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Is this what this generation's music has been reduced to? Pathetic.

I'm In Love With A Stripper
By T PAIN

[Intro]

Goddamn Lil Mama
U know u thick as hell u know what im sayin
Matter fact
After the club u know what im talkin bout
Me and my niggas gone be together u know what im sayin
I aint gon worry bout them really though
Im just lookin at u
Yea u know
U got them big ass hips god damn!

[Verse 1]

Got the body of a goddess
Got eyes with a peak of brown eyes see you girl
Droppin Low
She Comin Down from the ceiling
To tha floo
Yea She Know what she doin
Yea yea yea
She doin that right thang
Yea yea yea yea ea
I Need to get her over to my crib and do that night thang
Cause I'm N Luv wit a stripper

[Chorus x2]

She poppin she rollin she rollin
She climbin that pole and
Im N Luv with a stripper
She trippin she playin she playin
Im not goin nowhere girl im stayin
Im N Luv with a stripper

[Verse 2]

Out of all the girls she be the hottest
Like n the way she break it down i see u girl
Spinnin wide
And She lookin at me
Right in my eyes
Yea She got my attention
yea yea yea
Enough to get me to mention
I Need to get her over to my crib and do that night thang
Cause Im N Luv Wit a Stripper

[Chorus x2]

[Verse 3]

She can pop it she can lock it
Take the pinderas down im bout to see this sexy girl
In My bed
She don't know what she is doin
To my head
Yea She turnin tricks on me
Yea Yea Yea
She dont even know me
Yea yea yea ea
I'd have got her over to my crib to do that night thing
Cause I'm N Luv Wit a Stripper

[Chorus x4]


T PAIN
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I have to protest! the above may be crap but...

please, please, please! I shudder when I hear people say 'this generations' music/attitude/fill in the blank is soooooooo substandard.

Sure it is. But some of it is really awesome too. Not going to get into a quibble/debate about who is better than who... but there is some conscious, sassy, smart, intelligent creative expression being produced and created by the 'yoof' of today.

Yes misogyny - for both sexes is on the skyrocket rise and that's a shame - but there is hope too. It's probably hidden though.

Seek and you may find it. Some youth does possess a lot of wisdom.
I reject the 'my generation was better' thing... there are always commercial dipsticks and conscious individuals.... always.
.
Yes I notice how I am starting sound more and more like my parents about the music today Black Viking. I am 32 and feel little old sometimes when I hear some of the music being played on the radio. I barely even listen to the radio. I know it has been months since I turned the radio on. I have not heard of this song. The lyrics are ridiculous!
quote:
Originally posted by TruEssence:
Yes I notice how I am starting sound more and more like my parents about the music today Black Viking. I am 32 and feel little old sometimes when I hear some of the music being played on the radio. I barely even listen to the radio. I know it has been months since I turned the radio on. I have not heard of this song. The lyrics are ridiculous!


I basically don't listen to the radio at all... I get my music on via CD..... And I don't watch television... So I have to make an effort to hear this music... An effort which I'm less and less willing to make as I get older..
Personally, I would think that's one of the better "songs" out on the market if that's the extent of the lyrics! Eek

After all, he didn't call her a bitch or a ho or graphically describe the specific body parts that would be involved with his night "experience" with her. You can definitely tell right off the bat that it's not a Snoop song! Big Grin

If that was the worst that I had to hear when I listen to "this generation's" music ... I think I'd actually be relieved. sck
How do you sit down and write a song like that? Better yet, WHY do you sit down and write a song like that?

Poppin rollin yea yea yea blee blee blah

Is that even English?? Sounds like something Beyawnce would write. Roll Eyes One has to chuckle at the image of this simpleton writing a love song while being relieved of all his cash. That's just bidness, playa. bsm

In any event, I agree with EbonyRose. This is tame compared to such classics as "What That Thang Smell Like" "I Aint Got No Panties On" etc.
It feels like some of you guys are prejudging the whole generation of music based off this one song. I agree, strongly, that this a stupid song, but I get why it was written. It's nothing but pure entertainment. I take it as something to make you laugh, this type of music is not suppose to make you think. Your suppose to laugh at it and then get the song stuck in your head and start humming it. Or at the very least your not suppose to analyze this song, just find the funny in it. I think ebonyrose said that at least he's not calling her a bitch or a ho, and I agree. T-Pain could have said a lot of other things.
I'm just tired of calling the constant objectification of women entertainment.

Perhaps I'm getting fogy, but quite frankly, I'm no longer entertained.

I don't mind that such music exists, but I wish there were more of a balance out there.

I'm ready to be serenaded and revered. Not as a bitch, but as a woman.

What happened to that whole I want a Black queen thing that was popular when I was coming up?

How about that? We went from queens to hos in a decade.
quote:
Originally posted by ma'am:
I'm just tired of calling the constant objectification of women entertainment.

Perhaps I'm getting fogy, but quite frankly, I'm no longer entertained.

I don't mind that such music exists, but I wish there were more of a balance out there.

I'm ready to be serenaded and revered. Not as a bitch, but as a woman.

What happened to that whole I want a Black queen thing that was popular when I was coming up?


How about that? We went from queens to hos in a decade.


Co-signing....

Peace,
Virtue
T-Pain Lyrics

I'm N Luv (Wit A Stripper) Lyrics


(feat. Mike Jones)

[Intro]


[Verse 1]

Got the body of a goddess
Got the body of a goddess



[Verse 2 (T-Pain)]
Out of all the girls she be the hottest
Like n the way she break it down I see u girl
Spinnin wide
And She lookin at me
Right in my eyes
Yea She got my attention
Yea yea yea
Did I forget to mention
I Need to get her over to my crib and do that night thang
Cause I'm N Luv Wit a Stripper

[Verse 3 (Mike Jones)]
She's every man's dream
[Chorus x2]

[Verse 4]

She dont even know me
[Chorus x4]

-------------------------------------------

Figured if we're going to talk about a song, we'd probably need to point a few key lyrics...

Rumor is, he married said stripper...


Being a stripper isn't neccessarily a respectable occupation. But they're are respectable women that happen to be strippers.


I think another key word I forgot is
MESMERIZED

It's the trance that these women are able to put men in that makes them the envy of all women...

These women are usually in fairly decent shape, and take pretty good care of themselves (sometimes it's just genetics).

Women that don't stay in shape and take care of their bodies, have no room to speak against strippers.
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quote:
I'm just tired of calling the constant objectification of women entertainment.

Perhaps I'm getting fogy, but quite frankly, I'm no longer entertained.

I don't mind that such music exists, but I wish there were more of a balance out there.

I'm ready to be serenaded and revered. Not as a bitch, but as a woman.

What happened to that whole I want a Black queen thing that was popular when I was coming up?

How about that? We went from queens to hos in a decade.


It stopped selling...

The purse & wallet will always decide what is presented as popular entertainment. Buy more Maxwell, Jill Scott, Erykah Badu, etc.


Music always has generation gaps - face it - We are all getting old & crotchety - just like our parents! laugh
quote:
Originally posted by ddouble:
Music always has generation gaps - face it - We are all getting old & crotchety - just like our parents! laugh
This may be true.....

Well....

I celebrate being old....

because if being young means I have to reinterpret myself from goddess to ho.....

well....

I'll take old and crotchety any day...


no offense to you ddouble... Smile This statement is simply a pet peeve of mine.....


K?


Peace,
Virtue
No offense taken hat I don't think of old & crotchety as a bad thing - just being playful. Big Grin

I edited my earlier post because I was going to include one "sticky" point - but since you alluded to it:

Why does the music define you? What happened to the intelligence to differentiate between entertainment & reality? If we have lost the ability to perform this task, should we not ban all works of fiction, be they music, written, or visual?

If the kiddies are the main concern, proper parenting/mentoring is the answer IMO. No song or movie has ever (at any point in my life) made me behave in a certain manner. The song is fluff, but no one is holding a gun to anyone's head and making them listen to it (or ones like it).
quote:
Originally posted by ddouble:
No offense taken hat I don't think of old & crotchety as a bad thing - just being playful. Big Grin

I edited my earlier post because I was going to include one "sticky" point - but since you alluded to it:

Why does the music define you? What happened to the intelligence to differentiate between entertainment & reality? If we have lost the ability to perform this task, should we not ban all works of fiction, be they music, written, or visual?

If the kiddies are the main concern, proper parenting/mentoring is the answer IMO. No song or movie has ever (at any point in my life) made me behave in a certain manner. The song is fluff, but no one is holding a gun to anyone's head and making them listen to it (or ones like it).

Everyone has free will....

Yes....

Or do they?......

How much is influence and how influential a stage is one in their life.....

what is the ratio of free will and influence....

to a person that is very subjective.....

however....

the question is one of standards.....

and timing.....

if my standards are such that I abhor the degradation of women....

I have the will to turn off the t.v.

but.....

if I am in a relatively small environment and hear it daily....

perhaps I may allow myself to be ostracized ......
perhaps I may allow myself to be irritated to the point of leaving.....

irritated to the point of physically removing the offensive sounds....

irritated to the point of internalizing it into something unhealthy.....

giving in to it and allowing it to become a part of my entertainment....

standing up to it firmly in the hopes that others willl affect a change as well....

all options....

I'm sure there are more I've over looked....

the point is that we are all diverse.... in our standards, psychological tolerances, will and strength.....

but it boils down to ....... what are you willing to accept as images and entertainment flooding your way?

Some may say that degradation of women.... particularly Black women is intolerable...

others may say.... eh? it's just entertainment....

Peace,
Virtue
I understand every sentiment that has been expressed in this thread. Ultimately, everyone has to make a choice regarding how they process the stimuli in their environment. It is a willful, deliberate act, IMO - the responsibility of one's choice lies with the individual. Entertainment does not have to be entertaining to me, nor do I have to consume it.

The danger to me is also one of "standards":

Who gets to set the standards? What happens to those "outside" the standards & the standard-bearing group? See, we don't disagree.

If we are striving for Ma'at, there are a few, more pressing issues to bring in line before this song...
Wink
The music stopped selling because we stopped hearing it. Records companies are shelling out BIG BUCKS to determine what you hear on the radio. You'll hear this song 45 times before you'll hear Jill Scott once. We are basically listening to Clear Channel's personal, payola-enhanced playlist every time we turn on the radio, no matter what programming format it is. Add to that people who apparently buy records because they like to hum to the background music or not take lyrics "too seriously" or whatever and you have the situation we are currently in. It's like they're hypnotized, supporting whatever it is they are exposed to the most and told is "HOT." They do the same thing when they pick which movies to see, who the "best-looking" celebs are, anything and everything. And the large corporations are more than happy to step in and tell them exactly what it is "they like" so nobody has to be bothered with all that "thinking." sck
quote:
Originally posted by Frenchy:
The music stopped selling because we stopped hearing it. Records companies are shelling out BIG BUCKS to determine what you hear on the radio. You'll hear this song 45 times before you'll hear Jill Scott once. We are basically listening to Clear Channel's personal, payola-enhanced playlist every time we turn on the radio, no matter what programming format it is. Add to that people who apparently buy records because they like to hum to the background music or not take lyrics "too seriously" or whatever and you have the situation we are currently in. It's like they're hypnotized, supporting whatever it is they are exposed to the most and told is "HOT." They do the same thing when they pick which movies to see, who the "best-looking" celebs are, anything and everything. And the large corporations are more than happy to step in and tell them exactly what it is "they like" so nobody has to be bothered with all that "thinking." sck



yeah
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by Frenchy:

This is tame compared to such classics as "What That Thang Smell Like" "I Aint Got No Panties On" etc.


ek


If you're a nightowl like I am, you can hear these songs (and see the videos) on BET Uncut. A lot of this stuff is independent, regional music - Everybody thinks they're going to be the next 50 Cent. Roll Eyes

I think I'm not as bothered by it as other people because I've never been a fan of radio. Consequently, I'm not bombarded by payola programming. I usually have a CD or MiniDisk everywhere I go... music
My radio-listening time is confined to the 10 minutes it takes me to get to and from work and it's always NPR/Classical music. BUT, if we're going to talk about what's popular, we have to look at the impact of payola.

BET UnCut has made some people millionaires. Because they don't have to give a chunk of profits to large record labels, one (in)famous song can put a whole lotta change in their pocket. sck

Even beyond the UnCut crowd, there's always been a place for nonsense on the radio. Anybody remember Hammer's ummm "hammer" in that "Pumps and A Bump" video? 2 Live Crew/Luther Campbell? The "problem" is that these kinds of songs are 95% of what's being pushed.
quote:
Originally posted by Frenchy:
My radio-listening time is confined to the 10 minutes it takes me to get to and from work and it's always NPR/Classical music. BUT, if we're going to talk about what's popular, we have to look at the impact of payola.


I need to make a correction. T-Pain is the name of the person who sings the song "I'm In Love With A Stripper." I first heard this song while CD shopping at Best Buy. After about two minutes of shopping, a young guy, who was an employee, went over to the department's listening station to put this song on full blast. Immediately people shopping for CDs jumped up, as a I did, wanting to know from where the loud noise was coming. I could not believe this boy was able to play THIS song as loudly as he did without the manager ever saying a word. The lyrics were incredibly offensive, and I thought his song choice was inappropriate for playing in a place of business.
quote:
Originally posted by HeruStar:
Figured if we're going to talk about a song, we'd probably need to point a few key lyrics...
Being a stripper isn't neccessarily a respectable occupation. But they're are respectable women that happen to be strippers.
It's the trance that these women are able to put men in that makes them the envy of all women...These women are usually in fairly decent shape, and take pretty good care of themselves (sometimes it's just genetics). Women that don't stay in shape and take care of their bodies, have no room to speak against strippers.


I have so many issues to take up with your statements that I don't know where to begin! First, Brother Heru, one shouldn't zero in on a few "eloquently-stated" lines in this song and forget that Brother "T-Pain" is still adulating a stripper. In no other race of people would find men publicly announcing their adoration for "strippers," as if this is something to be proud of, except ours, and it's disgraceful. Of all the accomplished Black women that this brother could be honoring, he decides to honor a stripper. This is proof of where we are as a people. When are we going to learn that because of our situation in this country, everything that we do and say in the media, particularly if the media is broadcasted worldwide, is going to be received as a representation of our entire race? Right now, this comes across as a joke. And it's very difficult to take a person (or group) seriously when they are representing themselves in these explicit and abhorrent ways.

Secondly, I wouldn't refer to rap videos for examples of what strippers generally look like. Often times, the women that you see casted in rap videos, particularly the women that are the most attractive and fit, are professional models and actors. Most strippers don't look ANYTHING like the women being featured in costly rap videos. Most strippers are busted, overweight, unattractive, have tiddy-sag and stretch marks, and many of them DO NOT take care of themesleves for the simple fact that they are in this profession in the first place. Others work as prostitutes and escorts during late night hours. More importantly, it's not a woman's appearance or shape that makes her worthy of being envied, but her dignity and self-respect. Women with self-respect should be highly honored in our community, not women who "look good" while exploiting and selling themselves out for money.
quote:
Originally posted by ddouble:
The danger to me is also one of "standards":

Who gets to set the standards? What happens to those "outside" the standards & the standard-bearing group? See, we don't disagree.

If we are striving for Ma'at, there are a few, more pressing issues to bring in line before this song.


I totally agree. I'm not at all implying that Black people, or Black men in particular, are the only group of men who enjoys seeing nude women or patronizing strip clubs. Black people are also not the only group in America committing violence, using, and/or selling narcotics, but seemingly, we ARE the only group who likes to broadcast our "sins" to the world, almost to point of showing off. We don't seem to have any shame or embarressment about anything.

Everyone knows that White people use illegal drugs and they are probably the country's largest consumers of illegal drugs (and alcohol), but you don't see them singing songs about how much of a dope phene they are. You don't see them singing songs about how much "crack" they sell on a daily basis. They don't do this kind of stuff because they understand the power and importance of cultural representation.
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
But seemingly, we are the only group who likes to publicly announce our "sins" to the world, almost to point of showing off. Everyone knows that White people use illegal drugs and they are probably the country's largest consumers of illegal drugs (and alcohol), but you don't see them making songs about how much of a dope phene they are. You don't see them making songs about how much "crack" they sold on a daily basis. They don't do this kind of stuff because they understand the importance of cultural representation.


Rowe, I think you're way off in left field on this one.... You ever hear Eric Clapton's song "Cocaine"? There are tons of songs by white musicians about drugs and strippers...
Cocaine
Eric Clapton

If you wanna hang out
You've gotta take her out
Cocaine
If you wanna get down
Get down on the ground
Cocaine

She's alright,
She's alright,
She's alright,
COCAINE

If you got that lose
You wanna kick them blues
Cocaine
When your day is done
And you wanna ride on
Cocaine

She's alright,
She's alright,
She's alright,
COCAINE

If your day is gone
And you wanna ride on
Cocaine
Don't forget this fact
You can't get it back
Cocaine

She's alright,
She's alright,
She's alright,
COCAINE

She's alright,
She's alright,
She's alright,
COCAINE
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
Rowe, I think you're way off in left field on this one.... You ever hear Eric Clapton's song "Cocaine"? There are tons of songs by white musicians about drugs and strippers...


This is true; however, such songs are not as common in other communities as they are in ours. I mean, we've had to create an entire new genre, just for those who want to perpetually rap about about violence and drug dealing. This genre is called "Gangster Rap."
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A Passage To Bangkok
Rush

Our first stop is in Bogota
To check Colombian fields
The natives smile and pass along
A sample of their yield
Sweet Jamaican pipe dreams
Golden Acapulco nights
Then Morocco, and the East,
Fly by morning light
We're on the train to Bangkok
Aboard the Thailand Express
We'll hit the stops along the way
We only stop for the best
Wreathed in smoke in Lebanon
We burn the midnight oil
The fragrance of Afghanistan
Rewards a long day's toil
Pulling into Katmandu
Smoke rings fill the air
Perfumed by a Nepal night
The Express gets you there
We're on the train to Bangkok
Aboard the Thailand Express
We'll hit the stops along the way
We only stop for the best
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
We're the only group in the world that cares so much about how they're perceived that we overly obsess over representation even at the expense of cultural productivity.


May I ask what is your understanding of "cultural productivity?"



I think African America is currently suffering from a crisis in cultural creativity across the board... not just in pop music ... and part of the reason is that we get so caught up in properly representing the race, that we're not taking creative risks. We're not pushing the boundaries but are relying instead on established formulas and cliches.

Even the rap music that people get so vexed about is highly formulaic, predictable, and cliche ridden.
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WHITE RABBIT
Jefferson Airplane

One pill makes you larger
And one pill makes you small
And the ones that mother gives you
Don't do anything at all
Go ask Alice
When she's ten feet tall

And if you go chasing rabbits
And you know you're going to fall
Tell 'em a hookah smoking caterpillar
Has given you the call
Call Alice
When she was just small

When men on the chessboard
Get up and tell you where to go
And you've just had some kind of mushroom
And your mind is moving low
Go ask Alice
I think she'll know

When logic and proportion
Have fallen sloppy dead
And the White Knight is talking backwards
And the Red Queen's "off with her head!"
Remember what the dormouse said:
"Feed your head
Feed your head
Feed your head"
Artist/Band: Cash Johnny
Lyrics for Song: Cocaine Blues
Lyrics for Album: At Folsom Prison

Early one mornin' while makin' the rounds
I took a shot of cocaine and I shot my woman down
I went right home and I went to bed
I stuck that lovin' .44 beneath my head

Got up next mornin' and I grabbed that gun
Took a shot of cocaine and away I run
Made a good run but I ran too slow
They overtook me down in Juarez, Mexico

Late in the hot joints takin' the pills
In walked the sheriff from Jericho Hill
He said Willy Lee your name is not Jack Brown
You're the dirty heck that shot your woman down

Said yes, oh yes my name is Willy Lee
If you've got the warrant just a-read it to me
Shot her down because she made me sore
I thought I was her daddy but she had five more

When I was arrested I was dressed in black
They put me on a train and they took me back
Had no friend for to go my bail
They slapped my dried up carcass in that county jail

Early next mornin' bout a half past nine
I spied the sheriff coming down the line
Ah, and he coughed as he cleared his throat
He said come on you dirty heck into that district court

Into the courtroom my trial began
Where I was handled by twelve honest men
Just before the jury started out
I saw the little judge commence to look about

In about five minutes in walked the man
Holding the verdict in his right hand
The verdict read murder in the first degree
I hollered Lawdy Lawdy, have a mercy on me

The judge he smiled as he picked up his pen
99 years in the Folsom pen
99 years underneath that ground
I can't forget the day I shot that bad bitch down

Come on you've gotta listen unto me
Lay off that whiskey and let that cocaine be
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
We're the only group in the world that cares so much about how they're perceived that we overly obsess over representation even at the expense of cultural productivity.


appl
Somehow, I knew you'd raise this point before I got back to this thread. This is the model minority fallacy at its finest.

If you don't like the music, don't buy it, don't listen to stations that play it, teach people your perspective and encourage those in your reach to follow your lead (if they agree with your assessment).
Ted Nugent - Wango Tango
From the album "Scream Dream"

All right! It's zee Wango, zee Tango
1-2-3-4
Come on boys
Time to Wango

My baby she like to rock
My baby she like to roll
My baby she can dance all night
My baby got no control
She do the Wango Tango

My baby she can scream and shout
My baby she can move it out
My baby she can take a chance
My baby got a brand new dance

Wango Tango
Wango Tango
It's a Wango Tango
Ooooh yeah! (oooooh..)
Baby!

My baby like to rock
My baby like to roll
My baby like to dance all night
She got no control
She do...

Wango Tango
Wango Tango
Wango Tango
Ooooh yeah! (oooooh..)

Yeahhhhhhhhhh!
Baby! Baby! Baby! Ooooh I like the way you look baby
You look like you're made for me honey
If you wanna take a little chance
I'm gonna show you a new dance
Baby I gotta Wango down one time with you honey
I like it, I like it, I like it, I like it, I like it
Well, it's a brand new dance
Yeah been sweepin' the nation
I said a brand new dance
A rock 'n' roll sensation
Yeah I like it baby, I do it every night
I got to do it 'cos I like it so much
Oh honey believe it baby
You see it's a crazed gyration of the rock generation
It's my motivation to avoid the nauseation, frustration
When I need some lubrication - Baby!
Kinda like, goes kinda like this
You take her right ankle out
You take her left ankle out
You get her belly propped down
You get her butt propped up
Yeah lookin' good now baby
I think you're in the right position now baby
Yeah but if you ain't quite ready I'll make sure everything is a little bit nicer 'cos
I'm gonna get a little talcum
I'm gonna borrow it from Malcolm
Yeah you look so good baby I'm startin to drool all over myself
I got the droolin', droolin', get all wet, salivate, salivate
I got slimy legs, slimy legs, slimy legs
Got slimy, slimy, slimy, slimy, heh heh heh
Yeah you look so good baby, I like it, I like it, I like it
You know what I been talkin' about honey
It's a nice dance, we gotta a nice dance goin' here
Now what you gotta do, I'll tell you what you gotta do
You got to pretend your face is a Maserati
It's a Maserati
It's a Maserati
It's a gettin' hotty
It's a Maserati, Maserati, Maserati
It's a fast one too man, that thing's turbocharged
You feel like a little fuel injection honey?
I'll tell ya about it, I'll tell you about it
I'll check out the hood scoop
I gotta get that hood scoop off, shine and shine and buff
I gotta buff it up, buff it up, buff it up, buff it up, buff it up,
Yeah, shiny now baby, heh heh heh
You've been drivin' all night long
It's time to put the old Maserati away
So you look for a garage, you think you see a garage
Wait a minute, Hey!, there's one up ahead
And the damn thing's open
Hello! Get in there!

Is my baby alive? (Is my baby alive?)
Is my baby alive? (Is my baby alive?)
Is my baby alive?
She Wango'd to death

Wango Tango (Wango Tango)
Wango Tango (Wango Tango)
Wango Tango (Wango Tango)
Wango Tango (Wango Tango)
Wango Tango
Wango Tango
Wango Tango
Wango Tango
Wango Wango
Tango Tango
Wango Wango Wango Wango
Tango Tango Tango Tango
Brother Honestbrother, even in the songs "White Rabbit" and "Cocaine Blues," both written and performed by White men, there is an obvious tone of shame and guilt in the lyrics, unlike in rap music where there is usually a boastful, laudatory tone. In typical gangster rap, doing "drug business" is sung as if it were a rite of passage, a badge of honor. The same is true for T-Pain, rather than feeling shame for his fascination with a trife stripper, he sings songs of praise. Now what's culturally-productive about that?
Girls, Girls, Girls
Motley Crue

Friday night and I need a fight
My motorcycle and a switchblade knife
Handful of grease in my hair feels right
But what I need to get me tight are

Girls, girls, girls
Long legs and burgundy lips
Girls, girls, girls
Dancin' down on the sunset strip
Girls, girls, girls
Red lips, fingertips

Trick or treat--sweet to eat
On halloween and new year's eve
Yankee girls ya just can't be beat
But you're the best when you're off their feet

Girls, girls, girls
At the dollhouse in ft. lauderdale
Girls, girls, girls
Rocking in atlanta at tattletails
Girls, girls, girls
Raising hell at the 7th veil

Have you read the news
In the soho tribune
Ya know she did me
Well then she broke my heart

I'm such a good good boy
I just need a new toy
I tell ya what, girl
Dance for me, ill keep you overemployed
Just tell me a story
You know the one I mean

Crazy horse, paris, france
Forget the names, remember romance
I got the photos, a ménage á trois
Musta broke those frenchies laws with those

Girls, girls, girls
Body shop, marble arch
Girls, girls, girls
Tropicana's where I lost my heart

Girls, girls, girls
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
Brother Honestbrother, even in the songs "White Rabbit" and "Cocaine Blues," both written and performed by White men, there is an obvious tone of shame and guilt in the lyrics, unlike in rap music where there is usually a boastful, laudatory tone. In typical gangster rap, doing "drug business" is sung as if it were a rite of passage, a badge of honor. The same is true for T-Pain, rather than feeling shame for his fascination with a trife stripper, he sings songs of praise. Now what's culturally-productive about that?


White Rabbit was sung by Grace Slick - a white woman

I'm not defending the song "I'm In love With A Stripper"... or saying that it's some sort of model of "cultural production". What I'm saying is that black folk spend too much time worrying about stuff like this... and this impulse is one of the things that get in the way of/hamper our cultural productivity...
quote:
Originally posted by ddouble:
If you don't like the music, don't buy it, don't listen to...


Yeah right, brother Ddouble, I know the drill, but this method isn't working either. Brother Honestbrother can dig up as many drug-related songs that he can find performed by White artists, but the truth of the matter is that Whites are not in the predicament that we are in. WE have a lot of work to do in our communities and WE cannot afford to dig ourselves in hole that's any deeper than the hole that's already been dug for us.
By the way, I'm not obsessed with how Blacks are "properly represented." I usually don't even entertain discussions about "The Effects of Rap Music" because I know no matter what we do or say, it's not going anywhere. I was into rap music hard at one time, and many of the lyrics recited in these songs were derogatory and offensive. So it's whatever. I just thought the boy who blasted this song in Best Buy had some nerve. There was something cocky about the way he put the song on as if he didn't give a rat's ass about who it offended when HE knew the lyrics were nasty. I don't like that and I should have asked him just who the hell does he think he is. Everyone doesn't want to hear that shit. That's the kind of music that should be played in the privacy of your home or your IPOD, NOT in a place of business. These young kids out here don't have any consideration or respect for people.
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
By the way, I'm not obsessed with how Blacks are "properly represented." I usually don't even entertain discussions about the effects of "rap music" because I know no matter what we do or say, it's not going anywhere. I was into rap music hard at one time, and many of the lyrics recited in these songs were derogatory and offensive. So it's whatever. I just thought the boy who blasted this song in Best Buy had some nerve. There was something cocky about the way he put the song on as if he didn't give a rat's ass about who it offended when HE knew the lyrics were nasty. I don't like that and I should have asked him just who the hell does he think he is.


Rowe, I don't mean to seem obnoxious. I don't like the song either.... It bothers me DEEPLY - and I mean DEEPLY - when my young nieces and nephew are exposed to this stuff...

I'm just saying that one bad reason to be worried about the music is the one that has us being overly concerned over what other people think...This motivation is the one that takes us out of the drivers seat and takes away our creative prerogative.

And moreover it is based on a distorted view of other people and of ourselves in relation to them...
Ok, but damn, when do things like values and human decency come into play? Where do we cross the line? Why not sing a song then about "I'm In Love With The Anus and The Pussy Hole." Or, why not sing a song about having orgies and putting your feet in your nose, or some crazy shit like that? The point is, when do we differentiate between cultural creativity and plain trifling mess? In my view, this "I'm In Love With A Stripper" does not represent anything remotely "African" or individualistic on the part of African-Americans. Ultimately, at some point, we're going to have to take a stand and say, THAT MESS RIGHT THERE DOES NOT REPRESENT US! I'm not communicating this as well as I can, because I'm tired, but do you see what I'm saying?
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
Ok, but damn, when do things like values and human decency come into play? Where do we cross the line? Why not sing a song then about "I'm In Love With The Anus and The Pussy Hole." Or, why not sing a song about having orgies and putting your feet in your nose, or some crazy shit like that? The point is, when do we differentiate between cultural creativity and plain trifling mess? In my view, this "I'm In Love With A Stripper" does not represent anything remotely "African" or individualistic on the part of African-Americans. Ultimately, at some point, we're going to have to take a stand and say, THAT MESS RIGHT THERE DOES NOT REPRESENT US! I'm not communicating this as well as I can, because I'm tired, but do you see what I'm saying?


I don't think we're that far apart here... I'm not saying we should be free to just put anything out there in the name of "cultural productivity"...What I'm saying is we need to take the energy we spend being ashamed over "I'm In Love With A Stripper" .... take that energy and that shame impulse and do something creatively productive with it....
Final statement: I just get tired of the constant clamor - even among ourselves - to distinguish 'good' negroes from 'bad' ones, 'positive' from 'negative'.... It's time we begin to consider ourselves as being fully possessed of all the complexities that human beings have. I can be positive and I'm proud of it. I can be negative as hell and I embrace that too. I can be everything inbetween. Art needs to reflect that complexity. Art is NOT about putting the best positive face on the group. It IS about expressing the identity of the group.

We need to deal with all that inner shame that surfaces every time we're confronted with something like "I'm in Love With A Stripper" or "it's Hard Out Here For A Pimp". This is stuff that belongs in a private session with a therapist and not in discussions of art.
No, HonestBrother ... I think Sorry 2004 is just a stupid ass song!! With the only intent being a song in his voice range that possibly could generate him some money!! Eek And he really is sorry just for singing it! But that's another thread. Razz

However, if I'm understanding your argument here right, I think I disagree with you insofar as what is wrong with songs such as "I'm In Love With A Stripper" is that our kids sing and revere and emulate and are bombarded with such crap via BET and the radio day in and day out without interruption!

I have no problem agreeing that it is tasteless and definitely lacks anything in the way of positiveness and/or creativity. But, if there is a good reason to "focus" our energy on such, it would be because our 8- and 9-year-olds know songs like these (and worse) better than they know they're math and English!

And just because you stop your kid from watching BET and learning the lyrics, their classroom is filled with about 20 other students who know and can teach it to yours! Eek And that's why I have a problem with such songs and "music" and focus energy on denoting it as the crap that it is.

I'd rather my youngun sing to me "And this is my sorry for 2004" (grabbing the trash can at the thought of hearing it!) than singing that he's "In Love Wit A Stripper" and he's going to "get her over to my crib and do that night thang"!!

That just isn't right. Roll Eyes
John Lee Hooker
One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer

One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer
One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer
Hey mister bartender come here
I want another drink and I want it now

My baby she gone, she been gone two night
I ain't seen my baby since night before last
One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer

(spoken: )
And then I sit there
Gettin' high
Mellow
Knocked out
Feeling good
And by the time
I look on the wall
At the old clock on the wall
By that time
It was ten thirty daddy
I looked down the bar
At the bartender
He said
"Now what do you want Johnny?"

One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer
Well my baby she gone, she been gone two night
I ain't seen my baby since night before last
I wanna get drunk till I'm off of my mind
One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer

(spoken: )
And I sat there
Gettin' high
Stoned
Knocked out
And by the time
I looked on the wall
At the old clock again
And by that time
'T was a quarter to two
Last call
For alcohol
I said "Hey mister bartender!"
"Well what do you want?"

One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer
One bourbon, one scotch, and one beer ... (fade)
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
And just because you stop your kid from watching BET and learning the lyrics, their classroom is filled with about 20 other students who know and can teach it to yours! Eek And that's why I have a problem with such songs and "music" and focus energy on denoting it as the crap that it is.


Isn't it easier to influence the 40 parents of the kids in your child's class than to determine what's playing on BET?
Crawling King Snake Blues
John Lee Hooker

You know I'm a crawlin' kingsnake baby, and I rules my den
You know I'm a crawlin' kingsnake baby, and I rules my den
I don't want you hangin' around my mate, wanna use her for myself

You know you caught me crawlin' baby when the, when the grass was very high
I'm just gonna keep on crawlin' now baby until the day I die,
because I'm a crawlin' kingsnake baby, and I rules my den
Don't you hangin' around my mate, wanna use her for myself

You know I'm gon' crawl up to your window baby,
wanna crawl up to your door, you got anything I want baby,
wanna crawl up on your floor
Because I'm a crawlin' king snake baby, and I rules my den

You know you caught me crawlin' baby when the, when the grass was very high
I'm just gonna keep on crawlin' now baby until the day I die,
because I'm a crawlin' kingsnake baby, and I rules my den
I don't want you hangin' around my mate, wanna use her for myself
I'm Bad Like Jesse James
John Lee Hooker
(John Lee Hooker)
Recorded NYC August 30, 1966
Original release- Bluesway 'Live At The Cafe Au Go-Go' 1966
W/Otis Spann & Muddy Waters
Album: The Best of (1965-74)

Spoken:
A little thing I'm going to do called
'I'm Bad Like Jesse James'

I'm bad
I'm bad
Like Jesse James, uh-huh

I had a friend one time
Least I thought I did
He come to me
Said, 'Johnny?'
Said, 'What man?'
'I'm outdoor'
I say, 'Yeah?'

I taken the cat in
Get him a place to stay
And I found out
He goin' 'round town
Tellin' ev'rybody that he
He got my wife

Then I gets mad
I goes to the cat
Like a good guy should
I said, 'Look man'
'I'm gonna warn you just one time'
Next time I warn you'
'I'm gonna use my gun'

'Cause I'm mad, I'm bad, like Jesse James

I'm so mad, I'm so mad.
I'm gonna ruin you this mornin'.
I've got three boys
Do my dirty work
Now, you don't see me
I'm the big boss
I do the payin' off
After they take care of you

In their own way
They may shoot you
They may cut you.
They may drown you
I just don't know
I don't care
Long as they take care of you
In their own way

I'm so mad, I'm bad this mornin', like Jesse James.

They gon' take you right down
By the riverside
Now four is goin' down
Ain't but three comin' back
You read between the line
We're gonna have a deal

'Cause I'm mad, I'm bad, like Jesse James.

They gonna tie yo' hands
They gonna tie yo' feet
They gonna gag your throat
Where you can't holler none

An cryin' won't help you none
Set you in the water
Yeah, the bubbles comin' up.
Whoa
Rrrrrrr
Rrrrrrr

Oh yeah, I'm so mad
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
Final statement: I just get tired of the constant clamor - even among ourselves - to distinguish 'good' negroes from 'bad' ones, 'positive' from 'negative'.... It's time we begin to consider ourselves as being fully possessed of all the complexities that human beings have. I can be positive and I'm proud of it. I can be negative as hell and I embrace that too. I can be everything inbetween. Art needs to reflect that complexity. Art is NOT about putting the best positive face on the group. It IS about expressing the identity of the group.

We need to deal with all that inner shame that surfaces every time we're confronted with something like "I'm in Love With A Stripper" or "it's Hard Out Here For A Pimp". This is stuff that belongs in a private session with a therapist and not in discussions of art.


appl
HB- you are batting 1.000 tonight! tfro
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
Art needs to reflect that complexity.


I agree! But the question is, do you think music complexity and/or diversity is being fairly represented in Black music today, because there is nothing remotely complex about the lyrical composition of "I'm In Love With The Stripper."

And as far as shame is concerned, anyone who sings these lyrics should be ashamed (or at least mindful that his song may be offensive to some, if not many, people). The fact that T-Pain clearly doesn't give a shit and the producers and radio stations don't give a shit either is what I find so incredibly disturbing. If this song received a seal of approval, I shudder to think what will be heard on the radio 20 years from now.

There is an ignored genre of quality music that in my opinion, truly, represents musical complexity and diversity. Meshell N'Degeocello, revered as "The Mother of Neo-Soul," has led this genre since her first solo album Plantation Lullabies, was released in 1993. Her latest musical compilation, The Spirit Music Jamia: The Dance of the Infidel, which requried the playing of a total of 10 or more musical instruments (e.g., horns, drums, piano, harmonica, guitar, percussion, bass, programming, clay drum, and keyboards), most of which were played by N'Degeocello HERSELF! is never heard on the radio. The general public hardly ever gets the opportunity to hear and savor the extensive work of artists like Meshell, not a single track. Yet as soon as someone complains about the monolithic filth that we ALWAYS hear on the radio, suddenly, the censoring of musical complexity comes into question.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
I agree! But the question is, do you think music complexity and/or diversity is being fairly represented in Black music today


No... Not on commercial radio....Or on TV... or in the movies for the most part.... I think it's generally lacking in contemporary black oriented arts/entertainment... Don't ask me what I think of Tyler Perry...

quote:

... because there is nothing remotely complex about the lyrical composition of "I'm In Love With The Stripper."


I never said there was... Great we're in agreement!

quote:

Meshell N'Degeocello, revered as "The Mother of Neo-Soul," has led this genre since her first solo album Plantation Lullabies, was released in 1993. Her latest musical compilation, The Spirit Music Jamia: The Dance of the Infidel, which requried the playing of a total of 10 or more musical instruments (e.g., horns, drums, piano, harmonica, guitar, percussion, bass, programming, clay drum, and keyboards), most of which were played by N'Degeocello HERSELF! is never heard on the radio.


Thanks for the recommendation... I'll check it out! kiss

PS: I really did go out and get the CD Smile
Last edited {1}

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