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Head of the Nation's Largest Teacher Union Calls for Education Secretary to Resign

Posted February 24, 2004 -- The head the of nation's largest teacher union said Tuesday that U.S. Education Secretary Rod Paige should resign and apologize for his comments that his group was a "terrorist organization.":: AD ::

"Our members are outraged, and I think he should issue an apology and a resignation," Reg Weaver, president of the 2.7 million-member National Education Association (NEA), told BET.com in an interview. "It is not the first time he has been hostile to the nation's teachers, calling us the 'coalition of the whining and defenders of the status quo.' Our members are outraged and think it's time for him to get out of town."

Paige, speaking to a group of governors at the White House on Monday, said the NEA was a "terrorist organization" because the association challenged President Bush on many provisions of his school reform law passed by Congress in 2001. The NEA has been critical of the president's failure to fully fund the legislation, known as the No Child Left Behind Act.

The governors present when Paige made his comments were Jennifer M. Granholm, Democrat of Michigan; James Doyle, Democrat of Wisconsin; Republican Mike Huckabee of Arkansas; and Linda Lingle, of Hawaii, also a Republican.

"At this time and age, when you look at what is happening to our troops who are fighting terrorists in Iraq, it is unbelievable that he would label our teachers in the classrooms as such, all because we have a different point of view," Weaver continued.

Contacted by BET.com Tuesday afternoon, Paige's spokeswoman, Susan Ashbey, seemed surprised at Weaver's suggestion.

"Reg Weaver has called for his resignation?" she asked. "We have not heard this."

In a statement released Monday, Paige immediately acknowledged that his comments were insensitive.

"It was an inappropriate choice of words to describe the obstructionist scare tactics that the NEA's Washington lobbyists have employed against No Child Left Behind's historic education reforms," he said. "As one who grew up on the receiving end of insensitive
remarks, I should have chosen my words better." Paige grew up in segregated Mississippi.

Paige said that it was the union's high-priced lobbyists that were resistant to real change, not the everyday teachers.

"Our nation's teachers, who have dedicated their lives to service in the classroom, are the real soldiers of democracy," he said.

But Weaver, who has headed the union for the past two years, said that the secretary was merely trying to "separate the teachers from the NEA."

"These teachers are the NEA," Weaver said, "and our members are outraged at this type of hate speech." Weaver said that he has received calls from senators and members of the House expressing similar anger.

It's no secret that the NEA and the Bush administration have been at odds over national education policy.

While Bush has argues that the NEA has played the role of obstructionist in the goal to improve American education, Weaver contends that the president has failed to keep his commitment to bettering education opportunities for all children.

"The National Education Association is focusing on fixing and funding the No Child Left Behind Act, which is a one-sided approach to learning," Weaver said. "It has all the wrong priorities and is mired in paperwork and bureaucracy. We put together the Great Public Schools for Every Child Act, which is designed to ask for relief in areas such as full funding, flexibility in determining adequate yearly progress, making sure supplemental service-providers are qualified and certified." The legislation would also require states to follow the law of land as it relates to discrimination; make sure that paraprofessionals have access to Title I funds for poor children, enable educators to get professional development as required by law; and make it possible for schools not be punished but get the help they need to become successful, Weaver said.

"This is not a partisan issue," Weaver said. "There are at least 14 states – many of them Republican states, like Idaho, Utah, Virginia – who are requesting change. The administration is downplaying this and trying to get Republicans not to offer changes in an election year."

Do you think Education Secretary Rod Paige should resign?
 
 BLACK by NATURE, PROUD by CHOICE.
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Do you think Education Secretary Rod Paige should resign? --- EbonyRose

No.

The "No Child Left Behind Act" is a direct cancellation of the guarantee-my-job approach to public school education maintained by the National Education Association for generations.

The basic answer to the problems demonstrated in public school education is not simply more money. Teacher competence. Teacher accountability. Teacher responsibility. They are foundation stones to reconstruction of the public education system.

PEACE

Jim Chester
I don't think he should resign, but he should certainly issue a better apology than the one that was offered.Educators and education professionals as they are organized in NEAFT are the leading individuals putting pressure on this administration to fix No Child Left Behind. I don't think I need to make a strong argument regarding the necessity of strong "watchdog" groups, especially in this administration. Paige was simply trying to weaken this group's influence by destroying their credibility and shifting the attention away from the flaws in this policy. Rather than meeting with governors to call teachers terrorists, he should have been addressing the matter at hand, that being the flaws of no child left behind.
The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education has stated that elimination of the Dept. Of Education would have an adverse affect on blacks, particularly in higher education (which they and I are both a part of). The literature outlines how the Dept. is a focal point for people of color in terms of many educational resources that exist. It also stated that elimination of the Dept. would have the net effect of leaving people of color wandering around looking to see what resources actually exist and how to find them. I guess that is why white right-wing conservatives wanted to kill it.......they work hard to be legislatively punitive to black people in any way possible.....which is why it is so illogical for blacks to align themselves with their proven enemies......wow.....life sure can be strange sometimes.
quote:
Originally posted by Kevin41:
The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education has stated that elimination of the Dept. Of Education would have an adverse affect on blacks, particularly in higher education (which they and I are both a part of). The literature outlines how the Dept. is a focal point for people of color in terms of many educational resources that exist.


Are these the same resources that are doing so much to improve scholastic achievment?

I'm sure there's been marked improvment in black education that can be directly linked to NEA (not).

quote:
It also stated that elimination of the Dept. would have the net effect of leaving people of color wandering around looking to see what resources actually exist and how to find them.


Yup. With no Federal Bureaucracy to direct people of color, they won't know how to educate themselves. Roll Eyes

quote:
I guess that is why white right-wing conservatives wanted to kill it


Probably not. A more likely reason would be that it is a wasteful bureaucracy that has taken from education much more than it has put in. The federal government has no business in education- plus, it only screws it up anyway.

quote:
they work hard to be legislatively punitive to black people in any way possible


Yeah, I'm sure this is their main agenda. The must get up every morning thinking about how to screw the black man. Everything else must come second to that important end. After all, how could anything else be more important than that? Roll Eyes
Oh well....I am glad I read scholarly research written by blacks and others.....so my mind will not be colonized....I can get a clear look at things and how they exist instead of boodying up to white people and espousing whatever it takes to get a rub on the head:

Vital Signs: Statistics That Measure the State of Racial Inequality

In each issue, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education collects statistics bearing on the relative status of blacks and whites, some of which are interesting but not particularly important whereas others are highly relevant and critical to the measurement of racial progress.
(Note: Boldface type suggests items of positive or important change.)


"¢ Percentage of all freshman college students nationwide who report that they often have a serious conversation with a student of a different race or ethnic group: 50%
"¢ Percentage of all senior college students nationwide who report that they often have a serious conversation with a student of a different race or ethnic group: 49% (National Survey of Student Engagement)


"¢ Percentage of all white students who entered higher education in 1995 who voted in the 2000 presidential election: 60.9%
"¢ Percentage of all black students who entered higher education in 1995 who voted in the 2000 presidential election: 64.4% (National Center for Education Statistics)


"¢ Percentage of all white students who entered higher education in 1995 who took at least one remedial course: 17.4%
"¢ Percentage of all black students who entered higher education in 1995 who took at least one remedial course: 24.3% (National Center for Education Statistics)


"¢ Percentage of all white students who entered higher education in 1995 who during their college career withdrew from a course because they were failing: 16.3%
"¢ Percentage of all black students who entered higher education in 1995 who during their college career withdrew from a course because they were failing: 22.7% (National Center for Education Statistics)


"¢ Percentage of all white Americans over the age of 16 who engage in volunteer work: 29.4%
"¢ Percentage of all black Americans over the age of 16 who engage in volunteer work: 19.2% (U.S. Department of Labor)


"¢ Percentage of all Americans who use the Internet who are black: 10%
"¢ Percentage of all Americans who shop online who are black: 4% (Pew Internet and American Life Project)


"¢ Percentage of all white Americans who made a purchase over the Internet in the past year: 28%
"¢ Percentage of all African Americans who made a purchase over the Internet in the past year: 14% (Simmons Market Research)


"¢ Percentage of all white infants in America in 2000 who routinely slept in the same bed as one or both of their parents: 7.2%
"¢ Percentage of all black infants in America in 2000 who routinely slept in the same bed as one or both of their parents: 27.9% (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development)


"¢ Percentage of adult white Americans who have dated at least one African American in their lifetimes: 17%
"¢ Percentage of adult African Americans who have dated at least one white American in their lifetimes: 43% (Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation)


"¢ Economic buying power of all African Americans in 2002: $646 billion
"¢ Estimated economic buying power of all African Americans in 2007: $853 billion (Simmons Market Research and Selig Center for Economic Growth, University of Georgia)


"¢ Percentage increase in the net worth of all American families in the 1998 to 2001 period: 16.9%
"¢ Percentage increase in the net worth of all African-American families in the 1998 to 2001 period: 13.1% (Federal Reserve Board)


"¢ Median net worth of all non-Hispanic white families in the United States in 2001: $120,900
"¢ Median net worth of all African-American families in the United States in 2001: $19,000 (Federal Reserve Board)


"¢ Percentage of all African Americans who used their seat belts when traveling in their cars in 2000: 70%
"¢ Percentage of all African Americans who used their seat belts when traveling in their cars in 2003: 77%
"¢ Percentage of all Americans who used their seat belts when traveling in their cars in 2003: 75% (National Transportation Safety Board)


"¢ In the year 2000 the percentage of all 850,000 home-schooled students in the United States who were black: 1%
"¢ In the year 2003 the percentage of all 1.7 million home-schooled students in the United States who are black: 5% (National Center for Education Statistics)


"¢ Number of items listed on the Internet auction site ebay.com on March 15, 2003 that contained the word "nigger" in their descriptions: 69 (Search function at www.ebay.com)
"¢ The number of deaths from pregnancy-related complications per 100,000 white mothers who gave birth to live children in the 1991 to 1999 period: 8.1
"¢ The number of deaths from pregnancy-related complications per 100,000 black mothers who gave birth to live children in the 1991 to 1999 period: 30.0 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)


"¢ The number of African Americans who have served in the United States Senate in the entire history of our nation: 4
"¢ The number of African Americans currently serving in the United States Senate: 0

"¢ The number of African Americans who have served as governor of one of the 50 states in the entire history of our nation: 2
"¢ The number of African Americans currently serving as governor of one of the 50 states: 0

"¢ The number of times the word "nigger" appeared in The New York Times in the year 1995: 148
"¢ The number of times the word "nigger" appeared in The New York Times in the year 2002: 40
for the anti-AA Negroes to consider:

What If Harvard College Is Producing Black and White Graduates Who Have Similar Law Board Scores? A Possible Hole in Hopwood

A strong element in the conservative case against affirmative action in higher education has been the large disparity between the standardized test scores of admitted blacks and whites. A change may be at hand.


Ordinarily JBHE deals with verifiable statistics. But information has now come to us which if confirmed is of great importance to the future of affirmative action in higher education.

Some academic sources tell us that black and white graduates of Harvard College who take the standard Law School Admission Test (LSAT) have very similar scores. African-American scores are lower but not by much. We are also told that similar black and white score comparability also prevails among LSAT test takers at some other highly selective institutions including Yale University and Williams College.

Let us assume for the moment that this degree of racial comparability in LSAT scoring is in fact the case. What are the implications?

The first point is that the LSAT results, if true, may suggest that the racial gap in standardized SAT scores for admission to the nation's most demanding colleges and universities may be much smaller than was heretofore thought. The last available figures made public by the Consortium on Financing Higher Education on racial SAT score differences disclosed in 1992 that the racial gap in undergraduate SATs for students admitted to Harvard was 95 points, or 8 percent below the score of whites. At Williams College, according to the Consortium's report, the gap was 181 points, very close to the national SAT racial scoring gap. No figures on black-white differences in SAT scores for Yale were included in the Consortium's report.

A second possibility is that these LSAT scoring results support the view that affirmative action in undergraduate college admissions is more important than affirmative action for admission to graduate school. If the scores on standardized tests for graduate school, such as the LSAT, are now equal or closing for blacks and whites, and this is occurring despite a persisting gap in undergraduate SAT college entrance exams, there is evidence that some undergraduate colleges are bringing black students up to speed during the four years of college. The case for affirmative action in college-level admissions is then strengthened.

If, in some cases, colleges are producing blacks and whites with similar LSAT scores, the argument that affirmative action in law school and other professional schools is producing unqualified professionals goes out the window.

A third point is that if the Harvard figures reported are correct, supporters of affirmative action made a serious mistake when they gave conservative opponents a free hand to control the legal initiative in suits testing the legality of affirmative action. In choosing Texas, Michigan, Georgia, and Washington, litigating opponents of affirmative action were able to select institutions where either the SAT or LSAT racial gap was significant and thus built a stronger legal case based on that differential.

Possibly the outcome of affirmative action litigation would have sided with the proponents of racial preferences if the litigation had been controlled by supporters of affirmative action in such a way that the legal initiative challenging race-sensitive admission policies occurred at some highly selective colleges and law schools where the SAT and LSAT scores for black applicants were close or similar to the scores of white applicants. As this journal has pointed out, in a suit testing the legality of affirmative action Harvard University would have presented the ideal case.

Keep in mind that the opponents of preferences have always staged their lawsuits in favorable judicial forums and they have skillfully selected institutions where the racial score differential has favored their position.

In connection with this report of Harvard LSAT scores, a number of facts remain to be determined.

"¢ What is the LSAT data for blacks and whites at selective undergraduate institutions?
"¢ If the LSAT results for blacks and whites are relatively similar at some academically demanding colleges, is this a fluke or have the results persisted at these schools for a number of years?
"¢ Is the sampling large enough to be statistically acceptable?

All told, it is important to know the facts about the current racial differential in SAT and LSAT scores. The scores are available be-cause the institutions that administer the tests, The College Board and the Law School Admission Council, not only keep scoring data for blacks and whites but they can also relate the data to particular colleges and graduate schools from which the test takers have graduated.


**At the highest levels of education...the gap goes to zero...in terms of grades and completion rates......which proves.....that blacks are just unprepared at lower levels....and not naturally dumb and lazy like the conservs and house nigs like to elude to.......
**Conservatives are just racists who use politics to preserve historical white advantages in this country.......

The Good News That the Thernstroms Neglected to Tell

by Theodore Cross

"Blacks attend college at a rate that is higher than it was for whites just two decades ago. But the good news ends there. The gap in academic achievement that we see today is actually worse than it was 15 years ago."
"” No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning by Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom

Abigail Thernstrom is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute in New York and a member of the United States Commission on Civil Rights. Her husband, Stephan Thernstrom, is Winthrop Professor of History at Harvard University where he teaches American social history. His books have received the Bancroft Prize, the highest honor awarded in the field of history. The Thernstroms are among the nation's most influential conservative intellectuals. Whenever Abigail and Stephan Thern-strom write on racial issues, their words are treated by liberals and conservatives alike as important, learned, authoritative, and intellectually honest.

Their most notable work, published five years ago, is America in Black and White "” One Nation, Indivisible: Race in Modern America. In this 700-page treatise on race the Thernstroms contended that black militancy together with policies of affirmative action have been major barriers to black progress and to a color-free society. Except for a moderate dissent by Professor Glenn Loury, America in Black and White was enthusiastically praised, particularly by conservative reviewers and scholars.

Now the Thernstroms have published a new book, No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning. In this work they assemble a mass of statistics detailing the dismal educational failures of young blacks in the K-12 years. The Thernstroms describe their new book as a "devastating portrait of the racial gap in academic achievement." But even this understates the charges. No Excuses is a fierce, relentless, and unforgiving assault on the educational habits and accomplishments of young black people in the United States. The story the authors tell is unexceptionally grim. And as the disaster is laid before us, the book does not contain a cheerful adjective or hopeful adverb. Though directed at the educational failings of young blacks in the K-12 years, the book also casts a long shadow over African-American education at all levels.

No one who is remotely familiar with the failings of inner-city education in the K-12 years will question the painful and undeniable truths that the Thernstroms tell: dismal reading levels, absence of parental oversight, too much television, too little time on homework, and hostility to book learning.

The authors' conclusion cuts deeper than any stand they have taken heretofore: "By twelfth grade African Americans are typically four years behind whites. These students are finishing high school with a junior high education."

In painting this picture of total bleakness the authors make three important mistakes. First, they simplistically blame, without a hint of exception or qualification, the high college dropout rate of young blacks on poor educational preparation during the K-12 years. For example, they write on page 33, "The extraordinarily high black and Hispanic dropout rate is no mystery. Students who leave high school with skills at the eighth- and ninth-grade level can't keep up in colleges that are not geared to teaching students what they should have learned in high school."

But, as I will show, the black college dropout rate is a complicated issue. There are many important causes that are totally unrelated to the low level of preparation in high school that leave many young blacks unprepared for college.

Next, the Thernstroms see the black educational problem through the lens of race. They neglect to tell the reader that under comparable social, educational, and environmental circumstances, whites drop out of college at the same or, often, at a greater rate as blacks. Many white children, especially those from distressed rural areas, leave high school wholly unprepared for college. And, like similarly situated blacks, they too drop out of college in droves.

Now for the most troubling part of this study. This is the Thernstroms' failure to tell the story of the often brilliant, and now apparently unstoppable, progress black students from all backgrounds are making in the college years and at the graduate school level. But these gains are summarily dismissed. On page one of the Introduction to No Excuses the Thernstroms write: "Blacks attend college at a rate that is higher than it was for whites just two decades ago. But the good news ends there [italics mine]. The gap in academic achievement that we see today is actually worse than it was 15 years ago."

Since the Thernstroms have little to say about what happens to young blacks in the college years, except for the high dropout rates, they leave us with the expectation that for African Americans the college experience tends to be pretty much a wipeout. We shall see later that this statement is not only false, but that, because of the academic weight and influence of the authors, it inflicts harm on the college aspirations of young African Americans and on the racial expectations of Americans as a whole.

Why Do Blacks Drop Out of College?

Let's first take up the issue of the causes for high black student college dropout rates. There are lots of reasons why youngsters of all races fail to complete college. Sometimes they leave college because they are homesick. Often they have a friend or fiance whom they wish to join at another college. Sometimes they leave college for another institution where they see a more valuable course of study. Often there are social and ethnic conflicts that make a particular college a very unpleasant place to be. For tens of thousands of rural youngsters particularly, leaving home and going to college is a fearsome experience. Young blacks leave college for all of these reasons and perhaps, too, on account of feelings of rejection and isolation that they experience on many college campuses. The literature of race abounds with surveys showing that many young blacks leave college simply because they feel lost and insecure in a white environment.

But there is an overwhelming economic reason that almost necessarily will cause large numbers of young black students to drop out of college at a much greater rate than whites. This is the huge difference in the abilities of black and white families to bear the costs of college. In much of the Western world the cost of a college education is borne by the state. But not in the United States. In our country tuition and fees at the most selective private universities are now approaching $40,000 annually. At the nation's best state-operated colleges, the comprehensive fees run as much as $15,000 a year. For the vast majority of black families, this is a daunting sum of money.

Look first at the racial statistics bearing on the ability to pay. Black families in the United States have a median family income that is 63 percent of the median white family income. According to U.S. Census Bureau data, this figure has remained virtually unchanged for nearly three decades. This huge, almost 40 percent racial gap in family incomes alone would cause one to expect that the black student college dropout rate would be far higher than the college dropout rate for whites.

Most important, too, is the huge percentage of black college students who come from low-income families. Therefore, black families with college-age children face far more serious financial obstacles than white families. Census Bureau statistics show that 13 percent of all 18- to 24-year-old college-age black youths come from families with incomes below $10,000. This is more than seven times the level for white youths in the same age bracket. Only 1.8 percent of all white youth ages 18 to 24 come from families with incomes below $10,000. If we up the income threshold to $25,000, still well below the median income in the United States for both blacks and whites, we find that 30.6 percent "”nearly one third "” of all black youth come from families with incomes below $25,000. The similar figure for whites is much lower at 9.7 percent. Thus, black college-aged youth are three times as likely as white youth to come from families whose income is below $25,000.

According to U.S. Department of Education statistics compiled and published by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the nationwide difference between black and white college dropout rates at four-year colleges and universities is 21 percentage points. Arguing percentages is always problematic, yet if the black-white family income gap is 37 percentage points and young blacks are at least three times as likely as young whites to come from low-income families, one might well expect that family income inequalities would be producing an even higher gap in the black-white college student dropout rate. If, hypothetically, no other educational factors were at work and family income differences were the sole determinant of dropout rates, the black-white dropout differential would in fact be nearly double the rate it is today.

In an affluent nation such as the United States, the vast majority of whites handle college without serious damage to family budgets. In fact, many millions of whites write checks for college tuition and books without making the slightest dent in their bank accounts. But it rarely occurs to many scholars that, for a very large percentage of black families, meeting the financial burden of the college years is so onerous as to threaten family solvency.

Wealth Favors College Completion

Most people are aware of the very large income gap between black and white families. But family income differences are only part of the financial burden that almost all black families face in sustaining their children through the college years. In most cases, the huge economic cost of completing college is paid from two sources: family savings as well as disposable income. Here we see that the racial wealth differential is so huge that it all by itself can explain the very differences in college dropout rates between blacks and whites.

Once more, look to the figures. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in the year 2000 the median net worth of black families in the United States was less than one tenth of the median net worth of white families. This is a shocking disparity. For all black families in the United States, the latest Census Bureau figures show that financial wealth "” money in banks, stocks, bonds, etc. "” which also could be used to pay for a college education, is almost nonexistent in the black community. In 2000, according to the Census Bureau figures, the median net worth for black families in these types of assets was only $1,166. For whites the median net worth was 19 times higher at $22,566. Only 4 percent of black wealth was in highly liquid stock and mutual fund shares compared to more than 16 percent for whites.

In gauging the economic reasons behind the black-white college completion gap, another factor of great importance is the huge racial disparity in home ownership. For Americans generally, borrowing on home equity is a major source of money to pay for college. But according to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2002 less than 48 percent of all black families owned their home compared to 74.5 percent of all non-Hispanic white families. And for borrowing purposes homes owned by blacks are usually of much lower value than those of whites.

I hasten to add here that it would be wrong not to attribute a considerable part of the black-white dropout gap to the large differences in educational attainment and preparation in the K-12 years. Yet clearly family income differences between black and white families are a major if not decisive factor which the Thernstroms choose to ignore.

Scholarship Aid Does Not Close the Gap

Now the reader may say, yes, blacks do indeed operate at a severe financial disadvantage in meeting the costs of college, but they make up the difference because they claim a disproportionate amount of available scholarship money. This is a myth most Americans believe, yet it is totally false. According to a 1994 study by the General Accounting Office, scholarships reserved for blacks and other minorities amounted to only 4 percent of all scholarships in the United States. Blacks are more than 12 percent of the nation's population and, as the Thernstroms point out, they are now entering college at nearly the same rate as whites. Yet only 4 percent of the nation's scholarship money is earmarked for blacks and other minorities including Hispanics, American Indians, and Asians. How much of this 4 percent goes to blacks we do not know. In all events, the government statistics tell us that the scholarship money has a negligible impact in moderating, between black and white families, the ability to bear the costs of college.

Data from the Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics supports this conclusion. The center keeps track of the extent to which various income groups face higher education's costs not covered by financial aid. Current figures show that, depending on the type of institution attended, 74 percent to 92 percent of low-income students and 38 percent to 65 percent of middle-income students have unmet needs. The average amount of unmet need, again depending on the type of institution attended, ranged from $4,000 to $9,300 for low-income students and from $2,100 to $10,700 for middle-income students. Clearly this very large amount of unmet need places serious financial burdens on the ability of these families to keep their children in college.

We all know that statistics tend to be interpreted so as to support the position one is defending. And obviously the Thernstroms are defending the view that poor educational preparation for college is the controlling agent in college dropout rates. Citing the National Center for Education Statistics, the Thernstroms write on page 34 of No Excuses, "White and black students with similar high school test scores had the same college dropout rates. No racial difference." The fallacy here is that according to SAT test score data released by The College Board, with few exceptions, high test scores for blacks almost always occur in affluent black families. Black students from families with incomes of $80,000 or more have SAT scores that are more than 100 points higher than the mean for blacks as a whole and more than 200 points higher than for blacks from the lowest-income brackets. Thus it is family economic differences that tend to be the major factor in determining the differ

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