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After watching the Democratic debate on CNN, Clark strikes me as a moderate Republican pretending to be a Democrat just to be president. It may even be a set up by the Republicans- to have him win and then further their conservative agenda. Who knows, Republicans will play dirty even if they don't have to.

I didn't like the way he said that Bush was not the compassionate conservative that he claimed to be. So, that's telling me that he may have supported this "compassionate conservatism" movement of the Reagan era. I don't like him.

I think that the only reason people like him is because he's a general and the feel that he can protect us militarily. Just the fact that he's referred to as General Clark gives him a boost.
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Great post. Thanks! Some comments . . .

quote:
Originally posted by keylargo:

After watching the Democratic debate on CNN, Clark strikes me as a moderate Republican pretending to be a Democrat just to be president.


Well, pro affirmative action, pro-choice, pro-union, pro-health care, anti-war, anti-Bush tax cuts, anti-Patriot Act. I don't know. Also remember he's Bill and Hillary's boy from Little Rock.

quote:
I didn't like the way he said that Bush was not the compassionate conservative that he claimed to be. So, that's telling me that he may have supported this "compassionate conservatism" movement of the Reagan era.


BTW - Reagan had nothing to do with "compassionate coservatism". That is Bush's phrase. Reagan was clearly hardcore conservate all the way!

I think more than anything he was pointing out how Bush sold America on an agenda that he has not lived up to. As with the war, Bush has lied wherever he needed to merely to further his agenda.


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela
I agree with MBM. I'm not happy with his pro-Bush statements, but keep them in perspective: He used to be pro-Bush, but now he's so anti-Bush that he's running for president against him. He strikes me as my kind of candidate: a guy who is not married to a political party, but who loves his country. Even if Wesley Clark had been challenging Bush for the Republican nomination, I'd support him. I'm stayin' tuned, but if the election were today, I'd vote for Clark.
Not that it matters but I heard that Clark is Jewish (or heard it implied on a promo for an American Jewish news-mag).

I don't trust him but then again I think Gephardt is the most sincere. Mosley-Braun seems overwhelmed and Bro. Al is gonna say it like it is regardless...

I'll just leave it at that... I feel a bunch of cynicism coming on.
From what I remember reading, at least one of his parents was Jewish. Either Wesley or the Jewish parent (I forgot who) converted to Catholicism.

I've always wondered: if you convert out of Judaism, do you still consider yourself ethnically a Jew? I know it's a religion, but really, with most Jews, the religion is incident to their ethnicity.
Clark center stage at NAACP forum


CHARLOTTE, North Carolina (AP) --Three Democratic presidential candidates turned their focus back to a familiar target at an NAACP forum Friday night.

One day after other candidates ganged up on Wesley Clark at a debate in Phoenix, the retired general got a free pass as his only two opponents turned their anger toward President Bush. Then scheduling problems left him the only candidate on the stage for the last 25 minutes, turning the forum turned into the "Wesley Clark Show."

Plane problems kept three candidates from arriving in time to participate in the 90-minute forum, three decided not to attend and two left early to catch flights. Among those who missed the forum were the four candidates who had continually criticized Clark at Thursday's debate.

Friday's forum was supposed to give the candidates a chance to appear before South Carolina's National Association for the Advancement of Colored People leaders. South Carolina Democrats say black voters may cast more than half of the ballots in the state's first-in-the-South primary Feb. 3.

The meeting was held in Charlotte to honor a boycott driven by NAACP efforts to remove the Confederate flag that flies Statehouse grounds in Columbia, South Carolina.

Clark, the Rev. Al Sharpton and Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio criticized Bush's economic policy, his handling of the war in Iraq and his education policy.

They saved some of their sharpest rhetoric for the U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft and the Patriot Act.

"He's not much of an attorney and I know for sure he's not a general," said Clark, interrupted by applause.

Sharpton recalled how the FBI covertly investigated the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. during the civil rights movement and urged the crowd to fight Ashcroft and his policies. "We should not allow them to use the furor out of 9/11 to rob us of our rights," he said.

Kucinich said as president he would immediately ask the Justice Department to sue to overturn the Patriot Act.

The debate later turned to the death penalty, overcrowded prisons and other civil rights issues, but soon Clark was the only candidate around.

Sharpton was clearly the crowd's favorite. NAACP members stood and applauded as he opened the forum with his arms waving and voice booming: "We are never going back to a time when our votes don't count."

The ovation continued as he ripped Bush for failing to find Osama bin Laden, Saddam Hussein or the leaker who identified a supposed CIA operative to reporters. "I intend to help him find Crawford, Texas," Sharpton said of Bush's home.

North Carolina Sen. John Edwards, Missouri Rep. Dick Gephardt and former Illinois Sen. Carol Moseley Braun all arrived too late for the forum because of mechanical problems with their plane in Phoenix. The three spoke with people outside the ballroom after the forum ended.

Connecticut Sen. Joe Lieberman met with South Carolina NAACP leaders individually Friday, but had to leave Charlotte before the forum started so he could return to Washington before sundown to observe the Jewish Sabbath.

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean was attending parents weekend at his daughter's college and Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry had a long-standing commitment to campaign in New Hampshire.

Dean, Kerry, Lieberman and Edwards had been Clark's adversaries at the Phoenix debate.



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Copyright 2003 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.


There is no passion to be found playing small, in settling for a life
that is less than the one you are capable of living. - Mandela

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