The school board in Wake County, which holds the capital city of North Carolina, agreed on Tuesday to turn back a busing policy designed to achieve diversity. The decision was approved by the board in a 5 to 4 vote and led to a tremendous amount of controversy. The rule allows students to attend schools closer to home and leads to what some critics consider to be the resegregation of the school system.


The gathering led to students chanting and protesting outside the meeting. Three men were arrested and charged with trespassing and resisting officers. One of the men were released, while two others remained in jail on Tuesday night.


"Hey, hey. Ho, ho. Resegregation has got to go," an arrested man chanted as officers placed him in the back of a squad car.


State NAACP Chief William Barber accused the new school board of having "racist attitudes," after hearing the chairman of the board referring to his critics as "animals out of the cages."

"It's morally wrong. It's legally wrong. It's economically wrong," Barber said. "Your press to go backward will only serve to intensify our moral, political and legal fight to go forward. We will never go back."


Suburban parents have always felt busing to be a tremendous inconvenience. These parents, many of whom are white and middle class, argue that their children should be able to attend schools in their own neighborhoods. Suburban parents worked to get the new school board in place, leading to the change in the law.


Bill Randall, a black conservative running for Congress, stated that the diversity program was not a serious problem.


"Let this school board do what they were elected to do," Randall said.


The situation in North Carolina is disturbing for a number of reasons. First, the idea that the chairman would refer to his critics, many of whom are black, brown and poor as "animals" is reflective of the kind of racism that exists in the South.


 This is similar to the recent incident in South Carolina (down the road), where many conservatives are appalled that black lawmakers are asking for just one seat on the 16-seat board of trustees at The University of South Carolina. Some in the South, particularly conservatives, maintain a perception of black people as being less than human, less than capable and less than deserving of true equality when it comes to power and opportunity.


On the issue of school desegregation, we must realize that desegregation was necessary mainly because the schools that were attended by black children were so inadequately funded. If there were equality of funding for all schools across America, I would be the first in line to advocate for children to be allowed to attend schools that are closer to home.


The problem is, though, that dramatic differentials in opportunity, between inner-city and suburban schools, continue to make quality public education, for the most part, something that is only available or affordable to white America.


So, rather than being angry at the parents who want their kids to have a chance to attend better schools, suburban parents should look at the school boards and government officials who continue to keep educational resources away from children in urban America. Until we learn how to achieve true equality, we are always going to be faced with a fight.


Open link for video: 


http://www.bvblackspin.com/201...-to-massive-protest/
Original Post
I'm kinda liking this "takin' it to the streets" thing that I'm seeing going on around the country as of late.   And very happy to see that a lot of young people are taking part.

Of course, not all (or probably even most) of these groups are promoting issues that I have an interest in! (Which I won't bother name 'cause I'm sure I'd end up offending somebody in the process! )  But, every now and again, I'm seeing a group of us getting riled up about one injustice or another, gettin' a small posse together, and showing their collective displeasure in peaceful, civil and, of course, non-violent ways.

Kind of gives me a warm, fuzzy, nostalgic feeling of back in the day!  
My reading of this story on various news outlets leaves me with an impression of failure. Let me explain why. The "middle class" parents who voted in this new school board to do exactly what they have done, resegreate the schools held no rallies, no marches, no press conferences. No what they did was what? Went to school board meetings, made a decision, and showed up to vote in the people they knew would vote this way.
What did black folks do? Nothing. Now our people want to get out in the streets and protest. Yet the same people are still legally sitting on that school until the end of their terms. What should've happened was that our people attended those PTA meetings and school board meetings. Now they are marching in the streets, rapping a little, and giving the local press a one day story.  At the end of all this, what will change? I'm a little disappointed that we are using this as an all-in-one strategy.
What they're calling "resegregation," sounds to me more like the kids are now going to be just going to schools in their own neighborhoods. Can somebody explain why this is a bad thing?  Is it really easier to bus the kids elsewhere than it is to fix the schools black kids go to? 

I hate hearing people insist that our kids have to be bussed to schools with white kids in order to learn.
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I hate hearing people insist that our kids have to be bussed to schools with white kids in order to learn.
Vox, I agree with your sentiment of wanting children to be able to go to school in their own neighborhoods, but I think that this has to be weighed over against issues such as allocation of resources and opportunities. If it can be guaranteed that schools in the black communities have the same resources and opportunities as those in white majority communities, the situation might be palatable. In fact, I would go farther and suggest, if there is a guarantee in place that students attending schools in the black community have the same graduation rate, test scores, and college admissions, then I could care less about the racial demographics in the class room, they could be as segregated as they want to be.
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Vox, I agree with your sentiment of wanting children to be able to go to school in their own neighborhoods, but I think that this has to be weighed over against issues such as allocation of resources and opportunities. If it can be guaranteed that schools in the black communities have the same resources and opportunities as those in white majority communities, the situation might be palatable. In fact, I would go farther and suggest, if there is a guarantee in place that students attending schools in the black community have the same graduation rate, test scores, and college admissions, then I could care less about the racial demographics in the class room, they could be as segregated as they want to be.

AMEN to that, kresge!! 

I was "bussed" from what I thought was a pretty adequate school in the predominantly Black middle-class neighborhood that I lived in.  My bro and sis had attended that same school 6 or 7 years earlier when the neighborhood was "mixed" (before the White flight when families like mine moved in! ).

But when I got to the massive 'White' school perched high on a hill overlooking the Pacific Ocean as a scenic backdrop, with the athletic area/football field that itself was almost as big as my entire 'neighborhood' school .... there was simply no comparison!

The "White" school had one of the first "open campuses" in the district, which meant that the students could come and go as they pleased (there were no fences, no signed 'permission slips' were needed to leave, we could walk to McDonald's for lunch if we wanted to!).  At the "Black" school, there was a gate that surrounded the entire grounds which students cut holes in so the students could ditch, security guards were on constant patrol, and one was posted at the front door to monitor who went in and out!

And, surprise, surprise, the dropout rate was higher at the Black school than at mine.

Our kids aren't just bussed to a better education (which, with all the amenities those schools provide, they do probably get!) ... they are bussed to a 10-times better school and learning environment overall ... which can make the difference in being motivated to learn or not.
I believe in school choice, but busing is not school choice. It is just throwing children around in order to mix the schools composition up. A better idea is to take the average school funds to a predominately white school and make sure it is equal to the predominately black school.

Unequal funding and teacher staff is the problem, not race composition of the student body...
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I believe in school choice, but busing is not school choice. It is just throwing children around in order to mix the schools composition up. A better idea is to take the average school funds to a predominately white school and make sure it is equal to the predominately black school. Unequal funding and teacher staff is the problem, not race composition of the student body...
Equal funding is not sufficient. This is why I modified my argument for comparable outcomes in terms of scores on standardized tests as well as college admittance. It may be more expensive to educate children in some settings than others. It may require paying teachers more to work in some areas than others. Also, we must be sure that school funding is not tied to the tax base of a specific community. That would be death to urban schools in economically depressed neighborhoods, where there is major red lining et al.

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