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Obama May Seek Out Centrist to Replace Souter on Supreme Court

Greg Stohr and Tina Seeley Greg Stohr And Tina Seeley
2 hrs 51 mins ago

May 3 (Bloomberg) -- President Barack Obama, weighing advice from both the left and right on his first Supreme Court choice, is likely to seek a judicial version of himself: a moderate coalition-builder.

In making his first imprint on the court, Obama will choose from a list of candidates who would add ethnic or gender diversity. The most discussed possibilities -- federal appeals court judges Diane Wood and Sonia Sotomayor and U.S. Solicitor General Elena Kagan -- are well-credentialed lawyers whose records suggest they would become moderate-to-liberal justices.

Obama told reporters last week that he wanted to appoint someone with an “independent mind” and with a “a quality of empathy, of understanding and identifying with people’s hopes and struggles.” The president has his first chance to fill a seat on the court upon the resignation of Justice David Souter.

Senators from both parties said the Democratic president should avoid filling the vacancy with an “ideologue.”

“I don’t like to see an ideologue of either the right or the left,” Senator Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat and chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said on CNN’s “State of the Union” today. “I don’t think we’re going to have one.”

Obama “probably understands he is going to have more than one appointment,” said John O. McGinnis, a conservative legal scholar at Chicago’s Northwestern Law School who served in the Republican administrations of Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. “It may well be he doesn’t want to make a very divisive appointment immediately given that he is pursuing so many other matters.”

Future Vacancy

Choosing a relative moderate would square with Obama’s campaign promise not to seek Supreme Court “activism,” while leaving open the possibility of a bolder nomination for a future vacancy. It would also help ensure an easy Senate confirmation, burnishing Obama’s centrist credentials while he seeks support for a health-care overhaul and other priorities.

Republican Senator Richard Shelby of Alabama said on CNN today it would be “good for the country” if Obama appoints “a pragmatist, someone who is not an ideologue.”

“I think the criteria should be to follow the law, not to make the law,â€

Some conservatives say they are concerned that Obama, a former constitutional law professor, will select activists with an agenda for reshaping American law.

Senator Orrin Hatch, a Utah Republican who serves on the Judiciary Committee, questioned what the president meant in saying the nominee has to be person with “empathy.”

“Usually that’s a code word for an activist judge,” Hatch said today on ABC’s “This Week.”

‘Heroes of Mine’

In an interview last year with the Detroit Free Press, Obama hailed as “heroes of mine” former Chief Justice Earl Warren and former Justices William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall -- who were in the vanguard when the court began expanding constitutional rights for criminal suspects, women and minorities in the 1960s.

In his next breath, though, Obama said the time for that type of judicial philosophy had passed. “In fact, I would be troubled if you had that same kind of activism in circumstances today,” he said.

Obama said he would seek a nominee concerned about “how our laws affect the daily realities of people’s lives.” At the same time, he said he wanted a justice who “respects the rule of law.”

Democratic control of the Senate means Obama will have much leeway in selecting his nominee. Democrats hold a 59-40 advantage and have the prospect of a 60th vote should Democrat Al Franken be seated as a senator from Minnesota. That would be enough to overcome a procedural move to stall a nomination.

Bipartisan Support

Obama nonetheless may find himself drawn toward a nominee who would garner at least some bipartisan support. Such leading candidates as Wood, Sotomayor and U.S. Solicitor General Kagan all have the potential to draw Republican votes.

Wood, a 58-year-old judge on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, put her centrist credentials on display in March when she agreed almost entirely with Republican-appointed judges while discussing antitrust law at an American Bar Association luncheon in Washington.

In a free-speech case that divided the appeals court in 2006, she voted in favor of an Illinois university that revoked the student-organization status of a Christian group opposed to homosexual conduct.

Even so, her opinion contained limiting language, saying the university couldn’t discriminate against the group “based upon its evangelical Christian viewpoint”

Harvard Law School

Kagan, 49, won plaudits for smoothing over some of the ideological tensions that plagued Harvard Law School before she became dean there in 2003. Faculty member Charles Fried, who was President Ronald Reagan’s top Supreme Court lawyer, has suggested Kagan as a worthy Supreme Court nominee for a Democratic president.

Still, her nomination to become the first female solicitor general, the administration’s top courtroom lawyer, proved divisive. She won confirmation on a 61-31 vote with some conservatives saying they were concerned about her lack of experience and her opposition to on-campus military recruiting at Harvard.

As solicitor general, Kagan has taken some positions that have disappointed liberals, particularly on terrorism questions. She has yet to argue a case before the Supreme Court.

Sotomayor is a 54-year-old Hispanic appointed to her current post on the 2nd Circuit in New York by President Bill Clinton. Democrats recommended her to then-President George W. Bush as a possible nominee when Sandra Day O’Connor announced her retirement from the high court in 2005.

Divisive Nominee

Some legal conservatives are suggesting that Sotomayor would be a more divisive nominee than Wood or Kagan. Curt Levey, executive director of the Committee for Justice, put Sotomayor on a list of prospective nominees who are “so clearly committed to judicial activism that they make a bruising battle unavoidable.” Neither Wood nor Kagan were on that list.

In a high-profile race case now before the Supreme Court, Sotomayor backed New Haven, Connecticut, after it canceled planned promotions in its fire department because no blacks had scored well enough in testing to qualify.

Obama may be tempted to search beyond the realm of federal appeals courts. Every current justice came from one of those courts when nominated to the Supreme Court.

As a result, the justices haven’t always been “savvy to consequences in the world and political understandings,” said Barry Friedman, a New York University law professor.

Outside the Courts

A less traditional search might lead to a governor, possibly Michigan’s Jennifer Granholm or Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, or a state court judge such as Leah Ward Sears, the black chief justice of the Georgia Supreme Court. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, a former Arizona governor, might fit that template.

Obama yesterday suggested he will cast a wider net. “I will seek someone who understands that justice isn’t about some abstract legal theory or footnote in a case book,” he said.

Leahy said he has spoken with the president “and I know some of the names he’s thinking of. They are all going to be extremely good, good people.”

Leahy is meeting with the president this week and will recommend some names to him.

Obama will “ultimately choose someone who is a moderate, liberalish type,” said Lee Epstein, a constitutional expert at Northwestern Law School. “Whether he breaks this norm of federal judicial experience will be very interesting.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.net .

Everybody can be great... because anybody can serve. You don't have to have a college degree to serve. You don't have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.  


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

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quote:
In an interview last year with the Detroit Free Press, Obama hailed as “heroes of mine” former Chief Justice Earl Warren and former Justices William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall -- who were in the vanguard when the court began expanding constitutional rights for criminal suspects, women and minorities in the 1960s.

In his next breath, though, Obama said the time for that type of judicial philosophy had passed. “In fact, I would be troubled if you had that same kind of activism in circumstances today,” he said.


17
quote:
Originally posted by ricardomath:
quote:
In an interview last year with the Detroit Free Press, Obama hailed as “heroes of mine” former Chief Justice Earl Warren and former Justices William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall -- who were in the vanguard when the court began expanding constitutional rights for criminal suspects, women and minorities in the 1960s.

In his next breath, though, Obama said the time for that type of judicial philosophy had passed. “In fact, I would be troubled if you had that same kind of activism in circumstances today,” he said.


17


activism? Why does that sound curiously like the long lamented "activist judges"?


quote:
In making his first imprint on the court, Obama will choose from a list of candidates who would add ethnic or gender diversity.


good



quote:
Senators from both parties said the Democratic president should avoid filling the vacancy with an “ideologue.”


Why? There are already 2 or 3 on the bench...the balance is needed.

Good solid supreme court nominations, were an important part of the reasons for vote for Mr. Obama. I hope he is aware of that.
Last edited {1}

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