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Most discussion is about gay black males, but rarely gay black females, so I'm posting it for discussion and/or comment. I came across this blog page when doing a search for quotes by Fanon.

Posted by nubian

dear straight black women,

let me be frank – i am not trying to sleep with you, ok?
nor am i trying to ruin your heterosexual ego and taint your heterosexual privilege. can we for once and for all, as we used to say in the early nineties, squash that beef?

my "sista's," it would seem, by virtue of our black skin and shared oppression(s), that we would automatically be friends–support groups for one another, if you will. at least, i always keep thinking about that in the back of my mind, and the idealisitic hopeful inside of me doesn't want to let that idea go–just yet. with the exception of say, a handful of black women who have sometimes walked the same paths as i – who i cherish deeply – i have gotten disturbing vibes from my "sistas," who, are afraid of black lesbians for the fear of being deemed a potential love interest (scary!) or, lesbian by association (scarier!).

some of you act like you have never known of a homosexual before, but lets be real–every black family has an uncle or aunt who has never married and has lived with the same "roomate" since you were in diapers. so don't act like you don't know. acknowledging that we do exist, will not imply that you have gaydar or have an interest in women. all it would mean, is that you see the humanity of all of your black sisters.

and then there are some of you that wear the mask of the "conscious black female" – the one who can recite quotes from fanon or du bois at the drop of a hat, but are quick to think that gays and lesbians are not "african enough" or not "black enough," and that the very idea of sgl romance is a threat to blackness as a whole. but why do you – as conscious as you are –feel the need to police other black people? there are far more pressing issues which threaten the demise of blacks throughout the diaspora, i have yet to understand how i am contributing to that. actually, i hope to never understand; if to be "conscious" means to narrowly define my blackness and reject my being.

and some of you honestly, really are probably interested in women, but are uncomfortable with expressing that interest. i understand and i send you good vibes in working through that situation–it's tough, but you'll survive. hell, black women always do, right?

...so they say.

and others have just plain bought into the myths that all of us lesbians are trying to get into your pants. we are all trying to corrupt your sister, your mother, your daughter, your sons–especially you. we are always after any woman, simply because she is female, as we homosexuals have absolutely no taste, types, or standards that we desire of potential mates. this may be true for some women, just as is true for people on all points of the sexuality spectrum–heterosexuals included. but, the sad thing is, as readily as you are to eat up those stereotypes about your queer black bretheren, the same thing you are saying that they are doing to us, we are doing to eachother.

a black woman once asked me, how do i know if i am gay if i've never had sex with a man? she further claimed, that i was too pretty to waste my looks on women, but that i shouldn't get any ideas about her thinking that i was pretty.

please..don't get me started on her...

but to clear up messy situations such as that encounter, here is a good mantra for you to follow. recite it out loudly, if you will:

if i offer to help you–i am not trying to sleep with you.
if i offer to listen to you–i am not trying to sleep with you.
if i smile and say hello in the morning"”i am not trying to sleep with you.
if i offer you respect because i want it in return–i am not trying to sleep with you.
if i do end up loving you, as friends tend to do–I AM NOT TRYING TO SLEEP WITH YOU.

great–see how easy that was!

now that that's out of the way, maybe we can begin the process of really trying to understand one another–see where eachother is coming from–because if we aren't helping one another out, who else is going to? i know it's scary to step outside of your comfort zone and reject the restrictions and definitions that society has cast upon black female relationships, but i really believe that only good can happen once we tackle that damn pink elephant in the closet (my variation). i, too, get nervous and scared when i have to step outside of the familiar. it's never done gracefully; it's not meant to be. i stumble, i make mistakes, i say fucked up things, but i learn.

i had a long talk with a friend yesterday who told me that people fear what they do not understand. they are afraid to speak the same language as someone else, because, that would force them to grow and question everything that they had come to believe up until that point. we are quick to talk about the "community" that naturally exists amongst the marginalized, the outcast, the Other, but inside of that community, we try so hard to avoid attacking the social ills that destroy our powerful relationships before they have even had a chance to blossom.

indeed, "fear of the queer" (catchy, huh?), is a problem, but one that can be solved. if you, my heterosexual (not that there's anything wrong with that) sista's extend the proverbial olive branch, i will readily latch on to it.

peace,
nubian

<small>"Follow the grain in your own wood.” ~ Howard Thurman</small>

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i never knew there was that much beef between straight sisters and gay sisters. wow. that's rediculous. we straight chicks should be taking notes if any thing else. it seems that gay women are alittle more proactive and revolutionary since they don't suffer the fear of being labeled a bitch or undateable by black men. they don't seem to suffer the same body image nonsense either, since gay women seem to accept each other in all shapes and sizes, unlike black men who often swear that we're too big or too nappy to be loved.
bottom line is we're all sisters. what the hell is that beef about?
my best friend likes women. She is not particuarly feminine, wears men's clothes and often has her hair in corn rolls. we go out alot and always get stares from other people. ek i'm pretty feminine so i guess they see us and say i am the girl in the relationship. It pisses me off how people can stare and give you the ugliest looks sometimes. Roll Eyes (I've heard quite a few times,"thats just nasty") Even my cousins assume something is going on between us on the strength of her liking women and us hanging togeather. Roll Eyes Why can't people understand that just because a woman is gay it doesn't mean she wants to sleep with every woman she knows bang(and the same could be said for gay men)! I'm pretty much the type of person that doesn't care what other people think about me, but at times i feel like yelling "i'm not gay, we're just friends, she likes girls, not me!!!" when people stare and then i feel guilty for feeling that way. sck I guess i feel guilty because i try to be so supportive to her, support gay rights, say gays or no different from the rest of us and should be treated the same way etc.. and here i am feeling ashamed because perfect strangers perceive me as being gay. cool I feel like i have to constantly defend my hetereosexuality karate to ignorant people that just can't wrap their brains around me being best friends with a woman that openly likes women. And unfortunately the flack mostly comes from people in my own community not so much other races. 14
quote:
Originally posted by Nubian:
Dear straight black women, my "sista's," it would seem, by virtue of our black skin and shared oppression(s), that we would automatically be friends–support groups for one another, if you will. at least, i always keep thinking about that in the back of my mind.


Black women (and men) do share the same history, race-related experiences, and feelings of oppression, but that does not mean that we must also share the same beliefs and values. All Black people do not share the same thoughts and perceptions about issues related to sexuality. And people need to start differentiating between a person's race and a person's value system. As a Black woman, I am staunchly opposed to your sexuality for the simple fact that two people of the same sex cannot procreate. In every specie, there are two opposing, but complementary sexes (female and male). And these sexes have been specifically designed to come together and reproduce themselves. Therefore, I believe your sexuality is unnatural and is antithesis to universal order.

quote:
And then there are some of you that wear the mask of the "conscious black female" – the one who can recite quotes from fanon or du bois at the drop of a hat, but are quick to think that gays and lesbians are not "african enough" or not "black enough," and that the very idea of sgl romance is a threat to blackness as a whole.


We are conscious, that is why we are against your sexuality, which we believe is a consequence, condition, or choice that you have made out of unconsciousness.
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Man + Woman = The Perfect Match

After reading my responses, some members might be shocked by what they are reading. It is no secrect that I am a great admirer of beautiful women, and beautiful images in general. However, I will assure you that this admiration emanates from an artisitic interest, not a sexual one. I have no interest in having sex with women, especially since they have the very same "parts" that I have. In fact, when two people of the same sex engages in sexual activity, this activity is equivalent to masturbation. Therefore if we're talking about having the most satisfying and productive sexual experience, I believe this can only be accomplished by having sex with an opposing, but complementary opposite.
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quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
quote:
Originally posted by Nubian:
Dear straight black women, my "sista's," it would seem, by virtue of our black skin and shared oppression(s), that we would automatically be friends–support groups for one another, if you will. at least, i always keep thinking about that in the back of my mind.


Black women (and men) do share the same history, race-related experiences, and feelings of oppression, but that does not mean that we must also share the same beliefs and values. All Black people do not share the same thoughts and perceptions about issues related to sexuality. And people need to start differentiating between a person's race and a person's value system. As a Black woman, I am staunchly opposed to your sexuality for the simple fact that two people of the same sex cannot procreate. In every specie, there are two opposing, but complementary sexes (female and male). And these sexes have been specifically designed to come together and reproduce themselves. Therefore, I believe your sexuality is unnatural and is antithesis to universal order.

quote:
And then there are some of you that wear the mask of the "conscious black female" – the one who can recite quotes from fanon or du bois at the drop of a hat, but are quick to think that gays and lesbians are not "african enough" or not "black enough," and that the very idea of sgl romance is a threat to blackness as a whole.


We are conscious, that is why we are against your sexuality, which we believe is a consequence, condition, or choice that you have made out of unconsciousness.


I agree with you Rowe, but would also add that it isn't just a 'choice' made from unconscious thought processess.

I think the imbalance in the natural environment and the oppression of the Dark African female by White supremacist society also contribute to a lot of our sisters being 'gay' IMO.

All the hormones in our food and chemicals in our environment that effect our sexual development from the womb to the tomb, and are largely unavoidable. I mean if hermaphroditic frogs are being born what is happenning to us?

The oppression of the image of the Dark Skinned African womb-man(I notice a lot of sisters that dress 'like men' are phenotypically Dark and African in appearance.)

Also the imbalance that stems from the dominant society's lack of respect for the sacred feminine plays a role too. (and effects all the above)

AND I don't even have to go into great detail about the institutionalization that takes place as a result of our hisorical oppression and subsequent poverty.

I look at the increase in homosexual women in the African community as a symptom or result of a much greater societal imbalance, and therefore isn't necessarily a 'choice' in some cases...although I find it just as undesirable an outcome as you do.
quote:
Originally posted by Oshun Auset:
I agree with you Rowe, but would also add that it isn't just a 'choice' made from unconscious thought processess.

I think the imbalance in the natural environment and the oppression of the Dark African female by White supremacist society also contribute to a lot of our sisters being 'gay' IMO.

All the hormones in our food and chemicals in our environment that effect our sexual development from the womb to the tomb, and are largely unavoidable. I mean if hermaphroditic frogs are being born what is happenning to us?

The oppression of the image of the Dark Skinned African womb-man(I notice a lot of sisters that dress 'like men' are phenotypically Dark and African in appearance.)

Also the imbalance that stems from the dominant society's lack of respect for the sacred feminine plays a role too. (and effects all the above)

AND I don't even have to go into great detail about the institutionalization that takes place as a result of our hisorical oppression and subsequent poverty.

I look at the increase in homosexual women in the African community as a symptom or result of a much greater societal imbalance, and therefore isn't necessarily a 'choice' in some cases...although I find it just as undesirable an outcome as you do.


True, true, true. You know in many ways, we're elevating on the same consciousness, so you know that I'm going to agree with everything you've written. Well said.
Rowe and Oshun-clearly you two don't agree with homosexuality and thats fine, everyone is entitled to have their own opinion about a subject, but my question is this-Do your opinions on homosexuality make you treat individuals that identify themselves as homosexual negatively? Do you feel a desire to avoid them-consciously choosing to not interact with them? Again I'm not making any judgements, I'm just curiousSmile
I never knew there was beef either! I've always seen Gay Men and Straight Men have that complaint with each other, but this is new to me!

I think if people focused less on someone's sexual preference and more on the individual, we probably wouldn't see much of this problem. For instance, I have a page online and for some reason in the last week, I've had a MULTITUDE of Lesbians coming to my page using the comment feature of "Pinch" or "Flirt." Ladies, I know that a disgruntled Man who's pissed off at me must have done something to cause this (or a pissed off chic)...lol.

I've had to put up a sign that tells these ladies to stop doing that; especially given that I'm heterosexual. That did not offend anyone (I hope) and while I'm heterosexual, I would hope that I would not judge someone who is not.
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
quote:
Originally posted by Nubian:
Dear straight black women, my "sista's," it would seem, by virtue of our black skin and shared oppression(s), that we would automatically be friends–support groups for one another, if you will. at least, i always keep thinking about that in the back of my mind.


Black women (and men) do share the same history, race-related experiences, and feelings of oppression, but that does not mean that we must also share the same beliefs and values. All Black people do not share the same thoughts and perceptions about issues related to sexuality. And people need to start differentiating between a person's race and a person's value system. As a Black woman, I am staunchly opposed to your sexuality for the simple fact that two people of the same sex cannot procreate. In every specie, there are two opposing, but complementary sexes (female and male). And these sexes have been specifically designed to come together and reproduce themselves. Therefore, I believe your sexuality is unnatural and is antithesis to universal order.

quote:
And then there are some of you that wear the mask of the "conscious black female" – the one who can recite quotes from fanon or du bois at the drop of a hat, but are quick to think that gays and lesbians are not "african enough" or not "black enough," and that the very idea of sgl romance is a threat to blackness as a whole.


We are conscious, that is why we are against your sexuality, which we believe is a consequence, condition, or choice that you have made out of unconsciousness.


Eek
quote:
Originally posted by msprettygirl:
Rowe and Oshun-clearly you two don't agree with homosexuality and thats fine, everyone is entitled to have their own opinion about a subject, but my question is this-Do your opinions on homosexuality make you treat individuals that identify themselves as homosexual negatively? Do you feel a desire to avoid them-consciously choosing to not interact with them? Again I'm not making any judgements, I'm just curiousSmile


Sister Pretty, I'm sure that you've met people who do not share your values. Do you treat them negatively?
quote:
Originally posted by ShayaButHer:
I never knew there was beef either! I've always seen Gay Men and Straight Men have that complaint with each other, but this is new to me!


But should voicing a dislike for someone else's values, choices, or lifestyle be mistaken as "beef?" There were a lot of assumptions made by this article's writer. She (Nubian) believes that her sexuality can somehow be associated with Afrocentricity or "Black conscioiusness," and that being gay automatically makes her more "conscious" than those who are not. Nubian needs to acknowledge the difference between an individual's race and an individual's values. She needs to realize that a Black and oppressed person in America can be opposed to homosexuality. Some people, however, cannot fathom that. They assume that because all Blacks in America are being oppressed and alienated in some way that we should all be for homosexuality.
quote:
Originally posted by FireFly:
Rowe, (my sources tell me) you know that Alice Walker is bisexual?


No disrespect to you Sister Firefly (because I realize that you're a White sista), but in addition to Walker's sexuality, another aspect of Alice Walker that I don't understand is her attraction to former husband, Mel Leventhal (a White man). Have you seen him? There couldn't be a more odder couple. She's all Black Sista Power, Picked Afro, and Dashiki and he looks like a White conservative from Wallstreet. What in the world did these two see in one another?????? I just don't get. It's always these super-Afrocentric, Pro-Black power types of people who find themselves being attracted to the Whitest people to date and marry.
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
quote:
Originally posted by msprettygirl:
Rowe and Oshun-clearly you two don't agree with homosexuality and thats fine, everyone is entitled to have their own opinion about a subject, but my question is this-Do your opinions on homosexuality make you treat individuals that identify themselves as homosexual negatively? Do you feel a desire to avoid them-consciously choosing to not interact with them? Again I'm not making any judgements, I'm just curiousSmile


Sister Pretty, I'm sure that you've met people who do not share your values. Do you treat them negatively?


no i do not. I wasn't assuming that you did, it was a genuine question.
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
another aspect of Alice Walker that I don't understand is her attraction to former husband, Mel Leventhal (a White man). Have you seen him? There couldn't be a more odder couple. She's all Black Sista Power, Picked Afro, and Dashiki and he looks like a White conservative from Wallstreet. What in the world did these two see in one another?????? I just don't get. It's always these super-Afrocentric, Pro-Black power types of people who find themselves being attracted to the Whitest people to date and marry.


I haven't seen him and don't know any goss about him.
Sometimes opposites attract, usually quite powerfully - it avoids endless nodding and agreeing with the SO Wink or perhaps they had a meeting of the minds, or were soulmates. We'll never know coz it's none of our beeswax. Smile

That he wears a suit - or really any visual aspect of him - shouldn't ever be what's in question, more what's in his head and in his heart. I don't go for the banker type myself but a lot of women find that sexy and powerful. A lot of women find money, fullstop, sexy and powerful. I'd prefer energy, enthusiasm and imagination any day of the week... or year... lol eyes
.
The opening of the essay cracked me up.

"I am not trying to sleep with you."

Within the gender, there are many women who act like the so confused men that we love to make fun of.

One minute complaining about how often it has to be explained that eye contact or a hello doesn't mean lust, and the next minute attributing every bit of eye contact and hellos from lesbians as invitations to a dry rub.

The fear of "lesbian by association" is so true.

It's pathetic and hilarious at all the same time.

But, unlike Nubian, I don't recall this behavior from women who will identify as conscious, as I've seen that that too arises fear of lesbian by association, people who fear homosexuals do not wear the badge of consciousness. Rather, I think they tend to exert a lot of energy in proving, especially in front of men, how UNconscious they can be. At that time, they won't be spending too much time quoting Fanon, Truth, and who ever.

However, I will take her word for it because this is something that she'd be more keen on noticing since it will affect her segment of the community more.

I'll keep my eyes peeled, but I would be surprised if my impression isn't supported by what I observe.

This is not to say that I don't believe there is a big problem among with who label ourselves as conscious.

I just think it has a different source.

I would say that most breeders of conscious are hypocritical. Talking about "community" and "sisterhood" yet neglecting to look at issues through non-hetero lenses.

It's as if an issue isn't an issue unless it affects straights. And it is not as if these women won't see a problem faced by lesbians. Like, we all see this disconnect between straights and lesbians, I believe, but there isn't much of a move to correct it from the straight end.

And, straights will lament Sakia Gunn very quickly, but when there is a protest for a situation like Gunn's, I'm willing to bet most of the women in the crowd will be homosexuals.

Breeders of conscious will complain to death about the Black women raped as punishment for their sexuality, but the most vocal fighters that I've heard have been from Black lesbians.

But I think that many of us are on the verge of seeing the errors in our way, and I'm hopeful that things will change.

Other problems don't leave me so optimistic.

There is a real class problem with the group.

The middle-class tends to speak very middle-class-centric. And the poor tends to speak very poor-centrically.

I'm probably (very) guilty of that.

That is one big issue to be disenfranchising us from each other.

Perhaps this will be corrected by the time we reach eleventh wave feminism, lol.
quote:
Originally posted by msprettygirl:
Rowe and Oshun-clearly you two don't agree with homosexuality and thats fine, everyone is entitled to have their own opinion about a subject, but my question is this-Do your opinions on homosexuality make you treat individuals that identify themselves as homosexual negatively? Do you feel a desire to avoid them-consciously choosing to not interact with them? Again I'm not making any judgements, I'm just curiousSmile


Definately not. We are all human beings. If someone shows me respect I show them the same respect back and vis-a vis.

I look at the groing/large amount of homosexuality as a symptom of a much larger problem and not THE problem. I'm all about getting rid of the primary contradiction(s) not symptoms. I have a whole philosophy about why homosexuality is occuring in such LARGE amounts in our community in particular. I would even argue that a small amount of homosexuality(low population) may occur in nature, but exponentual growth of something that doesn't make reproductive(natural) sense means that other environmental/social factors are involved. I don't really do the moralistic judgenmental thing. It reminds me too much of right wing fundie X-tians.
Rowe,

No, I don't think voicing a dislike for someone else's values, choices or lifestyle should be mistaken as beef. The beef I was referring to was the whole premise of the argument between Heterosexual Woman and Lesbian Women; that "I'm not trying to pick you up, so don't think just because I smile at you, that's what that means!" argument.

Like I said, I've always seen this issue come up between Gay Men and Straight Men and I know this argument has always been something big between them because some Straight Men would voice that as their concern, i.e. "I don't want him looking at my manhood and getting any ideas!"

But I did ask my second cousin, who's a Lesbian Woman, about this. I also asked another psychologist I work with, who's also a Lesbian Woman, how she felt about this. They both said that they really could care less what another Woman is thinking about their intentions and I didn't have to ask why either...LOL...they just offered up why immediately. They both said, almost verbatim, that they are not predators that go around skulking Straight Women. I had to laugh at that given that apparently, this REALLY IS the perception many have about Lesbians. They said that when they were available (because they both have committed partners now) they approached dating like anybody else: by asking what they had in common with the person. They also looked at if the person made them happy and if their association was a pleasant one. What I did not expect to hear was that they both really stayed away from the Women who were "new" to Lesbianism or who were just "curious" about their sexuality. They wanted someone who was sure of themselves.

My cousin is Black. The psychologist is White. My cousin does not connect being Black with being Lesbian, but she does bring up the three strikes thing: "Black, Woman, Lesbian." The psychologist brings up the two strikes: "Woman, Lesbian."

Looking at both, and having talked with other Women who are Lesbian and some Men who are Gay, I do understand how people make the Black/Gay connection. I know that people are thinking if it was wrong to oppress and alienate someone because of their color, why is it not wrong to oppress and alienate someone because we may not agree with who they sleep with? The argument is that while being Black is something that is natural and couldn't be helped, how does one know that Homosexuality is NOT natural and something that one can help? I know what religion has us believe, but none of us will really know until the Creator speaks on that specifically.

I say this because we've all seen examples in nature of one being two sexes. Some people have even been born this way. We've even seen where the male actually fathers the child, among animals. So while a large amount of us are heterosexual, we really don't know.

I think the "more conscious" construct comes into play because people who go through more stressful or testy situations than others usually DO have a more conscious existence simply because their experiences render them more enlightened about the extremes of human behavior. However, that doesn't necessarily make Nubian more conscious because being gay just makes her different, not necessarily more enlightened by that difference, if she isn't learning what she is supposed to be learning IN that experience.

As far as the attraction, MAN do opposites attract! The extreme opposite is, believe it or not, what keeps the two people attracted to each other because they are so unlike the other. We attract what we relate to and we attract what we are missing, too! But I think if we are curious to "get over" the fears we have about others, we will crave that attraction more and actually seek out those situation that will allow us to do "deal with it." Also, the passion that each feels for their "cause" or "issue" is attractive. Remember: nobody likes boring...and that passion will keep the two alive FOREVER or until one gets sick and tired of too much passion and something comes to divert attention away from that passion.

For instance, there is both a Frenchman who's interested in me and a Latino man who's interested in me. The Frenchman lives in Canada and is White as White can be...and he's attracted to Black Women. He dated an African Woman for a while. The Latino was born here in the U.S., but he too is attracted to nothing but Black Women. And it is odd (to me) how heavily they pursue going after a Black Woman (me). I won't lie: it is uncomfortable because I know that many Men who are NOT Black who claim they are serious about Black Women, mistake their lust for something "different" for Truth about wanting to be in a real and lasting RelationShip. I've told them both that I think they are attracted to the Difference...and they swear up and down that isn't it.

Maybe the White dude and the Pro-Africa Woman were attracted to the differences in each other...who knows. It's been my experience that if the attraction is real, then the people involved will stand the test of time, Straight or Gay.
quote:
Originally posted by ShayaButHer:
Like I said, I've always seen this issue come up between Gay Men and Straight Men and I know this argument has always been something big between them because some Straight Men would voice that as their concern, i.e. "I don't want him looking at my manhood and getting any ideas!"


Also, I can understand the conflict between homosexual and heterosexual men because there is more of a stimga placed on being a gay man than there is a gay woman. In other words, gay women are not judged as harshly as are gay men. In the eyes of many Americans, seeing two gay women is "sexy" and "arousing." Seeing two gay men, on the other hand, is "disgusting" and "abhorrent."

quote:
Looking at both, and having talked with other Women who are Lesbian and some Men who are Gay, I do understand how people make the Black/Gay connection. I know that people are thinking if it was wrong to oppress and alienate someone because of their color, why is it not wrong to oppress and alienate someone because we may not agree with who they sleep with?


I don't advocate alienating anyone for anything, not their race, religion, or sexual orientation, unless they give me a reason. If a religious person, for example, keeps harrassing me and imposing his or her religious beliefs on me, then yes, I AM going to alientate that person so that they can hopefully get the message that I don't appreciate what they're doing. But again, communicating a strong passion against someone's beliefs, choices, or lifestyle should not be mistaken as having "beef" with this person.
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
quote:
Originally posted by FireFly:
Rowe, (my sources tell me) you know that Alice Walker is bisexual?


No disrespect to you Sister Firefly (because I realize that you're a White sista), but in addition to Walker's sexuality, another aspect of Alice Walker that I don't understand is her attraction to former husband, Mel Leventhal (a White man). Have you seen him? There couldn't be a more odder couple. She's all Black Sista Power, Picked Afro, and Dashiki and he looks like a White conservative from Wallstreet. What in the world did these two see in one another?????? I just don't get. It's always these super-Afrocentric, Pro-Black power types of people who find themselves being attracted to the Whitest people to date and marry.


off This is somewhat off topic, but did Alice Walker's bisexuality fueled some African-Americans to boycott "The Color Purple" at the Academy Awards, despite that 6 out of the 11 Oscar nominations (which nobody won) went to African-Americans?

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