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I was watching a short movie on 'hair', it discussed many aspects from a Black perspective, but there was one part that was so very cute I felt complelled to share it with you.

A mother and her little girl (perhaps 5yrs old) are recounting a situation regarding the little girl's hair.

The mother and father were both dread-lock wearing individuals. When their child was born they let the child's hair grow to a point where it too could be locked into dreads.

The daughter's dread-lock fashion was difficult for the mother to maintain. Apparently, after school, the little girl would often come home with glue, glitter, dirt, and the like in her hair.

One day the mother asked the daughter if she wanted her (the mother) to cut the daughter's dread-locks since it was causing so many up-keep difficulties. The daughter answered "No". When pressed by the mother as to why, the daughter responded that her father would be upset.

Later on the mother brought up the subject again [the mother really wanted to cut the hair], but this time she hedged her statement with "if your father said it was okay to cut your hair could we cut it then?"

At this point it's important to note that the daughter has never seen her mother or father cut their hair or anyone else'. So when her mother asked her that question the little girl said "No" again.

The mother pressed again, "Why don't you want us to cut your hair?"... without missing a beat the little girl said ...


"Because it will bleed." winkgrin



Children, they are beautiful, please share your children's story, joke, or statement.

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... its time for Prosperity


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An African American Board Game Of Wealth & Success.
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That was sweet. Isn't is funny how you can always count on something a child may say or do to make your day?

When I look back over my entire life, I feel that it has always been a child, children, that I remember the most joy from, the most happiness, and often the most wisdom. Usually exactly right after they have recked your last nerve, they make your entire day.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnubian:
That was sweet. Isn't is funny how you can always count on something a child may say or do to make your day?

When I look back over my entire life, I feel that it has always been a child, children, that I remember the most joy from, the most happiness, and often the most wisdom. Usually exactly right after they have recked your last nerve, they make your entire day.


true



here are few smileeees (net material)

quote:

I had been teaching my three-year old daughter the Lord's Prayer. For several evenings at bedtime, she would repeat after me the lines from the prayer. Finally, she decided to go solo. I listened with pride as she carefully enunciated each word, right up to the end of the prayer: "Lead us not into temptation," she prayed, "but deliver us some E-mail. Amen."



A little boy was overheard praying: "Lord, if you can't make me a better boy, don't worry about it. I'm having a real good time like I am."



A Sunday school teacher asked her little children, as they were on the way to church service, "And why is it necessary to be quiet in church?" One bright little girl replied, "Because people are sleeping."



A mother was preparing pancakes for her sons, Kevin, 5, and Ryan, 3. The boys began to argue over who would get the first pancake. Their mother saw the opportunity for a moral lesson. "If Jesus were sitting here, He would say 'Let my brother have the first pancake, I can wait'". Kevin turned to his younger brother & said, "Ryan, you be Jesus!"






At Sunday School they were teaching how God created everything, including human beings. Little Johnny, a child in the kindergarten class, seemed especially intent when they told him how Eve was created out of one of Adam's ribs. Later in the week his mother noticed him lying as though he was ill, & asked, "Johnny what is the matter?" Little Johnny responded, "I have a pain in my side. I think I'm going to have a wife!"


I know this doesn't have a spiritual basis, but ...

My mother tells a story about a conversation that my sister and I had back in the mid 60's.

I was about 2 yrs old and my sister was about 4. We had spent a Saturday quietly watching TV. The Lone ranger had just gone off and a news report came on about Selma. Then, Tarzan came on. It was the first time I had seen Tarzan, with it's depiction of Black folks. We lived in an all Black neighborhood, and I had never seen Black folks dressed like that. So I asked my sister, "Why are those people dressed like that?" My sister answered without missing a beat, "Those are Alabama Indians!"
My daughter (now nearly 4yrs) about two years ago was taught months earlier (then about 2) about turning a light 'off' and 'on'. While with her God-mother on a gloomy day, the Sun came out from behind the clouds and my little genius, made the following pronouncement.

"Look the Sun is on, the sun is on...."



[I posted that on another site two years ago, and I just found it. It still warms my heart.
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
I know this doesn't have a spiritual basis, but ...

My mother tells a story about a conversation that my sister and I had back in the mid 60's.

I was about 2 yrs old and my sister was about 4. We had spent a Saturday quietly watching TV. The Lone ranger had just gone off and a news report came on about Selma. Then, Tarzan came on. It was the first time I had seen Tarzan, with it's depiction of Black folks. We lived in an all Black neighborhood, and I had never seen Black folks dressed like that. So I asked my sister, "Why are those people dressed like that?" My sister answered without missing a beat, "Those are Alabama Indians!"

_______________________________________

I just couldn't help but run "Alabama Indians" through the search engine (although what was found was somber), here's the first thing that popped up:

They Say the Wind is Red
The Alabama Choctaw Lost in Their Own Land
The past and the present of the Southeastern Indian tribe
Jacqueline A Matte

This is a moving story of the Choctaw Indians who managed to stay behind when their tribe was relocated in the 1830's. Throughout the 1800s and 1900s, they had to resist the efforts of unscrupulous government agents to steal their land and resources. But they always maintained their Indian communities"”even when government census takers listed them as black or mulatto, if they listed them at all. A moving saga of the Southwest Alabama Choctaw Indians, They Say the Wind Is Red chronicles a history of pride, endurance, and persistence, in the face of the abhorrent conditions imposed upon the Choctaw by the U.S. government
I always call home and ask my family what they want me to bring home when I am coming.

My five year old neice said she wanted a radio. So I purchased her a pocket radio for $3.99. I brought it home that nite and gave it to her. The next day, my mother overheard a conversation between my 5 year old neice and my 7 year old neice. The conversation went as thus:

7 year old: Where you get the radio?
5 Year old: Auntie Karen brought it.
7 year old: How much it cost?
5 year old: Auntie Karen paid $12 for it.
7 year old: No she didn't, you know Auntie Karen is very triflin.
5 year old: Yep, she's cheap.
7 year old: Tell her I want one, too.

I nearly passed out when I heard this because I am always teaching them new words. And I told my 7 year old neice that I am a thrifty person.

Kid's can say the darnest things winkgrin

WHEN THE HELL FORCES IS KNOCKING AT YOUR DOOR AND THE DEVIL IS OUT TO DESTROY, GOD COMMANDS YOU TO ORDER PEACE INTO YOU LIFE. MMMMM...IS THAT NOT WONDERFUL. LIVE, LOVE, AND GET ON YOUR KNEES \O/ KDO

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