Skip to main content

To be honest, Black people don't start with their children in training them that there is nothing wrong or unusual about nappy hair in the first place, but, also, if Black women are trying to be white by straightening their hair, then white women must be trying to be Black by curling theirs because natural curls are a bi-product of nappy hair (tightly curled hair); and as for white men dating Black women whose hair is natural, any Black woman dating a white man that cannot accept her natural hair is a fool, so it would appear that they are dating men that fully accept them for who they are, which is actually more than I can say for some Black men who probably would gravitate towards the Black woman with the straightened hair over the Black woman with the natural hair.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
[I asked you because it was puzzling to me why you would react to the term "politics of hair" in the way that you did...

I'm further puzzled by the "i rule it you do not" statement, and the "boundary statement" since understanding "the politics of hair" does not imply "ruling" the hair of others? Confused


Let me try to clarify my question: What about the phrase "understanding the politics of hair" suggests "ruling" the hair of others? What about the term "the politics of hair" prompted a knee-jerk response of "it's mine. I rule it"????


I would venture to say the majority of posters in the thread declined to rule on "proper black hair styles".


oh, maybe your comments were in general and not directed specifically at any poster. And particularly not me since i stated in much the same way you did that whatever the style a sista rocks, it's all good...

i see... your comments were in no way directed toward me.

my bad

carry on.


Yes, I was not directing anything personal towards you and it was not a knee jerk reaction.. I was stating "in general" that there can be no "politics of hair" if we do not allow others to "war against" what belongs to us in the first place.

For instance, I have many friends who rock dreads, naturals, head wraps and the like in their corporate environments. They all comment on how some sought to make them "conform" to the status quo, however they all were adamant that they were not "changing" like that for anyone. It is their hair, and as long as it looks neat and presentable, who was anyone to tell them how to be wearing it?

For MySelf, when I made the transition from perming to natural hair, I wore head wraps, breads, locs and the like. People wanted to put their "hands all over" me, like I was the doll they'd seen at Toys R' Us....and I had to tell them that it was DisReSpectful to be putting their hands all over me. Not only that, it just isn't sanitary because I don't kwow where their hands have been.

The point being that while some may take issue with our own natural beauty, we own it - they don't. They may try to to take what belongs to us, as we see throughout the world with ladies plumping up their lips, butts, etc...and trying to braid their hair...and trying to "utilize" other characteristics of US, however, we own it...so no matter what anybody else tries to take or deny about us, it will always belong to us.

"Wisdom Is A Woman Who Owns Her Own!"
quote:
Originally posted by SistahSouljah:
{confused by "politics of hair"}


sorry i'm just now seeing this:, but perhaps this will get u started.


Natural hair


Young woman with parted afro curls.Natural hair, black hair, and afro-textured hair are terms used mainly by Western people to refer to the texture of African hair which has not been altered chemically (by perming, relaxing, straightening, bleaching or coloring). It should be noted though, that not all people of sub-Saharan African descent have naturally afro-textured hair, in particular certain Horn of Africa groups though most sub saharan Africans do. Adjectives such as "hard", "kinky", "nappy", or "woolly" are also used to describe natural hair. This hair is typically tightly coiled and soft to the touch. Andamanese Negritos and most Melanesian people also have tightly curled hair.

History in the United States

Black Americans have been experimenting with ways to style their hair since the nineteenth century. Between the late 1890s and the early 1900s, Annie Malone, Madam C. J. Walker and Garrett Augustus Morgan revolutionized Black American hair care by inventing and marketing chemical applications to alter the natural, "nappy" or kinky texture. During the 1930s, conking (vividly described in the Autobiography of Malcolm X) became an innovative method in the U.S. for Black men to straighten kinky hair.

It has been debated whether these practices arose out of a desire to make the hair more manageable or instead to conform to a Eurocentric standard of beauty.[citation needed] Supporters of the second theory believe that the same prejudice that viewed lighter skin as preferable to darker, held that straight or wavy hair was preferable to kinky or nappy natural hair; that this prejudice comes not from African diasporic peoples but from European slaveholders and colonizers as part of the rhetoric used to support slavery and racially-based social class stratifications. Some claim that the dominant prejudice for Eurocentric ideas of beauty pervades the western world. [1][citation needed]

The civil rights movement and black power and pride movements of the 1960s and 1970s in the U.S. created an impetus for African Americans to express their political commitments and self love through the wearing of natural hair. This contributed to the emergence of the Afro hairstyle into American mainstream culture, as an affirmation of African heritage, that "black is beautiful," and a rejection of Eurocentric standards of beauty. It has been used in songs, as a symbol of African heritage, notably in I Wish by Stevie Wonder. By the 1970s natural hair had evolved into a popular hairstyle.

Over the years, the popularity of natural hair has waxed and waned, but a significant percentage, approximately 75% of African American women still elect to straighten their hair with relaxers of some kind. Prolonged application of such chemicals can result in overprocessing, breakage and thinning of the hair.

In the past decade or so, natural hair has once again increased in popularity with the emergence of styles such as cornrows, locks, braiding, twists and cropped hair, most of which originated in Ancient Africa[citation needed]. With the emergence of hip-hop culture and Caribbean influences like reggae music, more non-blacks have begun to wear these hairstyles as well. There has been a boom in marketing hair products such as "Out of Africa" shampoo to African American consumers. Slogans that promote a pan-African appreciation of Afro-textured hair include "Happy to be nappy," "Don't worry, be nappy," as well as "Love, peace and nappiness."

Most black women in the West, however, continue to relax their hair.[2] Even today, people are sometimes discouraged in the workplace from wearing their hair in a natural style (see below)


[edit] Controversy over natural hair in the United States
Although there has been a reemergence of natural hair, there is still the underlying tone that straightened hair is a more acceptable or professional hairstyle. This is evidenced by the fact that high-profile black women in professions such as journalism and politics still wear straight hair.

A 1998 incident became national news when a teacher in Bushwick, Brooklyn, introduced her students to the book Nappy Hair by Black American author Carolivia Herron. The teacher, who is white, was criticized by parents of black children, who thought that the book presented a negative stereotype.[1]

In December 2006, the Baltimore Police Department created a policy to create a new professional appearance, but it raised questions of racial insensitivity. The new policy was more specific. Three out of the four hairstyles banned were worn primarily by blacks[citation needed]. The hairstyles include twists, locks, Mohawks, and cornrows. These hairstyles were regarded as "fads" and "extreme." A petition was made. Currently the Baltimore Police Department has rescinded the policy against natural hair styles and a new policy was put in effect after January 15th.

In June 2006, the Six Flags amusement park chain created an employee policy against "extreme hairstyles" including locks and cornrows. This caused many of their employees to either quit or alter their hair by cutting it or straightening it.

On Wednesday, April 4, 2007 radio talk-show host Don Imus referred to the Rutgers University women's basketball team playing in the Women's NCAA Championship game as a group of "nappy-headed hos" during his Imus in the Morning show. Bernard McGuirk then compared the game to "the jigaboos versus the wannabes," alluding to Spike Lee's film School Daze. Imus apologized two days later, after receiving criticism. CBS Radio canceled Don Imus' morning show on Thursday, April 12, 2007.

On April 24, 2007, mixed martial arts fighter Tito Ortiz reprised Imus' remark when he said of Rashad Evans, "He will be my nappy-headed ho." The two faced off in one of the three featured fights at UFC 73 in Sacramento, California on July 7, 2007.

During August 2007, American Lawyer Magazine reported that an unnamed junior Glamour Magazine staffer did a presentation on the "Do's and Dont's of Corporate Fashion" for Cleary Gottlieb, a New York City law firm. There was a slide show where the woman made negative remarks about black women's natural hairstyles in the workplace, calling them "shocking," "inappropriate," and "political." Both the law firm and Glamour Magazine issued apologies to the staff. [2][3]
quote:
Originally posted by SistahSouljah:
{confused by "politics of hair"}



The Politics of Hair

Robinson, Lori S

In her hit song "I Am Not My Hair," R&B songstress India.Arie painfully describes her struggle with trying to conform to European hair standards before adopting her own brand of beauty.

But the reality is African American hair - from the afro to the press and curl and perm to natural styles such as braids, twists, cornrows and dreadlocks - still stirs up controversy. Why?

"The standard of beauty is certainly a lot more flexible today than it has been in our history. Yet, there is still a kind of underlying standard of beauty that is fundamentally European," says Paulette Caldwell, a New York University law professor who specializes in education law and employment discrimination law.

Recently, when Vaughan Thomas took her mother-in-law to the beauty salon in a Montgomery, Ala., Dillard's department store, she was charged $30 for a wash-and-set, more than the listed $20 cost.

Thomas was told Black hair needs more conditioner and takes longer to style. She and seven other women are now suing Dillard's, claiming the company engages in race-based pricing. Though Dillard's denies charging African Americans more than Whites as a matter of policy, the company has presented evidence that doing Black hair is more difficult and time-consuming.

"What makes this such a fascinating case is that a corporation would actually try to justify race-based pricing under some sort of pseudo-scientific principal," says Patrick Cooper, Thomas's attorney.

For years, African Americans, particularly women, have had hair battles. Twenty-five years ago, Renée Rogers brought suit against her employer, American Airlines, for their policy against braids. And 10 years ago, Corrine McBride sued a Georgia temp agency that refused to refer people who wore all-braided hairstyles to job assignments.

But corporate America isn't the only adversary of natural styles. Some Black institutions discourage the "natural" look, believing it's best to prepare African Americans to blend into a majority-White corporate environment.

In June 2006, it became public that a college student had to cut his dreadlocks to keep an internship at Black Enterprise magazine. Years earlier, in the February 2000 issue of Black Enterprise, publisher Earl G. Graves penned a two-page editorial explaining his position on "traditional business attire." Recently, Susan L. Taylor, editorial director of Essence magazine, canceled an appearance at historically Black Hampton University, after learning that a program within its business school prohibits dreadlocks and long braids on men.

According to Caldwell, employers are protected by law.

"You're not required as an employer to announce that you've got a policy against braids," says Caldwell. "Anything that you do voluntarily to associate yourself with a particular race or culture or national origin is not protected by law against racism."

- Lori S. Robinson

Copyright Crisis Publishing Company, Incorporated Sep/Oct 2006
quote:
Originally posted by SistahSouljah:
{confused by "politics of hair"}


a different take on it...



The politics of hair

Koppelman, Connie

Throughout the history of humankind, women's hair has been fashioned to exhibit beauty, removed to cause humiliation, and interpreted as a sign of strength, power (often destructive), or powerlessness. Because hair continually replenishes itself, it has been imbued with magical, symbolic power and defined by myth and tradition. Stories of Samson and Delilah, Medusa, and Rapunzel are only three of many biblical, mythological, and fairy tales associated with hair. They help to shape our psyche, embedded as they are in our memories from childhood.

Hair also has social implications. It helps us determine age, economic, intellectual, and marital status, as well as religious affiliations. Hairstyles can signify conformity, for example, to army regulations, monastic celibacy, or any group-determined aesthetic. Hairstyles can also signify rebellion.

Today many women choose to shave their heads as a sign of female bonding and sometimes as a form of protest against the beauty myth. Whether they go bald for personal or political reasons, bald-headed women are often perceived as threatening, perhaps because of the negative connotations associated with baldness as a sign of age, punishment, illness, or rebellion. Prisoners of war were often shorn of their hair, and, after World War II, shearing was used as a

form of punishment for French women suspected of collaborating with the enemy. Sometimes hair was also removed from the heads of slaves as a sign of servitude, a tradition that dates back at least to ancient Egypt. In the Old and New Kingdom, children's heads were shaved, except for one remaining lock of hair. When they reached maturity, women's hair was closely cropped and covered with a wig.

Some orthodox religions mandate the covering of a woman's hair after marriage. Jewish women at one time were required to cut their hair off and wear a wig. Orthodox women today need not crop their hair but must cover it, usually with a wig, when in public. A sense of modesty also requires an orthodox

Muslim woman to cover her hair in public from at least the age of maturity. This signifies the renunciation of personal vanity and discourages sexual attraction from males other than her own husband. Amish and Old Order Mennonites also require women to cover their hair as a sign of modesty. Some Pentecostal sects require that a woman never cut her hair; however, when she reaches maturity, she must bind it tightly on top of her head. In such instances, it is hair's sexual attraction that is controlled by society-or we should say patriarchy--as it has been for thousands of years. According to many polls, hair remains one of the six most sensuous parts of the body.

Both good and evil have been attributed to hair, especially after its removal from the head. Superstition and sentiment led to the making of hair fetishes, objects with magical powers, such as a lock of a loved one's hair carried into battle as a form of protection or the burial of one's enemies' hair so it would not perpetrate evil. A far more sentimental custom was particularly popular during the 1880s when hair was designed into intricate jewelry for loved ones, or made from the hair of a deceased person as a memento of mourning. Besides taking the form of jewelry, shadowbox wall ornaments and glass-domed flower arrangements were made from the hair of family or friends. In its day a hair memento was comparable to having a photograph of a loved one.

The modern obsession with youth and thinness can lead to the use of substances that affect the health of women. In spite of warnings of the possibility of carcinogens in hair dye, many women refuse to heed warnings of danger. Perhaps it is the fear of getting old, or just looking old, that drives such decisions.

In our culture, shades of blond are perceived as most sensually appealing, although any color is preferable to the aging signs of gray. Some women have also bought the media's message that they can look more youthful and have so called "natural" looking hair when it is dyed, curled, or permanent waved. In recent decades, an industry has evolved to satisfy the need of black women whose hair texture often requires different shampoos, lotions, curling irons, and styling techniques. Today many black women wear hairstyles of braids, dreadlocks, and cornrows. Some styles last for weeks, are very expensive, and take hours to create. Sometimes these styles have met with hostility by employers and others threatened by African-inspired expressions of blackness. As we grow more comfortable with ourselves, what is on our heads should stop controlling what is inside, making us more tolerant of what others have done with their hair.

Copyright Frontiers Publishing, Inc. 1996
Professor explores hair's cultural implications for African-Americans




Until the birth of his daughter 15 years ago, Neal Lester had never given much thought to head hair.

Jasmine, the child of an African-American father and Italian-Argentine mother, was born with what Lester recalls as "bouncy, thick, ringlets." Her locks, like the shade of her skin, became the discussion of family, friends and strangers.

"People often commented on how ˜nice' or ˜good' her hair was," Lester says. "What they clearly meant was that it wasn't nappy."

As a professor of English specializing in African-American literary and cultural studies, and chair of ASU's Department of English, Lester is well-schooled on the gender and race politics of African-American hair. There is no shortage of head-hair references and treatments in African-American folklore, literature and popular culture.

"The rhetoric is clear that blacks' hair in a ˜natural' state is undesirable," he says. "It needs to be ˜tamed,' as if blackness is wild and animalistic, and whiteness is tamed and civilized."

Until he became a father, however, Lester admits he was not as tuned in to the central role hair continues to play in African-American identity; this despite the fact that his own mother wore long, straight wigs for a good part of her life – and he, himself, experimented with straightening his hair in the 1980s.

"I had earlier dismissed these events as insignificant," Lester says. "Now, however, they signify for me continuing racial and gender biases about head hair both within and outside black cultural experiences. They can affect everything from pop culture, to hiring practices, to student conduct policies."

In addition to studying and teaching courses on African-American literature, folklore, cinema and drama, Lester continues to lecture extensively on the race and gender politics of hair to broad and diverse audiences across the country. He wants others to explore the issue as not one of the past, but one that continues to complicate African-Americans' self-identities and broader social ideals of beauty.

Lester's work helped inform the acclaimed exhibition "HairStories" that is traveling through art galleries across the country"”in Arizona, Chicago and Atlanta, for instance. Its final stop is the 40 Acres Art Gallery in Sacramento, Calif., where it opened July 9 and continues through Sept. 11.

The exhibition examines the complex phenomena of blacks' hair in America as a vehicle for self-expression and artistic invention, and Lester's centerpiece essay in the "HairStories" exhibition catalog weaves together historical and personal insights.

His own "hairstory" includes his decision to grow dreadlocks eight years ago – a socio-political and spiritual decision to take back control of a life he felt was slipping away because of some legal struggles with an Alabama public school system.

While his students thought his new 'do was "cool," his family questioned just how "professional" it was for a university professor. Strangers have wanted to touch it, an experience that reminds him of his first white college roommate's curious request to touch his hair. That roommate expressed great surprise to see that his hair did not feel like steel wool or a Brillo pad.

"With dreadlocks, my hair for the first time in my life became a main topic of conversation," he says. "I've been mistaken for a musician and a Rastafarian – I was never mistaken for anyone when I wore a flat-top fade all the years before 'locking. For me, the issue is not that people are curious about my hairstyle, but that public representations and acceptance of such hairstyles and hair decisions are far from mainstream in this country."

His hairstory also includes his teenage daughter's decision to chemically straighten her curly hair – a moment that, for Lester, marked her passage from childhood to womanhood.

"For many African-American girls, that rite of passage means going from ˜natural' hair to straight hair," Lester says. "Our society forces that ideal of beauty that is unattainable by most African-American women without chemical treatment."

And even then, as rapper KRS-1 clarifies, the alleged "perm"(anent) is but "a temporary" when moisture makes contact.

Much of Lester's work focuses on how this straight/nappy "hair ideal" affects children, particularly young girls. He is interested in African-American children's literature and the extent to which black readership magazines and commercials target the straight-hair ideals typically to mothers of these girls.

When boys and men are attracted to "Barbie-doll-Rapunzel-straight-haired little girls," Lester adds, the gender politics are more all-encompassing.

While such African-American adult literature, as Maya Angelou's "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," and Toni Morrison's "The Bluest Eye" deal with young black girls coming to terms with their "nappy" hair in the face of culturally competing beauty mythologies, Lester notes that very few children's books create positive messages for young children about their natural hair.

The 1997 children's picture book "Nappy Hair," by Carolivia Herron, and the national controversy it created are the centerpiece of his lectures on hair and shows that conversations about hair can be self-celebratory for African-Americans despite historical and social baggage.

"There are multitudes of messages being sent to little black girls and their mothers about the necessity of transforming themselves into someone else's cultural image of beauty," Lester says. "Among African-Americans, there are so many hairstyles: dreadlocked, ˜natural,' curled, faded, braided, twisted, straightened, permed, crimped, cornrowed and even bald. I'd like to see all of these images represented and celebrated."

Lester's research, presentations and talks on hair afford another important lens through which to read culture and identity, highlighting ultimately that this discussion of difference can lead to personal "hairstories" and the realization that, as Angelou has proclaimed: "We are more alike than we are unalike."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By Sharon Keeler. Keeler, with Marketing & Strategic Communications, can be reached at (480) 965-4012 or (sharon.keeler@asu.edu).
August 8, 2005
quote:
"The standard of beauty is certainly a lot more flexible today than it has been in our history. Yet, there is still a kind of underlying standard of beauty that is fundamentally European," says Paulette Caldwell, a New York University law professor who specializes in education law and employment discrimination law.



Even when some sisters decide to go "natural", they are adamant about getting "locks" so that they can "manage" their hair.... into styles that mimic the smoothness of european type hair...

their is a certain group of "natural" sisters that abhor anything resembling "frizz"...

I find this odd...

although *disclaimer* I am one of them! lol...
fro The funny thing about "natural" hair especially in the winter...it requires A LOT of moisture. And when the air is dry and cold...it's gonna fuzz anyway...regardless if it's in braids, twist, pressed, perm, or dyed. The DNA in African hair is stubborn...it will NOT get use to being in COLD weather...period. And so if you sport a twist or braids, you are FOREVER moisturizing it...cuz you don't want breakage which is as a result of fuzzed hair... You bring out a good point Sista K. Cuz in Africa those "hefers" and I say hefer very lovingly mind you...can DO some hairlol And you know that's right. They know HOW to work that BLACK hair...and the hair cooperates cuz it's in the perfect climate for BLACK hair. If you look at Egyptians....they went the full throttle...from bald, locks, braids, twist, straight[yes blackfolks have straight hair as well] to wigs. Hair wasn't such a big issue as it is today. That's cuz back then Black women knew how to COMB their hair...and what ingredients to use.. I have a book full of different African hairstyles.... some are absolutely MAGNIFICANT! I remember one of my former braiders...she is from a village near Benin. When she used to do my hair, it was a gang of 'em taking turns braiding my hair throughout the 6 hours it took AND they would take breaks and eat and laugh...talking French, and an African language I never figured out what it was and...English simulatenously. I loved her! She braided my hair like basketweaving...and at work...the women were soooooo jealous cuz there is a difference between African braiders AND African American braiders...BIG difference. My braids would last almost 8 months...if I let it. When new growth appeared...the braid was still tight and in tact....no fuzz. Do you believe that? But! She cost a fortune. And was worth it for awhile. But I change hairstyles soooo much, I grew bored too soon for THAT kinda money. Back in those day she charged $175. Today for what she did back then, it's a least $300 to $500. That's ridiculous. Yet, there are those who will spend it with a smile. Not me. fro
quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:
fro The funny thing about "natural" hair especially in the winter...it requires A LOT of moisture. And when the air is dry and cold...it's gonna fuzz anyway...regardless if it's in braids, twist, pressed, perm, or dyed. The DNA in African hair is stubborn...it will NOT get use to being in COLD weather...period. And so if you sport a twist or braids, you are FOREVER moisturizing it...cuz you don't want breakage which is as a result of fuzzed hair... You bring out a good point Sista K. Cuz in Africa those "hefers" and I say hefer very lovingly mind you...can DO some hairlol And you know that's right. They know HOW to work that BLACK hair...and the hair cooperates cuz it's in the perfect climate for BLACK hair. If you look at Egyptians....they went the full throttle...from bald, locks, braids, twist, straight[yes blackfolks have straight hair as well] to wigs. Hair wasn't such a big issue as it is today. That's cuz back then Black women knew how to COMB their hair...and what ingredients to use.. I have a book full of different African hairstyles.... some are absolutely MAGNIFICANT! I remember one of my former braiders...she is from a village near Benin. When she used to do my hair, it was a gang of 'em taking turns braiding my hair throughout the 6 hours it took AND they would take breaks and eat and laugh...talking French, and an African language I never figured out what it was and...English simulatenously. I loved her! She braided my hair like basketweaving...and at work...the women were soooooo jealous cuz there is a difference between African braiders AND African American braiders...BIG difference. My braids would last almost 8 months...if I let it. When new growth appeared...the braid was still tight and in tact....no fuzz. Do you believe that? But! She cost a fortune. And was worth it for awhile. But I change hairstyles soooo much, I grew bored too soon for THAT kinda money. Back in those day she charged $175. Today for what she did back then, it's a least $300 to $500. That's ridiculous. Yet, there are those who will spend it with a smile. Not me. fro


off You know what kills me... In Ghana and they have braiding shops on the side of the road... Well, they are more like stalls... and it costs $5 U.S. to get your hair done. Micro braids, Senegalese twists, tiny cornrows ect... All $5!!!

Unfortunately, I didn't have the time to get it done. I'm still pissed about that.
quote:
Originally posted by ladyj:
i am a woman with locs that also wears weaves once in awhile. i am starting to notice how blk women tend to treat me differently depending on the hair on my head.
i wonder why blk women with natural hair act like they are better than blk women with a relaxer or weave?
i went to work with my curly short weave and some natural ladies wouldnt even speak to me unless i approached them first. then the weave wearers all of a sudden paid attention to me.
is there a hair war going on and i missed the memo?Confused

are you a hair snob?
do you pick your friends based on hair styles?
do all or most of your friends have the same type of hair? (exp. all natural or all have wash and sets)
do you find yourself making assumptions on females based on their hair?
weave= materialistic, gold gigger, high maintenance
straight hair= wants to be YT, easy going, not as high maintence
natural= afrocentric,vegan, socially conscious fro



Nah. Hair is just hair. Although, I do admit that I sometimes shake my head when I see some of these ridiculous hair styles that some black women wear. Can't help but think "ghetto" even if they may be the classiest girls in the world.
fro True dat. There are some Black women who are ridiculous when it comes to HAIR. Purple braidsEek Get out of here! But true. I've also seen pink, blue, bright red and burgundy braids as well. While I wouldn't go that far with the pink, blue and bright red....I have seen some braids in burgundy and various ranges of chestnut to copper color that were ABSOLUTELY beautiful! I think our ancestors were soooo debased about their hair that it continues to transcend generationally. And those who are jealous about hair....are trifling, ghetto and small women. My question, but are you raising your kids?! Stressin' over somebody's hair...but are you feeding your children balanced meals? Our priorities continues to be twisted and misdirected. But I do understand the fascination about our hair...I do. Remember, blackfolks [women] are the ONLY ones that can do a variety of things with their hair....no other culture can do that. And let's not forget that back in the slavery days, massa's wife had the slave girl standing on her feet for 2 to 3 hours brushing that tangled so-called straight mess....while the slave girl wore a "rag"....not because she couldn't comb her OWN hair but because her hair was soooo damaged and uncombed for years...it smelled and was sometimes covered with lice...which came from being in MASSA'S HOUSEHOLD or from slave ships [riddled with unclean filthy crewmen] that brought her and her family to America! It is so many reasons why blackfolks have issues about HAIR. However, this is where some of the issues derived. fro
Yeah, the 'hair' thing is a serious issue for some of us (black women). These days I'm wearing my hair natural. . .which means (for me)a huge afro sometimes and other times I'll brush it back in sort of an 'afro puff' look.

I absolutely LOVE missing out on the 5 to 6 hours it would take at a beauty salon because some beauticians don't know how to organize their time/schedules better.

And men seem to like my hair this way, I get compliments from them all the time. . .a couple of black men commented that, they like to see a 'sista' wear her hair 'natural'.

On the other hand, I'm leaving for San Francisco (Friday night) for a graduation on Saturday, one of my girlfriends had the nerve to say: you're getting your hair done, right? I KNOW you're not going to wear your hair like THAT (natural) at a college graduation. Eek

Personally, I LOVE the look and it's so damn easy. 4

so 'yes' I'll be wearing my hair 'natural'. . .cause I know how to 'dress it up'. lol

It's a talent & a gift. 1
quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:
fro True dat. There are some Black women who are ridiculous when it comes to HAIR. Purple braidsEek Get out of here! But true. I've also seen pink, blue, bright red and burgundy braids as well.



And then there are the black women who dye their hair a platinum blonde, and many of them have dark skin. I personally think sistas should stay away from blonde hair because it looks ridiculous on us.

quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:While I wouldn't go that far with the pink, blue and bright red....I have seen some braids in burgundy and various ranges of chestnut to copper color that were ABSOLUTELY beautiful!


I wouldn't consider burgundy or variations of brown to be bad. In fact, I would go as far as saying that MOST black women can pull off light brown hair.

quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:I think our ancestors were soooo debased about their hair that it continues to transcend generationally. And those who are jealous about hair....are trifling, ghetto and small women.


AMEN!

quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:My question, but are you raising your kids?! Stressin' over somebody's hair...but are you feeding your children balanced meals? Our priorities continues to be twisted and misdirected.


My thoughts exactly.

quote:
Originally posted by Kocolicious:But I do understand the fascination about our hair...I do. Remember, blackfolks [women] are the ONLY ones that can do a variety of things with their hair....no other culture can do that. And let's not forget that back in the slavery days, massa's wife had the slave girl standing on her feet for 2 to 3 hours brushing that tangled so-called straight mess....while the slave girl wore a "rag"....not because she couldn't comb her OWN hair but because her hair was soooo damaged and uncombed for years...it smelled and was sometimes covered with lice...which came from being in MASSA'S HOUSEHOLD or from slave ships [riddled with unclean filthy crewmen] that brought her and her family to America! It is so many reasons why blackfolks have issues about HAIR. However, this is where some of the issues derived. fro


Sad but true.
quote:
Originally posted by OhBlackButterfly:
I posted earlier:
And that is EXACTLY, imo, what black women with long black hair look like to me ---- black females with some indian mixed into their African ancestry.


And since when did black women have to mixed w/Indian or whatever to have long hair? I don't get it. Some of you act like it is IMPOSSIBLE for an African woman to have long hair w/out admixture. That is just white racist ideaology.





quote:
Originally posted by OhBlackButterfly:
As early as the latter years of the nineteenth century, ethnologists cited the deep relationship between African Americans and Native Americans. James Mooney in 1897 noted: "It is not commonly known that in all southern colonies Indian slaves were bought and sold and kept in servitude and worked in the fields side by side with negroes up to the time of the revolution... Furthermore, as the coast tribes dwindled they were compelled to associate and intermarry with the negroes until they finally lost their identity and were classified with that race, so that a considerable proportion of the blood of the southern negroes is unquestionably Indian."37 In his 1937 doctoral dissertation, James Hugo Johnston asserted, "The end of Indian slavery came with the final absorption of the blood of the Indian by the more numerous Negro slave. But the blood of the Indian did not become extinct in the slave states, for it continued to flow in the veins of the Negro."


The Indians aren't extinct; they are just in small numbers. And according to Henry Louise Gates, only a small percentage of black Americans have Native American ancestry; he may be wrong, he may be right.


quote:
Originally posted by OhBlackButterfly:
As Native American societies in the Southeast were primarily matrilineal, African males who married Native American women often became members of the wife's clan and citizens of the respective nation.


Half true, half false. False, because many Native American women who had children w/African men didn't take their African husbands back w/them to their tribes; many stayed w/their black husbands and raised their children as African-American. That is why there are so many AAs who are clueless to which tribe their Indian ancestors came from.



quote:
Originally posted by OhBlackButterfly:
During this period of transition, Africans and Native Americans shared the common experience of enslavement.25 In addition to working together in the fields, they lived together in communal living quarters, began to produce collective recipes for food and herbal remedies, shared myths and legends, and ultimately intermarried.


But the majority of the African slaves never even came in contact w/Native Americans because by the time slavery became fully institutionalized, the majority of Native American tribes were wiped out...literally.

quote:
Originally posted by OhBlackButterfly:
The intermarriage of Africans and Native Americans was facilitated by the disproportionate numbers of African male slaves to females (3 to 1) and the decimation of Native American males by disease, enslavement, and prolonged war against the colonists.


Hmm...that is interesting. I knew that there were more black men than black women on the plantations, but I didn't know that the number was so disproportinated.
quote:
Originally posted by Oshun Auset:

I am one of the few who has long hair... Long curley hair, but that is because of genetic admixture. The FACT remains that the majority of the African/Black female population on the GLOBE does not have my hair type, so it is odd and very strange indeed for it to be the 'feminine ideal'. Before genetic admixture, which is a result largely of the very negative and dehumanizing historical processes of slavery and colonialism/imperialism, this was not the case.


Again, since when does an African woman HAVE to be mixed in order to have long hair? I find all of this generalization extremely offensive.

Yes, I will admit, [loosely] curly hair is NOT typical for an African woman, but long hair is NOT a rarity, as you have stated sister Oshun. There are PLENTY of black women w/long hair and plenty more could have long hair if they would stop putting harmful chemicals on their heads all the time! From what I have heard, natural African hair grows like weeds when it is chemical free. Smile
fro Let''s not forget LONG hair, straight HAIR are NOT exclusive to Amerindians, Europeans or Asians. Africa is a CONTINENT....not a country....with 60 plus diverse countries. Africans have 2 genes...a brown gene and a black gene. These genes are interchangeable AND Europeans, Asians and Amerindians COME FROM those genes. Remember? So if there is a mutation in regards to HAIR...where did that mutation derive fromEek Don't get it twisted or confused about what MASSA say...straight and curled hair and light skin ARE NOT a product of being from different cultures....there are a result DIRECTLY from Africans in a form of mutation....and are due as a STRAIGHT ramification of CLIMATE! When it's cold....like in caves....well your skin becomes lighter[and if you stay in that environment for a reasonable amount of time..your descendents will be born lighter]..when you are exposed to the SUN especially in the Southern Hemisphere....you are what? Darker! Cuz why? The environment. It's the same with HAIR...it has a lot to do with the "brown" gene that came from whom? Africans. The Homosapian sapians migrated across the
Pangaea [one whole land mass] and then migrated again across the Gondwanland i.e. the Supercontinent...until it began to break apart once more. Don't believe what Massa say! Pleeeeze. We spin our wheels over insignificant factors when the reality/truth of it all is staring us right in our faces. Since Massa don't have a BRAIN...hair is his only glory...skin color is his glory...these are things he invented as issues of importance....he had to cuz his intelligence is about as big as a peanut....the only thing he has contribute to human kind is VIOLENCE and division....and what are WE doing? Scambling over HAIR? While our children are killing each other EVERY DAY and dying in the middle of the street as massa and his asian concubine step over their bodies. What difference does it make? Curled hair, straight hair, light skin, dark skin....the Ethiopian woman who has beautiful LONG hair would probably rather have FOOD to feed her children and a place to go where flies would not sworm around the eyes of her infant. So what is HAIR anyway? A textured element to protect the head....that's all. SOME Egyptian women wore their hair BALD...cuz the importance to them was spirituality, purpose and legacy. But what do we do? With hands on hips and a stupid smirk, "girl she thinks she's the shyte/better cuz she got long hair." As I say all the time "Nigress please....what about making sure your kids get the opportunity MANY blackfolks died for...how about that? And while you at it...take OFF those fake NAILSRoll Eyes fro
quote:
Originally posted by sunnubian:
It's a shame how much white racism has made Black people hate what is natural to them.

You should have told your friend that if it o.k. for her to fake having hair that is not naturally hers, then, there certainly is not anything wrong with your being for real having hair that IS naturally yours (and her's).


yeah 3
fro And...another thing...I hope in the future Sistas will stop hatin'on another Sista regarding her hair "choice." Especially if it's designed to save time. And we all know what that feels like. The reason I bringing this up is because yesterday I ran into a Sista with the "bomb" braids. They were absolutely "beautiful." Of course, I commented on it...and complimented her. She told me she was tired of the salon scene enough to go to braids which took 2 1/2 days....I said "get out!" She replied "yea I know...but. It will last me at least 6 or 8 months if I take care of it right." Like her, I hate to be in those salons...yet I am the type who grow tired early on with the SAME hairstyle. I've had them all...long hair, short hair, pressed hair [will never do again], processed hair [will never do again], curly hair, straight hair, cringled hair, the real/original natural Afro-short and big [not the one kids are currently sportin] braids [of all variations], twists, twist wraps....I did it all. As the young woman was conveying to me...her most important issue is TIME...she had a very busy life and STILL wanted to look GOOD by her STANDARDS, I suddenly realized she was like a lot of us...who basically want to have hair that is easy to manage....no matter what the LOOK. Some sistas can do that pressed/processed hair with no problems...other sistas can do the braids, twist, afro effortless.

We must learn to be ACCEPTING of each other's hair choice and convert this knowledge to be as women on a mission...cuz as women on a mission we TAKE CARE OF OUR FAMILIES the best we can as we look as beautiful as we can. Cuz if we look GOOD we feel GOOD and pass that goodness onto our family. Now I'm not saying pink, purple and green hair is acceptable for ME...but if a Sista is walking down the street sportin this psychadelic[sp] hair style and her children are clean, happy and well behaved...then the Sista is doing her job as a woman/mother Our eyes sometimes stop right at the purple hair instead on moving on to the children who are standing right next to her.

Now I know sometimes there will be women alone [without children] sportin' this rainbow look...but the point is we are soooo quick to jump to conclusions about what WE SEE instead of what we REALLY know. She might be a flower child...who knows. But it's not fair to judge her. And if we DON'T check ourselves, we will join the team of trifling, ghetto and small women who are invisibly JEALOUS and HATIN' over insignificant and beside the point non-issues. And we all know...we're better WOMEN than that. BTW...this point goes for the career woman as well. She may NOT be a mother but she has a time issue...sometimes she's hated upon just cuz she can afford to have a certain "look." We as Black women really need to start evaluating what we do when judging another sista based on hair...cuz it's wrong bottom line. But...JHMO is all. fro
Last edited {1}


~Apparently Solange Knowles is catching groups of hell for doing her big chop and going natural. The comments/responses on her twitter are straight up FOUL and coming from the men and the women. So sad the amount of hair snobs out there and how they exist on both sides of the fence --- natural hair snobs and processed hair snobs. It's crazy.

Anyhoo, this thread is about two years old, and while I still hold the same position/opinion on the issue, I have since gone natural myself. It's been about 17 months now. I like it, and I get plenty of compliments on it, but, mostly I get no comment at all (from fellow black women). They had plent to say at first, and stared at me. I was even called "brave", or "go head girl, be nappy" in a mocking tone. But, then, the longer my hair got, the more curly it became....and now I get no comments from them. But, they still stare. The men still compliment me and so do nonblack women. I find that odd.

Anyway, I'm loving the freedom and the "health" and "go green" of it all, so I have yet to even flat iron it straight, but there is that option and versatility available which is great to know. So, I'm thinking.... 19....depending on which style I'm rockin' on any given day, be it straight or naturally curly, I can cross the path of a hair snob --- from either side of the fence, and they'll think that they know me (can judge me)...until I switch up...then what? I guess they'd think I have split personalites...?


A hair tip for any natural ladies on the site: tightlycurly.com --- the Conditioner Only Method. You just might throw ALL of your products away. You just won't have a need for them. I use (after washing hair and while damp) the

1. Herbal Essences Hello Hydration
2. Extra virgin cocunut oil

The trick is to use A RIDICULOUS AMOUNT. That is the key. It has to be a ridiculous amount of conditioner. Your hair will almost look as if you are giving yourself a relaxer --- you know, like when it's all gooped up and white and in 4 stiff-ish spikes? That's the look you'd be going for. Seperate your curls individually by hand (finger-comb) or just shake your head vigorously. The "whiteness" will become "clear" in about 30 minutes, and your hair will air dry in a couple of hours or less...depending on your hair length and thickness. Don't touch your curls during the drying process, but finger comb or touch it minimally even after it dries. Or just shake it into place. Your style will get bigger/frizzier/puffier with each day, so depending on how you like to wear it...just repeat when necessary. I like Day 1, but I REALLY like Day 2 and Day 3. I can't do a damned thing with it on Day 4, so I'm on a twice a week routine.

Another tip: We all lose about 100 hairs a day, so don't freak when you start to use this method and think that you're experiencing excessive shedding or something. You're not. It's just that you're simply not combing your 100 hairs out daily because you aren't coming your hair for several days at a time. (Oh yeah, only comb your hair on wash days WITH THE CONDITIONER IN YOUR HAIR. Use a one conditioner (a cheapie) in the shower to comb out your tangles and rinse out as usual, and then use ANOTHER (better) conditioner as the leave in that you're going to glop on. And, yes this is safe if you are careful to read the ingredients on your conditioner. Check out the website to learn more about this.) She has been doing this method for TEN YEARS without losing hair. Quite the contrary. You have GOT to see how long and healthy this woman's hair is.~
quote:
Originally posted by OhBlackButterfly:


~Apparently Solange Knowles is catching groups of hell for doing her big chop and going natural. The comments/responses on her twitter are straight up FOUL and coming from the men and the women. So sad the amount of hair snobs out there and how they exist on both sides of the fence --- natural hair snobs and processed hair snobs. It's crazy.

Anyhoo, this thread is about two years old, and while I still hold the same position/opinion on the issue, I have since gone natural myself. It's been about 17 months now. I like it, and I get plenty of compliments on it, but, mostly I get no comment at all (from fellow black women). They had plent to say at first, and stared at me. I was even called "brave", or "go head girl, be nappy" in a mocking tone. But, then, the longer my hair got, the more curly it became....and now I get no comments from them. But, they still stare. The men still compliment me and so do nonblack women. I find that odd.

Anyway, I'm loving the freedom and the "health" and "go green" of it all, so I have yet to even flat iron it straight, but there is that option and versatility available which is great to know. So, I'm thinking.... 19....depending on which style I'm rockin' on any given day, be it straight or naturally curly, I can cross the path of a hair snob --- from either side of the fence, and they'll think that they know me (can judge me)...until I switch up...then what? I guess they'd think I have split personalites...?


A hair tip for any natural ladies on the site: tightlycurly.com --- the Conditioner Only Method. You just might throw ALL of your products away. You just won't have a need for them. I use (after washing hair and while damp) the

1. Herbal Essences Hello Hydration
2. Extra virgin cocunut oil

The trick is to use A RIDICULOUS AMOUNT. That is the key. It has to be a ridiculous amount of conditioner. Your hair will almost look as if you are giving yourself a relaxer --- you know, like when it's all gooped up and white and in 4 stiff-ish spikes? That's the look you'd be going for. Seperate your curls individually by hand (finger-comb) or just shake your head vigorously. The "whiteness" will become "clear" in about 30 minutes, and your hair will air dry in a couple of hours or less...depending on your hair length and thickness. Don't touch your curls during the drying process, but finger comb or touch it minimally even after it dries. Or just shake it into place. Your style will get bigger/frizzier/puffier with each day, so depending on how you like to wear it...just repeat when necessary. I like Day 1, but I REALLY like Day 2 and Day 3. I can't do a damned thing with it on Day 4, so I'm on a twice a week routine.

Another tip: We all lose about 100 hairs a day, so don't freak when you start to use this method and think that you're experiencing excessive shedding or something. You're not. It's just that you're simply not combing your 100 hairs out daily because you aren't coming your hair for several days at a time. (Oh yeah, only comb your hair on wash days WITH THE CONDITIONER IN YOUR HAIR. Use a one conditioner (a cheapie) in the shower to comb out your tangles and rinse out as usual, and then use ANOTHER (better) conditioner as the leave in that you're going to glop on. And, yes this is safe if you are careful to read the ingredients on your conditioner. Check out the website to learn more about this.) She has been doing this method for TEN YEARS without losing hair. Quite the contrary. You have GOT to see how long and healthy this woman's hair is.~


tfro

"Wisdom Is A Woman Supporting!"
fro Those photos above of Solange Knowles are a great example of what many black women go through in terms of their intrepretation of "black beauty." There's not a thang wrong with her short hair. In fact, I love her hair short....back in the day I wore it like that. I just loooooovvved it...but! All women can't sport a style like that. Yet those who can't or couldn't were the MAIN ones always hatin on those who could by callin' the style dyke[ish], unattractive and masculine and that's so far from the truth and we all know it. The look is quite elegant and classy!

During college, in my short hairdo I attracted more men than everEek Everytime I turned around there was some man in my face...callin me an African Queen or Black
Beauty. And I wore it short to my head for at least ten years. I stopped only cuz I grew really bored with it after a while. I like to change my hair style every 3 or 4 months depended upon the convenience and durability. I even wore it short during the jeri curl phase. It was sooo tighhhht! When you wear your hair that short it shows the unique features in your face....and draws attention to it. I think she has a nice face for it....otherwise she couldn't wear it with a smile. At any time in Africa, you will see a black woman wearing her hair that short...and it's absolutely gorgeous![A few African models have very short curled hair] We [African-American women] become so conditioned and brainwashed with massa"s view of beauty.....hair DOES NOT make one beautiful. It starts from within....then evolves outward....but!

fro

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×