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Friday, 16 December 2005, 12:05 GMT
Source: BBC News


Actor Morgan Freeman has dismissed America's Black History Month, held annually to mark the contribution of black people, as "ridiculous".

Freeman, who won this year's best supporting actor Oscar for Million Dollar Baby, said he hoped to see an end to the annual series of events.

The Shawshank Redemption star said: "Black history is American history."

In a US TV interview, Freeman said the only way to end racism was to "stop talking about it".

The 68-year-old called for an end to the use of the words "black" and "white".

He said: "I am going to stop calling you a white man and I'm going to ask you to stop calling me a black man.

Acclaimed actor
"I don't want a black history month. You're going to relegate my history to a month?"

Black History Month, held every February, was established in 1976 as part of the US bicentennial celebrations.

It has its origins in Negro History Week, which began in 1926.

The founder of the week of celebrations, historian Carter G Woodson, said he hoped it would end when black history became fundamental to American history.

Before Freeman won his Oscar, he was nominated twice for the leading actor category - for The Shawshank Redemption in 1995 and Driving Miss Daisy in 1990.

He was also shortlisted for best supporting actor for 1987's Street Smart.

Freeman's other film credits include Se7en, Unforgiven and Batman Begins.

--------------------- Live - Learn - Love...

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This isn't the first time he's said this ... just the first time it's been blown up by the media in this way.

I think what he's saying may be true for the future, but I still believe there are too many demons to fight for it to be true now.

However, it did raise a question in my mind as to how there would ever be a time when there is no distinction of "Americans" if Black people want to/choose to hang on to that designation for whatever reason or purpose it may serve. Should there ever be a time when we do not declare ourselves to be 'Black Americans" and just fold ourselves into the fabric of "American" or is there nothing wrong with such a designation? Is it truly separation/segregation to continue to identify ourselves as "Black Americans"? And what would be the outcome if we didn't wish to give up our collective identification? Is that something that's truly keeping "White American" at bay from a more comprehensive unification with us as a people? If America is a melting pot where you can bring who you are here and continue to be that person, then why can't we always be "Black Americans" and be proud of that? Is assimilation a requirement to fair and equal treatment under the law?

Okay. I guess that's a couple of questions. My bad. Razz
This is only testiment to the fact that white people see us through images portrayed by actors on movie and television screens and media clips and sound bites.

Why did this person not ask an African American historian any questions they had about African American History Month instead of an actor? Would they ask Brad Pitt if there should be an American history month; or would they keep their questions along the line of his craft/line of work?

This is not only not the first time Morgan Freeman has made this statement, but as I remember, he was one of the African American Actors who made statements like, "I'm not South African, so (aparthied) has nothing to do with me." (or something to that effect) along with Whoopie Goldberg, and the O'Jays during the anti-aparthied era and journalist questioning their performances,etc., in South Africa, despite the world's boycotts.

Hell, I guess it's a good thing that they chose entertainment as an occupation, especially after Whoopie Goldberg made the comment that she did not want to be called African American, because she could not even be African, she "could be from Egypt."
I had to find that for myself before I would buy it but here it is:

quote:
Smiley: ... But there are some folks who just seem to be uncomfortable in their own skin. They don't love being who they are. I tell a story in the book, I think it's in the book, about Whoopi Goldberg coming on my TV show when I was on BET. And she doesn't like being called an African American, and we had this big debate about why she didn't want to be called an African American, and she said to me live on BET one night, "How do I know I'm from Africa? I could be from Egypt." And I looked at her and I just started laughing, I could not believe that Whoopi said, "How do I know I'm from Africa? I could be from Egypt." Here is somebody on national television trying to say they don't like being called black, they don't want to be called an African American, and they don't know where Egypt is on a map in the context of the continent of Africa. So that was just really interesting for me, because I love Whoopi.


http://www.unctv.org/bif/transcripts/2001/bif1704.html

I have communicated with someone on the internet before who talked about Egypt not being in Africa.

umbra
quote:
Originally posted by umbrarchist:
I had to find that for myself before I would buy it but here it is:



I have communicated with someone on the internet before who talked about Egypt not being in Africa.

umbra


^ Was this person, who thought Egypt wasn't in Africa, blind or drunk or never seen a map in his/her life? Roll Eyes
quote:
------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by umbrarchist:


Whoopie Goldberg made the comment that she did not want to be called African American, because she could not even be African, she "could be from Egypt."
------------------------------------------------

Yes, this is what I was responding to this statement made by Whoopi Goldberg. People like her and infinite ignorance never seems to amaze me. Morgan Freeman is just an old fool. Very disappointing.
quote:
^ Was this person, who thought Egypt wasn't in Africa, blind or drunk or never seen a map in his/her life? Roll Eyes


I found a map on the internet and posted it and she still wanted to argue. How she was reading my posts though is beyond me. It was like she had a positive emotional bias about Egypt and a negative emotional bias about Africa and therefore this bias must affect geography. lol

When people want to believe something, reality is irrelevant.

umbra
Morgan Freeman is one of my favorite actors...but in this case he is slightly mis-informed....and I've knocked him down a couple of knotches....!

To my untrained ear--at first this sounded like a plea for integration...

Then I had an epiphany---and arrived at a different conclusion...maybe he is going senile in flip opposite of Bill Cosby (i.e. rather than blaming and fingerpointing; Morgan Freeman is in social denial)...

Separating the blaq collective from Black History is like eliminating sight from vision...

I am going to venture to say that maybe he hasn't had the time to read up on the subject of racism and hasn't yet come across the same type of literature I have:

The United Independent Compensatory Code/System/Concept/ for thought, speech and/or action for victims of racism (white supremacy) written by Neely Fuller, Jr is a great start.

Disclaimer: This text is not recommended for the faint or weak of heart...


http://www.trinidadandtobagonews.com/forum/webbbs_config.pl/noframes/read/2258

http://www.pointshop.com/Mall/Catalog/Product/ASP/engin...e-id/1000008761.html

Side thought: Mr. Freeman is such a fine actor, but what a waste. Someone needs to enlighten this brother up with:

The 23 Strategies or "Counter-Weapons"

1. De-Educate and Re-Educate yourself and your children. 10
2. Stop (or greatly limit) watching TV, their
top mind-control weapon and mental drug. 13
3. Stop funding the Controllers, hence
your destruction, by NOT buying Drugfoods & Drugs. 17
4. Detoxify your body (internal environment) a few times a year. 19
5. Detoxify your personal-care products (topical environment). 20
6. Detoxify your household (outer environment). 25
7. Help preserve Earth ­your Home, ­our common Home. 32
8. Practice "Right Use of Will." 34
9. Love Yourself! Nurture Yourself every single day. 40
10. Drop the Albino-poisoned,Re-fashioned Counterfeit Religions. 42
11. Recharge yourself often through contact with Nature. 43
12. Meditate. Find Quiet Time alone each day... 44
13. Support Blak Economic Independence. 46
14. Stop using credit cards and other "plastic." 48
15. Protect your money from Fraud & Shysters 49
16. Protect yourself from harmful radiations. 51
17. Let's all do the "Jive-Vibe-Buster" every Saturday... 57
18. Have at least one Bellylaugh a year 59
19. Offer gratitude /praise often 59
20. Move to the country (or a town) SOON!... 60
21. Learn survival skills & self-sufficiency skills. 61
22. Learn gardening and grow yo own food. 64
23. Hold private meetings to devise/refine OTHER strategies 70
http://suzar.com/Releases/7r-survival-toc.html
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quote:
I think our brother is showing early signs of dementia.
Or the residual effects of one too many shocks from the Electric Company...

quote:
What really set "The Electric Company" apart was its high standards. The cast included many acclaimed actors (including oscar-winner Rita Moreno and Bill Cosby) and actors who earn their star status later (such as Morgan Freeman and June Angela).
No wonder...
Do you think he was saying the way to stop racism, was to "stop talking about it" and "do something" about it? I watched the 60 Minutes interview last night. He can't be that ignorant, someone who was born and raised in Mississippi. He was for taking out the Confederate flag portion off the state flag, so he's not naive.
Let me say first that Morgan Freeman is way up on my list of actors, not just as my favorite. But, this isn't about his acting.

It is however about being a renown actor who is not European.

The interview I saw last night with Mike Wallace was about putting a non-European 'on the spot' now that he has 'won the big one.' Mike Wallace never ask what Morgan Freeman thought before.

It's what the European media does.

AND...we do it to our own as well.

We challenge those who achieve fame for their stance on race, racism, segregation, apartheid, etc.

Maybe it's human nature to do this.

I agree with Huey that there is an inconsistency to think the same man that fights the State flag of Mississippi is against the positive things of 'Black History Month'.

EbonyRose ask a fair list of questions:

However, it did raise a question in my mind as to how there would ever be a time when there is no distinction of "Americans" if Black people want to/choose to hang on to that designation for whatever reason or purpose it may serve. Should there ever be a time when we do not declare ourselves to be 'Black Americans" and just fold ourselves into the fabric of "American" or is there nothing wrong with such a designation?---ER

There should be such a time. I think, however, such a time is delayed as long as we call ourselves 'black' Americans and Europeans call themselves 'white' Americans.

One of us have to stop before we both can stop making color the differentiating language of our society.

I am willing to 'go first'. I did so in choosing to identify myself as an African American-American. I see it as a great positive in that it reestablishes both an ancestral nationality AND an ethnicity in one fell swoop.

In addition it is what I want as opposed to what someone tells me I have to be.

Further, it takes color out of the language identifying me.

It's a start.


Is it truly separation/segregation to continue to identify ourselves as "Black Americans"? And what would be the outcome if we didn't wish to give up our collective identification?---ER

Yes. It is separation/segregation to continue to identify ourselves as 'black' Americans.

'black' is what was chosen to separate us in the beginning, and it has served that purpose since.

The only reason to say you are 'white' is to distinguish that you are not 'black'.

Surely no one can believe that a room full of 'Europeans' walk around saying to each other, 'I'm 'white'.

I think they distinguish themselves to each other by their ancestral nationality.

It is the standard of parity in our society.


Is that something that's truly keeping "White American" at bay from a more comprehensive unification with us as a people?---ER

Yes, but it is in place with the intent of European Americans. This gets a little convoluted when it is put in terms of 'who's doing what to whom'.

We clearly have embraced the practice; the system, and applied it to ourselves and our lives.


If America is a melting pot where you can bring who you are here and continue to be that person, then why can't we always be "Black Americans" and be proud of that?

The simple answer is you can, particularly if 'black' is who you are.

It doesn't work for me, because I know that 'black' is not who I am.

And, of course, it keeps you/me plugged into the color construction that has constrained my family all the time it has been in this land.

I can't allow that to continue, knowingly.


Is assimilation a requirement to fair and equal treatment under the law?---ER

Yes. Assimilation has to mean equal protection under the law; equal opportunity in our society by us to others AND by others to us.

How we treat each other as individuals has to have the oversight of law that does not endorse any behavior that contradicts that.


I believe Morgan Freeman understands that. I believe he wants that. And I believe that is what he was talking about.

It is unfortunate that he has to explain that every time he speaks.

It is unfortunate that we think we have to explain it every time we speak.

PEACE

Jim Chester
Huey and JW, the inconsistency is not in what we think about Morgan Freeman words, the inconsistency is in his words. His words were not to stop talking about racism and start doing something about it; his words were if we stop talking about it, it will go away. To back that up think back on what he said to qualify his belief that if we stop talking about racism it will go away. Remember he stated to Mike Wallace, I am Morgan Freeman and actor and that's how you should know me, not as Morgan Freeman the Black actor and in turn he said he will identify him as Mike Wallace and not by his race.

Side note, did any one else notice how Mike Wallace tried to make a distinction between being white and being Jewish?
Not talking about racism is like sticking your head in the sand, except that you can't see who is f**king you from behind.

Freeman is one of my favorite actors hands down, but not talking about racism makes people think that its not there and everything is just ok, and its clear from what is going on in this country that it is not. The only people who don't like talking about racism are the racists who don't like being caught in the light about the shit that they do, healthly discussion is always a key to making amends for the wrongs being done. Am really confused about what he thought he was saying.

His statement about black history month however is right on, our history is part of american history. Its the part folks don't want to talk about because they are either ashamed of it or scared of it, but its the part of history that they don't want to deal with. So heah, I agree that squeezing in over 400 years of history into 30 days instead of making it part of history courses that are taught in schools over 300 days in this country is bullshit.
Huey and JW, the inconsistency is not in what we think about Morgan Freeman words, the inconsistency is in his words. His words were not to stop talking about racism and start doing something about it; his words were if we stop talking about it, it will go away. To back that up think back on what he said to qualify his belief that if we stop talking about racism it will go away. Remember he stated to Mike Wallace, I am Morgan Freeman and actor and that's how you should know me, not as Morgan Freeman the Black actor and in turn he said he will identify him as Mike Wallace and not by his race.

Side note, did any one else notice how Mike Wallace tried to make a distinction between being white and being Jewish?---Faheem

Yeah, I noticed. This is the 'dodge' I am referring to about 'parity'. Mike Wallace didn't want to be 'lumped' in that 'white' bag in his one-on-one with Morgan Freeman. He asserted his ethnicity.

And Morgan was still just 'black'.

When a 'white' person is 'pushed' about being 'white' the move is to being Jewish. That's who the person is when in the room with others who are 'white'.

I am reluctant to 'lay all of that' on Freeman. He didn't, literally, say that.

One could equally draw the conclusion that 'not talking about 'black' makes 'black' go away. If there is no 'black' in our language, there is no 'black' in our society.

That's not an absolute truth, but that interview was about one sound bite after another.

I choose to give Freeman the benefit of any doubt, until I hear him say differently.

We know that 30-day thing is a societal game. Since we, African American-Americans, got one, everyone has to have one, women, hispanics, asians, American Indians, etc

I tell you that when we treat ourselves with the respect all others treat themselves to we won't need a day, or a week, or a month.

We will be in the forefront of society's construction 24/7/365.


PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by jazzdog:
Not talking about racism is like sticking your head in the sand, except that you can't see who is f**king you from behind.

-------------------------------------------

Yea, isn't that what they used to tell rape victims and victims of child molestation to do . . .
___________________________________________



"The only people who don't like talking about racism are the racists who don't like being caught in the light about the shit that they do"
-----------------------------------

. . . and those in bed with them literally, or otherwise; (and those who want to be in some more movies)

____________________________________________


"So heah, I agree that squeezing in over 400 years of history into 30 days instead of making it part of history courses that are taught in schools over 300 days in this country is bullshit.

--------------------------------------------

"making it part of history courses that are taught in schools over 300 days in this country is bullshit."------is what he should have finished with
quote:
Not talking about racism is like sticking your head in the sand,


Actually I'm am sick of hearing all the talk about racism. I've been hearing it for decades. Talk doesn't accomplish jack sh!t. Talk doesn't get us any power. I'd be more interested in making accountin/personal finance mandatory for all Black kids in high school if the Whites are too dumb to do it tough sh!t. I don't care if White morons are racist if I am well ehough of to not be dependent on them.

umbrarchist
There is such a thing as an OLD fool......and they are really fools....because unlike a young man....he has had the time to recognize the err of his ways and change.....but we'll learn to quit taking the words of actors and atheletes to heart.....they are not inherent leaders because they are high profile...like one person said.....they might want to ask an HISTORIAN he next time.......
quote:
originally posted by Kevin41-- "...because unlike a young man...he has had the time to recognize the err of his ways and change..."


This statement is so very accurate.

-------------------------

Diagnosis: Morgan Freeman is suffering from a chronic episode of "Cultural Denial".

Cure: I suggest he research what these learned men and women have to say about the importance of 'knowing' to help counter this/his insidious mental disease process:

Dr. Claud Anderson
Dr. Neely Fuller, Jr.
Dr. Frances Cress-Welsing
Dr. Chancellor Williams
Dr. John Henrik Clarke
Dr. Alex Darkwah
Dr. Cheihk Anta Diop
Dr. Josef Ben-Jochannan
Carl Upchurch
and
JA Rogers

just to name a few....
Okay, yeah, people, yeah.

We should shun Black History Month en mass! That'll solve the problem of ourstory being totally left out of American History. The history texts in schools (both public and private) include everyone's perspective already, we don't need to cram our story into a single month.

Yeah... that'll work!
Yeah... that'll work!---Tsome

Most thinking African American-American have to agree that the answer is not in abandoning African American History Month.

That one-month observation gives us at least some degree of control over what is put in the language and content of American history.


Also, I still cannot condemn Morgan Freeman's understanding of himself, and all of us like him.

He cannot be held to making an all-inclusive, societal statement in '25 words or less', AND on the spur of the moment.

PEACE

Jim Chester
Can't say I agree we should stop talking about race--if anything, it would seem to lead to more problems, because issues which need to be addressed would be ignored. As for doing away with the whole Black history month, I kinda understand where he is coming from. I believe that our history is part of American history, and thus should be taught with "normal" history curriculum. I also think that Black History should be an additional elective subject, just like the Advanced Placement board offers high school students college credit for an AP course in European History (I took this class in HS). One thing that always annoyed me about Black History Month was that, first, it's a friggin' month! One month? Kiss my arse! Second, whenever I learned about Black contributions to American society, it was almost the most petty and superficial examples, like "peanut butter". Don't get me wrong, I'm glad Mr. Carver found several uses for the peanut, but there were/are TONS more important things that we never get taught. Why only the silly shiznit? It's not just me, either: almost all of my Black friends agree that in order to REALLY understand and appreciate what we have contributed, we have to study on our own, or else we'll be stuck with our newfound pride in inventing.....the doorstop.
Carver's inventions didn't stop at peanut butter... he was an agricultural chemist for crying outside!

He discovered three hundred uses for peanuts and hundreds more uses for soybeans, pecans and sweet potatoes. To help souther farmers economically were he created recipes and improvements to or for: adhesives, axle grease, bleach, buttermilk, chili sauce, fuel briquettes, ink, instant coffee, linoleum, mayonnaise, meat tenderizer, metal polish, paper, plastic, pavement, shaving cream, shoe polish, synthetic rubber, talcum powder and wood stain.

That doesn't seem "silly" to me. I don't know of the average joe who has invented anything.
quote:
Originally posted by umbrarchist:
Well I'm in the, "Oh no! It's Black History month again" camp. LOL


How's that working for ya'? Are you any less Black during February... or more? Are you more of a target? Less of a target? More prosperous... less? More Black (hue-wise) ... or less? Is there more discriminiation in February... or less? Is accounting closer to being mandatory for high schoolers in February... or less?

Oh' no... not ourstory again... dammit I don't wanna' hear about it no mo'! *ha ha ha... hee hee hell*
Well up here in the North we tend not to socialize as much as we're hunkered down for the winter.

Summer gives more opportunity to socialize in the community hence why Caribanna is not held in February Smile . Hot weather as far as I am concerned is part of our culture and history.

My inference is that the cold is contrary to our people and it is less likely that you are going to get a large gathering of people in the dead of winter (hence a crowd control tactic- just another conspiracy theory).

It is nice that there were all those firsts in February but who did the selections blacks or whites?

Just some food for thought
quote:
Originally posted by Isome:
quote:
Originally posted by umbrarchist:
Well I'm in the, "Oh no! It's Black History month again" camp. LOL


How's that working for ya'? Are you any less Black during February... or more? Are you more of a target? Less of a target? More prosperous... less? More Black (hue-wise) ... or less? Is there more discriminiation in February... or less? Is accounting closer to being mandatory for high schoolers in February... or less?

Oh' no... not ourstory again... dammit I don't wanna' hear about it no mo'! *ha ha ha... hee hee hell*


I have asked a number of Black people what the cotton gin was. Most didn't know what I was talking about. I did a search on it on this site a while back and found 3 mentions. I don't recall it ever hearing it mentioned as part of Black History Month.

The history of the last 500 years has been a record of what people with technology can do to people without technology and the people without technology can't do a damn thing about it.

Most of what gets peddled as Black history is the same as White history. distorted trivia to memorize that doesn't increase understanding or power. The White people don't tell the White kids that Hnry Ford donated money to the NAZI party in the 20s. Most people are supposed to be ignorant of important information, including most White people.

umbrarchist
******************************
Morgan Freeman Defies Labels

CLARKSDALE, Miss., Dec. 18, 2005

(CBS) In the movies, he often personifies the calm in the eye of the storm. But Mike Wallace finds that the off-screen man is, at 68, a dynamic presence from Hollywood to Clarksdale, Mississippi.

From one riveting movie role to another, Morgan Freeman somehow makes us believe that no one else can possibly play it as well he does. So often onscreen, he is the calm in the eye of a storm, the quiet, forceful voice of reason, but correspondent Mike Wallace found a more personal and candid Morgan Freeman of varying moods.

At age 68, Freeman shows no sign of slowing down, off-screen or on. This year, we saw him in four films and heard him narrate two others. He'll appear in four more films next year.

When it is sailing season in the Caribbean, that is where you'll find Morgan Freeman, alone.

60 Minutes met him first in The Virgin Islands, aboard his boat.

"This boat is a Shannon 43. It's one of the 12 best-built boats in the entire world," explains Freeman.

Freeman goes out sailing by himself, saying he enjoys the challenge.

"If you live a life of make-believe, your life isn't worth anything until you do something that does challenge your reality. And to me, sailing the open ocean is a real challenge, because it's life or death. There's no quarter," says Freeman.

But he spends most of his time in that make-believe world of acting.

"I like the character roles. Somewhere back there I really came to the conclusion in my mind that the difference between acting and stardom was major. And that if you become a star, people are going to go to see you. If you remain an actor, they're going to go and see the story you're in," says Freeman.

Some of the stories he has played in are among the most memorable in film history, including "The Shawshank Redemption," alongside Clint Eastwood in "Unforgiven," and opposite Jessica Tandy in "Driving Miss Daisy."

All those roles seem to be made for him.

A late bloomer, Freeman began his professional career in theater when he was 27. By age 34, he was the "Easy Reader" on TV's "The Electric Company" kids' show.

Thirty-three years, 41 films and four Oscar nominations later came his first Academy Award win last year, for his performance with Hilary Swank and Clint Eastwood in "Million Dollar Baby."

How does he approach a role?

"Yeah, how do you get there? My approach to acting is that I am totally intuitive. I read the script and I get it. If I don't get it, I can't do it. Those are the ones I say, ˜I don't think this is the role for me.' They'll be ˜But, oh, no you don't want to...' I know."

Freeman says he was drawn to acting by birth. "I was born to do it."

He says he realized his calling around the age of 12, going to movies and saying to himself, "I can do that."

"I can. Yeah. I had teachers tell me, ˜You're magic, you're good. You found your calling,'" Freeman remembers.

Freeman heard that calling in northeastern Mississippi, the birthplace of the blues, but a region that recently escaped the wrath of Hurricane Katrina.

This is where Freeman grew up for the most part and still makes his home, living near his childhood roots and miles from the nearest stoplight, albeit in a movie star's mansion.

He and his wife Myrna share 120 acres with their horses. Down the road in Clarksdale, Mississippi, Freeman co-owns a restaurant and a blues club.

Between his movie shoots, he is a regular in Clarksdale, often cutting up with tourists and cutting the rug with locals in his club.

He and his business partner Bill Luckett have been bankrolling the blues club and the restaurant at a loss for almost five years now. His business interests here are labors of Freeman's love for his native Mississippi Delta.

But Mississippi's history of racial conflict bothers him even to this day. Forgive, he says, but never forget.

For one, he thinks the Mississippi state flag, with its confederate emblem, should be changed.

"That flag has always represented, number one, treason and, number two, a separation of white people from Jews, niggers and homosexuals. And you can't change that. You can't tell me I'm never going to be able to look at that flag and think, ˜Ah, it's my heritage, my, you know...' Never," says Freeman.

His social and political views are at times surprising and he pulls no punches.

He says he finds Black History Month "ridiculous."

"You're going to relegate my history to a month?" asks Freeman. "I don't want a Black History Month. Black history is American history," he says, noting that there are no white or Jewish history months.

How can we get rid of racism?

"Stop talking about it. I'm going to stop calling you a white man," Freeman says to Wallace. "And I'm going to ask you to stop calling me a black man. I know you as Mike Wallace. You know me as Morgan Freeman. You wouldn't say, ˜Well, I know this white guy named Mike Wallace.' You know what I'm sayin'?"

Freeman's convictions make for lively dinner conversation with his wife. Myrna and Morgan met 25 years ago when both were struggling in the world of New York theater. Today, few people know him better than she does.

Asked if her husband is a narcissist, Myrna Freeman says he is an egoist.

"Narcissist strikes me as somebody who's in love with themselves. I don't see him as in love with himself. He's more full of himself," she says laughing. "He's self-absorbed."

And criticism doesn't bother him?

"Not that I've ever noticed," she says.

"I don't get criticized. I'm the greatest living American actor," Morgan Freeman interjects, laughing. "Ask anybody."

He is joking, of course, but film critics say his Oscar last year was long overdue. Freeman acknowledges he's happy finally to have one, but he finds the annual Oscar race demeaning to the nominees.

"At the end of this process four of us are going to be losers. I kind of resent it," says Freeman. "Who likes feeling like a loser, you know? That's why, you lost that one, you lost that time. Oh, you think it's finally your time to win one. Win...what are you going to win? I win a doorstop, you know?"

When he's at ease, Freeman is playful, but when it comes to his off-camera pursuits, he's serious.

Take his pursuit of learning to fly, for example. He always wanted to learn to fly and finally decided to do it when he turned 65. Now, he can pilot himself across the country.

One destination he sometimes flies to is The Virgin Islands, to get back to that sailboat.

Asked if he would rather be working or on his sailboat, Freeman says, "All my life, all my life that I can, as far back as I can remember, I saw my first movie when I was six years old. And since then I wanted to do that. I wanted to be a part of that."

He is a man who makes you believe he has got it all.

"But I can say that life is good to me. Has been and is good. So I think my task is to be good to it. So how do you be good to life? You live it," says Freeman.

*******************************

....and Thank You, Morgan Freeman for telling like it is, as opposed to mindless garbage in falsehoods, when balanced against the facts in the links to bring some reality into the mix, as opposed to the useless very unrealistic garbage that comes from a university professor.....

.....mindless gargage of an expression such as....

"funny how the bush lovers.......... tuck their tails in their azzes and avoid the forums where bush is factually taken to task.....lacky azz sambo azz nias......fo reel.............." by Professor Kevin41

"black community is ignorant and perverted...now this is coming from a dysfunctional criminal....how's that for audacity? by a dysfunctional Black University Professor
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ahhhh...another opportnity to try and deface black people when those types are not even handling their own business or their families...it is those who are the most judgemental who usually are the worse performers....it is like that student that bitches about everything in an online class..the schedule, the syllabus, the topic matter....and then they turn in a paper that reads like a small child wrote it....funny indeed...........

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