standard and created the test in the first place!! 

For so many of our children ... it's NOT that they can't be taught ... it's that they aren't given a fair opportunity or environment in which to learn.  Intellect knows no race.  But, you can't cut off a man's foot and expect him to run a "fair and square even" race!!  (Although, that doesn't mean he won't dust your ass if given the chance and a little motivation!  ).

I don't know if the test is biased or not ... but, if I had to guess ... I'd think, 'how could it not be??' 
This society promotes the idea that the upper classes are more "intelligent" than the lower classes and controlling the distribution of knowledge and USING LANGUAGE TO CONFUSE PEOPLE is part of the game.---Xum

I think we are mistaken to construe what is happening in our schools as classism.

I think our schools are the foundation of the 'color-construction' of our society.

We CANNOT AFFORD to forget what is real.

There is a reason...that they still call themselves 'white' people, and not Caucasian...as their preferred usage.

We, typically, do not know that 'white' is the distinction of one Caucasian from all other Caucasians who stretch from The Bosporus through Indonesia.

I am not saying this to simply be in contention with you.

I am trying to note this so that we don't  'drink the kool-aid'.

PEACE

Jim Chester

Hi Kevin 1122, I just named the individual who did a study on the SAT testing methods, Jay Rosner. Google him. I've gone through this training twice this year about this very subject. The SAT is racist and they have the power NOT to answer to anyone about their testing methodology. They administer and forumulate tests from the SAT to the GMAT and CLEP. They are the go-to testing agency and have a big chunk of profit to be made. Think of 'The System'. This is one of them.

Yemaya (quote)

when the SAT does their sample testing to formulate newer tests, they nearly always omit questions answered correctly by non-whites.

 

(reply)

When you consider the thousands of non whites who take the test, it should be impossible to find a question that all of us flunked on don’t cha think? Anyway can you give an example of a question that would be easy for a white person to answer but difficult for us?

 

Ebonyrose (quote)
I guess the bottom line as I see it is ... if you know that the conditions that a high percentage of Black and other minority children are learning under are inferior, then why give them the same test that  you know you're going to judge them by a higher standard on than you know they should be able to achieve?  And then pit their scores against the scores of those "other" children that you know are going to achieve higher marks ...

 

(reply)
Inferior high school or not, when you get to college you are gonna have to compete at the same level as everyone else. Maybe the test can determine if you are ready.

 

Yemaya
Hi Kevin 1122, I just named the individual who did a study on the SAT testing methods, Jay Rosner. Google him. I've gone through this training twice this year about this very subject.

 

(reply)

I googled him and I was unable to find anything that gave an example of the SAT as being racist.

I saw a book for sale about it being racist, but I don’t have time to buy and read his book. Perhaps you can find an example and share his findings with us


Kevin

Kevin 1122, as you stated in your initial post, you've never taken the SAT. So obviously this is a subject you know absolutely nothing about. I gave you the tools to verify what I've said, but you don't have the time to look up and review the information. That is the kind of laziness that plagues this country. If you were geniunely interested you would research this for yourself. Hilarious.

That is the kind of laziness that plagues this country. If you were geniunely interested you would research this for yourself. Hilarious.---Yemaya

Kevin 1122:

This is a demonstration of what I call 'Insistent Ignorance'.

Sometime ago, I realized I was practicing it in the case of references being made to Dr. Cress-Welsing.

My practice, habit, is to not continue to seek verification of a proven truth.

There will always be 'something else' to be considered.

Those who challenge, often challenge for the sake of the challenge.

I had not done that with Dr. Cress-Welsing.

I just assumed I knew.

While I agreed with what was reported about her conclusions, I did not know what she said.

So, I am taking this opportunity to refer 'The Isis Papers' by Dr. Frances Cress-Welsing.

She 'puts it where the goats can get it'.

It is 'low-hanging fruit'.

PEACE

Jim Chester
Reference:
(reply)
Inferior high school or not, when you get to college you are gonna have to compete at the same level as everyone else. Maybe the test can determine if you are ready.

"Inferior high school or not ..."

You say that so matter-of-factly ... as if the intentional lack of providing a quality education (to a certain group of children ... over another group of children) based on race and discrimination against them is no big deal ... or as if it doesn't cause an inferior level of education upon which those children will ultimately be judged!!

Yes, they will have to complete at the same level in college ... which is exactly why the "readiness" issue is so important (how 'ready' can you be if you were (intentionally) denied the tools you need to succeed at that "same level" while they were (intentionally) given to 'others') ... and the testing given to determine IF you will be able to 'compete' (where and whether you are accepted to a college and which one) doesn't account for such initial 'imbalance'??

School systems discriminate in the country.  I'm not sure whether or not you believe that ... (and if you don't, you will never accept "yes" as the answer to your thread question ... and this is a moot discussion anyway! )  But, if you're willing to believe that many Black children receive an inferior education at inferior schools ... then it seems to me that you would have to at least entertain the thought that testing them against children that are given a more 'superior' education and expecting the same results has to be at least somewhat unfair.
Reference:
it seems to me that you would have to at least entertain the thought that testing them against children that are given a more 'superior' education and expecting the same results has to be at least somewhat unfair.
To me, the point is not fairness, though, or "expecting the same result."  The assumption is that there's really only one standard of "readiness."  If the kids with inferior educations aren't ready, then they're not ready.  I don't see why we want to change the test, when the schools need to be changed. 

Yemaya's charge goes far beyond saying that unprepared students are doing worse.  She's saying that the test itself is tweaked periodically to weed out questions black kids do better on.  That's a far more serious charge, that I'd want to explore more.
Reference:
To me, the point is not fairness, though, or "expecting the same result." The assumption is that there's really only one standard of "readiness." If the kids with inferior educations aren't ready, then they're not ready. I don't see why we want to change the test, when the schools need to be changed.

I hear you, Vox ... but ... it seems to me that, at least for the sake of expediency of trying to 'level the playing field' and correct any 'racial bias' related to the test (IF, indeed there is any) .... it would be easier to change the test than it would be to change (or even) the school system.

It could, conceivably, take a decade to 'even out' the schools and student education levels ... but, "tweaking" the test to be able to more equally measure such education, perhaps, could be done within the course of a school year.

Also, it's possible that the test, itself, doesn't need to be "re-done" to be fair (if, in fact it is unfair). As I think I understand it, sometimes it's just a matter of a way a question is phrased or the words used on the test that create 'problems/confusion' for children of different ethnic groups.  It's kinda like how boys and girls are completely capable of learning the same things ... only it's more effective if they learn them in different ways.  Simply taking that into account could give the test-makers what they need to produce a better product? 
Yemaya (quote)

I gave you the tools to verify what I've said, but you don't have the time to look up and review the information. That is the kind of laziness that plagues this country.

Laziness?? Tools? You gave me a NAME! That’s it! I googled the name and I didn’t get the results you promised. How is that lazy?
I was hoping you would share what you learned from the man since you took a couple of his classes but instead you insult me.

Personally I think if you had an answer you would have given it to me by now rather than attacking me; but that’s okay, call me lazy, call me whatever you want I couldn’t care less what you think of me; I’ve been called worse than better people than you

 

JWC

This is a demonstration of what I call 'Insistent Ignorance'…..My practice, habit, is to not continue to seek verification of a proven truth.

There will always be 'something else' to be considered.

Those who challenge, often challenge for the sake of the challenge.

 

(reply)
James! I did exactly what she said; I googled the name and even though I got a lot of information about this guy, (that he helps minorities with the SAT test, Princeton Review, Admission Test expert, etc) But I couldn’t find anything relating to the SAT test actually being racist which is what this thread is all about! Now how is that an example of “Insistent Ignorance”???

 

Ebony
School systems discriminate in the country.  I'm not sure whether or not you believe that ... (and if you don't, you will never accept "yes" as the answer to your thread question ... and this is a moot discussion anyway! )  But, if you're willing to believe that many Black children receive an inferior education at inferior schools ... then it seems to me that you would have to at least entertain the thought that testing them against children that are given a more 'superior' education and expecting the same results has to be at least somewhat unfair.

 

(reply)
I understand many of the minority schools are giving a subpar education to our students but that’s not an example of the SAT being racist! IMO If a school is subpar; you fight to improve the school! You don’t sit back and the test racist! 

K

Reference:
I saw a book for sale about it being racist, but I don’t have time to buy and read his book. Perhaps you can find an example and share his findings with us---Kevin 1122

You chose not to pursue.

At your personal decision....insistence.

None of knows everything.

What we don't know is our ignorance.

When we choose to not remove that ignorance, it becomes 'insistent ignorance'.

PEACE

Jim Chester
Reference:
(reply)
 I understand many of the minority schools are giving a subpar education to our students but that’s not an example of the SAT being racist! IMO If a school is subpar; you fight to improve the school! You don’t sit back and the test racist!

Bush's "No Child Left Behind" was supposed to be the answer to 'fighting to improve subpar schools'.  A decade later, more of our children are being left further behind than they were when when his so-called plan for "improvement" was implemented.

Making the SAT more equitable to students who have purposefully (and for centuries) been denied the same quality of educational opportunities so that there is a better chance that they may be tested more equally and have a better chance to compete fairly against those who have been given the tools necessary to succeed ..... could probably be done within a school semester cycle.

However, I don't think we've reached the point (for many in this country) where 'equality' is really the goal.  So, if, indeed, the SAT test is 'racially bias' I wouldn't expect it to be acknowledged nor corrected to better serve those it discriminates against.

This is America, after all.

JWC quotes me and replies

I saw a book for sale about it being racist, but I don’t have time to buy and read his book. Perhaps you can find an example and share his findings with us---Kevin 1122

You chose not to pursue.

At your personal decision....insistence.

None of knows everything.

What we don't know is our ignorance.

When we choose to not remove that ignorance, it becomes 'insistent ignorance'.

 

(reply)
When I ask a person a question and they refer me to a book, the reason I don’t buy the book is because I’ve been down that road too many times before. What usually happens is the book gives an argument that is soo full of holes and I can’t refute the argument because I don’t have access to the author of the book. Meanwhile, I’ve spent too much money, and too much time in the purchase of a book that ain’t worth reading.

That’s why when I asked a person a question, (if they lead me to a website, that’s okay because there isn’t a time or money investment) I would prefer that they answer the question themselves instead of leading me to a source that can’t be questioned.

Yemaya claimed to have taken some of his courses on the subject, I didn’t think it was asking too much of her to simply share what she learned; was I wrong?

 

K

Ebonyrose (quote)

Making the SAT more equitable to students who have purposefully (and for centuries) been denied the same quality of educational opportunities so that there is a better chance that they may be tested more equally and have a better chance to compete fairly against those who have been given the tools necessary to succeed ..... could probably be done within a school semester cycle.

 (reply)
And how do you suppose that can be done?

 

K

I’ve spent too much money, and too much time in the purchase of a book that ain’t worth reading.---Kevin 1122

Yemaya claimed to have taken some of his courses on the subject, I didn’t think it was asking too much of her to simply share what she learned; was I wrong?
I agree about the money, but.....

Chosing to not get the book, or article is a personal choice.

As for asking, I don't think it was asking too much.

But the person has priorities too.

She shared some her conclusions.

The rationale of a concept belongs to the person who created it.

In my case, I chose to not pursue the rationale of Dr. Cress-Welsing.

When I finally felt I needed to 'read it for myself', I bought the book.

The persons on the site had no obligation to school me on her concepts.

They shared what they decided to share.

Going beyond was my responsibility.

Increasing one's level knowledge is the responsibility of the person.

It is not owed by others.

PEACE

Jim Chester
Guys... JWC in particular...  

For the record, I did the exact same thing Kevin did, and found plenty of references to this guy's research.  But none of it was really supportive of the claim that the SAT is racist.  

I'm sure that those of you who have known of me on this site for any length of time would think twice before accusing me of willful ignorance. 

That the SAT intentionally modifies its tests to remove questions black kids do well on... This is an explosive charge.  No one should have to go find some book in order to examine the evidence of that.  And just off the top, I can think of several problems with that theory in the first place.  Are these questions removed because the SAT wants black kids to do badly, or are they removed because kids who generally did badly on the test got those questions right (which means they don't have a lot of measurement value)?  And do black kids today do worse on the SAT than black kids did before those questions were removed?  Because if they don't, then what difference does it make if these questions are removed?  

It sounds to me that the SAT probably does exactly what it's supposed to do: measure readiness for college.   I don't think our people are served well by changing it to artificially inflate our kids' scores.  The energy we waste on fighting this kind of fight would be better served on the fight to improve our schools.
Reference:
(reply)
And how do you suppose that can be done?

By simply modifying the questions on the test.  It's done all the time on polls and other questionnaire-type samplings.  Usually the creators of such documents formulate the questions for a specific answer that favors their own point of view.

Again ... I don't know the specifics of what is contained on an SAT test any more than you do ... but, they can (and apparently do) change it at will (if and when necessary) ... and I'm sure it doesn't take years to accomplish that.  Where there's a will, there's always a way. 
Reference:
It sounds to me that the SAT probably does exactly what it's supposed to do: measure readiness for college. I don't think our people are served well by changing it to artificially inflate our kids' scores. The energy we waste on fighting this kind of fight would be better served on the fight to improve our schools.

You know, Vox ... I wouldn't advocate for changing the test for that reason, either!!   And I really hope that's not the case.

But, what I do know is true .. at least down here in Texas ... from talking to parents of young, elementary school-aged children is that the curriculum used in these schools nowadays does not "teach" subjects in the same way we learned them!!  In fact, the only thing really being 'taught' is how to pass the next upcoming test so that the kid can be eligible to go to the next grade!!

Texas has its own set of (SAT-like) tests - probably a result of NCLB - that start at the 3rd grade and are then given every couple of years through the child's entire school life!  The "lessons" taught are directly geared to be able to answer the test questions ... and not to really stimulate learning ... or develop tools like critical thinking, comprehension of what is being learned, or using 'context learning' to be able to figure out the answers to questions on their own.

Therefore ... if the test is set up so that these types of learning tools are needed in order to get an answer "right" ... or to determine a 'higher score' ... and certain children aren't  learning/being taught these tools, while 'others' are ... that alone could be a factor wherein the test itself could not necessarily be deemed to be specifically "racially biased" ... but, it could be determined to be fundamentally unfair on a 'racial' basis!!

Again ... I don't know the specifics of this test .. or what's on it or how its phrased.  But .. when you think back to the fact that Black people/children used to be killed for learning to read and write ... and White people/children NEVER were faced with that .. the fact that we can freely go to school and get educated today doesn't mean that all is fair and even.  There are systemic, historic, cultural and not to mention discriminatory practices and reasons why a "standardized" test supposedly given on a "fair, balanced and equal" basis to ALL students could/would be racially discriminatory towards one race over another.

Now ... whether or not it's intentional ... is, I think, the big question ... and, as you say a serious charge.  But, I also think it's possible that unintentional consequences can be at play based on the construction of the test that might make it unfair on some level, as well.

Vox ( quote)

That the SAT intentionally modifies its tests to remove questions black kids do well on..... This is an explosive charge.  No one should have to go find some book in order to examine the evidence of that.......It sounds to me that the SAT probably does exactly what it's supposed to do: measure readiness for college.   I don't think our people are served well by changing it to artificially inflate our kids' scores.  The energy we waste on fighting this kind of fight would be better served on the fight to improve our schools.

 

(reply)

Excellent points! I couldn’t agree more.

 

K

I'm sure that those of you who have known of me on this site for any length of time would think twice before accusing me of willful ignorance.---Vox

The issue of 'removing questions' was not in my mind when I replied.

I was addressing the decision to pursue information.

There is nothing (implicitly) pejorative about being ignorant.

I fully recognize that 'ignorant' has been assigned a pejorative context in the African American population.

I wasn't speaking in that context.

Ignorance is ignorance no matter how it is caused to exist.

To select it is choice.

To choose to not select known knowledge, repeatedly, is insistent.

For the record, all charges should be supported...provided that support can be offered by the person making the charge.

PEACE

Jim Chester

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