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This flyer is posted at Crunk & Disorderly.

I wonder if there was a brown paper bag test at the door? 8

Does that mean Salt could get in but Pepa couldn't (unless she's a Libra)?
*********************************** "It is certain, in any case, that ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have." -- James Baldwin
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~ Red FaceEmbarrassing.

The things we do to our children and each other's children with the selfish decisions that we make. Now who in the HELL, BUT a NIGGRA would even think to DO something like that?!! Okay, now let us count the number of heads --- how many NOT-LIGHT-skin young black girls will take this "event" INWARDLY and have issues with SELF because they are at a very impressionable age, and the impression that they've been given is that they are "less than". Uh-oh! Eek I feel a "prophecy" coming on! Said little black girls will one day find themselves on a message board listening to their brothas try to tell them, basically, that there is no probem, there is no favoritism, there is not preference for light skin, and that they (the females) are just angry, bitter, black women ---- (and these same brothas had TICKETS to the Bash!)~ Confused
quote:
"I didn't mean to offend anyone," he said. "I had planned a party for other shades (of black women). We were going to take a shade of color each week. Next week was going to be a party for 'Sexy Chocolate' and the week after that 'Sexy Caramel.'"‚"

All you dark skinned, nappy headed, so and so's stay yo Black asses home... At least until next week... That's when we have da sexy field niggra nite...

If ya lite, ya alright... If ya Black, get back...

quote:
...Barnes said he is hoping to host an event to raise money for a charity to make up for whatever problems or pain he caused over the party flier.


Now I wonder what the charity will be that he is going to give the money to???
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
quote:
"I didn't mean to offend anyone," he said. "I had planned a party for other shades (of black women). We were going to take a shade of color each week. Next week was going to be a party for 'Sexy Chocolate' and the week after that 'Sexy Caramel.'"‚"

All you dark skinned, nappy headed, so and so's stay yo Black asses home... At least until next week... That's when we have da sexy field niggra nite...



*rolling*
quote:
Originally posted by OhBlackButterfly:
~ Red FaceEmbarrassing.

The things we do to our children and each other's children with the selfish decisions that we make. Now who in the HELL, BUT a NIGGRA would even think to DO something like that?!! Okay, now let us count the number of heads --- how many NOT-LIGHT-skin young black girls will take this "event" INWARDLY and have issues with SELF because they are at a very impressionable age, and the impression that they've been given is that they are "less than". Uh-oh! Eek I feel a "prophecy" coming on! Said little black girls will one day find themselves on a message board listening to their brothas try to tell them, basically, that there is no probem, there is no favoritism, there is not preference for light skin, and that they (the females) are just angry, bitter, black women ---- (and these same brothas had TICKETS to the Bash!)~ Confused


appl appl appl
Party Invite Creates Furor, Dialogue on Color Divide

Date: Thursday, October 18, 2007
By: Corey Williams, Associated Press



DETROIT - (AP) Yasmine Toney describes herself as a "dark-skinned sista." So when she heard about a recent club promotion in Detroit, allowing all-night free admission to black women with fair or light skin, she was incensed.

"It's offensive," Toney said. "It continues a negative stereotype."

"I'm perceived to be aggressive, assertive, attitude-having ... a lot of things, because my complexion is darker," said the 24-year-old receptionist.

The party was canceled last week after its promoter, who is black, received dozens of complaints. But for Toney and other black women, the issue reopened old, deep wounds as word of the party spread through the Internet.

How black women are viewed -- and treat each other -- depending on the hue of their skin, eye color, and the length and grade of their hair has long been a point of contention for many in the black community.

Many women with lighter skin frequently are accused of believing they are better than those with darker complexions. Many women with brown or dark-brown complexions complain that they too often are not treated as well socially or professionally as those with fairer skin.

"I think they get to slide in a little easier," Toney, who is pursuing a master's degree in counseling, said of women with lighter skin. "They are assumed to be passive and nice and sweet. I feel I have to do a little bit more. Number one, I'm black. Number two, I'm dark and I have short hair."

Ulysses Barnes, who goes by the name DJ Lish, says he canceled his "Light Skinned Women & ALL LIBRA's" promotion after complaints rolled in from women, activists and organizations across the country.

"I thought it was a brilliant promotion at the time," said Barnes, who has spent the last several days apologizing to people. "I didn't anticipate any type of feedback. It was just a party thing."

Barnes, 27, canceled future "sexy chocolate" and "sexy caramel" promotions and just wants the controversy to go away.

But Detroit author and anti-racism advocate Elizabeth Atkins believes it's time for open, effective dialogue on how black women truly see and interact with one another.

"The celebrated standard of black beauty have been the Lena Hornes of the world," said Atkins, referring to the fair-skinned singer and actress who became one of the most popular black performers in the 1940s and 1950s. "It's been the fair-skinned, straighter hair, bigger eyes and pointed nose."

Horne got her start as a dancer in the famous Cotton Club in Harlem. Most dancers at the nightclub in its early years had light or fair complexions.

Atkins and Los Angeles author and women's movement activist Pearl Jr. say media portrayals of black women feed into the stereotypes that are perpetuated by blacks. Women who should be embracing their shared racial and cultural heritage instead harbor suspicion and resentment, Atkins said.

"They might be talking about flowers, or the weather or a wedding," she said, "but in the back of their minds they're thinking: 'She's looking at my dark skin or kinky hair.' Whereas the lighter-skinned woman is thinking: 'She's looking at my skin, or she's looking at my eyes and my hair, and making all kinds of assumptions of how much easier I must have it.'"

There may be something to that perception.

A 2006 study by University of Georgia doctoral candidate Matthew Harrison shows skin color may play a role in hiring. Psychology undergraduates, most of whom were white, were given fake photos and resumes to make hiring recommendations.

Lighter-skinned women applicants were preferred over those with darker complexions but equal credentials. Light-skinned black men also were preferred over those with dark skin who had better credentials.

Such thinking is rooted in America's slavery past, Harrison says. Lighter-skinned children of slaves and their owners were given better treatment and less strenuous household chores than darker slaves who toiled in the fields.

"That created a lot of animosity among slaves and began to replicate itself even after slavery," Harrison said. "Once blacks were able to have their own groups, they too adhered to the whole system of lightness being better."

One of the ways they did so was the "brown paper bag" test, in which blacks whose skin was darker than the bag's color were denied inclusion into social events or organizations.

But lighter-skinned black women also complain they at times are accused of not being "black" enough.

Tamika Franklin, who works with Toney, says she was taunted as "white girl" by other black children. The 30-year-old administrative assistant has very fair skin, freckles and reddish-brown hair. She says whites appear to be more accepting of her than blacks.

"I'm closer to their shade, so they're a little more comfortable with that," Franklin said.

That's because whites set the standard for what is considered attractive and acceptable, Pearl Jr. said.

"I believe they think the lighter you are and the straighter your hair, the more you resemble them, and the better you are," she said. "We have been taught as African-Americans to be less African, less dark."

The issue is central to "Other People's Skin," four novellas released this month and co-authored by Atkins and three other black women. The fictional work looks at discrimination that results from "colorism" in the black community.

Atkins has a fair complexion and long, light brown hair. Her mother is black and father is white.

"People have mimicked me to my face ... that I talk white or proper," said Atkins, who earned a master's degree at Columbia University. "An ex-boyfriend told me I should talk more black and go to a tanning salon to get darker. Another man told me I should dye my hair brown if I wanted to do business with black people.

"We often face hatred within the race, and it's more hurtful from your own people than the mainstream."
~Check this out, too. Frown SMH...sad.~

Monday, May 15, 2006
Don't Play In The Sun or Coffee Will Make You Black

Just as black Americans finally seem to have begun deprogramming themselves from the brainwashing forced upon them by the slave system and Jim Crow, leaving them thinking that lighter/whiter was more attractive (folks still have a way to go with the hair), it seems that other cultures are aggressively trying to emulate where blacks were a good half century ago. How sad!

In a grim irony, while white women continue hitting the tanning beds and slathering on bronzing lotions to give themselves a glow, Asian women are apparently eagerly scooping up creams that promise to turn them a paler shade of white. And according to the Sunday New York Times, it's a trend that is turning dangerous as some women overindulge in skin whiteners and buy risky black-market versions.

"I have a lot of complaints -- with photographs -- which show that before the cream is used the face is fine and then after it looks like it's been roasted in the oven," Darshan Singh, manager for Malaysia's National Consumer Complaints Center, told Thomas Fuller of the Times. Fuller's piece also includes the story of a Thai woman who may have irreversibly harmed her skin by turning it "albino pink and dark brown" with a bootleg batch of bleaching cream.

According to the Times, a recent survey found that skin whiteners are now so popular in some parts of Asia that four out of 10 women use them. Fuller attributes the Asian desire for lighter skin to an association with higher social status because "those from lower social classes, laborers and farmers, [have traditionally been] more exposed to the sun" and to the fact that European colonizers and Mongol conquerors "reset the standard for attractiveness." Apparently, pale South Korean soap opera stars are idolized across Asia.

But while old prejudices may feed the desire for paleness, now it is the beauty industry that is driving the bleaching trend. In recent years, some 62 new whitening products have been introduced in Asia. Among the most disturbing are products that whiten dark armpits and "pink nipple" potions that lighten brown breasts.


It's ironic that my mom just mentioned that she was reading Don't Play In The Sun, by Marita Golden, when I spoke with her last night. With a specific exception, I cannot recall anyone in my family being caught up in that kind of madness and, as a result, I grew up somewhat oblivious to color deliniations and was rather clueless about that pathology until I was quite old. Once I was exposed to people who made constant references to color and/or hair, I basically wrote them off as backwards, ignorant and "country" because I really didn't think that well bred and well read folks thought like that (have to exclude the folks from Louisianna. They are definitely a different breed. The mini-series "A Feast of All Saints" was a good illustration of their illness).

But, once I moved to California nearly 15 years ago, I was aghast to hear Asian and Indian women openly talk about skin color, how lighter was better and how they coveted children born of relationships with white men. I listened to one woman (she was Chinese) squeal about the prospect of our manager's pending child because it would have "an American nose and eyes." Mind you, my manager was an oversized Mexican American (whose features were hardly Euro in my opinion) who was married to a Taiwanese woman. These women were frank about something that even black people who thought it wouldn't dare say it and be accused of being self-loathing. I recall reading something about African and Carribbean women falling prey to the bleaching trend too.

Having been a little black girl who can't recall having a black doll but never internalized Barbie as something that I was or wasn't (in fact, I used to meticulously wash and set the straight hair on my Barbie on teeny, tiny rod curlers so her hair looked more like "mine"), it really saddens me when I read things like this. It saddens me when I see these women fawning over bi-racial offspring - focusing strictly on the non-Asian features. It upsets me that just as black women seem to have evolved and learned to embrace their dark skin and kinky hair, we have a whole new crop of women who are brazenly exhibiting the effects of colonialism and imperialism.

my state @ 7:06 PM :: Permalink
quote:
A 2006 study by University of Georgia doctoral candidate Matthew Harrison shows skin color may play a role in hiring. Psychology undergraduates, most of whom were white, were given fake photos and resumes to make hiring recommendations.

Lighter-skinned women applicants were preferred over those with darker complexions but equal credentials. Light-skinned black men also were preferred over those with dark skin who had better credentials.

Such thinking is rooted in America's slavery past, Harrison says. Lighter-skinned children of slaves and their owners were given better treatment and less strenuous household chores than darker slaves who toiled in the fields.

"That created a lot of animosity among slaves and began to replicate itself even after slavery," Harrison said. "Once blacks were able to have their own groups, they too adhered to the whole system of lightness being better."

One of the ways they did so was the "brown paper bag" test, in which blacks whose skin was darker than the bag's color were denied inclusion into social events or organizations.



The whole issue is very interesting, and as usual, the knee jerk "it hurts worse from your own people" response. However, why is the focus particularly on women, when it was a male DJ who promoted the ish from the get-go? Why are the color-struck preferences of black males slipping out from under the microscope of scrutiny? Males play a big role in perpetuating the whole color caste system through their sexual selectivity...
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
The whole issue is very interesting, and as usual, the knee jerk "it hurts worse from your own people" response. However, why is the focus particularly on women, when it was a male DJ who promoted the ish from the get-go? Why are the color-struck preferences of black males slipping out from under the microscope of scrutiny? Males play a big role in perpetuating the whole color caste system through their sexual selectivity...
I don't quite see where in the post that you quoted how Black men were less scrutinized then Black Women...

Having said that, I don't disagree with your assertion at all...

The reason men escape scrutiny is because men generally control the message... and since we play a roll in the perpetration, we tacitly agree that light is right...

Now... stop being a Rabbit Feminist!!!
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
The reason men escape scrutiny is because men generally control the message... and since we play a roll in the perpetration, we tacitly agree that light is right...


Regardless what people's preferences may be, this dude was basically promoting skin color as a point of distinction in who could attend the parties. It may be one problem for there to be attraction preferences based on shade, but to promote this distinction, after the history that we as a people have put up with, is what makes this story soooo idiotic to me.

quote:


Now... stop being a Rabbit Feminist!!!


YEAH! There's only one place for, uh, rabbits:
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
I don't quite see where in the post that you quoted how Black men were less scrutinized then Black Women...Having said that, I don't disagree with your assertion at all...The reason men escape scrutiny is because men generally control the message... and since we play a roll in the perpetration, we tacitly agree that light is right...

Now... stop being a Rabbit Feminist!!!


because the 2 articles recently posted focus on how women treat each other and the statements that women of various cultures make amongst each other regarding lightskin features/american noses etc. The lightskin libra bash DJ is only mentioned in passing in the first article. I'm not saying that women don't judge one another by skincolor and or haven't been influenced by the dominant culture...

I'm just saying that the two recently posted articles hardly give a passing glance to MEN as transmitters of the lightskin preference phenomenon...

The lightskin libra DJ is a prime example of how men are perpetuating the behavior but when confronted about it feign ignorance in a scoobydoo like manner as if it doesn't exists, or if it does, it's all in the heads of women. It's time for the brothas to be reflective on this issue.




that's all.
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
The reason men escape scrutiny is because men generally control the message... and since we play a roll in the perpetration, we tacitly agree that light is right...


Regardless what people's preferences may be, this dude was basically promoting skin color as a point of distinction in who could attend the parties. It may be one problem for there to be attraction preferences based on shade, but to promote this distinction, after the history that we as a people have put up with, is what makes this story soooo idiotic to me.

quote:


Now... stop being a Rabbit Feminist!!!


YEAH! There's only one place for, uh, rabbits:


Vox! Get outta here!!!!

well at least she's not barefoot and pregnant...She appears to have rabbit shoes on lol
Light-Skinned Sisters
Get in Free?
Posted Oct 23rd 2007 4:25PM by Toni Clark
Filed under: blackspin

DETROIT (AP) -- Yasmine Toney describes herself as a "dark-skinned sista." So when she heard about a recent club promotion in Detroit, allowing all-night free admission to black women with fair or light skin, she was incensed.

"It's offensive," Toney said. "It continues a negative stereotype."

"I'm perceived to be aggressive, assertive, attitude-having ... a lot of things, because my complexion is darker," said the 24-year-old receptionist.

The party was canceled last week after its promoter, who is black, received dozens of complaints. But for Toney and other black women, the issue reopened old, deep wounds as word of the party spread through the Internet.

How black women are viewed - and treat each other - depending on the hue of their skin, eye color, and the length and grade of their hair has long been a point of contention for many in the black community.

Many women with lighter skin frequently are accused of believing they are better than those with darker complexions. Many women with brown or dark-brown complexions complain that they too often are not treated as well socially or professionally as those with fairer skin.

"I think they get to slide in a little easier," Toney, who is pursuing a master's degree in counseling, said of women with lighter skin. "They are assumed to be passive and nice and sweet. I feel I have to do a little bit more. Number one, I'm black. Number two, I'm dark and I have short hair."
Promoter: 'I thought it was brilliant'
Ulysses Barnes, who goes by the name DJ Lish, says he canceled his "Light Skinned Women & ALL LIBRA's" promotion after complaints rolled in from women, activists and organizations across the country.

"I thought it was a brilliant promotion at the time," said Barnes, who has spent the last several days apologizing to people. "I didn't anticipate any type of feedback. It was just a party thing."

Barnes, 27, canceled future "sexy chocolate" and "sexy caramel" promotions and just wants the controversy to go away.

But Detroit author and anti-racism advocate Elizabeth Atkins believes it's time for open, effective dialogue on how black women truly see and interact with one another.

"The celebrated standard of black beauty have been the Lena Hornes of the world," said Atkins, referring to the fair-skinned singer and actress who became one of the most popular black performers in the 1940s and 1950s. "It's been the fair-skinned, straighter hair, bigger eyes and pointed nose."

Horne got her start as a dancer in the famous Cotton Club in Harlem. Most dancers at the nightclub in its early years had light or fair complexions.

Activist: Media feeds into stereotypes
Atkins and Los Angeles author and women's movement activist Pearl Jr. say media portrayals of black women feed into the stereotypes that are perpetuated by blacks.

Women who should be embracing their shared racial and cultural heritage instead harbor suspicion and resentment, Atkins said.

"They might be talking about flowers, or the weather or a wedding," she said, "but in the back of their minds they're thinking: 'She's looking at my dark skin or kinky hair.' Whereas the lighter-skinned woman is thinking: 'She's looking at my skin, or she's looking at my eyes and my hair, and making all kinds of assumptions of how much easier I must have it."'

Study: Skin color may affect hiring
There may be something to that perception.

A 2006 study by University of Georgia doctoral candidate Matthew Harrison shows skin color may play a role in hiring. Psychology undergraduates, most of whom were white, were given fake photos and resumes to make hiring recommendations.

Lighter-skinned women applicants were preferred over those with darker complexions but equal credentials. Light-skinned black men also were preferred over those with dark skin who had better credentials.

Such thinking is rooted in America's slavery past, Harrison says. Lighter-skinned children of slaves and their owners were given better treatment and less strenuous household chores than darker slaves who toiled in the fields.

"That created a lot of animosity among slaves and began to replicate itself even after slavery," Harrison said. "Once blacks were able to have their own groups, they too adhered to the whole system of lightness being better."

One of the ways they did so was the "brown paper bag" test, in which blacks whose skin was darker than the bag's color were denied inclusion into social events or organizations.

Not 'black' enough?
But lighter-skinned black women also complain they at times are accused of not being "black" enough.

Tamika Franklin, who works with Toney, says she was taunted as "white girl" by other black children. The 30-year-old administrative assistant has very fair skin, freckles and reddish-brown hair. She says whites appear to be more accepting of her than blacks.

"I'm closer to their shade, so they're a little more comfortable with that," Franklin said.

That's because whites set the standard for what is considered attractive and acceptable, Pearl Jr. said.

"I believe they think the lighter you are and the straighter your hair, the more you resemble them and the better you are," she said. "We have been taught as African-Americans to be less African, less dark."

The issue is central to "Other People's Skin," four novellas released this month and co-authored by Atkins and three other black women. The fictional work looks at discrimination that results from "colorism" in the black community.

Atkins has a fair complexion and long, light brown hair. Her mother is black and father is white.

"People have mimicked me to my face ... that I talk white or proper," said Atkins, who earned a master's degree at Columbia University. "An ex-boyfriend told me I should talk more black and go to a tanning salon to get darker. Another man told me I should dye my hair brown if I wanted to do business with black people.

"We often face hatred within the race, and it's more hurtful from your own people than the mainstream."


Black Spin will continue to address this controversial issue until it has been resolved and stamped out once and for all ...



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******************************************************

Reader Comments
(Page 1)
1. This is really a shame but it is true. We as black people should stop taking what other races do to us and use it to hurt each other. As Beautiful black women of all shades we should emprace our own uniquenes and compliment and not tear down our black sisters.


RoxAnn at 4:59PM on Oct 23rd 2007

2. I am a dark skin women so I understand completely what this young women is talking about. But the sad thing is White folks are not bother by my complexion it's my own people who has a problem with it.

Lisa at 5:00PM on Oct 23rd 2007

3. People are so sick now-a-days that no matter what, they will always find something wrong with someone else. If they only examined their ownselves as they do someone else, just think we just might get better a little at a time. It is so many people today that have mixed genes, that even if you were light skin, or fair skin, or whatever you call it, the hair is very kinky. So how can you tell who is who anyway. I've seen some very dark black women with beautiful, long hair and not a weave. Just look at the fact that today black folks are now called African-Americans, well not me, I am still black. Damn how will they identify me next year. As for the person using the promo, light skinned invidiuals in free, who know's where their head was at the time. They stated they ment no harm, however, it did affect the darker skinnned individual, but when you hear caramel or sexy chocolate, guess what, any one of any tone of skin is answering to that. If it doesn't apply, let it fly.

VMRoss at 5:57PM on Oct 23rd 2007

4. This is crazy and totally unacceptable. We are at the end on the year 2007. What the hell is going on? #1 - I agree with the above comment we are all Black, not African Americans. #2 - Was a law suit filed against this so-called club promotor? #3 - And lastly who wants to be in a club with ALL light complexion people anyway?

Katrina at 6:38PM on Oct 23rd 2007

5. It has taken me a long time to come to terms with my dark skin. 10yrs ago this article would have ruined my day but today I just laugh that we have not evolved. The best thing about being dark is our tight skin. I look at all the light skin female celebs of the 80's. Some of them need Botex and they are not even 40yrs old. Then you look at women like Sheryl Lee Rauph, Vanessa Bell Callaway and Natalie Cole and you see a big difference in the way light and dark skin age.

Grace at 6:54PM on Oct 23rd 2007

6. None of us can conrtol what we look like! If you have a problem with it take it up with God!!!! He created us!

SIMPLY SAID

Brittani Lewis at 6:58PM on Oct 23rd 2007

7. "as a woman thinketh"....Your thoughts create who you are, how people perceive you and how you are treated
more than ANY physical attribute. You attract what you think; people and situations. If you think you are always treated poorly, you will be. If you wish to be treated differently than you are now, change how you think. Change the inside environment to Winner and expect it and you will be treated as a Winner. Don't change others, change yourself. Why would you want to be around people who don't live up to your internal standards? There are plenty of people in this world
who will treat you with dignity and respect, but ONLY if YOU believe it through your entire being. If you wish success and happiness you can have it. If you wish to be miserable and treated differently you can have that too. If you want to change and improve, read the classic "As a Man Thinketh" by James Allen. You can get it as a free ebook at asamanthinketh.net or get it in a bookstore.

j at 7:18PM on Oct 23rd 2007

8. I'm from that city also and it is a shame that in the year 2007 our people
(African Americans) still have negative lables based on skin complextions . I am a 30 something successful African American female with a smooth deep complextion. I stand proud of my heritage and always have admired all the varity of shades of our people especially the brothers. It is a shame how a carmel sister can be reminded of her great distinctiveness in a negative way. I was recently told by a slightly older ignorant, "broke" brother that he previously did'nt date darker skinned women.

Kim at 7:29PM on Oct 23rd 2007

9. This is a very great article and it is a long overdue disscussion amongst black people in America. I come from a very diverse african american family. My mother is light skin and my father is dark skin. For years, I thought something was wrong with me because I took on my father's complexion and felt inferior to others who were lighter than me. My mom, who has always been extremely open minded about the "issue", however some members on my paternal side of the family are not. Many small remarks were made about me and to me as a child which left me with a serious insecurity complex over the complexion of my skin.

I now consider myself an extremely beautiful woman; but as a child I often felt an inner torcher to the way I looked. Some of my cousins who were lighter than me, always confirmed my beauty and even at times longed for my own complexion. I never understood it then. I can say that I have healed partially to the remarks made to me as a child but there seems to remain that small obsession with looking at other women who are lighter and some how feeling that think they are better or they will have more success with work, career, and family.

I think this topic must be addressed in school, through disscussion topics, books, documentarys. This is one of those hidden demons that continues to keep our race and our families at war....

There is so much more I can say on this.... Will comment later when I gather more of my thoughts on this matter. Good job Toni Clark. Good Job!!!!!

Chanell at 7:48PM on Oct 23rd 2007

10. Halle Berry is a hottie. Half white, right? BTW, I am not Jewish, but I am white and have a very big nose. Sign of a big penis, right? :-D

steven09 at 7:55PM on Oct 23rd 2007

11. My brothers and sisters......skin color has nothing to do with nothing. The misinformed brother who wanted to let a lighter complexion woman enter an establishment for free does not have a clue. Especially since most of the brothers I know would have let every woman in for free. I know that I love African American women period. I don't look at the color, I look at what is inside that person. God made us who we are and there is very little one can do about it externally, but internally, one can do much with that. Let's join together as one....African American brothers and sisters, because the struggle is on....and we have to fight it.....nooses-Jena 6--lack of good jobs--high foreclosure rate amongst our people--the War and the next Presidential election.

HA at 8:09PM on Oct 23rd 2007

12. Willie Lynch III , utellmesweetlies, Joe & all you dumb ass, loser, miserable degenerate, Why is it that every time you are done sucking your own balls, you log on here spewing stank shit? Can't you even brush your teeth first? Better yet, why don't you scrub those balls
so it doesn't repulse women. May be you'll get some? Oh my bad, you take it up the ass. Sorry, no broke back mountain here.
Scrub the balls, may be you'll get lucky, your cousin Jackie sue would do you. Beats doing it yourself.
Just like your mama told you, you are a loser. You'll die one too!


eve at 8:40PM on Oct 23rd 2007

13. I have a 10yr. old African American son. On the MANY occasions when race has been an issue in our household or with someone IN our Famly I have tried to tell my son that, the color of ones skin doesn't matter. I try to instill in him the belief that it is the CHARACTER of a person that counts.
I also have a 25yr. old son and a 19yr. old son. lol I call em' MY THREE SONS like the old tv series. 'member???
Anyway, my two older sons are constantly and somewhat aggressively, I think (altho that, might just be a
man / woman thang) lol Anyway, they both tell me AND ESPECIALLY their little brother that, and I quote, "don't be stupid or ignorant or naive, color ALWAYS COUNTS !!! It is more times than NOT, THE one thing a person will remember about you. One of THE things a person will use to measure you." They tell him, "don't listen to Mom (in a real nice way lol) she's a girl." And I say, "Amen to that!"
How sad it is that in this day and age, a persons COLOR, NOT their accomplishments or even phylosophy on life still carries SO MUCH WEIGHT. And, often times, is indeed used as leverage, in one way or another.
In my next comment, I will try to address the issue of light skinded & dark skinded. lol

give peace a chance*

I hoped that it could be my youngest sons generation that would maybe, just maybe, a few, grow up in a mostly color blind society. Am I the one being naive? It has to start somewhere . .

OH ! And light skinded people, da white people only know black n' white. Dey don't acknowledge "hues" of Blackness. If you Black U Black ! It don't much matter you be light or dark. YOU IS BLACK. Sadly, it is mostly among our Own people that this light skinned, dark skinned way of thinking comes into play.

AND WE IS ALL SOOO BEEAUTIFUL !

IN ALL OUR COLORS !

IN ALL OUR GLORY !

EMBRACE our differences.

***peace***

linda aka lindalu aka lindy aka linne* at 8:41PM on Oct 23rd 2007

14. Truthfully, I'm with lisa on this one. It's more about facial features and how your body looks. But I know some people that would disagree with my opinion. Unfortunately, racism is still alive in this country, both white and black.

steven09 at 8:54PM on Oct 23rd 2007

15. I am soooo sick of this issue, it's absolutely absurd and people need to get over there "OWN INSECURITIES" and stop blaming lighter skinned women. Yes, I am the result of a dual heritage (white/black), but I have "NEVER IN MY LIFE FELT I WAS BETTER THAN DARKER SKINNED WOMEN". Where does that come from? I had a lot of problems coming up, being the light one of the bunch and living in a predominately black environment. I dealt with girls picking on me, making comments, wanting to fight me, calling me out my name cause their boyfriends may have liked me, and I just wanted to fit in, because I didn't look like everyone else, I stuck out like a sore thumb, but not realizing what was going on until I got older.

Every man and woman has their own preference on what they like in a significant other, it's what your attracted to and "BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER". No one has a choice in who their parents are, or what they are going to look like when they are born, but you better believe "ALL OF US WISH WE COULD CHANGE SOMETHING ABOUT OURSELVES AND THAT IS THE SAD RESULT OF SOCIETY TRYING TO EMBED IN OUR BRAINS WHAT BEAUTY SHOULD LOOK LIKE INSTEAD OF WHAT IT TRULY IS". There are beautiful women of all shades and races all over the world, from white to the darkest shade of black, and it's "GORGEOUS"! You have to love yourself and be confident in you and not just what you look like on the outside, because that is just a small piece of who you are. Then once you have that down, then you can be in a room full of beautiful women (ALL SHADES)hold your head high, compliment the next woman, and still be noticed because you are just as beautiful!



Shannon Johnson at 8:56PM on Oct 23rd 2007

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