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Am I reading this right? Did she really say what I think she's saying? Confused

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050906/ap_on_re_us/hurricane_katrina_19

Barbara Bush, who accompanied the former presidents on a tour of the Astrodome complex Monday, said the relocation to Houston is "working very well" for some of the poor people forced out of New Orleans.

"What I'm hearing, which is sort of scary, is they all want to stay in Texas. Everyone is so overwhelmed by the hospitality," she said during a radio interview with the American Public Media program "Marketplace." "And so many of the people in the arena here, you know, were underprivileged anyway, so this is working very well for them."
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Lord Have Mercy! Yes, I'm sure living in the arena, owning nothing but the clothes on their backs, is a step up from their underpriviledged neighborhoods.

The Bush family as a whole has a terrible case of foot-in-mouth disease. Talk about having no idea how the other half lives.

50 Cent can catch 8 bullets and this family can't catch ONE?!?!
Let's think about this for a sec Vox before we react to what she is saying irrationally. A great many of our people lived in dilapadated buildings, poor and horrible communities that have been destroyed. Truthfully, many of us had no where to go but up from where we were. So while I don't know the spirit in which Babrbara Bush spoke those words the truth is many of our people will be better off, will have the oppurtunity to attend better schools than those that have already failed their communities a hundred times over. The circumstances by which this change has come about could not have been worse but the change that may come out of it can not be worse than the condition they were living in. Surely no one would willingly trade all of their belongings to be where they are today and go through what they have all been through but we should not simply react to words that may be prophetic in nature.
A man came into my office this morning who's sister works for FEMA. He says FEMA will be buying homes for these people around the country and working out with them special financing.

Many of these people have been in their dilapidated homes for almost half a century. These homes are paid off. FEMA is offerring them new loans. And I bet my life on FEMA not buying 5000 sg ft homes for these folks. They will be going from one crowded project to another. The added students to other area schools is going to stretch funding and resources even tighter. This is not an improvement.
Who are you kidding Frenchy? The majority of those Black folk displaced down there were not in Homes at all, and were living in projects for the most part. Surely not everyone will come out of this better than they went into it, I have read and heard stories of people who had just recently bought their home, there was a Black couple whose house warming was to be last weekend. I am not saying there will be improvements across the board but surely a great many of our people will come out of this thing better than they went into it, no different than those who lost family members on September 11. 2001 receiving money and support that made their lives far better than it was when the love one they lost was alive.
A friend has property and family in New Orleans. Her family is safe. She make the statement that she has a deed to property in New Orleans that she doesn't know if its above or below water. But, one thing she is sure of, they will be taking peoples land.

My questions is, "Will Homeland Security do a better job if there is a terrorist attack? Or will we be like the citizens of New Orleans?"

I know I am changing the way I do things. I depend too much on the ATM. And my gas tank will never go below half again.

What's your disaster plan?
The resources here in Houston that are being put in place to relocate, (re)employ, and (re)house many of the evacuees are setting them up for what very well probably are better living conditions and opportunities than they had in N.O.

Job training and housing, especially, have already started taking place as well as opportunities for education. For any of those that are looking to move on to the next phase, the opportunity to do so is being offered. And yes, many/most (probably 95%) would like to stay ... from the majority I talked to is because they are already here and just want some semblance of a normal life again as soon as they can get to it. They don't want to wait until N.O. is ready for rehabitation.

They want peace and stability ASAP.
Faheem, I have no idea where you are getting this idea.

The projects in every city I've ever lived in has been comprised of low-cost, rundown homes that have been standing since almost the turn of century, paid of a long time ago, and huge project buildings full of renters.

What exactly do you think these people are going to be moved into? High-end homes? Middle-class homes? Project people will move right into a new project with the same substandard conditions. You have information from somewhere that leads you to believe differently (besides 2 folks' house warming parties)?

As for Sept 11th folks, what makes you think they are financially better off than before? In NYC, they are STILL writing articles about the businesses that have folded because they never recovered from Sept 11th, despite all the breaks. Families driven further into poverty because of the loss of a loved one and their earning potential (no overtime, no side businesses, etc). Do you know how much time it takes to actually receive benefits? How much paper work is inolved? How quickly everything can go downhill while you wait for relief?People are not overwhelmingly better off.
quote:
Originally posted by Diamond:
A friend has property and family in New Orleans. Her family is safe. She make the statement that she has a deed to property in New Orleans that she doesn't know if its above or below water. But, one thing she is sure of, they will be taking peoples land.



Out of everything thats being said.......this concerns me. This has happened throughout history.......and yes, history has a way of repeating itself.

With the high cost of insurance...(dont think the insurance companys are going to write policys after this.........if so the premiums are going to be so high, home owners are not going to be able to afford it)..........So whats next?


No matter what........if the land owners decide that they dont want to rebuild, the property should be SOLD not taken.
But, one thing she is sure of, they will be taking peoples land.---Diamond

That's very often the way it works.

A land grab.

Now that we have them out, we can really do what we have always wanted.

Paranoid? Yes.

Cynical? Yes.

True? Probably.

After all, 'so many of these people were underprivileged anyway.'

Come Fat Tuesday they'll be ready to 'jump and dance' again.


PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:
But, one thing she is sure of, they will be taking peoples land.---Diamond

That's very often the way it works.

A land grab.

Now that we have them out, we can really do what we have always wanted.

Paranoid? Yes.

Cynical? Yes.

True? Probably.

After all, 'so many of these people were underprivileged anyway.'

Come Fat Tuesday they'll be ready to 'jump and dance' again.


PEACE

Jim Chester

I just heard an interesting analysis on our local Pacifica affiliate that made some of these points. The speaker suggested that Katrina is an opportunity for major urban renewal which has often meant "Negro removal." It is almost assured that large numbers of the poor from these areas where not property owners, but where renters, or in federally subsidized housing. He went on to say that the new improved NO will have little or no place for many of these people. How long did it take Halliburton to get a contract and how many of the poor and dispossessed do you think that they will hire to rebuild the destroyed infrastructure.

I mean, this would be a perfect opportunity in my mind to reconstitute something along the lines of the WPA. Give people jobs to rebuild their destroyed communities, you kill two birds with one stone. Not in George Bush (and his mama's) America.
quote:
Originally posted by Frenchy:
EbonyRose, any idea where these people are being rehoused?


Well, from reports I see and hear here, most of the evacuees will be or are being placed all over the place!! But, generally speaking, they will not be being housed in the same types of "ghettos" that they came from. This is primarily because since it is government agencies (state, federal and local) handling the placing of these people, they will not be moved into any rundown or condemned situations. The standards (red tape) of these agencies will not allow people to be moved into homes or apartments that are unsafe or that do not meet certain standards for living conditions.

This morning they moved about 140 elderly people from the Astrodome into a senior housing type of community! And they are trying to keep such people together, i.e. those who were moved out of senior living areas are being moved together (as much as possible) in to the same such situation here. But one lady exclaimed, "Oh, look, a dishwasher! This will be the first one I've ever had in my life!" Smile

Chances are that living conditions will improve for if not a majority, then a whole lot of these people. And for many more, once they get paid by their insurance companies, what they will be able to buy here will be newer and probably a little better than what they had.

Houston has been in building mode for the last 4-5 years now. There is a LOT of housing available. With FEMA guaranteeing money for the opportunity to purchase, people will be able to improve their lifestyles quite a bit.
Texas state and local agencies sound surprisingly compassionate. In NYC and Florida, they routinely have people in death trap, low-income housing. And have the nerve to have all the red tape as well.

quote:
This morning they moved about 140 elderly people from the Astrodome into a senior housing type of community! And they are trying to keep such people together, i.e. those who were moved out of senior living areas are being moved together (as much as possible) in to the same such situation here. But one lady exclaimed, "Oh, look, a dishwasher! This will be the first one I've ever had in my life!" Smile


That is too cute tongue I hope the others are as fortunate finding good housing.
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by Frenchy:
EbonyRose, any idea where these people are being rehoused?


Well, from reports I see and hear here, most of the evacuees will be or are being placed all over the place!! But, generally speaking, they will not be being housed in the same types of "ghettos" that they came from. This is primarily because since it is government agencies (state, federal and local) handling the placing of these people, they will not be moved into any rundown or condemned situations. The standards (red tape) of these agencies will not allow people to be moved into homes or apartments that are unsafe or that do not meet certain standards for living conditions.

This morning they moved about 140 elderly people from the Astrodome into a senior housing type of community! And they are trying to keep such people together, i.e. those who were moved out of senior living areas are being moved together (as much as possible) in to the same such situation here. But one lady exclaimed, "Oh, look, a dishwasher! This will be the first one I've ever had in my life!" Smile

Would you happen to know whether that was the senior center associated William A. Lawson Center. I colleague of mine at Rice was saying that they were working on this, but I had not heard if they were successful.
There have been interviews in which many of the survivors expressed tearful gratitude to Texans and the facilities afforded them there, and have stated they won't go back to Orleans, and would welcome staying in Texas. These I saw myself on television. Was she simply reflecting on these people as accurately as she could, her being in her 80's now.

Sounds like her statements are accurate enough in the context of an interview. We can easily twist her meaning into anything we want to hear. Question is, who has made larger charitable donations than she? Thats likely to be a very short list. Why would we even want to bite that hand or foment hatred upon her when her actions speak louder than anyone's words?
Regarding 'Halliburton':

We need to become aware of how the government does business.

Companies are contracted far in advance of any idea what will happen where. They are contracted for their expertise, and in-house resources technical, monetary, and otherwiese.

Huge companies win these contracts, and in turn contract subcontractors to be standing resources for specified services, and they in turn contract, etc.

All emergency response agencies do this.

There is little choice involved.

Most of these companies can have their people on scene, literally, within a small number of hours,depending on distance.

In special cases, within minutes.

PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by Faheem:
Let's think about this for a sec Vox before we react to what she is saying irrationally. A great many of our people lived in dilapadated buildings, poor and horrible communities that have been destroyed. Truthfully, many of us had no where to go but up from where we were. So while I don't know the spirit in which Babrbara Bush spoke those words the truth is many of our people will be better off, will have the oppurtunity to attend better schools than those that have already failed their communities a hundred times over. The circumstances by which this change has come about could not have been worse but the change that may come out of it can not be worse than the condition they were living in. Surely no one would willingly trade all of their belongings to be where they are today and go through what they have all been through but we should not simply react to words that may be prophetic in nature.


Faheem? A little warning before you go and defend the words of anyone with the last name Bush. (Can someone get me a towel to get this coffee off my keyboard and screen?) Wink

And Brother James? So true on the Haliburton "issue".
Frenchy: "These homes are paid off. FEMA is offerring them new loans. And I bet my life on FEMA not buying 5000 sg ft homes for these folks. They will be going from one crowded project to another. The added students to other area schools is going to stretch funding and resources even tighter. This is not an improvement."
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Another retarded thought. Do you know how much a 5,000 square foot house costs? These people need help, not a gravy train ride.



Diamond: "Will Homeland Security do a better job if there is a terrorist attack? Or will we be like the citizens of New Orleans?"
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Not sure, every situation is different. But they have sniffed out numerous plots (the most recent was the Muslim freaks in California).


Frenchy: "What exactly do you think these people are going to be moved into? High-end homes? Middle-class homes?"
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I object to my taxes going to these folks for "high-end" or "middle-class" homes. You should too. They should receive what they had earned before the storm.


Frenchy: "are STILL writing articles about the businesses that have folded because they never recovered from Sept 11th, despite all the breaks."
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I sympathize with those folks that lost their businesses affected by Sept. 11th and the future businesses that will be affected by Katrina. But, as brutally honest as it may sound: That's life.


It is strangely noticable that Texas, GW's ol' stompin' grounds, was the first state to step up to the plate.
quote:
Originally posted by kresge:
Would you happen to know whether that was the senior center associated William A. Lawson Center. I colleague of mine at Rice was saying that they were working on this, but I had not heard if they were successful.


No, I did not hear any specific name of the center that took them in. However, today I heard a report that over 200 apartment complexes are organizing and offering 10,000 apartment units for rent based on taking vouchers from FEMA and the Dept. of Homeland Security (rent out the apartments now, get paid later).

These apartments will first go to the elderly and seniors, then to families then to others. It is estimated that at least 120,000 - 150,000 people will be relocating here permanently.

These apartments and other housing are located all throughout the city. Funny thing is, though, that in places line 3rd or 5th Ward, where it is much like the conditions from where they were living in N.O., the conditions are so bad that that is NOT one of the places that are being considered for placing these new residents because most of the housing there is sub par!!

For many of the evacuees, it really is going to be a "whole new world" opened up to them. It's so interesting to watch this all happening. The whole demographic of this city is about to change.
No disrespect but straight up... anyone who feels like all these poor black people are going to be given Better Housing, OR that they don't deserve better Housing, because they were poor to begin with has a Sad and Limited understanding of African American History and spends too much time believing the crap they feed you on the TV.

quote:
Snippet from a forum post i found:

From the US Census (2000), here is a pre-Katrina breakdown of the per capita income in New Orleans by race:

White(28% of population) $31,971
Latino(3% of the population) $16,151
Asian(2% of the population) $13,826
Native American (0.2%) $13,151
Black or African American(67%) $11,332

Those of you who have lived in or visited New Orleans, may already be aware of these facts by inference. In one of the few cities where Blacks are most congregated (Blacks form only 12% of the entire US population otherwise), Blacks are already devastated by intense racism and hypersegregration with severe financial ramifications.



I've heard that poor people in NO get as little as $8,000 annual income. These are Americans, in the richest country in the world, in living conditions equivalent to third world countries. This didn't happen over night! What makes anyone so quick to believe that these delayed, and poorly executed relief efforts are an indication that these people are finally going to get adquate housing, schools, and training. Perhaps a few will, probably the ones they show on every news reel and in every article, but the masses will get dispersed and denied just as they have been in the past.

We can't let the media dupe us into thinking that we can sit back and let our country take care of this, because it's our country that has lead to the deep financial concerns and racial injustices that this natural disaster is bringing to light. What's the difference between NO poor people and poor folks in Rwanda or Haiti. They have no money and no political pull.

Keep letting the government beat you in the head, and you won't see the issues until their own your doorstep.

As intellegent African Americans we are obligated to support our people. Barbara Bush's comment is as ignorant as the phrase "Let them eat cake." She feels that she has the class and social distinction to belittle people who were stuck in a dome with no food, surrounded by death and dispair. Babies were being raped in there and folks think the people who stood by to let that violent mentality grow and explode in the superdome are going to all of a sudden do everything they can to give our people a better life.

Wake up.

Hurricane Katrina: African American Relief Efforts
blackoutloud ...

How many of those Black people affected by Katrina would have ever seen a $2,000 check in their name, had they remained where they were? Nobody was going to knock on their doors and offer them a decent apartment in a nice neighborhood just because they did not have one. The emotional horror that they faced is separate from the position that many are going to find themselves in after all is said and done. And when I say "many", I'm talking tens thousands at least!!

Good, bad or indifferent, most of these people are being given a new opportunity. What they do with it is what will determine the outcome of that opportunity, and is frankly anybody's guess. But I can tell you, the majority of the people are not being moved from one poor rundown neighborhood to another. In addition, not all of those evacuated are/were poor! Many had nice homes and jobs and cars that were lost ... and will be paid for by insurance.

If nothing else, what these people are being given a chance to improve their situation ... some will do so for the better, some will end up right back where they were before they got it. But a change in lifestyle will be afforded them. Whether you believe that or not.
quote:
How many of those Black people affected by Katrina would have ever seen a $2,000 check in their name, had they remained where they were?


EbonyRose, are you referring to those debit cards they plan on giving out? Those are only going to people who have no insurance. And they haven't worked out the logistics yet (the last I heard is that they were going to use aerial photographs of the destruction to see if people with no form of ID are telling the truth). The statement was that it is being used to encourage people to voluntarily move out of shelters. People who decide to go to other shelters, live in newly-formed tent cities and on cruise ships will not get the card either (because their food and incidentals will be taken care of).

When hundreds of thousands are currently displaced, I can't jump for joy about tens of thousands possibly being moved into a nicer area. It's great for whomever it happens for, but IMO, it's too early to say most will be granted a step up in lifestyle.
Faheem, my problem with the quote, at least the way I read it, was that it implied that the people were better off in the Astrodome's temporary refugee camp than they were before. Maybe she meant that they have a new lease on life that will hopefully end them up better than before the hurricane, but it seems to me that she meant the Astrodome was better than home.

I certainly do hope that the victims do end up in a better, stronger economic condition, but I also think of all of that death, not to mention the survivor's mourning, and all of their post-traumatic stress. And don't forget, poor children don't always feel too deprived, so if they've lost everything they've ever know, that could be potentially devastating even if they did live in the projects. Still, I'm looking forward to see how this recovery is going to work out. Thanks, EbonyRose, for your insights in Houston...
Frenchy ...

I'm not sure what reports you have heard, but, no, those cards are for everyone (well one per family) displaced by Katrina, whether or not they are in one of the shelters. Everyone at the Astrodome were allowed to stand in the line to receive the cards, but when they got there, found out that right now, they are only "registering" people for the cards. The cards themselves will not be here for I think it's too weeks! Eek

While they do want to use these cards to get people out of their homes, I have heard that they also hope they are a way to encourage people to voluntarily move out of the shelters.

I agree it's too early to tell what the final outcomes and numbers will be ... but I can tell you, just from what I'm seeing, a lot of them are already getting that step! They started relocating people since Monday. The Red Cross has been passing out vouchers since then if not before. It's amazing how many more people from Louisiana I see in the stores and on the road. Vouchers in hand, they are buying food and household items. And that's only the ones I can tell for sure are not from here! On the news this evening, they are saying that the number being housed in the Astrodome is down to 10,000 or so. Some are going back to N.O., some are going to family here and in other places, many are still here, however ... and not planning to go anywhere! Eek They are being placed with families all around town.

If many/most of these people were really living mired in poverty with seemingly no way out of it, being able to run through Target buying drapes and pillows and pots and pans for a new apartment and new clothes for their children to go to school in is better for them than had Katrina not hit and they were still doing whatever they were doing in their hometowns.
EB, this is the article I'm referring to: $2000 Debit Cards for Katrina Victims

quote:
Only for neediest
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is administering the program. FEMA officials said the program is aimed at those most in need, so not all families that fled their homes will be eligible.

"For instance you may have some people who have insurance and insurance is meeting their living expenses while they have been displaced," said Ed Conley, a FEMA spokesman in Houston. "You have some people who may be looking at an option such as a cruise ship where all of their needs are going to be met. It is going to vary by family."

The cards are to be used to help victims purchase food, transportation and other essentials.


Are they saying something different on the News there?
I worked with some people from various agencies to develop an action plan for the City of LA to take in at least 1000 evacuees yesterday....we had to develop a plan for them to fly into LAX and get checked in via a Receiving Center (Westchester Rec Center) before they will be given a location to stay in....we also had to plan for them coming in on buses after flying into San Fran, San Jose and San Diego airports in case LAX was determined to be under a security threat. Personally I think Houston is much more hospitable of a place and the lower cost of living and rental/houses will allow someone to get on their feet faster than they would here......
BLACK COLLEGES IN NEW ORLEANS RAVAGED BY HURRICANE KATRINA

New Orleans is a predominantly black city. And upwards of 80 percent of the city's black population is poor, with no automobiles, no relatives outside the city, and no money to buy transportation required to retreat from the devastation in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Therefore, Hurricane Katrina has been disproportionately catastrophic for blacks.

As is the case with most natural disasters in urban areas, the sharp divide between blacks and whites becomes painfully clear.

So too is the terrible impact on African-American college students in New Orleans. Today and for the foreseeable future, there is no higher education in New Orleans, even on high ground, because there is no electricity in the city. Louisiana officials say that 135,000 college students in the state now have no school to attend.

According to JBHE's count, there are at least 20,000 black students enrolled in college in New Orleans who have been displaced and will not be attending classes this semester.

Colleges around the country, in many cases, have tried to find room for displaced students from New Orleans. But in most cases they are skimming off the academically talented white students from Tulane and other predominantly white institutions whose families are prepared to pay or have paid full tuition. Most African-American college students in New Orleans go to community colleges. Tens of thousands of them will have no place to go.

So far, JBHE has no data on the total number of displaced black students who have been admitted to other colleges. Hampton University, the historically black institution in Virginia, reports that about 25 black students who were enrolled at colleges in New Orleans are planning to transfer and enroll at Hampton.

Most of the students who lived on campus at historically black Dillard University were evacuated to predominantly white Centenary College in Shreveport before the hurricane struck. Both colleges are affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The Dillard campus was subsequently flooded with up to eight feet of water. Dillard president Marvalene Hughes has set up office in Atlanta. President Hughes is concerned that Dillard will permanently lose many students who enroll at other institutions this semester.

About three quarters of the 1,600 students at Xavier University, the historically black Catholic university in New Orleans, left campus before Hurricane Katrina hit the city. About 400 students remained on campus. They were housed in two high-rise dormitories. By this past Thursday they had run out of food and water. National Guard troops reached the dormitories by amphibious vehicles and transported the students to a nearby elevated highway. The students were then taken to Southern University in Baton Rouge. University officials said it would be at least late January before the university reopens.

The United Negro College Fund has set up a relief effort for Xavier and Dillard universities and also for Tougaloo College in Mississippi, which was also hit hard by the hurricane. Donations can be made online at: http://www.uncf.org.
Nope, Frenchy, the last I heard (which was yesterday) the Dome was going to stay available for as long as it was necessary ... whatever that is supposed to mean! Eek

It seems like they are getting out a couple hundred or so a day, though. And they are creating a lot of smaller shelters and switching people to them, to create more space for everyone.

I'm glad the Dome was used ... there was talk last year of tearing it down, because Reliant Energy built the new football stadium practically on top of if (actually on it's parking lot!!) and have let it just sit ever since. They even stopped having the Rodeo in there. It was the first ever domed sports facility, so a lot of people don't want to see it destroyed. I think they were just gonna wait for it to become deteriorated so that they have an excuse to tear it down. But it was a haven for a lot of people ... and maybe that will keep it on the map! Smile I'd hate to see it go.

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