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Missouri Football Coach, Gov. Nixon Weigh in on Student Protests 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"I'm just trying to make a way out of no way, for my people" -Modejeska Monteith Simpkins

 

AFRICAN AMERICA IS AT WAR

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICA

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON AFRICAN AMERICANS

THERE IS A RACE WAR ON BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

AMERICA'S RACISTS HAVE INFILTRATED AMERICAN POLICE FORCES TO WAGE A RACE WAR AGAINST BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICA

THE BLACK RACE IS AT WAR

FIRST WORLD WAR:  THE APPROXIMATELY 6,000 YEAR WORLD WAR ON AFRICA AND THE BLACK RACE

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Wolfe said, "My motivation in making this decision comes from a love of Columbia where I grew up and the state of Missouri. I thought and prayed over this decision. It is the right thing to do. ... The frustration and anger I see is real and I don’t doubt it for a second. ... I take full responsibility for the actions that have occurred. I have asked everybody to use my resignation to heal. Let's focus in changing what we can change today and in the future, not what we can't change in the past.""

Next school...Ithaca College

 

http://college.usatoday.com/20...ident-campus-racism/

 

Ithaca College president in hot seat for alleged campus racism

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“Tom Rochon! No confidence!” is becoming a common chant at Ithaca College.

The president of the school in Ithaca, N.Y., is in the hot seat thanks to what some students say are inadequate responses to several allegedly racist incidents on campus and an overall negative racial climate.

The incidents range from reportedly offensive remarks made by Public Safety officers at RA training sessions as well as by two Ithaca alumni at a campus event, to a racially tinged party invite from a fraternity.

Now, an email has been sent out by the Ithaca Student Government Association (SGA) asking for a vote of “confidence” or “no confidence” in Rochon, with votes due Nov. 30.

“You should care about … creating an inclusive environment,” says senior and Student Government Administration (SGA) president Dom Recckio. Students “aren’t confident in President Rochon.”

Rochon’s “performance is definitely sub-par,” says sophomore and first year resident advisor Mike Sylvester. “He seems to be avoiding what’s going on.”

The first alleged instances happened at two RA training sessions in August, according to RAs in attendance and an article in student publication The Ithacan.

The two officers, ID’d in the article as Sergeant Terry O’Pray and Master Patrol Officer Jon Elmore, supposedly dismissed concerns about racial profiling, “saying that it does not happen at Ithaca College” and then showed a BB gun, according to RA Rita Bunatal, with one officer saying, “‘If I saw someone with this I would shoot them.’”

Two RAs of color reportedly walked out “in anger and frustration.”

“It was fine … until the conversation turned to guns,” says Sylvester, who was in the training session. “There was awkward laughter, because everyone didn’t know how to react in the moment. The meeting got very tense after that.”

Another meeting was called by the school to address the training session incidents, but many students left dissatisfied. Benjamin Rifkin, provost and vice president for educational affairs, provided The Ithacan with a statement that read:

“In the past year there has been increased attention given to centuries-old patterns of violence against people of color in our country. It is certainly understandable that Ithaca College community members, especially people of color, women and individuals who identify as LGBTQ, have concerns about their own sense of safety in this larger context.

“Indeed, recent events on our campus focus our concerns on disrespect here at Ithaca College: much to my dismay, at a recent meeting of Resident Assistants, I heard from a number of people of color that they do not feel safe on our campus. I affirm the college’s expectation that all members of our community, especially our Public Safety officers, are to treat others with respect and compassion.”

Another controversial incident occurred at the college’s Blue Sky Reimagining event Oct. 8 that asked students to help “formulate ideas about the evolution of Ithaca College.”

During the event, two Ithaca alumni carelessly and offensively referred to Tatiana Sy, a panelist and woman of color, as a “savage” after she said she had a “savage hunger” to succeed.

The third instance occurred when an unaffiliated Jewish fraternity, Alpha Epsilon Pi, posted an invite on Facebook post  for a “Preps & Crooks”-themed party in October. According to the post, “Prep” attire was described as a “Polo shirt, button-down, backwards baseball cap, khakis or boat shoes” whereas “Crooks” attire was described as a “bandanna, baggy sweats and a t-shirt, snapback, and any ‘bling.’ After students angrily shared the invite, the event was quickly cancelled.

Many students have responded to the issue of systematic racism at the college with protests, and have started the hashtag #POCatIC on social media in support of the campus group “People of Color at Ithaca College.” Some faculty members have raised their voices as well, with some displaying signs on their doors in support of POC.

 

Rochon and other administration members have held meetings with student organizations to discuss the issues, including at an event “Addressing Community Action on Racism and Cultural Bias” held in late October that was interrupted by PoCatIC, which took over the stage.

The group “really did a lot to prove their ‘no confidence’ (in Rochon),” said Recckio. “Half of the people (ended up walking) out of that room.”

President Rochon continued the event after the walkout occurred.

USA TODAY College was given the following statement from Rochon:

“Ithaca College has a proud history of educating student activists, and we will continue to recruit students who ask tough questions and find solutions that better the whole. The administration encourages the Student Government Association to share its voice with the campus and solicit feedback from all students.

“Every institution has room for improvement, and we are thankful that the students are sharing specific and vital issues they would like addressed. We hear them, and are committed to partnering with our students, faculty and staff to make IC the strongest institution it can be. A campus is made stronger by shared governance and the insights that a variety of perspectives and active feedback can bring. Our job is to take the input available to us and make ourselves and the institution a better reflection of what our community wants and needs.”

People of Color at Ithaca were not available for immediate comment.

Sam Lisker is a student at Ithaca College and a member of the USA TODAY College contributor network.
Originally Posted by RadioRaheem:

Wolfe said, "My motivation in making this decision comes from a love of Columbia where I grew up and the state of Missouri. I thought and prayed over this decision. It is the right thing to do. ... The frustration and anger I see is real and I don’t doubt it for a second. ... I take full responsibility for the actions that have occurred. I have asked everybody to use my resignation to heal. Let's focus in changing what we can change today and in the future, not what we can't change in the past.""

 

He made this statement to spread the false propaganda that this protest is Black people angry about the "past" [i.e. slavery, etc.]

 

Hell no!  This protest is very much about the present, about what is happening at that school today, in the year 2015!

 

Nice try . . . but Wolfe can 'miss' Black people with his little deceitful statement.   

 

 

Tim Wolfe is full of sh*t.

 

It took him almost a month to apologize for what his driver did (clipping two of the protesters) -- almost a whole damn month!!!!! 

 

Can you believe that grade A bullsh*t?

 

If he had clipped a dog, the owner would've received an apology from him a LOT sooner I'm sure.

 

And the nerve to say, "I know it looked like I didn't care"….  it looked like he didn't care because HE DIDN'T (a**hole).

 

Good riddance .

 

Image result for image - boy bye!

 

I hope his replacement is a better deal and not a stone cold racist like him (wolfe).

I guess Yale might be on the radar as well...

 

http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/...sions-343944032.html

 

Yale Students March for Racial Justice Amid Recent Tensions

 

 
(Published Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015)

Thousands of Yale students, faculty and staff took to the streets of New Haven in a "march of resitance" on Monday, calling for racial justice after complaints of racial tensions at the prestigious Ivy League institution in recent weeks.

About 2,000 people in the Yale community participated in the march that started at the Afro American Cultural Center on campus and ended at the Bass Library. The purpose of it was to protest what they are calling injustices against minorities on campus. Students held signs saying they're standing up against racism.

 

This comes just days after the university president and a dean, as well as other school officials, met with dozens of students on Thursday to discuss concerns in the wake of a fiery exchange about "culturally offensive" Halloween costumes as well as allegations that a fraternity recently held a "white girls only" party.

Other issues at hand, according students, are injustices they've witnessed when it comes to hiring and the lack of diversity among tenured professors and faculty on the track to get tenure.

 

Marchers chanted, "We out here, we've been here, we ain't leaving, we are loved" throughout the protest.

“We planned this demonstration so that students know there is a community, they physically see each other’s support and solidarity and can move forward together," Cathleen Melissa Calderon, a Yale junior, said.

 

The debate over Halloween costumes — such as "blackface and turbans" — that could be considered culturally insensitive, came after the university's Intercultural Affairs Council sent an email to students before Halloween, asking them to be cognizant of the "cultural implications" of their costumes.

The other issue includes allegations that the Yale chapter of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity threw a "white girls only" party and denied classmates entry based on their race. The fraternity has denied the allegations and called them "deeply disheartening."

 

On Monday, students, carrying signs, with messages including, “I Stand With My Sisters“ and “United We Stand,” said they are marching for racial justice, but declined interviews.

"We are unstoppable, another Yale is possible," students chanted.

 

"It is time for a change in strategy. It is a time for student power," one person proclaimed.

 


 

Prior to the march President Peter Salovey addressed the back-to-back issues in a letter to the student body, saying the conversation he had with students about the allegations left him “deeply troubled” and said the university must “act to create at Yale greater inclusion, healing, mutual respect, and understanding.”

The racial argument flared up around Halloween. After the Intercultural Affairs Council email was sent out, Yale lecturer Erika Christakis fired back with an email defending "students' rights to wear potentially offensive costumes as an expression of free speech," according to The Yale Daily News.

 

"I know that many decent people have proposed guidelines on Halloween costumes from a spirit of avoiding hurt and offense," Erika Christakis wrote in an email to the students of Sillman College. The full email was posted by TheFire.org. "I laud those goals, in theory, as most of us do. But in practice, I wonder if we should reflect more transparently, as a community, on the consequences of an institutional (which is to say: bureaucratic and administrative) exercise of implied control over college students."

Then came the alleged "white girls only" party. After student protests and media attenton, brothers at Sigma Alpha Epsilon released a statement denying that anyone was turned away from their party on the basis of race. They said they support all efforts to "highlight perceived discrimination" and that they "harbor no resentment" over the claim.

 

"We do regret, however, that a more thorough investigation into these claims did not occur before allegations were made," said the fraternity's statement from last week.

 

Yale College Dean Jonathan Holloway's statement to the student body, released over the weekend, said he is investigating.

 

 

"Remember that Yale belongs to all of you, and you all deserve the right to enjoy the good of this place, without worry, without threats, and without intimidation. I don't expect Yale to be a place free from disagreements or even intense argument; I expect you to disagree on a wide range of issues. In so many ways, this is the purpose of our institution: to teach us how to ask difficult questions about even our most sacrosanct ideas. While we do this, however, we must support each other," he said in a statement.

Participants also claim the university hasn't done enough to hire and retain minority professors. Just last week, Yale administrators announced a $50 million effort to recruit more minority faculty.

 

“I think it’s pretty telling that Yale’s response to all of these issues is to throw money at them," Charles Decker, a Yale graduate student, said.

Decker is a political science PhD candidate at Yale and said he's only one of 24 black male students in the arts and sciences graduate program. He doesn't see a future in New Haven once he finishes school.

 

"Until Yale actually takes steps to retain faculty of color once they get there I have a hard time imagining being here professionally," Decker said.

NBC Connecticut reached out to Yale for comment, but we haven't heard back.We also reached out to the mayor's office and were told that Mayor Toni Harp is respecting Yale's autonomy in the city regarding university matters and declining to comment.

 

Graduate students have been working to unionize to get a negotiating table with Yale Brass to talk about many of the issues, but that effort hasn't proven to be successful.

 

 

Last edited by RadioRaheem

Ithaca College:

 

"The two officers, ID’d in the article as Sergeant Terry O’Pray and Master Patrol Officer Jon Elmore, supposedly dismissed concerns about racial profiling, “saying that it does not happen at Ithaca College” and then showed a BB gun, according to RA Rita Bunatal, with one officer saying, “‘If I saw someone with this I would shoot them.’”

 

 

"Another controversial incident occurred at the college’s Blue Sky Reimagining event Oct. 8 that asked students to help “formulate ideas about the evolution of Ithaca College.”

During the event, two Ithaca alumni carelessly and offensively referred to Tatiana Sy, a panelist and woman of color, as a “savage” after she said she had a “savage hunger” to succeed."

 

 

"The third instance occurred when an unaffiliated Jewish fraternity, Alpha Epsilon Pi, posted an invite on Facebook post  for a “Preps & Crooks”-themed party in October. According to the post, “Prep” attire was described as a “Polo shirt, button-down, backwards baseball cap, khakis or boat shoes” whereas “Crooks” attire was described as a “bandanna, baggy sweats and a t-shirt, snapback, and any ‘bling.’"

 

 

 

 

Yale:

 

" . . . concerns in the wake of a fiery exchange about "culturally offensive" Halloween costumes as well as allegations that a fraternity recently held a "white girls only" party.

Other issues at hand, according students, are injustices they've witnessed when it comes to hiring and the lack of diversity among tenured professors and faculty on the track to get tenure."

 

 

"The other issue includes allegations that the Yale chapter of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity threw a "white girls only" party and denied classmates entry based on their race. The fraternity has denied the allegations and called them "deeply disheartening."

 

 

"The racial argument flared up around Halloween. After the Intercultural Affairs Council email was sent out, Yale lecturer Erika Christakis fired back with an email defending "students' rights to wear potentially offensive costumes as an expression of free speech," according to The Yale Daily News."

 

 

 

I never understood a hunger strike...like what if the opposition just don't care and you starve yourself to death...

 

And this shit wouldn't have happened if Black folks just go to HBCUs instead of going to PWI...but you know Obama want every Black person to go to Cracker schools where we get treated like crap.

 

Thanks Obama.

 

Obama's America everyone, where White and Black people act like it's 1950s all over again. 

 

Congrats to Missouri students, better human beings than me cause starving and marching and using megaphones ain't in my nature and the people that be around me nature.

 

We'll be like the White kids in Berkeley that break shit.

 

http://www.berkeleyside.com/20...huge-southside-riot/

 

 

 

Thousands of revelers took to the streets around Channing Way and Piedmont Avenue in Berkeley’s Southside neighborhood Saturday night in what many called “a riot” that ultimately resulted in property damage and at least three assaults, one of which sent a victim to the hospital.

 

Greenwood said there had been some reports of people throwing rocks or bottles, so officers withdrew from the immediate area but continued to monitor the situation and respond to life-safety issues. Greenwood said there had been no tear gas used, or any other force used by police in relation to the crowd.

 

 

Are they criminals Mr.President..

 

Anyway...

 

 

Last edited by GoodMan

The Incident You Have To See To Understand Why Students Wanted Mizzou's President To Go.

What happened at a homecoming parade set the stage for Tim Wolfe's eventual resignation.

 

 

 

When students at the University of Missouri started a petition calling for the system's president, Tim Wolfe, to resign, it was not simply because he hadn't done enough to address racism on campus. The petition clearly stated students were outraged that Wolfe sat in silence while his driver clipped at least one protester with a car during a demonstration weeks earlier.

 

On Oct. 10, a group of black students interrupted the Mizzou homecoming parade. Wearing T-shirts that read "1839 Was Built On My B(l)ack," referring to Mizzou's founding and slave labor, the students stopped right in front of the convertible that Wolfe was traveling in as he waved to parade watchers.

 

The students took out a megaphone and one by one began speaking about incidents of systemic and anecdotal racism from the founding year 1839 through 2015. 

 

A crowd of mostly white people watching the parade began to yell at the black students within one minute to "move on" and get out of the street. Many chanted "M-I-Z, Z-O-U" in an attempt to drown out the activists.

 

After three minutes, two white men came out and tried to move the students aside, drawing cheers from the crowd.

 

Then the driver of Wolfe's car tried to drive around them.

 

The students moved their line, arms linked, to block the driver, who continued to try to push forward. The driver again tried to get through a moment later, coming in contact with one of the students.

 

At that point, an older white man came out and physically pushed several of the students away with his body. A few other white men and women then came out and formed their own human chain, linking arms and standing between the students and the car to allow Wolfe's vehicle to get through. 

 

It took about 11 minutes before a couple of police officers intervened and asked the black student activists to step aside to allow Wolfe's car to drive. White people cheered when this happened.

 

Wolfe remained silent the entire time. With the car's top down, he could easily see the entire encounter unfolding right in front of him.

 

Another video, from the Columbia Missourian, shows the emotional state the activists were in after their demonstration.

 

Protest stops parade from Columbia Missourian on Vimeo.

 

Open link for video: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...2cc8e4b0307f2cadea10

 

Jonathan Butler, who would later start a hunger strike in protest, shouts on the megaphone, "We will not continue to be called niggers on this campus, believe that!"

 

Wolfe did not address the incident for nearly a month. It wasn't until Butler was on his hunger strike, calling for Wolfe to resign, that the president finally issued a statement on Nov. 6 apologizing for just sitting there as his driver tried to steer around the students.

 

"I regret my reaction at the MU homecoming parade when the ConcernedStudent1950 group approached my car," Wolfe said. "I am sorry, and my apology is long overdue.

 

My behavior seemed like I did not care. That was not my intention. I was caught off guard in that moment. Nonetheless, had I gotten out of the car to acknowledge the students and talk with them perhaps we wouldn’t be where we are today."

 

But by the time Wolfe made that statement, the activists were already calling for his removal. It was his inaction at the homecoming parade, on top of what students said was silence from him in light of other racist incidents at his schools, that resulted in calls for his removal. 

 

"He does not understand systems of oppression, yet claims to care about Black students," the students said in a petition started last week.

 

"He did not intervene in the violence students faced during the peaceful parade demonstration on October 10, 2015 and has not apologized or recognized his negligence. We are asking for the immediate removal of Tim Wolfe."

 

A day after Wolfe's apology for the homecoming parade incident, black Mizzou football players -- with the support of their coach -- announced they would strike until Wolfe stepped down. On Monday morning, Wolfe resigned.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...2cc8e4b0307f2cadea10

Last edited by Cholly

  Wow!  It's coming to a head yall.  And because of this kind of exposure of sheer racism?  It is starting to crack with many whites not wanting that to happen.  Missouri students showed the strength their ancestors would be proud of and is why educating our black children on their history in this country is vital to black power.  Cuz it is here in the states...that slavery will eradicated completely worldwide.  We must never forget that slavery still exist in South America, the middle east, eastern Europe and definitely in places in Africa and Asia [including Indonesia and yes India].  So the whole world is watching.  Everybody knows that racism is connected to slavery...or self-entitlement is connected to servitude of others.  We need to blast those theories NOW.  Cuz NOW is the time.  But!

Last edited by Kocolicious

Mizzou-Inspired Protests Coming At Other Colleges

Ithaca president Tom Rochon, like Missouri's Wolfe, has been under fire for his perceived soft handling of racially sensitive incidents on campus.

 

NEW YORK, Nov 10 (Reuters) - Students are holding events designed to bring attention to racial issues on a handful of U.S. college campuses this week, spurred on by the impact of protests at the University of Missouri, which culminated in the resignation of the school's president and chancellor on Monday.

 

Peaceful marches or walkouts have occurred, or are planned, at Yale University, Ithaca College and Smith College in the Northeastern United States, though none has yet reached the intensity of demonstrations at Missouri, where hundreds of students and teachers protested what they saw as soft handling of reports of racial abuse on campus.

 

Shortly after Tim Wolfe, president of the University of Missouri, announced he would step down on Monday, a crowd of more than 1,000 gathered peacefully at the Afro-American Cultural Center at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, to hold what students called a "March of Resilience," in solidarity with Missouri.

 

The crowd sang and chanted for an end to racism on campus. The issue has been in focus at Yale after a fraternity turned away black guests at a Halloween party, saying, according to reports at the time, that only white women would be admitted.

 

A walkout is also planned at Ithaca College, a private school in upstate New York. A student group called People of Color at Ithaca College announced on its Facebook page that it is planning an on-campus 'Solidarity Walk Out' at 1:30 p.m. (1830 GMT) on Wednesday "for all the injustices students of color face on this campus and other colleges nationally."

 

Ithaca president Tom Rochon, like Missouri's Wolfe, has been under fire for his perceived soft handling of racially sensitive incidents on campus.

 

"With University of Missouri's president stepping down, we demand Rochon do the same as it is vital to fight against both covert and overt racism in all places of education and empowerment," the group said on a Facebook event page it created, where 500 students confirmed their attendance.

 

Students at Smith College, a women's private school in Massachusetts, also planned a walkout for Wednesday. A Facebook event called 'Smith Stands with Ithaca and Mizzou' is planned for midday, when students say they will walk out of class "for all the injustices students of color face on this campus and other colleges nationwide."

 

A group of University of Missouri professors walked out of classes on Tuesday even after the resignation of Wolfe.

 

"I support the students who are still camping out and fighting for racial justice on campus," said Elisa Glick, an associate professor of English and Women's and Gender Studies at the University of Missouri, in an email to Reuters. She did not say how many teachers joined the walkout.

 

Some schools were taking preventive measures. President of the University of Michigan, Mark Schlissel, scheduled a school-wide session on Tuesday to discuss diversity on campus, according to a post from him on Twitter. (Reporting by Melissa Fares and Angela Moon; Additional reporting by Ben Klayman; Editing by Bill Rigby)

 
 

A course originally called ‘The Problem of Whiteness’ returns to Arizona State

 
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 November 12 at 3:13 AM  
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Missouri students celebrate president's resignation

 
Social video captured University of Missouri students singing "we shall overcome" in celebration of President Tim Wolfe's resignation. His announcement came after days of protests and strikes on the Columbia campus. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

Freedom of speech. Racial inequality. Student activism. Safe spaces.

These are the phrases that have been lobbied about over the last week, in tones both fervent and contemptuous, as University of Missouri students successfully campaigned for the resignation of their system president.

Mizzou is, of course, just the most prominent example. As The Washington Post’s Michael Miller pointed out Tuesday, similar debates are being had and protests held across the country, for instance at Yale University and Ithaca College.

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At the center of all these debates is another word: whiteness.

[Protest shows colleges are once again becoming civil rights battlegrounds]

At some universities, there are classes dedicated to understanding the notions of whiteness, white supremacy and what the field’s proponents see as the quiet racism of white people. The professor of one such “whiteness studies” course, Lee Bebout of Arizona State University, announced recently that he would be teaching for the second time a course originally called “U.S. Race Theory & the Problem of Whiteness.”

The syllabus described “Critical Whiteness Studies” as a field “concerned with dismantling white supremacy in part by understanding how whiteness is socially constructed and experienced.” Readings included works by Toni Morrison, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva (“Racism without Racists&rdquo and Jane H. Hill (“The Everyday Language of White Racism&rdquo.

For the coming semester, Bebout will add Ta-Nehisi Coates’s recent book“Between the World and Me.”

Whereas disciplines such as African American studies and Asian American studies focus on race as it relates to communities of color, courses like Bebout’s look at how race is experienced by white people, exploring institutional racism and the dominance of those considered “white” in America.

Bebout pointed out that the definition of what constitutes a white person has changed over time — in the past, Irish and Jewish people weren’t considered “white” — but white systems of power have existed since slaves were brought to the country.

“White supremacy makes it so that white people can’t see the world they have created,” Bebout told The Washington Post. It’s a culture so pervasive that living in it, subscribing to it and upholding it feel as natural to most Americans as breathing air.

News of the class’s formation caused considerable outrage after it was first reported last spring by Campus Reform, a conservative news site.

Bebout, who is white, said he was promptly attacked for promoting discrimination against white people. Fliers appeared around his neighborhood which featured a photo of him and the declaration that he was “anti-white.” Bebout was still relatively new to the area at the time, he said: “It was not the way I wanted to meet my neighbors,” though many of them turned out to be supportive.

Fox News correspondent Elisabeth Hasselbeck called the course “quite unfair, and wrong and pointed,” whereas ASU student Lauren Clark told Fox News that the course “suggests an entire race is the problem,” according to theArizona Republic.

Clark is the same student who wrote the original Campus Reform article about the course, which will be offered for a second semester next spring under the modified name of “Whiteness and U.S. Race Theory.”

Bebout said the demographic makeup of his 18-person class last year was diverse, including several mixed-race students. Next year, the course will be expanded to accommodate 38. He said the angry responses stem from a misunderstanding of what it means to study the “problem of whiteness.”

[It’s 2015. Where are all the black college faculty?]

He said the class is not a critique of white individuals, per se, but rather whiteness as a form of institutional racism, where the experiences of people of color are rarely validated. In Bebout’s words, this centers around the conviction that “my experience as a white male should be the experience of everybody else, and there is something dysfunctional about them if they don’t see the world in the way that I do.”

By this definition, you don’t necessarily have to be racially white to act “white” and support white power. It’s long been known, after all, that there are white supremacists who aren’t themselves white-skinned.

The study of whiteness has been around for decades. It began with American sociologist, historian and activist W. E. B. Du Bois, who first took this critical perspective in a 1920 book chapter titled “The Souls of White Folk.”

In 2003, The Washington Post’s Darryl Fears reported that at least 30 institutions, including Princeton and the University of California at Los Angeles, had courses in whiteness studies despite widespread opposition.

The field has been criticized as being at turns biased and over-generalizing.

Social critic David Horowitz told The Post in 2013, “Black studies celebrates blackness, Chicano studies celebrates Chicanos, women’s studies celebrates women and white studies attacks white people as evil.”

“It’s so evil that one author has called for the abolition of whiteness,” he said.

Writing in the Tulane Law Review in 2013, Dagmar Rita Myslinska argued that whiteness studies, by lumping all whites together, ignores the heterogeneity within groups of European descent, especially in regard to their immigration history.

In Bebout’s opinion, such criticism misses the point of whiteness studies. In fact, he said, the field is meant to divert attention away from the acts of individual white people and toward the systems he says privilege them.

“Everybody can be individually bigoted,” Bebout said, “but not every group can have systemic power.”

Terrance MacMullan, a philosophy of race professor at Eastern Washington University, said since systemic power is generally invisible to those who hold it, white people tend to conflate all forms of racism with “invidious acts” such as calling someone a racial slur or burning a cross on a black person’s lawn.

In fact, he said, the racism that exists today is much more habitual and understated, making awareness all the more challenging. His students often remark, “Why do I have to talk about race? I’m white.”

Some commentators have chided protesters at Missouri and Yale for causing a furor over individual acts such as a poop swastika and an email they deemed offensive about Halloween. But students of color have in turn pointed out that their movements are less about those individual incidents and more about the systemic racism that has permeated their lives on campus.

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The New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb wrote this week, “To understand the real complexities of these students’ situation, free-speech purists would have to grapple with what it means to live in a building named for a man who dedicated himself to the principle of white supremacy and to the ownership of your ancestors.”

(Cobb refers to a residential college at Yale named after South Carolina’s John C. Calhoun, the antebellum congressman, Secretary of State and U.S. vice president who was also a fervent advocate of slavery.)

This “critical race theory” concept — one at the heart of whiteness studies — is perhaps the hardest for most people to understand, MacMullan said. Namely, it’s entirely possible and in fact, normal, to not personally be a racist while still being complicit in a racist culture.

It can be challenging to teach the shift in perspective that this theory requires. While anti-racist in its intent, whiteness studies can often yield counterproductive outcomes.

“We all think of ourselves as decent people,” MacMullan said, “so it’s very disconcerting to see yourself as someone who benefits from systemic racism.” He said pointing out white privilege in classes has incited white students to bring up their personal struggles, turning the conversation toward their own “victimhood” and once again detracting from the experiences of people of color.

“One problem inherent in whiteness studies is that it might become a white pity party,” MacMullan noted. “Instead of talking about how whiteness is problematic, it becomes about the problems of white people.”

 

 

second student arrested for threats...

 

http://www.komu.com/news/secon...VkPADykTDjk.facebook

 

 

Second student apprehended for threats on social media

Posted: Nov 11, 2015 4:06 PM by Ashton Day, KOMU 8 Digital Producer 
Updated: Nov 11, 2015 5:45 PM

MARYVILLE -For the second time in a single day, a Missouri college student has been arrested for making threats on the social media site Yik Yak.

Northwest Missouri State University announced Wednesday afternoon it has taken Connor Stotlemyre into custody.

Stotlemyre is accused of making threats overnight and was taken into custody at about 11 a.m. at his residence hall on campus. Stottlemyre has not be charged yet.

University police began an investigation after receiving a report that the suspect made threats on Yik Yak to hurt others. Students and employees received a notification email about the incident around 8:30 a.m.

Stottlemyre's apprehension comes on the same day that Missouri S&T student Hunter Park was arrested for making threats toward MU's campus.

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And now time for a word from the urban philosopher Don Lemon...

 

http://www.mediaite.com/online...ont-leave-the-house/

 

Don Lemon to Mizzou Students: If You Want a Safe Space, ‘Don’t Leave the House’

AUDIO239

don lemon

 

Two days after praising the University of Missouri football team for forcing out its president, CNN host Don Lemon returned to the issue to reproach Mizzou students for clashing with reporters and setting up “safe spaces” to avoid difficult conversations.

“…[T]he only issue I have with what happened at the University of Missouri is their vigorous effort to squash freedom of speech and freedom of the press,” Lemon said on The Tom Joyner Morning Show. “That is a very dangerous road that no one should want to go down.”

“Mizzou has one of the most well-respected journalism programs in the country,” he continued. “Students there should know that in America, a country with a free and open press, that it is dangerous to deny anyone that freedom. In fact, it’s un-American.”

 

Lemon pointed out that Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X didn’t have any problem talking with those they disagreed with. “Why? Because they weren’t afraid of confrontation; of being challenged. They weren’t afraid of being offended, they weren’t afraid of offending. They knew the real meaning of freedom of the press, freedom of speech and expression.”

College students, he argued, “should not be coddled by retreating into so-called ‘safe spaces’ because they’re afraid of having their feelings hurt. If you’re afraid of having your feelings hurt, don’t leave your house. College is the place where robust debate should be welcomed and vigorously explored.”

Listen above, via The Tom Joyner Morning Show.

[Image via screengrab]
——
>>Follow Alex Griswold (@HashtagGriswold) on Twitter

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http://www.usatoday.com/story/...y-keep-job/75642556/

 

Embattled U. of Missouri names black interim president

 and 2:50 p.m. EST November 12, 2015
 175 127 1LINKEDIN 159COMMENTMORE

The governing board of the University of Missouri named a black law professor and deputy chancellor emeritus to serve as interim president of the university system.

Michael Middleton, who recently retired from the university, earned bachelor and law degrees there. His selection comes three days after Tim Wolfe resigned amid a firestorm over his handling of a series of racially charged events on the sprawling campus in Columbia.

"We all must heighten our focus, improve our culture and climate across all of our campuses and share the responsibility to see our university advance in healthy ways built  upon respect for others," Middleton said.

Controversy has swirled on the embattled campus in recent weeks as students held protests demanding Wolfe be fired. The issue blasted onto the national scene Saturday, when more than 30 of the school's football players announced a boycott of football-related activities. The deans of several academic departments also had called for Wolfe to go.

"We are excited for the new leadership under Interim President Middleton!" tweeted Concerned Student 1950, an advocacy group named for the year the school admitted its first black student.

On Monday, Wolfe announced his resignation effective when a replacement could take over the job. Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin also resigned; an interim chancellor already has been named.

“Tim Wolfe’s resignation was a necessary step toward healing and reconciliation on the University of Missouri campus, and I appreciate his decision to do so,” Gov. Jay Nixon said after Wolfe's announcement. “There is more work to do, and now the University of Missouri must move forward ."

Middleton takes over a campus in turmoil.

Northwest Missouri State University student Connor Stottlemyre, 19, was arrested on suspicion of making a terrorist threat after he allegedly posted a threat on the anonymous social media app Yik Yak that read "I'm going to shoot any black people tomorrow, so be ready," said university spokesman Mark Hornickel. Police also arrested Hunter Park, 19, a student at the University of Missouri's Rolla campus, and charged him with making terrorist threats for allegedly posting messages suggesting he was going to do harm to black students on the Columbia campus.

A Columbia campus associate professor, Dale Brigham, offered to resign after facing backlash for calling on his students to show up for class despite the threats, which had caused some African-American students to leave campus. Brigham expressed regret for sending an email to students in his nutritional science course encouraging them not to let "bullies" win.

Christian Basi, a university spokesman, told USA TODAY in an email Thursday that Brigham is still employed at the university and would not comment on the status of his resignation offer. KOMU was reporting that the school had declined to accept the resignation.

Another staff member has been placed on leave pending an investigation of her actions during protests on campus.

Janna Basler, director of the Columbia campus' Greek Life, was among students, faculty and staff who were trying to keep reporters away from protesters with the group Concerned Student 1950. Video of Basler shows her berating and having physical contact with student-journalist Tim Tai, who was on assignment for ESPN and trying to take photographs of the scene.

"We are looking into this and following up," police department spokesman, Maj. Brian Weimar said.

Click did not immediately respond to request for comment.

Students cited several campus incidents they blame for a hostile environment for black students.

Student government president Payton Head, who is black, said that in September people in a passing pickup truck shouted racial slurs at him. In October, members of a black student organization said slurs were hurled at them by an apparently drunken white student. In addition, a swastika drawn in feces was found recently in a dormitory bathroom.

Hundreds of protesters gathered on the university's quad Monday to celebrate after Wolfe announced his resignation. They sang We Shall Overcome, a song that had become an anthem of the civil rights movement, and said they would continue to press for change on campus.

Contributing: Doug Stanglin

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another college...

 

http://gawker.com/dean-of-clar...tm_medium=socialflow

 

Dean of Students at Claremont McKenna College Resigns After Students Protest Racial Bias and Marginalization

Dean of Students at Claremont McKenna College Resigns After Students Protest Racial Bias and Marginalization

Responding to campus protests and two reported hunger strikes over racial discrimination and faculty’s inadequate and tone-deaf response to student concerns, the dean of students at Claremont McKenna College, in Claremont, California, has resigned her position, reports the Los Angeles Times.

At issue is the school’s apparent mishandling of a couple of high profile attempts by members of the student body to engage the school’s leadership on the topics of marginalization and inclusiveness. On April 9, 30 students of color sent a letter to the school’s president, Hiram Chodosh, offering a series of proposals to help Claremont McKenna provide better support to students who have felt isolated and even excluded on campus. That letter can be found in its entirety at the bottom of this post.

According to an article in the CMC Forum published November 10, despite receiving “assurances regarding several action plans for this fall semester,” “the students who were involved recognized that none of their proposals had been implemented.” Frustrated by an apparent lack of urgency by the school’s administrators in addressing their concerns, the student group sent another letter, this time chronicling specific aggressions experienced by students belonging to marginalized groups, and reframing their proposals as demands. Examples included vandalism of Queer Resource Center and Black Lives Matter posters, a student of color being called a “cockroach” by a professor, and a Civil War class that “simulated the pros and cons of slavery,” among many others.

 

The straw that finally broke the camel’s back and led to campus-wide protests and the hunger strikes was Dean Mary Spellman’s emailed response to an October 23 op-ed in The Student Life, written by a Lisette Espinosa, a CMC student, about the daily realities of attending Claremont McKenna as a Latina. Spellman’s email to Espinsoa did not go over well at all:

Dean of Students at Claremont McKenna College Resigns After Students Protest Racial Bias and Marginalization

Specifically, the suggestion that students of color “don’t fit [the] CMC mold” “outraged several students of color, and the email was cited as another example of institutional racism at CMC,” according to The Claremont Independent.

In an open letter to the school published November 11 on Medium, student Taylor Lemmons announced the start of a hunger strike aimed at triggering Spellman’s resignation. Spellman apologized for her choice of words, but the damage had already been done among a significant and vocal segment of CMC’s student body. The campus was “roiled” by protests this week, leading to Spellman’s resignation this afternoon.

The student actions have inspired other changes at Claremont McKenna, too:

On Wednesday, Chodosh announced that new leadership positions on diversity and inclusion would be created in the offices of academic and student affairs. The administrators will work to increase diversity in hiring and in the curriculum, and a new space will be dedicated for work on diversity, identity and free speech, he said in a letter to the campus community.

Campuses around the country have seen protests along the lines of what happened at Missouri, where the school’s president and Chancellor both resigned after a student’s hunger strike and a strike among the football team’s athletes of color brought national attention to ongoing overt racism at the school. Ithaca College in New York, Smith College in Massachusetts, and Yale University in Connecticut are dealing with similar actions by students over issues of marginalization and racial discrimination.

The first letter to President Chodosh:

Dean of Students at Claremont McKenna College Resigns After Students Protest Racial Bias and Marginalization

Dean of Students at Claremont McKenna College Resigns After Students Protest Racial Bias and Marginalization

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