PLATINUM SELLING RAPPER TELLS '60 MINUTES': WOULDN'T HELP POLICE CATCH EVEN A SERIAL KILLER BECAUSE IT WOULD HURT HIS BUSINESS AND VIOLATE HIS 'CODE OF ETHICS'
Thu Apr 19 2007 12:47:1 ET

Rap star Cam'ron says there's no situation -- including a serial killer living next door -- that would cause him to help police in any way, because to do so would hurt his music sales and violate his "code of ethics." Cam'ron, whose real name is Cameron Giles, talks to Anderson Cooper for a report on how the hip-hop culture's message to shun the police has undermined efforts to solve murders across the country. Cooper's report will be broadcast on 60 MINUTES Sunday, April 22 (7:00-8:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

"If I knew the serial killer was living next door to me?" Giles responds to a hypothetical question posed by Cooper. "I wouldn't call and tell anybody on him -- but I'd probably move," says Giles. "But I'm not going to call and be like, The serial killer's in 4E.' " ( For an excerpt of Giles' interview, click here

Giles' "code of ethics" also extends to crimes committed against him. After being shot and wounded by gunmen, Giles refused to cooperate with police. Why? "Because...it would definitely hurt my business, and the way I was raised, I just don't do that," says Giles. Pressed by Cooper, who says had he been the victim, he would want his attacker to be caught, Giles explains further: "But then again, you're not going to be on the stage tonight in the middle of, say, Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, with people with gold and platinum teeth and dreadlocks jumping up and down singing your songs, either," says Giles. "We're in two different lines of business."

"So for you, it's really about business?" Cooper asks.

"It's about business," Giles says, "but it's still also a code of ethics."

Rappers appear to be concerned about damaging what's known as their "street credibility," says Geoffrey Canada, an anti-violence advocate and educator from New York City's Harlem neighborhood. "It's one of those things that sells music and no one really quite understands why," says Canada. Their fans look up to artists if they come from the "meanest streets of the urban ghetto," he tells Cooper. For that reason, Canada says, they do not cooperate with the police.

Canada says in the poor New York City neighborhood he grew up in, only the criminals didn't talk to the police, but within today's hip-hop culture, that's changed. "It is now a cultural norm that is being preached in poor communities....It's like you can't be a black person if you have a set of values that say I will not watch a crime happen in my community without getting involved to stop it,'" Canada tells Cooper.

Young people from some of New York's toughest neighborhoods echo Canada's assessment, calling the message not to help police "the rules" and helping the police "a crime" in their neighborhoods. These "rules" are contributing to a much lower percentage of arrests in homicide cases -- a statistic known as the "clearance rate" -- in largely poor, minority neighborhoods throughout the country, according to Prof. David Kennedy of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. "I work in communities where the clearance rate for homicides has gone into the single digits," says Kennedy. The national rate for homicide clearance is 60 percent. "In these neighborhoods, we are on the verge of -- or maybe we have already lost -- the rule of law," he tells Cooper.

Says Canada, "It's like we're saying to the criminals, You can have our community....Do anything you want and we will either deal with it ourselves or we'll simply ignore it.' "


quote:
Yet there are those who will complain that the police are the problem in our communities and that they don't care about crime when it involves black victims..... I especially like the part about moving, somehow I get a picture of him sneaking out the neighborhood in the middle of the night when everybody is asleep
Original Post
Good post, prison ethics are being promoted among young black youth via Rap music.

Someone told me that rap music sales are on the decline more than 20% last year and white kids are the largest consumers of it lately.

So there is hope that the debase and gutter mentality are being ignored more by black youth.
quote:
"It's about business," Giles says, "but it's still also a code of ethics."


Code of ethics! According to this fine human being, his code of ethics involves moving out of the neighborhood instead of arousing his community to the monster in their midst.

I wonder where his code of ethics would be if one of his relatives end up buried in the basement of his neighbor.
quote:
Originally posted by jazzdog:
Giles' "code of ethics" also extends to crimes committed against him. After being shot and wounded by gunmen, Giles refused to cooperate with police. Why? "Because...it would definitely hurt my business, and the way I was raised, I just don't do that," says Giles. Pressed by Cooper, who says had he been the victim, he would want his attacker to be caught, Giles explains further: "But then again, you're not going to be on the stage tonight in the middle of, say, Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, with people with gold and platinum teeth and dreadlocks jumping up and down singing your songs, either," says Giles. "We're in two different lines of business."


That's just a damn shame. Roll Eyes

quote:
Good post, prison ethics are being promoted among young black youth via Rap music.

Someone told me that rap music sales are on the decline more than 20% last year and white kids are the largest consumers of it lately.

So there is hope that the debase and gutter mentality are being ignored more by black youth.


appl

I've heard the same thing. I'm hoping for a better, more positive mentality to replace it. Smile

Although Ddouble won't believe me ... I do think very highly of many of today's youth and the positive things they are doing and accomplishing!

Many of them contribute to this very board. tfro
Yet another example of Hip Hop protecting it's "credibility". When are we going to wake up and see that there is a serious epidemic influencing and "shaping" our future.
quote:
Originally posted by Momentum:
Good post, prison ethics are being promoted among young black youth via Rap music.

Someone told me that rap music sales are on the decline more than 20% last year and white kids are the largest consumers of it lately.

So there is hope that the debase and gutter mentality are being ignored more by black youth.


I wish I could agree here, but most of that 20% is probably from white kids. It occurred to me a few months back that as white pop music becomes more hip hop influenced (a la Justin Timberlake & Nelly Furtado), the pop consumers who drove rap's chart surge in recent years can now get that same edginess, attitude, and beat that drew them to hip hop from this new pop instead. So now they don't need rap as much.

And what's worse, even if hip hop disappeared tomorrow, the culture that it came from-then-amplified-and-reinforced will still be here. I doubt that anybody who already refuses to call the cops will change that attitude just because hip hop is not as popular. Frown
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:
I wish I could agree here, but most of that 20% is probably from white kids.


But does that really matter, Vox? For me, any decline, for whatever reason, of any negativity regarding Black folks is a plus! You don't think so? Confused
quote:
Originally posted by Sigmasteel:
Yet another example of Hip Hop protecting it's "credibility". When are we going to wake up and see that there is a serious epidemic influencing and "shaping" our future.



**nice frat picture.....I recognize the hat and shield.....also how the kid sees himself in the mirror.....
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:
I wish I could agree here, but most of that 20% is probably from white kids.


But does that really matter, Vox? For me, any decline, for whatever reason, of any negativity regarding Black folks is a plus! You don't think so? Confused


Definitely I agree that any decline in negativity is a plus, but Momentum was suggesting that the 20% decline might be mainly due to decreasing BLACK interest in it. Hopefully that day is coming, but while I disagree that the 20% is mostly due to a decline in interest among black listeners, I do think Momentum's implication is correct, that it probably would be better if the decline was mostly in black interest instead of white interest.

Let's see... jazz, 1920s... rock & roll, late 1940s... hip hop, 1970s... Seems like we're about due for some brand new form of music to come out anyway, right?
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:
Let's see... jazz, 1920s... rock & roll, late 1940s... hip hop, 1970s... Seems like we're about due for some brand new form of music to come out anyway, right?


Yep, that might be nice! Smile
Things tend to go around in circles, maybe its time for jazz to make a hugh, hugh comeback. If it does I'm ready for it cabbage
Vox, I see your point. Where that kind of gangster mentality is already established, yeah those people are unlikely to change anytime soon.

I agree with you Ebony Rose, any positive news that gangster rap, misogyny rap is on the decline is good news.

But I see a backlash at anyone who disrespect or exploit black culture for whatever reason. I was so pleased that Imus was fired when black folks had enough and now I see more of us directing our anger towards the rappers and their industry that are just as guilty as Imus. Also I watched Oprah the other day and those girls from Spelman College vented and lot of frustration at the panel of 4 who are leaders in Hip Hop industry who they accused as part of the problem of how black people and black women are perceived over the world.

I think the Imus issue is a turning point towards decency and civility, I hope anyway.

Jazzdog, how could we have ever abandoned Jazz art, there is so much more work and innovation to be done and enjoyment to have, Blues too.
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:

I doubt that anybody who already refuses to call the cops will change that attitude just because hip hop is not as popular. Frown


I imagine that any wholesale shift from Hip Hop would no doubt be driven by an evolution in mass mindset - which could be what also changes broader behavior beyond just what kind of music someone buys.
quote:
Originally posted by jazzdog:

Things tend to go around in circles, maybe its time for jazz to make a hugh, hugh comeback. If it does I'm ready for it cabbage


Yeah - I can just see it now GANGSTA JAZZ! ohsnap
quote:
Originally posted by jazzdog:
HEY!! They better not screw with my jazz!


Don't worry ... a "gangsta" wouldn't know the first thing about what to do with a musical instrument!! Eek lol
Point 1: I think that most cops are assholes... Having said that, I would still call them if I found out that someone like Jeffery Dahmer lived next door...

Point 2: Anyone who would not "do the right thing" just because they were concerned about their "street cred"/record sales is certainly not going to do it when it comes to misogyny and the destruction of the Black community...

Point 3: Hip Hop is not driven by the artists... It is not driven by the consumers... It is not driven by arbitron or billboard magazine... It is driven by entities that have no interest in promoting positivity in the Black community... It is driven by those who seek to prevent us from gaining/seeking knowledge of ourselves... KRS-1 and PE did not fall off, they were pushed!!

Point 4: Some Jazz musicians are gangstas... don't be fooled!!
i think the drop in sales of rap has nothing to do w/ people not "listening" to rap..

imo, it is still the most popular genre of music on the scene to day..

drop has everything to do w/ how it is purchased (or is the correct tern stolen?)

nobody buys records from the wharehouse anymore...

people are burning cd and downloading at a very large rate.

that is the reason for the drop in sale, but rap music is still as popular as ever.
quote:
Originally posted by blaqfist:
i think the drop in sales of rap has nothing to do w/ people not "listening" to rap..

imo, it is still the most popular genre of music on the scene to day..

drop has everything to do w/ how it is purchased (or is the correct tern stolen?)

nobody buys records from the wharehouse anymore...

people are burning cd and downloading at a very large rate.

that is the reason for the drop in sale, but rap music is still as popular as ever.
People are burning/downloading because; 1. rec stores like Tower (now defunct) are charging outrageous rates for cd's... $18.99 and all you get is 45 mins worth of music... and 2. Music is no longer real music... Back in the day 80% of today's music would not have even been recorded...
quote:
Originally posted by AlwaysFidelis:
anyone familiar with the term "snitch-jacket"? It has a bit more to do with personal safety than just street cred.
Anybody can go to a payphone and call in an anonymous tip... No one would be the wiser...
assuming of course that the police know who they are looking for. Not too long ago there was a gang shooting at a park, which resulted in the death of a little kid. When someone finally decided to speak up, a young boy, he had to testify in court. Not only in front of the gang member who was charged, but also the rest of southside mafia that decided to attend.
Nothing says courage more then staring down evil and doing the right thing. The sad part is that the child is probably the only person brave enough to show some guts. Evil depends on the inaction of good people.
Let's see... jazz, 1920s... rock & roll, late 1940s... hip hop, 1970s... Seems like we're about due for some brand new form of music to come out anyway, right?---Vox

I have been thinking the same thing for some time.

Someone has to write the next genre.

, or create the new 'feel'.


'Country & Western' restructure itself into 'Country' in a movement led largely by Chet Atkins with great assist from Les Paul.

The 'Black Music' of the '40s became the 'Rhythm & Blues' of '50s... that was quickly dubbed 'R&B' with the arrival of 'Elvis' singing of the music, and the attending need of European-American to 'call it something else'..., and 'Jazz' was used for something else... made a new name mandatory before the 'greater society' could claim it.

Therefore another conversion....'Rock 'n Roll'.

Wasn't that what that 'guy' was singing about 'rockin' and rollin' till the break of day...'?

'Hip-Hop' and 'Rap' have 'ruled the day' for more than a generation.

But I don't see the new genre...yet.


PEACE

Jim Chester
African Americans, as an aggregate are as equally socially stratified as their white counterparts. That is to say, that many blacks in America enjoy social and economic stratification and the social values associated with that stratification in identical or in similar fashion as middle-class whites. Middle and upper-middle class African Americans embrace many white middle-class values that are unquestionably distinctly different from those of inner-city residents at the economic lower class rung of society. These middle class values encompass such things as; racial integration, home ownership, education, religion and service in the defense of their nation, - i.e., military service irrespective of how America treats black folk! I seriously doubt if social values such as the ones I just mentioned are prevalent among inner-city Hip-Hoppers. As the piece on Rap shows, a distinctly different social value system is at play. More often than not, the values of the Hip-Hop community are born out of many decades of racial segregation, isolation, economic deprivation, and daily life under a white racist police state. It should surprise no one that African Americans under these circumstances would indeed develop a way of life that is conducive to the environment they reside in. After all, isn't Rap music about the life and experiences of those who live it?

Even so, it should still be made clear that the adoption of white middle-class values by African Americans, - does not denote in anyway, that somehow racism has cease to exist. In fact, it is precisely the persistent presence of societal racism that in one form or another or, to one degree or another, - binds the black middle class with their less fortunate brethren in the "hood." Regardless of how or what the black middle class thinks about Rap, no different from our manumitted and enslaved predecessors, - regardless of class, race in America continues as a powerful binding force that attaches the black middle class to the plight of our economically less fortunate brothers and sisters in the inner-city. That is precisely why blacks, e.g., Juan Williams, Armstrong Williams, Shelby Steele, John McWhorter and their ilk, - who use their hand picked political or high visibility positions to publicly denounce and outright "diss" lower-class black folk in the "Hood" are so deeply despised by most blacks at all social class levels. There are many, many middle class blacks for whom despite their adoption of white middle class values are still socially, religiously or culturally very much attached to the black community. And before I forget, there are certainly those who listen to Hip-Hop. Numerous middle-class black folk today still eat chittlins, ham hocks and collard greens, - and as far I know, you still have to go to the Hood to get it.
quote:
Numerous middle-class black folk today still eat chittlins, ham hocks and collard greens, - and as far I know, you still have to go to the Hood to get it.


You kidding, right?
A story about Killa Cam. Cam'rom and his crew Dipset. Still do illgal stuff anyway. Even if they do sell a million and so. Cam'rom and Dipset are horrible people.

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