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If this story is true, the next time that bum Calderon comes here talking about what we are doing is wrong the POTUS should punch him in his f*@#ing mouth.

http://www.examiner.com/immigr...s?cid=examiner-email


The Inter-Press Sevice (IPS) is reporting that the head administrator of the Mexican Superintendency of Tax Administration, Raul Diaz, has confirmed that his government is building a wall in the state of Chiapas, along the Mexican/Guatemalan border.

The official reason is to stop contraband from coming into Mexico, but as Diaz admitted: “It could also prevent the free passage of illegal immigrants.”

According to Mexico's National Commission on Human Rights, 500,000 people from Central America cross into Mexico illegally every year.

Just as Mexican authorities have opposed the construction of a fence by the U.S., along our border with their country, Mexico is now receiving a great deal of criticism from the Guatemalan government.

The executive coordinator of the National Bureau for Migration in Guatemala, Marila de Prince, told a local newspaper: “It is not a correct measure being taken by the Mexican government.”

Erick Maldonado, executive secretary of Guatemala's National Council on Migrants said: “We are watching the Mexican government's initiative with concern because the migrants are in a situation of highest vulnerability, as demonstrated by the massacre in Tamaulipas, where five Guatemalans died.”

Maldonado said the wall “is going to make the migrants' situation worse, because to meet their needs they are always going to find blind points where there are no migration or security controls, which implies greater risks."

Vice-President of Guatemala, Rafael Espada, said: “The walls are not the solution to the problems.”

The Catholic Church has been highly critical of U.S. treatment of illegal aliens, and one priest in Central America used the news of the Mexican wall to take another shot at the American people.

Father Francisco Pellizari, of the Casa del Migrante told IPS: “The dramatic increase in the cost of 'polleros' (human traffickers) and the corruption of the authorities is the result of the walls the United States plans to build and has built along the border. We can transpose the Guatemala case to this situation and the results will be the same.”

Peliizari said border walls “are supposedly intended to halt migration, but that hasn't happened. Instead they have triggered an economic hemorrhage and a shift in the migratory flow to inhospitable routes that lead to thousands of deaths.”

Of course, the U.S. press has completely ignored the story…They excoriate Americans for their desire to simply defend their own borders, but give Mexico a pass for building a wall to keep out illegal aliens.

____________________________________________________ Got no love for politicians Or that crazy scene in D.C. It's just a power mad town But the time is ripe for changes There's a growing feeling That taking a chance on a new kind of vision is due I used to trust the media To tell me the truth, tell us the truth But now I've seen the payoffs Everywhere I look Who do you trust when everyone's a crook? Revolution calling Revolution calling Revolution calling you (There's a) Revolution calling Revolution calling Gotta make a change Gotta push, gotta push it on through catch
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No surprise here. Mexico is very hypocritical with their constant whining, complaining and accusations of racism of the way illegal Mexicans are treated in the US (even though there is some truth to this). The Mexican government and Mexican drug gangs are ruthless and merciless with their treatment of Central American immigrants who cross into Mexico. Beatings, raping, imprisonment and murder are their instruments of correction for non-Mexican transgressors. It’s almost offensive how they talk out the side of their mouths while ruthlessly dealing with non-Mexican illegals in their country.

 

To make a long story short, here is the cache version from Google of the story on IPS. It required a subscription to see the article regularly.

Another Wall Blocks Route to U.S.
By Danilo Valladares

GUATEMALA CITY, Sep 15 , 2010 (IPS) - Travelling without documents to the United States from Latin America can turn into an odyssey, in which migrants have to elude common criminals and drug traffickers along the way, not to mention the laws on migration. But now another obstacle is emerging: a wall between Guatemala and Mexico.

According to the head of customs for Mexico's tax administration, Raúl Díaz, in order to stop boats carrying contraband, the southern Mexican state of Chiapas is building a wall along the border river Suchiate, similar to the one the United States is building along its southern border with Mexico.

"It could also prevent the free passage of illegal immigrants," admitted the Mexican official.

Smugglers use the Suchiate River to move products across an international border without paying duty taxes, but at the same time, thousands of Central and South Americans cross the river in their attempts to reach the United States in search of opportunity -- and without the required documents.

Some 500,000 migrants cross Mexican territory without permission each year, according to Mexico's National Commission on Human Rights (CNDH).

The intention to build a border wall has triggered a wave of opposition from civil society and government organisations, with charges that it is a "senseless" measure that will not succeed in preventing undocumented migrants from crossing the border on their way north.

"We are watching the Mexican government's initiative with concern because the migrants are in a situation of highest vulnerability, as demonstrated by the massacre in Tamaulipas, where five Guatemalans died," Erick Maldonado, executive secretary of Guatemala's National Council on Migrants, told IPS.

The cruelty to which undocumented migrants are often subjected was laid bare Aug. 23, when 72 people coming from Guatemala, as well as El Salvador, Honduras, Ecuador and Brazil, were brutally murdered in San Fernando, a town in the eastern Mexican state of Tamaulipas. They were presumably killed by the Los Zetas drug cartel, which is also involved in kidnapping and exploiting migrants.

In addition, a total of 9,758 kidnappings of migrants were reported in Mexico from September 2008 to February 2009, according to the CNDH.

Putting up a wall on the Guatemala-Mexico border "is going to make the migrants' situation worse, because to meet their needs they are always going to find blind points where there are no migration or security controls, which implies greater risks," said Maldonado.

The vulnerability of the Latin Americans, and especially Central Americans, who emigrate "without papers" to the United States has remained at the forefront in recent months, not only because of intense violence like the Tamaulipas massacre, but also because of government measures taken to fight illegal migration.

Law SB1070, enacted Apr. 23 by the southwestern U.S. state of Arizona, authorises police to inquire into the immigration status of any person based on "reasonable suspicion." Critics say the legislation leads to racial profiling and violations of civil liberties.

The long line of obstacles that migrants face on their way to the United States gets longer with the construction of the wall on the Mexico-Guatemala border.

However, the authorities in Guatemala have yet to receive any information from the Mexican government about the wall.

Nevertheless, Maldonado expressed his concern this week to Mexico's migration representative in Guatemala, Alejandro Martínez.

Opposition to the project has even reached the highest circles: "Walls we can jump over; they are not a solution to the problem," was the terse comment from the vice-president of Guatemala, Rafael Espada.

The Chiapas state's intention to build a wall in some ways echoes the United States' controversial construction of the 1,126-kilometre wall along its southern border river -- known as Río Grande in the U.S.; Río Bravo in Mexico -- to prevent entry of undocumented immigrants.

"The dramatic increase in the cost of 'polleros' (human traffickers) and the corruption of the authorities is the result of the walls the United States plans to build and has built along the border. We can transpose the Guatemala case to this situation and the results will be the same," Catholic priest Francisco Pellizari, of the Casa del Migrante (Migrant House), told IPS.

According to the priest, walls are a "historic error" in many countries around the world, and have failed to resolve the problems associated with migration.

"They are supposedly intended to halt migration, but that hasn't happened. Instead they have triggered an economic haemorrhage and a shift in the migratory flow to inhospitable routes that lead to thousands of deaths," he said.

Erick Zúñiga, mayor of the western Guatemalan municipality of Ayutla, better known as Tecún Umán, bordering Mexico, said the state of Chiapas has already begun construction of the barrier, which he said "looks like a wall to prevent the Suchiate River from flooding."

In any case, said the mayor, "no wall will prevent migration. It won't stop people from crossing because they are going in search of job opportunities and a future for their families." (END)

This may be another example of how we need extraordinary means these days in order to try and get the real story. 

I hunted high and low, and in the end, the most reliable piece I could find on this story is in Spanish: http://noticias.com.gt/naciona...-de-contrabando.html

The border wall would be built along the border between Mexico and Guatemala at the Suchiate River.  This comprises about 50 miles of border.  The total border is 541 miles (http://www.nationsencyclopedia...exico-MIGRATION.html). There are other rivers that form part of the border, and a lot of land border.  And that doesn't even include the Mexican border with Belize, which is just east of Guatemala.  I'm not sure why, but Mexico has chosen to put a wall up only along a very small portion of its border with Guatemala.  On the other hand, the US is putting up 700 miles of fence out of its 1951 mile border with Mexico. 

We're looking to keep out people.  Mexico's stated goal is to keep out illegal contraband.  It "may," as the article says, restrict immigrants too.  But given that they're only looking to protect a tiny portion of their border, and that there is a substantial city in Mexico right there (Hidalgo, where illegal contraband has a market), I lean toward assuming that this area is more likely to be a main transport haven for illegal contraband, while immigrants probably have additional routes they can exploit. 

Basically, all of the right wing anti-immigrant reads I'm seeing on this story are just saying that Mexico is walling off their border with Guatemala.  But it turns out they're only walling off a small portion (less than 10%).  A 50 mile fence is probably not that big a deal, and its stated rationales make sense, given what I've gone and learned about the area and the project.  So  I'm not sure I see much hypocrisy, nor mainstream media bias, in not reporting on this.  I'll keep an open mind, but you really can't trust the way these partisan reporters and bloggers put out stuff.
Last edited by Vox
I ain't mad at Mexico!!  As a country, it has every right and a deep responsibility to keep people who don't belong there out!!  Just as the United States (or any other country for that matter) does.  And ... IMO, it's the right thing to do!!  Unless a country is already adequately taking care of their own citizens .. and then sharing and dividing resources with "others" ... who weren't given permission to enter, and, therefore, shouldn't be there, does a disservice to those who do have a legal, citizens' right to governance and whatever the country/government has to offer.

I can understand that for many people in other countries the big, flashing, neon light of 'FREEDOM" ... and what that means, is something to be desired.  As screwed up as it is, this really is a great country just by virtue of it having the ability to live a good life without the constant threat of military coups, government domination, death and who knows what other kinds of bad things that can happen to you at any given minute!! 

I get why people want to come here (although that "risk of death" thing is a little bit over my realm of understanding!!  ) .. but, different strokes for different folks, I suppose!!  But, I can't agree with it being alright for people to illegal cross borders and break laws to get here ... or being allowed to stay here having broken the law to get here.  And believing that just because you are here, you're not wrong for what you did and shouldn't be treated as if you aren't breaking the law or punished for having done so!!

It's just the principle of "law and order."  And violating that should not just be shrugged away and accepted.  We ALL have to live by laws here.  And breaking them should have ramifications ... no matter who you are!!

I also find it interesting that people will pay smugglers thousands of dollars (the survivor of that recent massacre said that he had paid $15,000 to be brought across to the U.S. from Mexico!)  But .... I would think $15,000 could sustain a decent way of life for someone (especially for someone from a country as poor as Guatemala!!) at least for a little while!!  And having the ability to save (or receive) that much money in the first place means that there should be a way to create a better life for themselves there where they are!!

There were 75 people in that group ... and if everybody gave up $15,000 just for the chance to get over here, that's a LOT of money ... and, in the end it was wasted, because the smugglers took it and that 15 grand ended up buying those people their own death.

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