MSNBC drops simulcast of Don Imus show but program's ultimate fate still rests with CBS executives.

April 11: NBC News President Steve Capus explains the network's decision to drop "Imus in the Morning" from MSNBC.

"This decision comes as a result of an ongoing review process, which initially included the announcement of a suspension. It also takes into account many conversations with our own employees," NBC news said in a statement.

Talk-show host Don Imus triggered the uproar on his April 4 show, when he referred to the mostly black Rutgers women's basketball team as "nappy-headed hos." His comments have been widely denounced by civil rights and women's groups.

The decision does not affect Imus' nationally syndicated radio show, and the ultimate decision on the fate of that program will rest with executives at CBS Corp. In a statement, CBS reiterated that Imus will be suspended without pay for two weeks beginning on Monday, and that CBS Radio "will continue to speak with all concerned parties and monitor the situation closely."

MSNBC's action came after a growing list of sponsors "” including American Express Co., Sprint Nextel Corp., Staples Inc., Procter & Gamble Co., and General Motors Corp. "” said they were pulling ads from Imus' show for the indefinite future.

NBC News President Steve Capus said he made the decision after reading thousands of e-mails and having countless discussions with NBC workers and the public, but he denied the potential loss of advertising dollars had anything to do with it.

"I take no joy in this. It's not a particularly happy moment, but it needed to happen," he said. "I can't ignore the fact that there is a very long list of inappropriate comments, of inappropriate banter, and it has to stop."

NBC's decision came at a time when Imus' program on MSNBC was doing better competitively than it ever has been. For the first three months of the year, its audience was nearly identical to CNN's, leading CNN to replace its morning news team last week.

˜He's crossed the line'
Calls for Imus' firing from the radio portion of the program have intensified during the past week, and remained strong even after MSNBC's announcment. The show originates from WFAN-AM in New York City and is syndicated nationally by Westwood One, both of which are managed by CBS Corp. MSNBC, which had been simulcasting the show, is a unit of General Electric Co.'s NBC Universal.

Bruce Gordon, former head of the NAACP and a director of CBS Corp., said before MSNBC's decision Wednesday he hoped the broadcasting company would "make the smart decision" by firing Imus.

"He's crossed the line, he's violated our community," Gordon said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press. "He needs to face the consequence of that violation."

Gordon, a longtime telecommunications executive, stepped down in March after 19 months as head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, one of the foremost U.S. civil rights organizations.

He said he had spoken with CBS chief executive Leslie Moonves and hoped the company, after reviewing the situation, would fire Imus rather than let him return to the air at the end of his suspension.

"We should have a zero tolerance policy when it comes to what I see as irresponsible, racist behavior," Gordon said. "The Imus comments go beyond humor. Maybe he thought it was funny, but that's not what occurred."

A CBS spokesman, Dana McClintock, declined comment on the remarks by Gordon, who is one of at least two minorities on the 13-member board.

The 10 members of the Rutgers team spoke publicly for the first time Tuesday about the on-air comments, made the day after the team lost the NCAA championship game to Tennessee. Some of them wiped away tears as their coach, C. Vivian Stringer, criticized Imus for "racist and sexist remarks that are deplorable, despicable, abominable and unconscionable."

The women, eight of whom are black, agreed to meet with Imus privately and hear his explanation. They held back from saying whether they'd accept Imus' apologies.

Stringer said late Wednesday that she did not call for Imus' firing, but was pleased with the decision by NBC executives.

She said the meeting with Imus was never designed to call for his removal but to give the women on the team the opportunity to meet with him and for him to see the people he had so publicly hurt.

"The young ladies and I needed to put a face behind the remarks... He needs to know who these young ladies are that he hurt," Stringer said.

Imus has apologized repeatedly for his comments. He said Tuesday he hadn't been thinking when making a joke that went "way too far." He also said that those who called for his firing without knowing him, his philanthropic work or what his show was about would be making an "ill-informed" choice.

The Rev. Al Sharpton said in New York that he would put pressure on CBS but that the issue was larger than Imus.

"I think we also have to have now a broad discussion on how the music industry allows this to be used," Sharpton said. "I don't think that we should stop at NBC, and I don't think we should stop at Imus."

Jackson wants more black show hosts. The Rev. Jesse Jackson said he planned to meet with CBS and NBC executives on Thursday with a delegation of other civil rights activists and lawmakers to discuss the Imus situation and diversity in broadcasting.

"Imus is on 1,040 hours a week and yet they have virtually no black show hosts. That is true for other networks as well," Jackson said. "We must raise the ethical standard for all of them."

At the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick, N.J., about 300 students and faculty rallied earlier in the day to cheer for their team, which lost in the national championship game, and add their voices to the crescendo of calls for Imus' ouster. One of the speakers was Chidimma Acholonu, president of the campus chapter of the NAACP.

"This is not a battle against one man. This is a battle against a way of thought," she said. "Don Imus does not understand the power of his words, so it is our responsibility to remind him."

Before the announcement was made, Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) had appeared on the MSNBC program "Hardball," where host David Gregory asked the senator and presidential candidate if he thought Imus should be fired.

"I don't think MSNBC should be carrying the kinds of hateful remarks that Imus uttered the other day," Obama said.

He went on to note that he and his wife have "two daughters who are African-American, gorgeous, tall, and I hope, at some point, are interested enough in sports that they get athletic scholarships. ... I don't want them to be getting a bunch of information that, somehow, they're less than anybody else. And I don't think MSNBC should want to promote that kind of language."

Obama went on to say that he would not be a guest on Imus' show in the future.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Do not condemn the judgement of another because it differs from your own. You may both be wrong.
Original Post
Now 'Ain't That Good News?'

This also has to cause the media, particularly the rap-playing media, to take pause and consider what they are doing.

That comedian Williams Guy, and all the other 'Def Comedy Jam' performers will have to 'work' this into their routines.

Let's see how that plays out.

PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
This also has to cause the media, particularly the rap-playing media, to take pause and consider what they are doing.


I don't see the relationship. We're talking about two different mediums.

Oops! That's me thinkng about the rap music industry in general.
Maybe the most misogynistic songs - LYRICS - do get air play, and perhaps prime-time air play, on mainstream radio stations. To be honest, I really wouldn't know.

Seems to me that wouldn't be hard. No harder than all the years (past or present) when curse words were banned from air play. I don't know if that does anything, though. There is always the underground and now the internet for rap...

Anyway, I think the comparisons between Imus and rap music are silly. We're simply not talking about the same thing or the same formula for change. Rappers really only have one corporate sponsor and that's they're label/distributor who have nothing to gain or to stop from losing by promoting certain rap artists.

Unlike Imus, there are no advertisers who can determine the fate of rapper like they did with Imus.
The reverberrations from this will be interesting. Former BET owner Bob Johnson was part of a roundtable discussion (via phone) on MSNBC last night.

Predictably, when the discussion got to basically "what about the BET videos and what black rappers say about women, blah, blah" I thought Johnson's answer was weak.

Johnson basically said that during his ownership of BET he went to the rappers and said if they produced better, less offensive material he'd have been happy to air that.

Now, I've never been a fan of Armstrong Williams, but he called bull---- on Johnson on that point and was competely correct, IMO. Had Johnson said he while answering market demand because he was in business, he was trying to make changes, I'd at least have felt better. But the ansnwer he gave, was not believeable.

While it's disengeneous for the mainstream community to make this gangsta rap vs. Imus comparison for a few reasons (1. there HAVE BEEN and CONTINUE TO BE black protests about gansta rap, and 2. these mainstream critics hadn't been so up-in-arms about the defense of black womenhood in the weeks/months preceding Imus' rant) hopefully some good can come of this.

If this leads to a come up by BET and others -- really us, as consumers who buy, and thus push the product, then something good will, indeed, come of this.
We're simply not talking about the same thing or the same formula for change.---Nmaginate

I get your point.

And I agree.

The music industry is so fractured it almost impossibel create a similar effect.

And we know that in both cases the driving force is the money.

And unless that money is threatened, nothing will change.

Maybe...maybe...maybe there will be some response from the performers.

A rapper who 'downs' the rappers will make money.

Now there's an idea.

Truthseeker:

Katt Williams, the comedian, is the guy I'm referring to.

By the way, this issue has got local talk radio 'smokin'.

The area is about 98% European.
\
Everybody is trotting out their 'downtrodden' history.

And demanding that 'we' get over slavery...refusing ot pay reparations.

It's a hoot!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

In fact, the host just got finished 'putting' a 'black' guy in his place for referencing slavery, and talking about its continuing effect.

Then she welcomed onto her show a producer of a Broadway play about the Molly McBuires.

The talked extensively about ht hardship of the Irish miners, and how they would have gladly changed places with the slaves who didn't get paid, but were 'warm and safe'.

The host never interrupted, and supported everything he said.

Of course, she is European-American.


PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:
We're simply not talking about the same thing or the same formula for change.---Nmaginate

I get your point.

And I agree.

The music industry is so fractured it almost impossibel create a similar effect.

And we know that in both cases the driving force is the money.

And unless that money is threatened, nothing will change.

Maybe...maybe...maybe there will be some response from the performers.

A rapper who 'downs' the rappers will make money.

Now there's an idea.

Truthseeker:

Katt Williams, the comedian, is the guy I'm referring to.

By the way, this issue has got local talk radio 'smokin'.

The area is about 98% European.
\
Everybody is trotting out their 'downtrodden' history.

And demanding that 'we' get over slavery...refusing ot pay reparations.

It's a hoot!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

In fact, the host just got finished 'putting' a 'black' guy in his place for referencing slavery, and talking about its continuing effect.

Then she welcomed onto her show a producer of a Broadway play about the Molly McBuires.

The talked extensively about ht hardship of the Irish miners, and how they would have gladly changed places with the slaves who didn't get paid, but were 'warm and safe'.

The host never interrupted, and supported everything he said.

Of course, she is European-American.


PEACE

Jim Chester


Jim, someone should've told that radio-talk host that she's more full of "it" than a hospital bedpan. Can you compare Irish miners to slaves. The miners were still acknowledged as HUMAN BEINGS. They had FREEDOM, and they were PAID!!

And to compare Sharpton, Jackson and rappers to Imus? O'Reilly and Hannity were wrong as hell to draw that comparison. First of all, when Jackson and Sharpton said their nasty quotes, they didn't have a radio show, Imus did. They weren't governed by the FCC, Imus was. And gangsta rappers don't get played on MSNBC, which gets a lot more viewers than any radio station in America, combined. So what O'Reilly and Hannity said were moot points.
We are talking about apple and oranges here. Rap music is seperate from the IMUS incident.

Imus is a 70 year old man (if he isn't 70 he looks it) and the word NEGROE would roll off his tongue wrong and be offensive. Lets call it what it is. He is not a good person who done something bad. He is a white man with a racist heart and the only thing he is SORRY about is the money he won't be making.
Now that Imus is gone from CBS, I hope that the critical attention Imus garnered will be leveraged to take on recording industry execs and the radio and TV media.
quote:
Now that Imus is gone from CBS, I hope that the critical attention Imus garnered will be leveraged to take on recording industry execs and the radio and TV media.



You got plenty of WHITE (and Black) Imus APOLOGISTS
and Jesse and Al Deflect&Redirectionists who should be first in line.
quote:
Originally posted by Nmaginate:
quote:
Now that Imus is gone from CBS, I hope that the critical attention Imus garnered will be leveraged to take on recording industry execs and the radio and TV media.



You got plenty of WHITE (and Black) Imus APOLOGISTS
and Jesse and Al Deflect&Redirectionists who should be first in line.


True that ... True that. I was talking with one [white/male] today who was arguing [like Imus] "Don't criticize me if you are doing it yourself" and "there is a billion dollar business out there that does worse than [Imus], why pick on him?"

I responded by asking him: Who is it that is taking Imus to task? Who is it that is contributing to the billion dollar industry? Are any of those tasking Imus to task, involved in the billion dollar industry? Are any of those in the billion dollar business actively criticizing Imus?

Of course, he sheepishly backed off. stck
I saw this quote on CNN.com which talks about how Imus set himself up as having "power" and regularly denigrated his guests. Thought it was interesting.



"Then there's personality, or at least persona. Compared with Imus, for instance, his rival Howard Stern may be offensive, but he's also self-deprecating, making fun of his own satyrism, looks and even manly endowment. Imus doesn't take it nearly as well as he dishes it out. His shtick is all cowboy-hatted swagger, and his insults set him up as superior to his targets and the alpha dog to his supplicant guests.

Imus uses jokes to establish his power, in other words. He's hardly the only humorist to do that. But making jokes about difference "” race, gender, sexual orientation, the whole list "” is ultimately about power. You need to purchase the right to do it through some form of vulnerability, especially if you happen to be a rich, famous white man. But the I-Man "” his radio persona, anyway "” is not about vulnerability. (The nickname, for Pete's sake: I, Man!) That's creepy enough when he's having a big-name columnist kiss his ring; when he hurled his tinfoil thunderbolts at a team of college kids, it was too much. "Some people have said, 'Well, he says this all the time,'" Rutgers' team captain Carson told TIME. "But does that justify the remarks he's made about anyone?""
quote:
I was talking with one [white/male] today who was arguing [like Imus] "Don't criticize me if you are doing it yourself" and "there is a billion dollar business out there that does worse than [Imus], why pick on him?"


No doubt, he backed off because the it would be clear which side of the RACE LINE he stood on and how his protest would fall on a certain side of the line.

The message is this: "You Negroes leave us White folks alone and clean up your own garbage."

So, again, it's obvious which side of the line he was on. It's also obvious where so many of the Talking Heads stood. Instead of saying, "WE" as is ALL AMERICANS should go after the rap music industry, one cat on Anderson Cooper wanted to play the "Gotcha!", "It's Hypocrisy" game and basically left it up to Black people (Jesse and Al, in particular) to address the billion dollar (gansta??) rap music industry ALL BY THEMSELVES.

They'll claim they're against both rap music (its negative imagery) and Imus but, of course, those are Black people's problem. Not theirs. Funny how that RACE TEAM Membership works.
I heard Michael Myers, Clarence Page and Some white dude as panelist on an NPR radio show this morning discussing the whole Imus issue.

Michael Myers, a black man, who ostensibly heads some "civil rights" group (read black conservative twist on civil rights group) out of new york seemed particularly perturbed that Imus' right to free speech was taken away when he was canned for making the comments.

Clarence Page, disagreed, and stated that he had been on Imus show in the past and made him pledge to stop making racist statements, which Imus did for a while. Page was supportive of him being fired because of the racist tones of the comments

But the very egregious nature of this attack upon black women seemed to be lost upon these brothas...They couched their discussion in terms of freedom of speech vs racism and never broached the idea that there could be anger

at this white man

for dragging black women through the mud...

How come? Shouldn't Imus have received threats from brothas for daring to besmirch these daughters of africa?

(I know I know...rappers do it too) Roll Eyes
NS,

Roland Martin was holding it down for you on CNN's Anderson Cooper 360'.

Martin repeatedly emphasized how it was a SEXISM issue first and racism issue second.


quote:
(I know I know...rappers do it too) Roll Eyes


My sentiments EXACTLY. I liked your CHEW GUM and WALK comment in your post in MBM's thread.
Thanks Nmaginate...And I believe that we are capable of launching a multi-pronged approach. I don't agree with people who say "the internal" is more important than "the external" so let's ignore it. I was very impressed with Bruce Gordon's ability to use his position at CBS to register his/our discontent regarding imus imagery of black women. It made me revise my opinion of him and his stint with NAACP. He was right there, speaking up, saying "No, not here", and had power and influence to make it matter. Maybe I'm exaggerating his influence in the situation but that's a baaaaad cat!


On that whole "rappers do it too" track, I will say this:

Sistas have to re-evaluate what we mean when we listen to, ignore, and dance to misogynistic lyrics, thinking

"oh he ain't talking about me, I'm not a ____"

That means sistas find it legitimate for some of us to actually be labeled and thus treated in this manner...
Are we victimized? or complicit in the perpetuation?
ohsnap

I'll have to check out the Roland Martin comments. He's a spicy dude. I liked him on BET back when they had news.
These are his words ONLY from the CNN transcript:

quote:
ROLAND MARTIN, CNN CONTRIBUTOR: No, it's not enough.

I mean, as Whoopi Goldberg said, it must be beyond that. Keep in mind, it was Bernard McGuirk, his executive producer, who first called the women hos. Imus responded to him. We have forgotten about him.

He has a sport sidekick who, in the past, has criticized Venus Williams and Serena Williams. He was fired, but he got hired back. Of course the suspension is not enough.

But, also, Anderson, I think we need to put this in context. We're trying to compare Imus to rappers. Keep in mind, NBC has "Today Show." ABC has "Good Morning America." CBS has "The Early Show." CNN has "AMERICAN MORNING." FOX has "FOX & Friends." MSNBC has Don Imus.

As Whoopi Goldberg said, it is a different standard. He is operating on a different platform. You don't see Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton sitting down with the Ying Yang Twins. You don't see Senator McCain rapping with Snoop Dogg. It's a different standard. So, to compare the two is not proper.

______________________________________________________________________________

MARTIN: It's all right. It's all right. But the whole point, here's what's happening. Anderson, you have three African-Americans talking about this issue. This was not just a racist issue. This was a sexist issue.

As Vivian Stringer said, whites, Hispanics, Asians, African- Americans should be outraged. The problem is not rappers using language. You go to -- you go to boxing matches, women are walking around with ring cards. We have a society that is about sexism.

And so when men don't stand up and say to a Don Imus you shouldn't say that because that is degrading, then we have this problem. I think we have to broaden this. This is not a black issue. This is a sexist issue and a racist issue, and more people should be speaking out, not just African-Americans.

______________________________________________________________________________

MARTIN: Here's what I find to be interesting, Anderson. Anderson, Bishop T.D. Jakes has been the only national moral leader who has issued a statement denouncing Don Imus.

What I'm amazed by is where is the national statement from Focus on the Family, from the Family Research Council, from Concerned Women for America? Where are the moral groups?

I had a woman from CWA on my radio show today, and she was speaking. And I said, "But wait a minute. What about the national organizations?"

This is a moral dilemma. This is not just a racial dilemma. This is a moral dilemma. And you need to have folks focusing on the broader issue and not just, well, this is a black issue.



quote:
A. COOPER: Roland, double standard?

ROLAND MARTIN: Well, what we have in America is a country that is sexist. And again, I made the point, Anderson, and I will keep making the point that Don Imus' comments started with Bernard McGirt (ph) saying hard headed hos, or something along those lines. And so he made the comment first, then Imus followed up. And so we have sexism to deal with. And so it's not just a matter of race. We do have to deal with that. And sure, we certainly should go after it. I've said it, we've spoken out against the lyrics in gangster rap.
______________________________________________________________________________

MARTIN: John [Fund], John, John, one second. You're talking to the wrong cat here. Stop using radio, television, newspaper, you name it, to speak out against it.

But Hip-hop is 30 years old. The kind of emphasis that we have, how we denigrate women, existed before hip-hop. I'm not letting them off the hook. What I'm saying is hold them accountable and hold the sexists in our society accountable as well.
______________________________________________________________________________

CALLER: "...Should we throw Imus to the dogs for failing to do what we as black men failed to do? Before anyone else can respect us we must first be self-respected."

COOPER: Sharriess makes a lot of great points. Roland, what is your take on that?

MARTIN: Sure, I think he makes excellent points. But the bottom line is Don Imus is no longer a shock jock and just because he plays B.B. King is not going to excuse the attacks that he makes on women, the attacks he makes on others. When you choose to sit with presidential contenders and sit with U.S. senators and sit with prominent journalists, you are operating on a different level. This guy competes with the "Today Show," GMA, CNN's "AMERICAN MORNING."

______________________________________________________________________________

CALLER: My question is, why has this whole issue been wrapped around racism when Imus' comment was addressed towards the girls in general? When I saw their press conference, there were white girls as well on the team. So why haven't there been any women's rights groups speaking out against this guy on their behalf?

COOPER: Roland, I know you've been making that point.

MARTIN: Thank you. Now, finally now and the National Council of Women's Organizations, they came out. You know, and I just sent another e-mail to the Concerned Women for America, a conservative group, and I said, you know, I don't understand this, how can you be called the Concerned Women for America and you -- a conservative group, you are not taking a public stand on this?

I don't get that. This is a sexism issue first, a race issue second.
______________________________________________________________________________

CALLER: "...OK, well, yes, what [IMUS] said is a horrible thing... but at the same time when do we draw the line and where do we stop?

COOPER: Roland, go ahead. You try to take it.

MARTIN: Sure, Anderson, I think we draw the line when you don't make the comments. I think you draw the line when you accept some responsibility as a person who is on the public airwaves and you don't insult people to this point. It is called restraint...

______________________________________________________________________________

MARTIN: It was WEB DuBois who said that race was the problem of the 20th Century of America. It is clearly that case in the 21st Century. But also I do hope, Anderson, that we as a nation understand that sexism is also real. That when women are paid less than men, that is a problem. We do not have enough female and African-American, Hispanic, Asian, minority voices on the air, and that's also a problem.

Do not allow this opportunity to simply go by. We can change the course of America right now if we have the will to do so.




http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0704/10/acd.01.html

http://edition.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0704/11/acd.02.html
Thanks! tfro

So many great points....

1. that sexism started before hip-hop... ohsnap

2. that prominent politicians and presidential candidates appeared regularly on a shock jock show

3. Indeed, where are the national organizations, especially the national women's organizations, whove shown t heir true color by not standing up for women when they're black.



So is hip-hop, and more precisely, rap, the greater problem or sexist, racist society???
quote:
Nmaginate,

Do you agree? That this is a sexist problem first, and then a racist one?


I'll be honest, I didn't exactly view it in quite that way at first. In fact, I didn't separate the two. My initial thoughts were that "these sisters didn't do anything whatsoever to be singled out and maligned like this."

I still don't separate the two but I acknowledge the strong current of sexism in American society. And, yes! Both Imus and sexism were around before rap music made it the thing to dump on sisters/women.


.
Imagine if a black radio talk-show host with a huge audience had referred to a predominately white female college sports team as "stringy-haired trailer trash." The people who are now supporting Don Imus would be calling for that black guy's head! Apparently, it's OK with some people if young women are viciously insulted, as long as those women don't look like their own loved ones. I certainly hope that Imus' producer, Bernard McGurk, was shown the door as well. He's the jerk who described the Rutgers team members as "some hardcore hos" before Imus made his awful remark. Let's not forget about McGurk's role in all of this. Makes you wonder just how deep the racism is on that show; it apparently goes deeper than just Imus. And I've heard enough about Imus' charity work. How many criminals have been defended because they also give to the communities that they terrorize? It's kind of like Ollie North hiding behind his war-hero status in order to get away with felony crimes against the Constitution. Imus isn't just some ignorant Archie Bunker type spewing his bigoted opinions in some neighborhood bar. He's a nationally-syndicated talk-show host with a huge audience. So, to all of you Imus supporters out there: If you would not sit back and let your own daughter be verbally assaulted in the manner that Imus assaulted the members of the Rutgers basketball team, then stop complaining about this being a free-speech issue and let Imus go.
I don't understand how calling a black woman a ho gives the word a different meaning depending on who says it.

I mean, is there a nice/good/flattering way to be designated as a ho? Roll Eyes
I got a question:

Why do black people have the burden of having to explain why other black people do fucked up shit? As if no other group of people on earth does fucked up shit?

Everytime a Black person is victimized, people always want to drag up the existence of negative rappers and Black-on-Black crime. Although I do not condone the self-hatred, negative stereotypes, sexism, materialism and violence of the majority of rap/hip-hop music today, why is it that everytime a Black person is harmed in some way the fact that rappers promote violence/use the N-word, or the fact that Black-on-Black crime exists is brought up?

When White men are killed, I don't see anyone bringing up the violence, materialism, sexism and such in rock music, or the existence of White-on-White crime. Why can no Black person be a victim because of the existence of problems in the Black community? DOES EVERY GODDAMN BLACK SOUL ON THIS PLANET HAVE TO BE A SAINT FOR A BLACK PERSON TO BE ABLE TO BE A GENUINE VICTIM? I don't see people bringing up the problems and depravity of the White, Hispanic, or Asian collective everytime a person of those races are a victim.

That brings my piss to a boil! Mad Mad nono bang

*A Black person gets killed by a White stalker. The stalker writes a White power symbol on the Black person's dead body*

Black commentator: "This is unacceptable. That man should go to jail!"

White commentator: "Well, Black people kill each other, so I don't see why they are complaining. Maybe they should fix the crime problem in their community while they are complaining about this one killing."


bang bang
I'm with you on that one EP...black people have to learn to be fair to themselves....and not carry any burden associated with their race that no one else carries because of theirs......this society does not emphasize black excellence the way it emphasizes and promotes black ignorance.....so I say fuck em.....and be sure that I am never pigeonholed by a racist azz ideology.....
quote:
Originally posted by Kevin41:
I'm with you on that one EP...black people have to learn to be fair to themselves....and not carry any burden associated with their race that no one else carries because of theirs......this society does not emphasize black excellence the way it emphasizes and promotes black ignorance.....so I say fuck em.....and be sure that I am never pigeonholed by a racist azz ideology.....


thanks appl
What really ASTOUNDS me is the "Jason Whitlocks" in the world that seem to surface and make statements like," Thank you, Don Imus. You've given us (black people) an excuse to avoid our real problem." That was the begnning of a commentary on Imus written by Kansas City Star reporter, Jason Whitlock.

http://www.kansascity.com/182/story/66339.html

I personally HATE the lack of a united front among Black folks. Rosa Parks was not the first to refuse to give up her seat but it was the catalyst to the Civil Rights movement. Janet Jackson superbowl incident wasn't the first taste-less event seen on TV but it was the one incident the public screamed about. Therefore, fines were threatened and changes were made for future superbowl half-time show. I guess what I'm trying to say is, someone has to be the catalyst for change to happen and now its Imus. Its been said that we as a people are accepting of the bad language and negatives lyrics in rap songs. This is not true. I know Black politicans who have fought against this for years and rap songs negative lyrics is still around. At least this incidient is giving some of those in charge pause and just maybe all talk show host and even the music industry will be persuaded to think carefully before they speak or sing.
quote:
Originally posted by Empty Purnata:

Why do black people have the burden of having to explain why other black people do fucked up shit? As if no other group of people on earth does fucked up shit?


link
We are NOT a race of inferior people. In fact, I would go so far as to say in many ways we are superior. Some time ago some researchers came up with the conclusion that inner city black youth's cranial capacity was actually smaller (a few centimeters) than their white suburban counterparts due to the emotional and environmental constraints experienced in their early childhood. Yet white suburbia's young black counterparts perform just as well if not better.

History has proven that we have accomplished more in the face of adversity, overcome more obstacles and expressed countless acts of innovation, genius, leadership, courage, scholarship, and sacrifice. However, in the process of riding the success gained from such countless acts of innovation and sacrifice over the last few decades, we, as a people, have lost our cohesiveness, our sense of purpose, and direction.

Individual successes amongst our people are great but when I see the shear numbers of failures and shortcomings as a whole it would be an understatement to say we have a long way to go. It's the year 2007, and on the death of Coretta Scott King some of black America's most prominent people are saying: "What are we going to do now that all of our leaders are gone?" When I heard that comment made in a discussion on BET last year, I said to myself, "Damn, what about the millions of other negroes in this country? Who says we need to have one prolific leader or even two or three?"
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:

The best revenge is success.


YES SIR! 15

Welcome by the way!! wel
For some reason, I didn't feel compelled to jump on the "Get Imus" bandwagon. When I first heard about it, I knew there would be trouble, but, I figured he'd get fired and that would be the end of it. I had no idea it would go as far or be as wide-ranging a firestorm as it's turned out to be. I've mostly tried to ignore it, because it has been the only news on TV since it happened. And I'm glad he got fired and that a discussion about it has been brought to light.

I'm not of the opinion that Imus said what he said because of hip hop music. I believe he said what said because he's a racist and tried to tell a joke that wasn't funny. But, I am of the opinion that Black women being called a ho by Imus is no different than being called a ho by Snoop Dogg! I don't think I'd be a better ho because it was said to me by a rapper than an old white man. I don't think a woman can be called a ho "respectfully" or "with love"! Eek Would I be a "special" kind of ho if it came from Snoop? Or does his being a Black man give him a certain privilege ... a pass ... to be able to refer to Black women as hoes? Confused As far as I know, there's only one definition for a "ho." And just like a woman can't be a 'little bit pregnant' she can't be "a ho ... but not really!" either!

I liken it to those who say that Obama is a Black man and so Black America should vote for him! Well, 50 cent is a Black man too ... should I give him my seal of approval to be able to call me a ho? Confused

In my opinion, Imus saying what he said was/is definitely a problem for Black women especially and the Black community as a whole. But so are those songs that say the same and worse ... especially being said by Black artists (?) and it should be unacceptable at any level and regardless of who it comes from. It certainly is to me. And I give Snoop Dogg or 50 no more nor more less respect than I give to Imus. You know I like to spread things around evenly, so they can all kiss my @$$!! Eek

Be that as it may ... it was not lost on me that the reason for the firing and condemnation of Imus was activism and agitation. That man could not rest in peace from the time he uttered those words from his mouth. There were emails, phone calls, protests, and demonstrations out in front of his building. People (and a lot of them!) voices their opinions and oppositions in every form possible. And got results by doing so!

If we really want to put an end to the degradation of Black women in rap music, it can be done. And the only reason for it continuing is our refusal to do what it necessary to stop it. Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:

For some reason, I didn't feel compelled to jump on the "Get Imus" bandwagon. When I first heard about it, I knew there would be trouble, but, I figured he'd get fired and that would be the end of it. I had no idea it would go as far or be as wide-ranging a firestorm as it's turned out to be. I've mostly tried to ignore it, because it has been the only news on TV since it happened. And I'm glad he got fired and that a discussion about it has been brought to light.

I'm not of the opinion that Imus said what he said because of hip hop music. I believe he said what said because he's a racist and tried to tell a joke that wasn't funny. But, I am of the opinion that Black women being called a ho by Imus is no different than being called a ho by Snoop Dogg! I don't think I'd be a better ho because it was said to me by a rapper than an old white man. I don't think a woman can be called a ho "respectfully" or "with love"! Eek Would I be a "special" kind of ho if it came from Snoop? Or does his being a Black man give him a certain privilege ... a pass ... to be able to refer to Black women as hoes? Confused As far as I know, there's only one definition for a "ho." And just like a woman can't be a 'little bit pregnant' she can't be "a ho ... but not really!" either!

I liken it to those who say that Obama is a Black man and so Black America should vote for him! Well, 50 cent is a Black man too ... should I give him my seal of approval to be able to call me a ho? Confused

In my opinion, Imus saying what he said was/is definitely a problem for Black women especially and the Black community as a whole. But so are those songs that say the same and worse ... especially being said by Black artists (?) and it should be unacceptable at any level and regardless of who it comes from. It certainly is to me. And I give Snoop Dogg no more nor more less respect than I give to Imus. You know I like to spread things around evenly, so they can both kiss my @$$!! Eek

Be that as it may ... it was not lost on me that the reason for the firing and condemnation of Imus was activism and agitation. That man could not rest in peace from the time he uttered those words from his mouth. There were emails, phone calls, protests, and demonstrations out in front of his building. People (and a lot of them!) voices their opinions and oppositions in every form possible. And got results by doing so!

If we really want to put an end to the degradation of Black women in rap music, it can be done. And the only reason for it continuing is our refusal to do what it necessary to stop it. Roll Eyes


Beautifully said! appl
quote:
Originally posted by Diamond:
What really ASTOUNDS me is the "Jason Whitlocks" in the world that seem to surface and make statements like," Thank you, Don Imus. You've given us (black people) an excuse to avoid our real problem." That was the begnning of a commentary on Imus written by Kansas City Star reporter, Jason Whitlock.

http://www.kansascity.com/182/story/66339.html

I personally HATE the lack of a united front among Black folks. Rosa Parks was not the first to refuse to give up her seat but it was the catalyst to the Civil Rights movement.


So the D.A.W.G. got fired.

Dumb Ass White Guy

I'm surprised it took so long but I somewhat agree with Whitlock and I don't think it is going to have any effect on the Black Assholes.

Other DAWGs will know better than to be that dumb in such high profile positions.

umbra
IMUS IS GONE. WELL, LET ME THINK AM I SAD HE GOT FIRED? NO, I AM NOT FOR ONE SIMPLE REASON--THE REMARKS HE MADE racist !!!!!!!!

HE WAS AN IDIOT TO GET ON THE RADIO AND SAY THE THINGS HE SAID ANYWAY. THIS IS THE MAN THAT CALL THE PRESIDENT AND EVERYBODY IN POWER A STUPID RACIST NAME.

IT WAS ONLY A MATTER OF TIME BEFORE THAT RACIST BAST---- GOT FIRED.

QUOTE:

"I SHED NOT A TEAR FOR THE IGNORANCE OF OTHERS, BUT REGARD THEIR JUSTICE AS A PUNISHMENT FROM GOD"-DONNA12
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
We are NOT a race of inferior people. In fact, I would go so far as to say in many ways we are superior. Some time ago some researchers came up with the conclusion that inner city black youth's cranial capacity was actually smaller (a few centimeters) than their white suburban counterparts due to the emotional and environmental constraints experienced in their early childhood. Yet white suburbia's young black counterparts perform just as well if not better.

History has proven that we have accomplished more in the face of adversity, overcome more obstacles and expressed countless acts of innovation, genius, leadership, courage, scholarship, and sacrifice. However, in the process of riding the success gained from such countless acts of innovation and sacrifice over the last few decades, we, as a people, have lost our cohesiveness, our sense of purpose, and direction.

Individual successes amongst our people are great but when I see the shear numbers of failures and shortcomings as a whole it would be an understatement to say we have a long way to go. It's the year 2007, and on the death of Coretta Scott King some of black America's most prominent people are saying: "What are we going to do now that all of our leaders are gone?" When I heard that comment made in a discussion on BET last year, I said to myself, "Damn, what about the millions of other negroes in this country? Who says we need to have one prolific leader or even two or three?"


wel and thanks for your comment. I'm so glad that someone has finally posted what many of us have thought several times.

We can't wait for the next MLK, Malcolm, Harriet Tubman to be born or to gain air time on TV. We have to be our own Moses or our own Noah and build our own arks to be achieve what we want/need to achieve with our God-given talents. As long as no one tries to sink our boats or arks, you can ride with me or sail your ark next to mine, side by side.

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