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National Black Peoples Unity Convention to Convene In Gary, Indiana, March 9-12

Does anybody know anything about this?

Confirmed conference participants include political activists such as: Harry
Belafonte, Dick Gregory, former U.S. Labor Secretary Alexis Herman, the Reverend
Jesse Jackson of Operation PUSH, former Southern Christian Leadership Conference(SCLC)leader the Reverend Joseph Lowery, the President & CEO of the National Action Network, the Reverend Al Sharpton, SCLC President Charles Steele and the Honorable Mary Francis Berry, former Chair of the U. S. Commission on Civil Rights.From the business community, General Motors Vice President Roderick Gillum

Also confirmed as participants are organization leaders such as: New national NAACP
President & CEO Bruce Gordon, Joseph Leonard, Executive Director of the National
Black Leadership Forum, the Honorable Mary Coleman, Chair of the National Black
Caucus of State legislators, Reginald Weaver, President of the National Education
Association, Lezli Baskerville, President of the National Association for Equal
Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO), Dr. Major Jemison of the Progressive
Baptist Convention, Ted Shaw of the NAACK Legal Defense Fund, and Dr. Ronald
Walters, Director of the African American Leadership Institute at the University of
Maryland.

Dr. Dorothy Height, President Emeritus of the National Council of Negro Women, will
serve as the Convention's Honorary Chair.

Former Gary Mayor Richard Hatcher, who co-chaired the 1972 Gary Convention and is one of the three co-chairs for this year's meeting, said, "This meeting presents a rare opportunity for us to talk among ourselves. The shocking disaster of Hurricane Katrina is a sobering reminder that poverty and racism still takes a deadly toll on our communities."

Once again, the convention site will be the West Side High School in Gary, just as it
was 34 years ago. The 2006 theme is "POLICIES FOR EMPOWERMENT: A Struggle
for a New Economic Order."


Convention Co-Chair William Lucy, President of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists
(CBTU) and International Secretary-Treasurer of the American Federation of State,
County & Municipal Employees (AFSCME), summed up the mission of this convention:
"The broad aim of this convention is to bring together the collective wisdom,
creativity and resources in our community, to map out a bold economic agenda that
will unite us in communities of color across the nation."

Members of the convention's founding executive committee include: Paul Brock, of
News & Information Management Systems (NIMS); Clayola Brown, President of the A.
Phillips Randolph Institute and Vice President of the UNITE - HERE labor organization;
the Honorable David Cunningham, Los Angeles businessman and former LA City
Councilman; the Honorable Harold Ford, Sr., from Tennessee; Ernest Green, a
Managing Director of Lehman Brothers and a one of the "Little Rock Nine";
Tony Harrison, a Washington, DC consultant; Virtual Murrell, a Principal of The
Pegasus Group; Miriam Poe of the United Auto Workers; and Dr. Ronald Walters of the
University of Maryland.

Truth is undoubtedly the sort of error that cannot be refuted because it was hardened into an unalterable form in the long baking process of history... Michel Foucault Hope begets many children illegitimately and prematurely. Allie M. Frazier Beware the terrible simplifiers... Jacob Burckhardt

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quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:
I knew about this.

I have wondered what the difference is, or is perceived to be with two similar events being held.

There are some of the same participants.

Is it 'Old Guard' versus 'New Guard'?

If unity is the goal, when does it happen?

Maybe after two course os action have been decided.

PEACE

Jim Chester

JWC,
That was my thinking as well. I did notice that this event has support from labor and trade unions, which I think is a good thing. I would also imagine that as a multi-day event, that there would be an opportunity for some sustained engagement and real strategizing.

The story in Black Commentator states:
The living, breathing fruit of the Civil Rights era, Black elected officials, have been summoned to attend in force: the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), National Black Caucus of State Legislators (NBCSL), National Conference of Black Mayors (NCBM), National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials (NBCLEO), National Association of Black County Officials and appointed Black officials from all levels of government. Every name on Ebony magazine's Most Influential 100+ list has been contacted, in the effort to give the convention both broad and deep representation - William Lucy's shop floor labor troops mixing with grassroots activists, business and investment types, and political luminaries.

HB and anyone else who attends, please give us the 411 on what transpires.
I did notice that this event has support from labor and trade unions, which I think is a good thing.---kresge

I noticed too.

We suffer from the same syndrome in labor, particularly the AFL-CIO as we do in politics.

We staunchly endorse an organization that has historically marginalized non-Europeans to the point of exploitation.

Oh, well....

Let's hope. Certainly opportunity is there.

AGAIN!!!!!


PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
Okay ... but how was the convention itself?? WAs anything interesting talked about? Confused Big Grin


I was too busy taking pictures... Just kidding... I don't know how many of you remember or know about Gary I back in 1972 (I was just a year old!). Gary I was monumental and everybody who was somebody attended (Coretta Scott King, W.E.B. DuBois, Jesse Jackson, etc). Thousands of participants. Out of Gary I came the collective vision and will to produce hundreds (even thousands) of elected black political officials across the country.

One thing that struck me, and a number of others, was that by comparison, this convention was a failure. Projected participation was 16,000 but there were a GREAT many empty seats. I'd be surprised if we got 5000. Many of the big name invitees didn't show. Most of the participants were from out of town (meaning few locals), many had attended Gary I (meaning few young people). Somebody either forgot or failed to explain the importance of this convention to the people who really matter. Because of this, the overall feeling I got was that instead of charting a great new vision for the next 30 years (as Gary I did) this convention instead was a nostalgic celebration of/apology for it's predecessor.

But then Gary II is not special in this regard. I find that the same can be said about a LOT that we're doing now.

There were great moments. Al Sharpton and Louis Farakhan showed, gave great speeches, and left. Sharpton blasted the buying off of Black political leadership and clergy. Of course, no one was fond of "It's Hard Out Here For A Pimp." Of course there was a special session on Katrina (what happened and what do we do now?)... but sadly this event didn't live up to the expectations.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
I was too busy taking pictures... Just kidding... I don't know how many of you remember or know about Gary I back in 1972 (I was just a year old!). Gary I was monumental and everybody who was somebody attended (Coretta Scott King, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jesse Jackson, etc).

Ah HB, I know your area is mathematics and not history, so I will cut you some slack on this one, but Du Bois died August 27,1963, in Accra, Ghana. It was the eve of the famous March on Washington.
quote:
sadly this event didn't live up to the expectations.

That is too bad. Just curious, was there any reference to the SOBU or the Covenant.
quote:
Originally posted by kresge:
Ah HB, I know your area is mathematics and not history, so I will cut you some slack on this one, but Du Bois died August 27,1963, in Accra, Ghana. It was the eve of the famous March on Washington.


Of course, you're correct. When I made that statement I was looking at pictures of the 1972 convention participants and I coulda sworn I saw DuBois (obviously I didn't).

quote:

quote:
sadly this event didn't live up to the expectations.

That is too bad. Just curious, was there any reference to the SOBU or the Covenant.


No, there was no mention of either (that I can recall).... but I also missed the first day of the Convention.
Okay, thanks, HonestBrother!!

I had never heard of Gary I and heard nothing about this second one until Kresge posted this thread. What an interesting concept though! And do you think that the impact of the first convention is really the reason why we have as many black elected officials as we do now?? Or was it just a matter of being inevitably the way things would have to turn out?

It is unfortunate the turnout this year was so small. Maybe we haven't yet reached that "tipping point".

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