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Alex Dunlap, 16, gets full ride through doctorate!

IPS high school student receives prestigious Gates Millenium Scholarship.

INDIANAPOLIS - A Broad Ripple High School student is one of only 1,000 students in the country to receive the prestigious Gates Millennium Scholarship.

The scholarship -- funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation -- covers a full ride to any college or university in the country, all the way through a doctoral degree if the recipient chooses.

At 16, Alex Dunlap is poised to graduate Broad Ripple Magnet High School a year early in May. She knew all her hard work had paid off when she got the letter announcing her scholarship.

"Oh, I was ecstatic," she said. "I started crying, my mom started crying."

Dunlap plans to pursue her passion for languages.

"I'm going to study Spanish, French and Chinese in college with a focus in Arabic, I'm going to pick that one up as well," she said. "And after undergrad, I plan on attending law school."

Dunlap hopes to fight for the rights of children in foreign countries, but while her travels might take her worldwide, she plans to stay close to home for college.

"I've just recently decided to go to DePauw because they have such a great liberal arts program," she said. "Their study abroad program is great and exactly what I need because of my languages. Their language program is great. And I'm going to be entering as a Bonner scholar, which is a community service scholarship."

Beyond being a great student, Dunlap has a passion for community service. She teaches Spanish to inner-city kids, and she plans to keep volunteering.

She has this advice to other students.

"Always work hard, study hard and make sure you find something you're passionate about in high school," she said. "For me it was languages and it was music. And I was passionate and I loved doing it, so I always worked hard doing it."

Dunlap is the first student ever from Broad Ripple High School to become a Gates Scholar.

She'll meet the other 999 winners when Bill Gates flies them all out to meet each other and network.



Written by :Tanya Spencer.
Alex Dunlap, 16, gets full ride through doctorate! IPS high school student receives prestigious Gates Millenium Scholarship. INDIANAPOLIS - A Broad Ripple High School student is one of only 1,000 students in the country to receive the prestigious Gates Millennium Scholarship. The scholarship -- funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation -- covers a full ride to any college or university in the country, all the way through a doctoral degree if the recipient chooses. At 16, Alex Dunlap is poised to graduate Broad Ripple Magnet High School a year early in May. She knew all her hard work had paid off when she got the letter announcing her scholarship. "Oh, I was ecstatic," she said. "I started crying, my mom started crying." Dunlap plans to pursue her passion for languages. "I'm going to study Spanish, French and Chinese in college with a focus in Arabic, I'm going to pick that one up as well," she said. "And after undergrad, I plan on attending law school." Dunlap hopes to fight for the rights of children in foreign countries, but while her travels might take her worldwide, she plans to stay close to home for college. "I've just recently decided to go to DePauw because they have such a great liberal arts program," she said. "Their study abroad program is great and exactly what I need because of my languages. Their language program is great. And I'm going to be entering as a Bonner scholar, which is a community service scholarship." Beyond being a great student, Dunlap has a passion for community service. She teaches Spanish to inner-city kids, and she plans to keep volunteering. She has this advice to other students. "Always work hard, study hard and make sure you find something you're passionate about in high school," she said. "For me it was languages and it was music. And I was passionate and I loved doing it, so I always worked hard doing it." Dunlap is the first student ever from Broad Ripple High School to become a Gates Scholar. She'll meet the other 999 winners when Bill Gates flies them all out to meet each other and network. Written by :Tanya Spencer.
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"I'm just trying to make a way out of no way, for my people" -Modejeska Monteith Simpkins

 

AFRICAN AMERICA IS AT WAR

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICA

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICANS

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

AMERICA'S RACISTS HAVE INFILTRATED AMERICAN POLICE FORCES TO WAGE A RACE WAR AGAINST BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

THE BLACK RACE IS AT WAR

FIRST WORLD WAR:  THE APPROXIMATELY 6,000 YEAR WORLD WAR ON AFRICA AND THE BLACK RACE

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High school senior gets 150 scholarship offers

Posted: Mar 19, 2014 9:29 AM EDTUpdated: Mar 19, 2014 12:17 PM EDT

 

Miami, FL -

When a student receives one or two scholarships, that's reason to celebrate. But 150!

Chad Thomas, 18, and a senior at Booker T. Washington High School in Miami, is a man of many talents.

He received 150 scholarships offers partly for his football skills and his many musical abilities - he plays 9 instruments.

In addition to the piano and trombone, he plays the tuba, a small tuba called the euphonium, guitar, bass guitar, snare, trumpet and drums.

And the winner is - the University of Miami. He will play football and will play football as a Hurricane, and also practice his musical talents at the University's Frost School of Music.

Thomas helped lead the Booker T. Tornadoes to back-to-back state championships and win a national title this season. As far as his love for music, he says fell in love with music when he was three-years-old listening to his late grandmother's gospel CDs.

CHESS

<nyt_headline version="1.0" type=" ">Masters of the Game and Leaders by Example

Richard Perry/The New York Times

From left, James Black Jr., Justus Williams and Joshua Colas competing in Manhattan last month. Their success is a “phenomenon,” one veteran player said.

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Fewer than 2 percent of the 77,000 members of the United States Chess Federation are masters — and just 13 of them are under the age of 14.

Among that select group of prodigies are three black players from the New York City area — Justus Williams, Joshua Colas and James Black Jr. — who each became masters before their 13th birthdays.

“Masters don’t happen every day, and African-American masters who are 12 never happen,” saidMaurice Ashley, 45, the only African-American to earn the top title of grandmaster. “To have three young players do what they have done is something of an amazing curiosity. You normally wouldn’t get something like that in any city of any race.”

The chess federation, the game’s governing body, does not keep records on the ethnicity of its members. But a Web site called the Chess Drum — which chronicles the achievements of black chess players and is run by Daaim Shabazz, an associate professor of business at Florida A&M University — lists 85 African-American masters. Shabazz said many of them no longer compete regularly.

Ashley, who became a master at age 20 and a grandmaster 14 years later, said the rarity was not surprising. “Chess just isn’t that big in the African-American community,” he said.

The chess federation uses a rating system to measure ability based on the results of matches in officially sanctioned events; a player must reach a rating of 2,200 to qualify for master.

In September last year, Justus, who is now 13 and lives in the Bronx, was the first of the three boys to get to 2,200, becoming the youngest black player to obtain the master rank. Joshua, 13, of White Plains, was a few months younger than Justus when he became a master last December. James, 12, of Brooklyn, became a master in July.

(Samuel Sevian of Santa Clara, Calif., is the youngest master in United States history, earning the title last December, 20 days before his 10th birthday.)

The three New Yorkers met several years ago during competitions. Justus has an edge over James, mostly because he won many of their early games, before James caught up. Head to head, James and Joshua each have several wins against the other. Justus and Joshua have rarely competed against each other.

Although they are rivals, the boys are also friends and share a sense that they are role models.

“I think of Justus, me and Josh as pioneers for African-American kids who want to take up chess,” James said.

James’s father, James Black, said he and Justus’s and Joshua’s parents were aware of what their sons represent and “talk about it a great deal,” but tried not to pressure them too much.

Black said his son “knows that the pressure comes along with the territory. What is going to happen is going to happen. As long he plays, we’re sure that things will work out for the best.”

The three boys approach the game differently. Justus and Joshua say that James studies the most, and Joshua admits he would rather play than practice. “I like the competition,” he said. “And I like that chess is an art.”

Justus said he is the most aggressive of the three, and he and James agree that Joshua is the most unpredictable. “Joshua likes to change up his openings during tournaments,” Justus said.

Supporting the boys’ interest is not easy financially. Though there are many tournaments in the New York City area, the boys must travel to play in more prestigious competitions, sometimes overseas. This week, they are set to play in the World Youth Chess Championship in Brazil.

They study the game with professional coaches who are grandmasters. The lessons are expensive — $100 an hour is not unusual — and the boys’ families have either found sponsors or have paid for the instruction themselves.

The boys aspire to be a grandmaster by the time they graduate from high school, something that only a few dozen players in the world have done. Ashley, who has met the boys but does not know any of them well, says the obstacles are substantial.

He said several children that he had coached to the junior high school national championships in the early 1990s went on to enroll at elite colleges and then to have successful careers. Along the way, he said, playing chess became less of a priority for them. It is difficult to make a living as a player, he said, adding, “I’ve seen many talented kids go by the wayside.”

Ashley said he could not predict whether the success of Justus, Joshua and James would encourage other young African-Americans to play. Another black teenager, Jehron Bryant, 15, of Valley Stream, N.Y., became a master in September.

“Masters will never be epidemics,” Ashley said. He said the rise of the young masters was a “phenomenon” that was “ worth noting.”

“It is special,” he said, “and that we know for a fact.”

Justus, Joshua and James all played in the Marshall Chess Club Championship in Manhattan last month. Justus and Joshua finished with disappointing results — a common problem for young players, who often lack consistency. But James tied for fifth. In the last round, he beat Yefim Treger, a strong veteran master who is in his 50s.

Treger is a tough opponent because he uses unorthodox openings. James kept his head, however, patiently seizing space and building up his attack until he was able to force through a passed pawn. He wrapped up the game by cornering and checkmating Treger’s king.

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This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: November 15, 2011

 

An earlier version of this article erroneously stated that there were 47,000 members of the United States Chess Federation.

 

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We'd like to introduce you to Zna Gresham. She caught a 1-month-old baby tossed from the second-story of a burning building in Decatur this afternoon. Click LIKE to say thanks to Zna for being a hero! Click SHARE so others can hear about her good deed! Justin Gray FOX 5 has the story tonight on FOX 5 News at 10 -- http://bit.ly/14O4ApE

We'd like to introduce you to Zna Gresham. She caught a 1-month-old baby tossed from the second-story of a burning building in Decatur this afternoon. Click LIKE to say thanks to Zna for being a hero! Click SHARE so others can hear about her good deed! Justin Gray FOX 5 has the story tonight on FOX 5 News at 10 -- http://bit.ly/14O4ApE
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Towson University students win national debate championship

Ameena Ruffin and Korey Johnson are the first black women to win a national debate championship tournament

Towson debate winners

Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/ne....story#ixzz2xXhiSOyH

 

Two Towson University students edged out 170 other teams to win a national debate championship held in Indiana this week, the second time in recent years a Towson team has netted national debate honors.

Ameena Ruffin and Korey Johnson, both from Baltimore, bested a team from the University of Oklahoma in the final round. Their argument likened police brutality, the prison-industrial complex and structural poverty issues to a warlike violence against African-Americans in the U.S. and identified solutions.

Ruffin and Johnson are the first black women to win a national debate championship tournament, according to the Cross Examination Debate Association. Another Towson team won at the same championship in 2008.

Amber Kelsie, one of two coaches for Towson's debate program, compared the Cross Examination Debate Association national championship to the "Super Bowl" of debate championships. The students are preparing for a second challenge, the National Debate Tournament, later this week at the same location, Indiana University.

The Towson debate team was at the center of a controversy last fall when its members said the university was preventing it from participating in a tournament at Harvard University. Towson eventually relented and the team took part in that competition.

Johnson, an 18-year-old sophomore, called the win "surreal." The team spent untold hours poring over books, articles and other publications to craft their arguments, then took more time to practice their delivery strategies, she said.

"The arguments we construct are like mini-dissertations," Johnson said. "One of our strongest things is being adaptable, not just to our opponents, but when you get judges, you have to assume that they're susceptible to certain types of arguments."

Kelsie said both teams in the final round agreed that police brutality, the prison-industrial complex and structural poverty issues amounted to a "warlike violence" against black people in the U.S. But she said Ruffin and Johnson argued that the issue could be overcome not by focusing on the negative of the situation, as the opposing team did, but by imagining a better future.

Now Ruffin, 21, and Johnson are designated among the top 16 debate teams in the country. Ruffin placed second and Johnson placed fourth in the individual rankings.

"I'm beside myself," Kelsie said. "They're just amazing, remarkable young women."

cwells@baltsun.com

twitter.com/cwellssun

A previous version of this article gave incorrect information about how Ruffin and Johnson placed in the individual rankings. The Baltimore Sun regrets the error.



Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/ne....story#ixzz2xXhqnPdO

Last edited by sunnubian
 

Ebony Nettles-Bey was diagnosed with cancer back in October. Despite losing weight, her hair and undergoing several chemotherapy treatments - she remained on her high school basketball team.

The Miami Heat caught wind of Ebony's story and arranged a meeting with her favorite player - LeBron James. Saturday night, her dream came true!

Grio fam, Ebony is an inspiration to us all. Please click her picture to read more!

theGRIO VIDEO - A Wisconsin teen battling cancer met her idol LeBron James Saturday night in Milwaukee. It was a dream come true for 16-year-old Ebony Nettles-Bey, who was diagnosed...
THEGRIO
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NY Teen Accepted to All 8 Ivy League Institutions

Kwasi Enin, a 17-year-old senior at William Floyd High School in Mastic, N.Y., applied to all the Ivy Leagues, hoping to get into one.

Posted: April 1 2014 8:20 AM
 

 
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Kwasi Enin

 

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Just a week after a Washington, D.C., teen was accepted to five Ivy League schools, a Long Island high school teen has set the bar even higher. He was accepted to each of the eight elite Ivy colleges and universities, the New York Daily News reports.

Kwasi Enin, the son of immigrant nurses from Ghana, figured he would hedge his bets and apply to all of the Ivy League schools.

"By applying to all eight, I figured it would better the chances of getting into one," the 17-year-old senior at William Floyd High School in Mastic, N.Y., said.

According to the Daily News, the collective acceptance rate of all Ivy League schools is less than 9 percent of all applicants for the class of 2018, ranging from 5.9 percent at Harvard to 14 percent at Cornell.

"I've never seen anything like it in my 15 years as a high school counselor," Nancy Winkler, Enin’s guidance counselor, told the Daily News. "He's going to be a leader in whatever he chooses."

Enin wants to be a physician.

"I'm thinking of being a cardiologist or neurologist," Enin told the Daily News. "A doctor is a community leader, a protector, someone who people turn to ... when they need help."

Looking for ways to make college more affordable, click here.

 
 

Read more at the New York Daily News.

CONGRATULATIONS!!

Urban Prep Academies seniors holding college admission letters!

Spring 2014!

CONGRATULATIONS!! Urban Prep Academies seniors holding college admission letters! Spring 2014!
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