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Can't honestly say that former National Football League running back Lawrence Phillips never had a chance. Neither Phillips, nor the Black community can blame the fall of Phillips's promising career on racism, racist Caucasians, the Bush Administration, the KKK, etc., etc.

Disregard for the life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness of other individuals, can lead to civil lawsuit for damages, criminal indictment, ruining your means of gainful employment, or other truly earned punitive responses.

It is certain that, Lawrence Phillips, will be sued for his assets, that is if he holds anything substantial from his NFL playing career, should Myrna Flores, the mother of a 15-year-boy injured in Sunday's vehicular assault, take this to civil court.
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Ex-NFLer Arrested After Attack in L.A. Park
By David Rosenzweig and Valerie Reitman

Times Staff Writers, August 22, 2005

Former National Football League running back Lawrence Phillips was arrested on suspicion of attempted murder Sunday after he allegedly drove a stolen car into a throng of boys with whom he had just played pickup football at Exposition Park in Los Angeles, police said.

Phillips, who has a decade-long history of arrests for violence and traffic violations, apparently was angered when he couldn't find his belongings minutes after the game ended and accused the youths of stealing from him, according to the mother of one of the victims.

None of the victims' injuries were life-threatening, police said.

Phillips' alleged behavior Sunday added to his long string of brushes with the law, including at least five arrests for allegedly assaulting women. He was wanted in San Diego on felony charges stemming from two alleged attacks this month on a girlfriend. In one incident, he allegedly choked her into unconsciousness, authorities said.

An apparent difficulty controlling his temper also shortened Phillips' once-promising football career. Several NFL and Canadian Football League teams cut him for insubordination, clashing with coaches and other disciplinary problems.

As a player for the University of Nebraska, Phillips was a standout talent who helped the Cornhuskers win two national championships in the 1990s "”earning him a first-round NFL draft slot despite having a criminal record even then.

On Sunday afternoon, the 30-year-old Phillips, who is 6 feet 2 and weighs more than 200 pounds, had joined an informal football game with a group made up largely of teenage boys, police said.

It was unclear how Phillips, actively sought by the San Diego police, came to be playing pickup football in Los Angeles, although police said the Honda Accord he was driving had been reported stolen in San Diego.

Myrna Flores, the mother of a 15-year-boy injured in Sunday's vehicular assault, said her son, Rodney, told her that Phillips had joined the game with him and his friends, who all gather regularly at the park.

After the game, Phillips apparently couldn't find some of his possessions and asked the boys repeatedly what they had done with them. "The kids were amazed," Flores said. "The kids said they didn't know where his belongings were."

Phillips left but came back onto the field behind the wheel of a car and drove it toward the boys, according to police. Witnesses told police that others on the field scrambled to get out of the path of the car.

"My son landed on the roof. He broke the windshield; he fell back over it," Flores said by telephone as her son was being released seven hours later from California Hospital Medical Center, where he was treated for lacerations and bruises. She said two others also injured were treated and released.

Witnesses to the incident flagged down a police cruiser. The officers pursued Phillips as he allegedly fled the scene. They arrested him a short time later without a struggle.

Phillips, who spent his teens in a West Covina group home, first attracted national attention for violent behavior when he was a star player at Nebraska. In 1995, he was charged with trespassing and assault for an attack on a college girlfriend, who said he threatened to shoot her in the kneecaps and elbows. The university provided her with 24-hour protection. Phillips pleaded no contest and was sentenced to a year of probation.

Before Sunday's incident, Phillips' most recent run-in with authorities came when San Diego police said that he had choked a 28-year-old girlfriend Aug. 2 at her home in the Mission Valley area. A second attack allegedly took place 11 days later when Phillips confronted the woman at a party.

San Diego police described him as potentially dangerous and said he had warned officers in the past that he would not be arrested peacefully.

When Sunday's incident occurred about 1:30 p.m., thousands of USC fans were watching a free Trojan football scrimmage at the Coliseum, diagonally across from the open green field, which is typically used for pickup soccer and football.

Those nearby noticed a commotion and a cloud of dust, according to the two front-desk attendants at Roy A. Anderson Recreation Center directly across the street from the field.

"All we saw was a cloud of smoke," said Todd Howard, a recreation assistant working the front desk with colleague Ramon Ramirez. The two men said they saw people lying on the field when the dust cleared. They called 911 and then summoned lifeguards working at the center's pool to help the three victims until ambulances arrived.

One of the victims was carried off the field on a stretcher, and the other two appeared to suffer cuts to the legs, the recreation assistants said.

Howard and Ramirez said they were told by witnesses that the driver had jumped the curb, had driven up the full length of the south side of the field, turned the car around and then accelerated toward a crowd of several dozen people playing football. Several jumped out of the way; one of the victims was thrown up in the air, witnesses said.

Despite his troubles with the law, Phillips received many opportunities over the years to start fresh. After pleading no contest in the attack on his college girlfriend, he was drafted the following year by the St. Louis Rams as a first-round pick and No. 6 overall. That same year, he was arrested for drunk driving, a parole violation that carried a 23-day jail sentence.

The Rams released Phillips in 1997 for insubordination. He was signed briefly by the Miami Dolphins, but was dumped again after a woman claimed that he struck her after she refused to dance with him at a nightclub. Phillips pleaded guilty to battery and was placed on six months' probation.

After being signed and then cut by the San Francisco 49ers, Phillips was charged in May 2000 with attacking a girlfriend in Beverly Hills. That December, he was sentenced to six months in jail after pleading no contest to felony charges of beating the woman and making a terrorist threat. He also was given three years' probation and ordered to take anger-management training.

Phillips briefly found football success in Canada "” where he had to get special permission to work because of his criminal record in the U.S. "” but was dropped by two teams for behavioral problems, despite agreeing to additional anger-management counseling, according to news accounts.

In late 2003, Phillips was back in criminal court, charged in Quebec with sexual assault, assault and uttering threats, apparently against another girlfriend. He was denied entry into Canada last year when he attempted to appear in court on those charges. Canadian officials told him that because of his criminal history he needed a visa to cross the border, even to answer legal charges there.

Times staff writers Richard Winton and Robin Fields contributed to this report.

Copyright 2005 Los Angeles Times

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The above article is on the front page of today's, Monday, August 22, 2005, Los Angeles Times.

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Your reaching....(dork)

Isn't it odd that negro-cons are the primary ones "finding" race in issue where no one else has brought it up....?

This topic belongs in the sports forum anyways.

Lawrence Philips is just a case of alot of talent & alot of bad advice...

Coming out of Nebraska he was tha' man; but the bad life choices that have followed this young man is the reason he is not in the league anymore...

Not racism, the man, or the habitual excuse making of negro-cons
It amazing that you would highlight that sorry excuse of a man but forget all the white football, basketball, hockey, baseball players whose criminal involvement on and off the field is also the subject of front page news.

I have no problem admitting that we have some real pieces of work in our community but lets make it fair and balance and look at all sport stars including those with fair hair and skin that screw up big time.
There are people on this board who continue to blame the wrongs of Black people on racist Caucasians, the Bush Administration, etc., etc.,.....

.....This being said this post is being posted in the right place!

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The Glass Closet

Latasha Byears' off-the-bench 'dirty work' helped the Los Angeles Sparks win two WNBA championships. Then a sexual assault allegation ended her career.

By Sandra Kobrin and Jason Levin
Sandra Kobrin and Jason Levin are Los Angeles-based freelance writers. Kobrin last wrote for the magazine about the cost of medical care for older inmates.

August 21, 2005

At 5-feet-11 and 203 pounds, Latasha Byears epitomized the power in power forward. She used her girth to set body-crunching picks that freed up Los Angeles Sparks center Lisa Leslie to score. On defense, she snatched rebounds and dogged the opponent's best shooter. If a player physically rubbed her or a teammate the wrong way, Byears exacted payback, committing hard fouls while helping the Sparks win back-to-back championships.

Then, in June 2003, a few weeks into the team's drive for its third WNBA title, Byears was dealt a blow of her own: She was accused of sexual assault following a party at her Marina del Rey condo.

Less than a month later, a similar allegation would be leveled against Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant by a Colorado hotel worker. The athletes shared more in common than the specter of a criminal trial. They also worked for the same corporate family, an L.A. institution that would treat the two ballplayers"”one famous and the other relatively obscure"”very differently.

The Los Angeles Lakers stood by Bryant. The team's general manager, coach and fellow players publicly supported him throughout his arrest, teary declaration of innocence at a televised Staples Center news conference and court appearances. NBA Commissioner David Stern said that Bryant should "absolutely" continue to play until proven guilty.

In contrast, as a police investigation was opened, the Sparks wasted no time in releasing Byears. She hoped to be picked up by a different team, but the woman who had worn the number 00 on her uniform found zero interest among the other WNBA franchises. She took a series of odd jobs, including a stint slinging JC Penney merchandise in a Buena Park distribution center that lasted seven hot, boring days. "It's not that the work was bad," Byears says. "I just couldn't take it. Playing basketball is what I've been doing since high school, and it's all I really know how to do."

In some ways, the uneven treatment of Bryant and Byears speaks to the obvious: Bryant is a marquee player"”so famous beyond the arena that, like Arnold or Oprah, he is widely known by only his first name. He sells millions of dollars' worth of tickets and merchandise for a big-time sports franchise. Byears generated no discernible income for an unprofitable enterprise, and she had already made some other missteps on and off the court. What's more, in its effort to project a wholesome, family-friendly image, the WNBA is more sensitive to bad press than is the NBA, which could field a pretty decent All-Star team of players who have rap sheets.

And yet the 32-year-old Byears believes her particular predicament stems from something other than her largely unheralded status as a player or her reputation for unladylike behavior. She's convinced she has been ostracized for another reason: She is gay.

As a child in Millington, Tenn., a small town near Memphis, Byears related to boys. She was tall and heavyset, big enough to hold her own on the basketball court with her brothers and male cousins. And like them, she desired women. "I've been gay for as long as I know," says Byears, who goes by the nickname Tot-o, a moniker inspired when her grandmother called her "Tot" while she was growing up.

Byears says she never hid her sexuality from her family, which she says supported her. At Bolton High School in nearby Arlington, Tenn., a few people dared to pick on her, but she had found a refuge. "I loved women," she says, "but I was serious about basketball."

The top colleges in women's basketball wooed Byears"”until they got a look at her transcript. Anemic grades and low admission-test scores sent her instead to a two-year college, Northeastern Oklahoma A & M, where she continued to bash bodies and score big. Division I schools were watching.

As a transfer student at DePaul University in Chicago, Byears averaged 22.8 points and 11.7 rebounds a game during the 1995-96 season, a performance that earned her a first team All-American slot. Along with impressive stats, she picked up a reputation as a tough competitor who once was suspended for taking things too far. "She talked some trash, did some 'signifying' to the other players and coaches, got upset at the referees, things like that," says Doug Bruno, DePaul's head coach for the past 19 years. He notes that while he found Byears to be "a pleasure to coach" and "inside is a really good person," she's "a nonconformist who knows she needs to conform, but sometimes has a tough time with that."

Despite her rough edges, Byears expected to be an early selection in the inaugural WNBA draft. Back home, she and her family gathered at a barbecue to await the call and celebrate the beginning of her pro career. "It never came," Byears says.

The disappointment of being passed over in the draft faded when the Sacramento Monarchs invited her to training camp. Byears' confidence soared when she saw the other free agents"”her competition. "It was the same girls I slaughtered in college," she recalls. "I called my mama and said, 'I'm on the team,' before I even picked up a ball."

Byears not only made the team but posted solid numbers as a starter for three straight years. In her fourth season, 2000, head coach Sonny Allen shook up his roster and yanked Byears from her starting position. Miserable on the bench, Byears asked to be traded, and that November she joined the Sparks.

It was a team on the cusp. The Sparks had put together a league-best 28-4 record in 2000 under new coach Michael Cooper. But the season ended in late summer with a second straight playoff loss to the then-indomitable Houston Comets. The Sparks hoped Byears would toughen them up around the basket, pushing them past Houston and into the WNBA Finals for the first time in 2001.

Cooper, a former Laker swingman whose defensive skills helped seal five NBA titles, gave Byears simple instructions. "My job was to do the dirty work," she explains, "guard the other team's best player and create some space for Lisa. I had a lot of respect for coach Cooper because of what he had accomplished, and I wanted to win, so I said, 'Fine, let's do it.' "

But before she could get down to business, Byears was suspended. A few months prior to the start of the 2001 season, she was arrested for drunken driving and pleaded no contest to a lesser charge of reckless driving. She sat out her first game. The following year, she was suspended for two games, for bouncing the game ball off the face of Michelle Marciniak of the Seattle Storm during an on-court tussle. In online forums, WNBA watchers started calling Byears a thug.

Still, as the first or second player off the bench, Byears did her job"”and then some. She sank 60% of her shots from the field in her first two seasons, grabbed a team-record 10 offensive rebounds in one game and made six steals in another, tying the team record. The Sparks jelled, beating the Charlotte Sting to win the WNBA title in 2001 and again clinch the crown in 2002.

Cooper says Byears' hustle and grit factored heavily in the team's turnaround. "Latasha was a real team leader who pushed everyone in practices and in games," he says. "She was one of the most committed players on the team and a big reason we won it all. She was just huge for us, nasty and tough on the inside."

On June 5, 2003, just before the Sparks' first home game of the new season, Byears received her second WNBA championship ring"”diamonds in several colors set in platinum.

That same evening, after a victory over the Sacramento Monarchs, Byears threw a party at her team-owned condo across from the Cheesecake Factory in Marina del Rey.

The next morning, someone"”there are conflicting accounts as to who it was"”reported to the Sparks management that Byears and male guests had sexually assaulted a woman, a former Sparks player. That person also urged the alleged victim to contact the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, which opened an investigation.

Byears won't talk about the party except to say that among the guests were current and former teammates. In the case of sex crimes, the names of the victims are kept confidential, and sheriff's officials won't release them. Attempts to contact the alleged victim, who reportedly lives overseas, were unsuccessful.

Whatever happened that night, it cost Byears her job. In a wrongful termination suit filed last fall in L.A. Superior Court against Los Angeles Lakers Inc. and LAL Women's Basketball LLC, Byears points to the organization's treatment of Kobe Bryant as evidence of gender discrimination against her. She also alleges that her sexual orientation played a role in her release.

According to the suit, Byears learned about the accusations against her the day after the party. The team was gathering at LAX for a flight to Sacramento when Karleen Thompson, then an assistant coach, told Byears that she had heard that she had been involved in a sexual assault. Byears denied it.

On the team bus headed for a hotel later that day, the legal complaint says, then-Sparks communications director Kristal Shipp gave Byears the news that she would not be playing against the Monarchs. As Byears recounts it, Shipp offered no explanation. "Nobody told me anything," Byears says, "other than I had to stay in the hotel, then when we got back to town, to just stay at home and not go to practice. I had no idea what was going on."

Byears flew back to Los Angeles with the team. The next day, Rondre Jackson, the Sparks' assistant general manager, delivered the word that Byears had been suspended with pay. (She was then making $60,000 a year.) He cited the ongoing police investigation, according to Byears. On June 10, five days after the alleged incident, Byears says she called Jackson to see where things stood. General Manager Penny Toler came on the line and informed her that she was being dumped by the team. She would no longer be collecting her salary.

"Penny wished me luck in the future, told me I was cut," Byears says. "Then she hung up." About two weeks later, Byears was told to move out of her condo, which the team was paying for, according to court documents.

When asked recently to respond to the account in the complaint, the Sparks declined to comment. In their response filed in Superior Court to the suit, the organization denies that Byears was wrongfully terminated and asserts that under WNBA regulations her complaint should be handled through binding arbitration. A trial date of Feb. 21, 2006 has been set in the case.

Few, if anybody, in the local sports media missed her. It was not until mid-August, after a TV news report on the investigation, that the Associated Press, the Los Angeles Times and others picked up on the story. Byears remembers, she says, because the news broke right around what otherwise would have been another cause for celebration"”her 30th birthday.

On a sunny day in late March, the Sparks' corporate offices near lax are buzzing with the activity of energetic young women in slick sweatsuits. This is the support staff for Sparks President Johnny Buss, whose corner office looks like the room of a kid with his own credit card. There are collections of lunchboxes and bobble heads, assorted board games and boxes of cereal, including Corn Pops, which he offers to visitors as refreshment along with coffee or water.

Buss, who wears a stud in the graying blond soul patch under his lip, makes the day-to-day decisions for the Sparks, and he happily admits that he consults with his father, Jerry, on the larger issues: "Oh yeah, I talk to him about the state of the WNBA. But he would rather stay out of it. He enjoys watching me make decisions."

Johnny Buss' moves include the trade that brought Byears from the Sacramento Monarchs to L.A., as well as her release. He says he cut her from the team mostly because of dissension among her teammates. She was, he suggests, just too much trouble to keep.

"We had just won a championship, we were waiting to exhale, and with it came difficult attitudes and problems beyond anything that happened with the alleged sexual assault," he says without elaborating. "We knew it was going to be difficult to trade her under the cloud. We make changes whether they are popular or not. It was a tough situation; I wish it didn't happen. I wish the publicity or the accusations never happened. People do things and get kicked off the team. Was the timing the worst for Byears? Yes."

A few weeks later at the franchise's nearby HealthSouth practice facility, now the Toyota Sports Center, a few of Byears' old teammates rally to her defense after a spirited session under new head coach Henry Bibby. Ignoring repeated "Don't answer!" directives from a hovering Ashley King, a Sparks communications staffer, center Lisa Leslie recalls that the team had good chemistry.

"Initially our team always hung out. Every day we would go to the mall, or hang out watching a movie in our hotel room in our pajamas. We had fun in practice with jokers like Tasha [Byears], Nikki T [Teasley] and Coop [coach Cooper]." On the court, she says, "We knew if someone came at us, we had each others' back, and Tasha was big for us that way because she was always there, especially protecting me. Latasha and I respected each other on and off the court."

Guard Tamecka Dixon puts it this way: "The first two years it was just an incredible cohesion. It made us a tough team to beat. In the last two years that hasn't been there, especially since Latasha was let go."

As for Cooper, recently named coach of the Albuquerque franchise in the NBA Development League, he never considered Byears a negative influence, despite what Buss remembers. "Latasha was not a problem with teammates that I saw at all," he says.

If Byears was a public relations liability, as Johnny Buss implies, she had nothing on Kobe Bryant.

On July 1, 2003, a 19-year-old woman accused him of raping her in a hotel room in Edwards, Colo., where he had gone for knee surgery. His arrest and the ensuing legal drama gave sportswriters a break from chronicling his public feud with then-Laker center Shaquille O'Neal and from speculating on his relationship with head coach Phil Jackson, who in his 2004 book "The Last Season" described Bryant as defiant and uncoachable. It also gave late-night TV comedy writers relief from skewering miscreants such as Saddam Hussein. Regardless of the front-page headlines and cue-card quips, Jerry Buss re-signed Bryant before the 2004-05 season, giving him a deal that will pay $136.4 million over seven years.

The charges were eventually dropped in the case of People of the State of Colorado vs. Kobe Bean Bryant. He and his accuser reached an undisclosed financial settlement in her civil suit stemming from the alleged incident. Nike recently began featuring Bryant in a new ad that doesn't mention the Colorado case, but casts him in the role of underdog"”a sympathetic figure who has made mistakes.

But Byears can't even get a tryout. "All the WNBA teams knew about the allegations, and three general managers told me specifically they would love to have her, but their organizations couldn't touch her because of the negative publicity," says Memphis-based sports agent Ricks Mason, who represents Byears. "Let's face it. Males and females are treated differently in sports, and a gay woman has it even tougher."

With the loss of her salary and residence, Byears has found herself anxiously waiting for the phone to ring. But even though Cooper says he remembers other teams often asking about her in trade talks, none wants her now.

"They left me for dead," Byears says.

In the summer of 1996, as it finalized plans for a women's league, the NBA offered Lisa Leslie, the 6-foot-5 gold medalist for the United States at the summer Olympics in Atlanta, a personal services contract estimated at $300,000"”then a sizable sum in women's sports. The WNBA hoped that Leslie, a scoring machine and sometime model with polished nails and manners, would help it establish an identity and attract a diverse audience: that is, both men and women.

Now in its ninth year, the fledgling league's marketing materials continue to showcase players such as Leslie, now 33, and Seattle's Lauren Jackson, who appears in the 2005 Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue. Like tennis players Maria Sharapova and Serena Williams, they unabashedly embody a mix of athleticism and sexuality.

But it all begs a question: If these remarkably pretty women were also openly gay, would they be sales tools for the league?

The WNBA keeps a strong lesbian fan base, as well as its lesbian players, in what the University of Minnesota's Mary Jo Kane calls "a glass closet." Everyone knows they're there, says Kane, director of the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport, but no one wants to open the door.

Michael Messner, a sociology and gender studies professor at USC, agrees: The collective understanding in the WNBA is that if you're a lesbian, you'd better hush up about it. "It's OK to be who you are, but it's not OK to talk about it, and bring a male to the team party," Messner says.

Minnesota Lynx center Michele Van Gorp, one of the few openly lesbian WNBA players, certainly got that message. In an interview last year with a gay and lesbian magazine called Lavender, Van Gorp said that when she played for the New York Liberty in 1999, a coach invited her to lunch specifically to discuss her sexual orientation. "It was actually a big issue . . . and within the [Liberty] it seemed very taboo," she recalled in the article.

Byears says she received a similar lecture from the Sparks, having arrived in L.A. with a history of hard partying in gay nightclubs. Byears says it was Shipp, then the team communications director, who "told me not to speak to any gay and lesbian magazines and to use discretion regarding the clubs I like to go to." Shipp declined to comment on any specific conversations with Byears but acknowledged that all players receive media training.

Byears didn't talk to the gay press. She did, however, give the readers of GQ an earful. In a July 2003 profile titled "Beauty in the Beast," she was depicted as a martini-slugging, foul-mouthed loose cannon, telling the magazine how she "didn't go to no all-white Catholic school, didn't live next door to no doctors and lawyers."

"I lived next to pimps ... pullin' up in their big Cadillacs with a lot of wimmins," she was quoted as saying. "That's what I wanted to be. I wanted to be a pimp growing up. Trust me, I'm gonna be a millionaire someday. Man, I'm gonna buy my momma the biggest house in the world. And I'm gonna open me a restaurant or a nightclub. Whether it's a strip club or a gay club, I don't give a damn."

For his part, Johnny Buss says that Byears' homosexuality was not a factor in her firing: "What I have learned over all the years, you're just better off being blind to certain lifestyles."

"We've discussed homosexuality in the NBA and WNBA," he adds. "We don't ask. If you look at the general population, you could come up with statistics on who is homosexual and who is not. I don't know why that would be any different in professional sports. Now it's one of those things that people won't come out and disclose. I think they should. I know there's a lot of prejudice in America and it's sickening to me."

It's unlikely this sentiment will help Byears, at least anytime soon. Her agent tried and failed to get her a training camp invitation for the season now underway. "I was like, this is crazy. I play basketball. That's what I do," Byears says.

These days she has to do it overseas, playing in a Turkish league during the winter. When she's home, she shares a small Pasadena apartment with friends and works odd jobs"”none of which have lasted much longer than the seven days at JC Penney.

On a smoggy June day, Byears arrives at a Fairfax district café wearing a baggy Rocawear shirt and jeans, her hair in cornrows, to talk about the frustration of being out of the WNBA. "Maybe they're scared of me because I'm gay," she says, sounding amazed at the thought. "Maybe it's just because I'm outspoken and I love women."

It is impossible to measure the impact of Byears' 2003 release, if any, on the team's performance. Their dream of a "three-peat" died that season in the WNBA championship finals against the aptly named Detroit Shock. The following year they flamed out in the Western Conference semifinals, losing to the team that tops this season's conference standings, the Monarchs.

And yet Byears knows that she is no Kobe Bryant, on whom an entire franchise hinges. She understands, too, why the Sparks and the WNBA would have found it easier to back a player with the soft-spoken star power of a Lisa Leslie.

Even so, it may be harder than ever for the league to ignore Byears.

Late last month, authorities officially closed the two-year-plus investigation into the alleged sexual assault. Byears was never arrested or charged in the case. Gina Satriano, a Los Angeles County deputy district attorney, cited "insufficient evidence" for the decision to drop the matter.

When Byears hears the news over the phone she lets out a loud yell, a whoop of relief and celebration, and then begins to cry. "You can't believe how happy this makes me," she says. "I'm so happy that part is over."

But where it will lead is uncertain. Johnny Buss declined to comment on the closing of the case. Whether Byears will be invited back to play for the Sparks or another WNBA team is unknown.

Only one thing is guaranteed: Latasha Byears is not about to retire quietly. She believes that she deserves to play again"”even if it's just off-the-bench dirty work"”with the best female basketball players in the world. "I want justice," she says. "I want to continue to play ball. It's what I do."

Copyright 2005 Los Angeles Times

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More must be done, to stress the importance of being respectful for the rights of others in our community. Had these individuals as described above had respect for themselves, and/or others neither of them would be facing this music!

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quote:
Originally posted by jazzdog:
It amazing that you would highlight that sorry excuse of a man but forget all the white football, basketball, hockey, baseball players whose criminal involvement on and off the field is also the subject of front page news.

I have no problem admitting that we have some real pieces of work in our community but lets make it fair and balance and look at all sport stars including those with fair hair and skin that screw up big time.


Jazzdog,

Black = Bad
White = Right


I thought you knew....why do you think things that others do on a magnitude far worse than black people get a pass? It is self-hatred bro....nothing to do with trying to uplift black people....just a celebration of the personal fuck-ups of others and a way to reinforce stereotypes as part of a way to cop a self-righteous judgemental posture.......the sad reality of it all.....but I have learned that some are troubled....and try many different types of approaches to social and racial relations....for mentally therapeutic reasons.....i know you dig where I am coming from bro..........hopefully they will hate all they like and feel better about themselves as a result.....if that is the only sorry goal an individual is striving to attain....then I let them have it....and pity them.......unless they come at me directly with that bullschit.........and then it is time to let em have it with both barrels......figuratively speaking..... nono
**Clinically observable patterns of behavior....Part I:

Self-hatred
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Literally, self-hatred refers to an extreme dislike of oneself, or being angry at oneself. The term is also used to designate a dislike or hatred of a group to which one belongs. For instance, 'ethnic self-hatred' is the extreme dislike of one's ethnic group. Accusations of self-hatred, like playing the race card, are often used inappropriately as an ad hominem attack to avoid rational debate.

The term 'self-hatred' is used infrequently by psychologists and psychiatrists, who would usually describe people who hate themselves as 'persons with low self-esteem'. Some people think that self-hatred and shame are important factors in some or many mental disorders, especially disorders that involve a perceived defect of oneself (e.g. body dysmorphic disorder). "Ethnic self-hatred" is considered by some people as being a cultural issue, to which psychological theories have limited relevance..........
quote:
Isn't it odd that negro-cons are the primary ones "finding" race in issue where no one else has brought it up....?


Please don't use Michael as an example of a "black conservative." Michael is a self hating fool who would rather cite anecdotal examples of what is wrong with "us" than what is right.

He has no sense of the strength, accomplishment, power, talent, perserverance, and possibilities of Americans of African descent. He chooses flout examples of why we are so "bad" instead highlighting our accomplishments as examples of what is good and what should be continually promoted in our communities and within our subset of American existance.

To him, there is no factor of our history- of what has happened the past that affects or present and future, and how we should never forget it regardless of the continual gains we make. To him there is only a constant search for the destructive, the rotten, and the negative. BUT ONLY within our own corner of American culture. That, to put it very kindly, is CRAP.

While I have refrained up until now from overtly expressing my own personal political orientation and views, a few of you probably have already figured out that I am one of these "negro-cons" that many of you love to hate on so much.

But let me make it clear that Michael is not even close to being representative of Americans of African descent that have political and social views similar to mine. While Wikipedia is often suspect in its definitions depending on the political slant of the person making the entry, I think that the definition of self-hatred posted by Kevin41 is a near perfect desctiption of Michael.

(That is, of course, if Michael is really black. From some of the BS that he posts, he could very well be a poser who gets off on posting in forums dominated by Americans of African descent. His style is very similar to some white supremecists that I have stumbled upon in other forums- especially the constant linking to suspect sources of the KKK, etc. variety.)
quote:
While I have refrained up until now from overtly expressing my own personal political orientation and views, a few of you probably have already figured out that I am one of these "negro-cons" that many of you love to hate on so much.



**you blkCONS love to say people hate you without examining why...it is like people who talk about violent behavior on the part of an individual...without examining what his motivation may have been....which many find out that they would have reacted worse in a similar situation....my thing with the black CONS is that they support elimination of past civil rights gains that black people suffered like hell to attain, they benefitted from and how they align themselves with racist whites to appease them.......I have tried to dialogue with many a blkCON but i now see it is to no avail......you all are on some kinda mission to undo black gains and feed other black people rhetoric as if we are some dumb motherf-kers......that is the main part of my disdain.....you all can believe in whatever the hell you like and strive to be detrimental to black people as a whole.....but quit trying to sell that schit off as progressive pro-black thought....because it makes you all look really dumb....like when I ask CF about repeals on AAand black college enrollment and professional inclusion...he gives me some shit about kids which is a obvious diversion from the specificity of my question....or when he tries to start that OUTCOMES, INTENTIONS and RESULTS bullschit....and then when faced with the same topic he was being assertive on.....goes silent and disappears.......now I guess in the spirit of black-hatred a blkCON thinks that all blacks have low ass test scores so it is easy to talk to us like we're dumbazzes....but those fluctuations between assertiveness and quietness on specific questions is a clear indicator that the thinking they employ is flawed....i know that....they know that...but it is a matter of whether or not they can divert and deflect and ignore in a tactful manner to mask those flaws....that schit is insulting to know that they even think they can play someobody like they're stupid ...when it is obvious that it boils down to appeasing whites at the expense of blacks....why in the hell blkCONS try to present the outcomes they support as anything else is really stupid on their part....because the shit "ain't" passing muster.........
Wow, Kevin. THAT was inviting. Wink Perhaps you should also suggest that I am for killing all first black sons too- including my own.

Did you read my entire post or just that one line? Did ya happen to notice that I was agreeing with you?

You and I have never had a dialogue other than a blip about the the current economy, which I supported my view with data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. You disagreed. Other than that, you have no idea what I believe- you only assume you know because of a label that many of you like to use. As if the label "conservative" automatically designates a single line of thought that isn't swayed from.

There is a myriad of opinions on many different subjects throughout African-American American communities- even among us that you would label as blkCON. Like everyone in this forum- and everyone in our "community" there are going to be issues that we agree on and disagree on. I often agree with CF, but don't agree with him on everything or even how he got to his conclusions. There are surely times when he and I got to the same "vote" by very different paths. And I don't agree with Michael's BS on anything (but I don't consider him to be a blkCON or even a CON anyway- he is just a full blown hater to mostly ignore.) I will agree with you and others at times I won't.

You don't yet know scit about me, and what I do and don't support- other than your pre-conceived notions, assumptions, and your professorly, know it all, "got you all figured out from one sentence", psychoanalysis.

By the way- by "hate on", read your own reply and see if you can figure out what I was talking about. No, really. Read it line by line. Slowly.

Here a few select tidbits:

  • you blkCONS love to say people hate you without examining why... (Oh- I get it. I should examine why you hate me first before I comment on anything. Damn- and I thought my expression "hate on" was just that- an expression. You really do hate me even before we have a "dialogue.")

  • I have tried to dialogue with many a blkCON but i now see it is to no avail (Well, then I guess it's of no use of having one with me, because I must be the exact same person as CF and others you have "tried" to have a dialogue with. I'm sorry that "we" frustrate you so much.)

  • because it makes you all look really dumb (Then why would you even take the time to engage me within this topic then? Just to insult me out of love? Like you said in the past- why would you want to take the time to educate someone for free. Not TOO condescending...)

  • I guess in the spirit of black-hatred a blkCON thinks that all blacks have low ass test scores so it is easy to talk to us like we're dumbazzes. (Hmm. Black hatred.... WAIT JUST ONE MINUTE. I'M BLACK. That would mean... Oh, I get it. More psychoanalysis. You obviously don't know me. And I, as much as anyone in here, know that people in this forum are highly intellegent. You made a generalization that I would never make. I know better.)

  • why in the hell blkCONS try to present the outcomes they support as anything else is really stupid on their part. (Now this is the more curious statement. You are assuming that as a "blkCON" that I support "outcomes" detrimental to the Americans of African descent. Of course, I am assuming your intention here from my prior reading of much of the back and forth between you and CF. But in any case, you will automatically reject any part of my contribution to a "dialogue" as "stupid" so why bother?)


But don't worry. If you really want to have a dialogue. I'll try to do better for you than others who don't seem to give you the answers you seek. If you choose to label me even further, then so be it.

Like I've said before, I try not to take any of this stuff too personally. I wouldn't be here if I did. Now that I have gotten comfortable with the lay of the land, I'll try to engage more when I have time.
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I'm kool on it all...because SOCIAL conservatism is based on values and morals that most black people would be hard-pressed not to agree with....but POLITICAL conservatism is based on racially biased whites who strive to implement politics that is punitive in nature to black people and the poor(most white poor are too stupid to realize it). And just like when I dissect policy outcomes and negroes try to tell me how they support black college enrollment drops without stating why it is beneficial or what their true motivation is......it is insulting to the intelligence.....and that is where my disdain for them come from......because they state a point and try to be indignant because other blacks do not support that schit....and when asked logical questions....they try to shroud the subject in a cloud of rhetorical mystique....as if they are really lifting their intelligence level above that of others who really can comprehend what the hell is REALLY going on....and I have come to a point in life where talking to any negro who cannot answer those 5 questions in a relevant answer....useless to me and the black race as a whole.....
Hello Michael,

the article:

The Glass Closet

Latasha Byears' off-the-bench 'dirty work' helped the Los Angeles Sparks win two WNBA championships. Then a sexual assault allegation ended her career.

and this:

Late last month, authorities officially closed the two-year-plus investigation into the alleged sexual assault. Byears was never arrested or charged in the case. Gina Satriano, a Los Angeles County deputy district attorney, cited "insufficient evidence" for the decision to drop the matter.

Michael, this is a story that leaves me wanting to know where Ms Byears went wrong.
If she didn't do anything wrong....someone did, on several possible levels.
Can we blame Bush? nah
racism? maybe
sexism? maybe
age discrimination? maybe
Hope that she can find justice here.
Hello Jefftec,

I must commend you for your rational response. As you see, more so than not, insults are sent my direction........


........and the individuals throwing the insults seem to be at a loss as to why I have chosen to ignore such nonsense.

***********************************

"The Glass Closet

Latasha Byears' off-the-bench 'dirty work' helped the Los Angeles Sparks win two WNBA championships. Then a sexual assault allegation ended her career.

and this:

Late last month, authorities officially closed the two-year-plus investigation into the alleged sexual assault. Byears was never arrested or charged in the case. Gina Satriano, a Los Angeles County deputy district attorney, cited "insufficient evidence" for the decision to drop the matter.

Michael, this is a story that leaves me wanting to know where Ms Byears went wrong.
If she didn't do anything wrong....someone did, on several possible levels.
Can we blame Bush? nah
racism? maybe
sexism? maybe
age discrimination? maybe
Hope that she can find justice here." By Jefftec

***************

Latasha must be relieved to know that the criminal charges have been dropped. If she truly did it, we will never know what kind of deal was cut to quash this issue, in settling this out of court.

My reason for posting this is not to condemn Black people, as stated by several dissenters on this board, who also choose to use character assassination, to belittle me. I don't let their views get next to me though, because these issues must be raised to keep Black people from entrapping themselves.

It is very important to be ethical, moral, law abiding, respectful, etc., etc. This is especially true for anyone who holds substantial assets.

It is certainly better to be the plaintiff in such an action, where Caucasians, Koreans, etc., etc., have assets worth suing for, have unlawfully violated a Black man or woman, than to put yourself on the defensive, by committing criminal acts, or violating the property rights of others yourself.

Anyone who holds assets should strive to be respectful for the rights of others, that is if they expect to keep their assets, and/or keep from spending time behind bars for unlawful acts truly committed.
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Michael,

Do you feel like greater responsiblity is reserved for Blacks with 'assets'?

Could you tell me your thoughts on the disproportionate scrutinization of blacks with assets?

Do you not hold any skepticism on the behalf of Blacks?

It seems that you are overtly malignantly critical of blacks. We've always maintained a critical discussion of our short-comings, solely as it relates to black nationalism and afrocentricity. So really, what is your dilemma? And please don't divert back to 'O.J. did it!....'Martin Luther King was a Ho!'...
Well Herustar, etc., etc.

Do you feel like greater responsiblity is reserved for Blacks with 'assets'?

Could you tell me your thoughts on the disproportionate scrutinization of blacks with assets?

Since it did not register, I'll state it again,

"Anyone who holds assets should strive to be respectful for the rights of others, that is if they expect to keep their assets, and/or keep from spending time behind bars for unlawful acts truly committed."

.....Now if Black people want to be that foolish, the individuals who do this, can only blame themselves, should they face this music.

Personal responsibility, self discipline, and common sense, should prevent anyone with assets from losing their assets through foolish actions that can result in civil litigation, and/or criminal indictment for violating the rights of others.

You would think, that at some point, Black people would be tired of going into court as defendants, as opposed to being a plaintiff in pursuit of redress for those who have unlawfully violated you.

Anyone who disrespects the rights of others, has just increased their chances of being a defendant.
Buss, who wears a stud in the graying blond soul patch under his lip, makes the day-to-day decisions for the Sparks, and he happily admits that he consults with his father, Jerry, on the larger issues: "Oh yeah, I talk to him about the state of the WNBA. But he would rather stay out of it. He enjoys watching me make decisions."

Johnny Buss' moves include the trade that brought Byears from the Sacramento Monarchs to L.A., as well as her release. He says he cut her from the team mostly because of dissension among her teammates. She was, he suggests, just too much trouble to keep.

"We had just won a championship, we were waiting to exhale, and with it came difficult attitudes and problems beyond anything that happened with the alleged sexual assault," he says without elaborating. "We knew it was going to be difficult to trade her under the cloud. We make changes whether they are popular or not. It was a tough situation; I wish it didn't happen. I wish the publicity or the accusations never happened. People do things and get kicked off the team. Was the timing the worst for Byears? Yes."


Michael said:
It is very important to be ethical, moral, law abiding, respectful, etc., etc. This is especially true for anyone who holds substantial assets.

If this scenario is factual, Johnny B. has just possibly compromised some very valuable assets and (credibility). How an organization can be ran that way is amazing.

(still, can't help but wonder if there was another some other factor that caused this situation.)
In the event Latisha Byears, is truly innocent, she has a claim against those who have maligned her good name and reputation, that resulted in any loss of income or employment.

This would be a lucrative business opportunity for a competent lawyer from the Black community, to file a claim against the L.A. Sparks organization, that is in the event enough evidence exists to prove that Latisha's losses stem from the unwarranted defamation of her good character, reputation, etc., etc., which has resulted in the loss of income, property, etc., etc.

It must proven that this is indeed the case though, because going to court against anyone is serious business.

Sincerely,

Michael Lofton

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