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Natural Philosopher (355? - 415 CE)

She is one of the more romantic figures in science. She was the daughter of Theon, a mathematician who taught at the great school at the Alexandrine Library. She traveled widely and corresponded with people all over the Mediterranean. We know of her only through her letters because all of her work was destroyed when the Great Library of Alexandia was destroyed.


She taught at the school in the Library in Alexandria, Egypt. Letters written and addressed simply to the philosopher were delivered to her. She taught mathematics and natural philosophy. She is credited with the authorship of three major treatises on geometry and algebra and one on astronomy. She invented several tools: an instrument for distilling water, an instrument to measure the specific gravity of water, an astrolabe and a planisphere.



She died violently. She was dragged to her death by a mob who pulled her from her classroom into the streets where they peeled her to death with oyster shells.

Always Remember that: "Anytime We As A People Are Not Having Our WaySomeone Else Is Having Theirs...And It's Never To Our Advantage."

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HOW COULD I HAVE MISSED THIS??????????


grrrrrrr..... I LOOOOOVVVVEEE HYPATIA!!!

I almost made this my screen name... I "discovered" her in my "Intro. to Phil." class in college.... I became fascinated... (*erm* jus' a lil' bit)

more info. about Hypatia:


*If a man reaches the age of thirty-six without having gotten married, does that automatically make him a homosexual? To make such an unfair assumption would likely raise the hackles of a man who, despite his wishes, has been unable to find a suitable woman, and who, as a result, now finds his very masculinity brought into question. Wouldn't it also be unfair to make such an assumption in the case of a woman? Hypatia has been adopted by feminists the world over as their patron saint simply because she was, in a real sense, the world's first "liberated" woman........ Hypatia was the first woman in history to venture into exclusively male realms (namely, mathematics, astronomy, science, philosophy, and invention) and to achieve independence thereby. Before Hypatia, the only women that were highly educated and were regarded as the equals of men in Hellenistic society were the hetæræ, or high-class prostitutes. Hypatia somehow pulled off the unprecedented feat of winning the adoration and high esteem of men without having to sell "” or rent out "” her body to do so. Still, Hypatia was nothing like a modern feminist. She was not a masculine, arrogant, man-hating female supremacist eunuch. In ancient Hellenistic society, men and women alike were more free and easy and natural with their sexuality. Sappho's love poems to her female friends seem alien to sexually-repressed moderns, for they defy being placed into any modern categories of sexual preference. Her sublime expressions of spiritual love that recognize no Christian shame, and hence no sexual taboos, no boundaries, no limits, have made her the archetype of female homosexuality. In fact, lesbianism was named after her, or, more properly, after the island she lived on "” Lesbos. Yet, like Hypatia, Sappho was no dike. Neither of them strove to become mannish in manner or appearance. Both were distinctly feminine "” in fact, both reveled in their feminine power. Sappho eventually married, and loved her daughter, Cleïs, with poetic tenderness. Although Hypatia never married, nevertheless she was ever the enchantress surrounded by men, and was even accused, by some of her Christian detractors, of "bewitching" men. To me, this doesn't sound like a lesbian "” at least not what we think of as a lesbian today "” for today the whole idea behind lesbianism seems to be for a woman not to need men anymore, not for anything, not even for sex "” or perhaps, especially not for sex. In other words, the object of lesbianism today is not to have to bewitch men anymore. The heterosexual woman wants something from a man, and uses the power of her femininity to get it, while the homosexual woman wants only to be left alone by men, and she accomplishes this by rejecting her feminine attractive power, seeking instead independence, and masculine power, becoming mannish in order to repel men. As Gloria Steinem put it, "Some of us have become the men we wanted to marry." But Hypatia did not fit the profile of the modern lesbian/feminist. By all accounts, Hypatia was very feminine, an enchantress who was adored by men, and who enjoyed the company of men. This makes it seem quite unlikely that she was a lesbian "” at least not as we understand the term today.

and I lurve this assessment.....

it seems clear that history's greatest woman would have to be: 1) A woman for whom we have historical evidence that she actually existed, and it is reasonably certain that she was not merely a legend; 2) A woman who wasn't ruthless or heartless, and wasn't responsible for increasing the amount of suffering or death in the world; 3) A woman who had a pleasant, benevolent, loving personality, without a trace of arrogance, greed, or selfishness "” in short, a woman that anyone would love to meet, and indeed, once having met her, one would not want to part from; 4) A woman that is wise. Mind you, intelligence is a wonderful quality, but history's greatest woman would have to more than merely intelligent. She would need to be wise "” someone that anyone would want to learn from, some whose influence would make one a better, happier person, someone who knows how to make the world a better place; 5) A woman who didn't merely live for herself, but lived for others "” a woman who contributed to the ascent of man, who made the world a better place for all. And if this woman also dedicated herself to preserving the intellectual legacy of mankind, and ultimately was martyred for her cause, so much the better. Better yet if she happened to be stunningly beautiful "” yet was always modest "” and wasn't already taken by someone in marriage. Guess what? There is only one woman recorded by history who meets all these criteria, and her name was Hypatia.




Have you read Ms. Lumkins book regarding proof of her Ethiopian origin??? I have not... I might have to go ahead and order it....

oooohhh... yep... that's what I'll do...


Peace,
Virtue
Thank you so much, Virtue--for your contribution to the subject of Hypatia!

I listen to Dr. Ray Hagins quite a lot and I remember him discussing her in one of his radio broadcasts and remembered the spelling of her name so that I could do a little investigating myuself.

She was a fascinating woman. The inhumane manner in which she was treated was insane.

PS May I have the title of Ms. Lumpkins book?

I have a bad habit of speculating about the Afrikan-ness of famous people (i.e. Socrates, Cleopatra). I thought about it but decided not to speculate about Hypatia. Although it makes sense that her strength and knowledge might have African Roots. Although history is silent I know black women were first to be strong, intelligent and powerful:

1. Meryt-Neith (1st Dynasty c3000bc)--first female Pharoah

2. Nitocris (6th Dynasty 2148-44BC)

3. Sobeknofru (12th Dynasty ?1757-1759BC)

4. Hatshepsut (18th Dynasty c1473-1458BC)--Yes, with certainty she did rule as Pharoah.

5. Neferitit (18th Dynasty 1336BC) possible, but not certain.

6. Twosret (19th Dynasty 1187-1185BC)

7. Cleopatra (51BC)
http://www.ancientnile.co.uk/pharaohs-women.php
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quote:
Originally posted by Fine:
She taught mathematics and natural philosophy. She is credited with the authorship of three major treatises on geometry and algebra and one on astronomy. She invented several tools: an instrument for distilling water, an instrument to measure the specific gravity of water, an astrolabe and a planisphere.



She died violently. She was dragged to her death by a mob who pulled her from her classroom into the streets where they peeled her to death with oyster shells.


With all the material comfort she provided to the city of Alexandra she still was not PUBLIC APPROVED in the END.

That was around the time of the Greeks and Romans who established themselves in Egypt thus depriving the Egyptian African people of KNOWLEDGE of their GLORIUS PAST.

Then a IGNORANT MOB just TOOK it all AWAY that is her LIFE.

This strategy sounds familiar used by a race of people who inspiration was the Romans.

Oh well, I guess that is what we all get for FOLLOWINGthose WHITE GODS and their MINIONS.

quote:
Originally posted by Fine:
I have asked Virtue to get back with me on a book she mentions by a Ms. Lumpkins.

I suspect she was mulatto therefore black. And as such received the same treatment as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King--thought they were men.


Forgive me for the delay fine.....

The book is titled "Hypatia and Women's Rights in Ancient Egypt"

the author's name is Beatrice Lumpkin

Smile


Peace,
Virtue
No problem!
Thank you so much, Ms. Virtue U Are Tops!

http://www.africa.upenn.edu/K-12/African_Science.html
8. Beatrice Lumpkin (1988) and Margaret Alic (1986) have both described the life of Hypatia, " For fifteen centuries Hypatia was often considered to be the only female scientist in history. Hypatia is the earliest woman scientist whose life is well documented" (Alic, 1986, p. 41). Lumpkin provides evidence that Hypatia was not Greek and instead was an Egyptian and thus of African origin. It seems that contrary to the customs of Greek women at that time, "Hypatia remained unmarried and moved freely and publicly in her scientific pursuits" (Lumpkin, 1988, p. 155). Hypatia lectured on mathematics, philosophy, physics and astronomy (Lumpkin, 1988). She wrote important treatises on Algebra and Conic sections. Hypatia is credited with designing an astrolabe, a water still, an instrument to measure water level and an hydrometer (Alic, 1986, p. 44). Hypatia refused to convert to Christianity and in 415 A.D. she was murdered brutally by Christian fanatics (Lumpkin, 1988).
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quote:
Originally posted by Fine:
No problem!
Thank you so much, Ms. Virtue U Are Tops!


One...tfro

quote:
http://www.africa.upenn.edu/K-12/African_Science.html
8. Beatrice Lumpkin (1988) and Margaret Alic (1986) have both described the life of Hypatia, " For fifteen centuries Hypatia was often considered to be the only female scientist in history.


FIFTEEN CENTURIES!!!!!!!!!!!! Good lawd..

and the ONLY female scientist....????

See, I studied her just a bit as a philosophy major....

How many more of our sheroes have been overlooked?

In the old days... there was a goddess for every god... and it reflected in the cultural status of the women...

but I digress....

Kudos for this thread..


Peace,
Khalliqa
Your digression has merit, Ms. Virtue!

Ditto.

The highly refined-visible nature and political standing of the women is evidenced by the number of female Pharoahs:

1. The first 'female' known to be pharoah: Meryt-Neith (1st Dynasty c3000bc)

2. Nitocris (6th Dynasty 2148-44BC)

3. Sobeknofru (12th Dynasty ?1757-1759BC)

4. Hatshepsut (18th Dynasty c1473-1458BC)--Yes, with certainty she did rule as Pharoah.

5. Neferitit (18th Dynasty 1336BC) possible, but not certain.

6. Twosret (19th Dynasty 1187-1185BC)

7. Cleopatra (51BC)
http://www.ancientnile.co.uk/pharaohs-women.php

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