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More Black Men in College Than In Prison

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Black Men photo

Schools such as Urban Prep Academy has a 100% college bound graduates who are entirely Black

AFRICANGLOBE – At this point, it’s almost a clichÉ to declare “There are more Black men in jail than in college.” I’ve heard it my entire life—from adults, friends, politicians, and assorted pundits. When he was just a presidential candidate, then-Senator Barack Obama told the NAACP that “We have more work to do when more young Black men languish in prison than attend colleges and universities across America.”

It’s a great soundbite. But it isn’t true. As Howard University professor Ivory Toldson shows in a story for The Root, the original report on Black male college enrollment—the Justice Policy Institute’s “Cellblocks or Classrooms,” first published in 2001—is far out of date. “If we replicated JPI’s analysis,” writes Toldson, “we would find a 108.5 percent jump in Black male college enrollment from 2001 to 2011. The raw numbers show that enrollment of Black males increased from 693,044 in 2001 to 1,445,194 in 2011.”

By contrast, of the estimated 2 million inmates held in state or federal prison—or local jails—841,000 are African American men. To be fair, those numbers are from 2009. Toldson provides a more direct comparison using data from the National Center for Education Statistics, the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and the Department of Justice’s statistics on prison enrollment:

Black men college enrollment photo

Black men college enrollment

In 2009, the DOJ’s most recent year for data on prison populations, there were more than 150 percent more Black males in college than incarcerated. Given the declining prison presence of African Americans—incarceration rates fell sharplybetween 2000 and 2009, and remain on a downward slope—and the growing presence of Blacks in higher education, the difference between the two populations is likely larger.

This is great news. Whether it will affect our conversations over the status of Black males is, of course, a different question.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I'm just trying to make a way out of no way, for my people" -Modejeska Monteith Simpkins

 

AFRICAN AMERICA IS AT WAR

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICA

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICANS

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

AMERICA'S RACISTS HAVE INFILTRATED AMERICAN POLICE FORCES TO WAGE A RACE WAR AGAINST BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

THE BLACK RACE IS AT WAR

FIRST WORLD WAR:  THE APPROXIMATELY 6,000 YEAR WORLD WAR ON AFRICA AND THE BLACK RACE

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Originally Posted by Yemaya:

I hear this statistics now more than ever, But how many complete college??? That's the real question that needs to be addressed. I haven't found an answer to this yet.

 

That is a good question; something that should be answered by African Americans in academia in positions of educating, enrolling, counseling and motivating students, particularly those at our HBCUs.  

 

IMO, most people do not complete college because they come in with a lot of personal and/or family problems in the first place, or they may be struggling academically and receiving little or no help or encouragement.  There is also the problem of money, considering that most colleges/universities have their tuition, fees and cost of books set up to drain students of every dime they get in financial aid, and then some if at all possible.  You have all of these colleges and universities just using student for their financial aid, with no concern what-so-ever for the students' academic achievements, or whether or not they stay in school.  

 

Colleges and Universities in the United States are run the same way thatthe Prison Industrial Complex, and Gangs in America are; they are always looking for replacements and they deliberately do exactly what it takes to make sure that there is a constant stream of new recruits.

 

America is the most predatory nation in the world, and now, so are America's businesses and educational institutions.  It's now all just one big giant Pyramid Scheme, thus, now you almost have to be an intellectual and financial gladiator to come out unscathed, it's no wonder that there is a high college drop-out rate for those who start out in the lion's den with the most lions in the first place.

There is a statement in this video that is really funny in a disgusting sort of way at 21:45:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAuIEN-JQ-Y

 

"You Americans have the best high school education in the world.

 

What a pity you have to go to college to get it."

 

This video is from 1998 so that is what some people in England were thinking about American education 15 years ago.  The system is a scam to make kids spend a lot of time and a lot money having information dribbled out to them. 

 

A reading list could combat that.  Like how many people encounter Plato's Allegory of the Cave in some college philosophy class and have instructors make a Big Deal of it?  Well Arthur C. Clarke used it in a science fiction story, A Fall of Moondust, in 1961 and I read it in grade school.  Most high school and college textbooks are lots of words with little information and presented in a way to make it seem more complicated than it is.  Look at how big books and backpacks have gotten since the 60s.

 

So why don't we make a list for Black kids and politely ignore the palefaces.  But are there lots of Black educators hooked into the system caught up in the same game?

 

I wish someone had told me about this when I was in high school.

 

The Tyranny of Words (1938) by Stuart Chase
http://www.anxietyculture.com/tyranny.htm
http://archive.org/details/tyrannyofwords00chas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9H1StY1nU8

 

Xum

  regarding the article's statement, it is funny as heck. Cuz when I was in high school a thousand years ago, I graduated prepared.  If I had decided NOT to go to college...I would have STILL had enough skills to find a job and take care of myself independently.  Today?  Nope.  High schoolers are at a disadvantage cuz for the most part, many essential components were TAKEN out of high school curriclum and transferred over to the college level.  Totally UNFAIR.  And it didn't have anything to do with MONEY and more of trying to accommodate the increase in student enrollment over the years-classrooms got larger.  And that crippled those who just wanted to graduate and find a decent job.  Cuz now they were FORCED to attend college to acquire those skills no longer given in high school. 

 

For example:  auto shop, wood shop, home economics, sewings, cooking, accounting, etc.  are no longer offered at the high school level. (Let's not forget some folks are not college material)  And it really a kinda oxymoron cuz more students are getting pregnant today than ever before and NEED these skills to take care of their  young families independently from govt programs and from depending on family members.  It used to be you could graduate from high school and get a job working on cars or construction, as a secretary, clerk  or even smart enough to pass government job examinations.  Today?  Even so called college grads are suffering from lack of basic skills to obtain entry-level employment  In some places, you need a bachelors just to work as a receptionist. 

 

So my point is....it's a new day.  And if students want to get ahead of the game, they better prepare themselves on the college level which really is in many cases the old high school standard except for the onset of technology-the ONLY crucial difference.  Yeah it's funny cuz really I had all I needed to survive in this world with just my high school dipolma.  Who knew?  But! 

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