Skip to main content

Old Testament

Amos--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Ahmo.

Isaiah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Asa is transposed by changing A to I and adding iah.

Jeremiah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Chereme. First transposed to Cheremiah then further after Western European tongues--Jeremiah.

Zechariah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Sechere. The S is dropped in mis-transliteration and a Z added. 'Chere' is changed to 'chariah.'

Obadiah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Means creator in Akan and is pronounced Oboadee. The word was then transposed to Obadee in European ears and then Obadiah in European languages and orthography.

Joshua--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Gyasi. Transposed by Greeks to Djoser, Djeser. The most famous African Ancient Egyptian who possessed this name was Gyasi Kraseneboo, a famous ancient sot.

Haggai--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Agyei.

Hosea--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Osee. In Europe this name Osee was transposed to Osea and then the "H" was added.

Samuel--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Asamoa.

Daniel--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Daani. One "a" was dropped; and then 'el' was added.

Jonah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Ajena. The 'a' was dropped then 'Jena' was changed to Jona then finally became Jonah.

Ezekiel--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Ezeke.

Ezra--an original Nzima/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced as Azra.

Habakkuk--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Baako.

Malachi--This name has not gone thru much trans- mis- literation/position

Nahum--an original Akan/African name and not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Nana/Naal Afum.

Nahemi--an original Ga-Adangme/African name and not European Jewish/Hebrew.

Zephaniah--an original Akan/African name and not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Sapanin. The 'Sa' dropped. Then 'in' dropped. 'Z' added to prefix and 'iah' added to suffix.

"African Who Wrote the Bible" by Dr. Darkwah. Pages 311-313.

Note: I was so impressed with this book that I send Dr. Darkwah a personal email to which he did respond, humbly and gracefully, as only he could.

Fine

Always Remember that: "Anytime We As A People Are Not Having Our WaySomeone Else Is Having Theirs...And It's Never To Our Advantage."

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

quote:
Originally posted by Fine:
Old Testament

Amos--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Ahmo.

Isaiah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Asa is transposed by changing A to I and adding iah.

Jeremiah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Chereme. First transposed to Cheremiah then further after Western European tongues--Jeremiah.

Zechariah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Sechere. The S is dropped in mis-transliteration and a Z added. 'Chere' is changed to 'chariah.'

Obadiah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Means creator in Akan and is pronounced Oboadee. The word was then transposed to Obadee in European ears and then Obadiah in European languages and orthography.

Joshua--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Gyasi. Transposed by Greeks to Djoser, Djeser. The most famous African Ancient Egyptian who possessed this name was Gyasi Kraseneboo, a famous ancient sot.

Haggai--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Agyei.

Hosea--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Osee. In Europe this name Osee was transposed to Osea and then the "H" was added.

Samuel--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Asamoa.

Daniel--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Daani. One "a" was dropped; and then 'el' was added.

Jonah--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Ajena. The 'a' was dropped then 'Jena' was changed to Jona then finally became Jonah.

Ezekiel--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Ezeke.

Ezra--an original Nzima/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced as Azra.

Habakkuk--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Baako.

Malachi--This name has not gone thru much trans- mis- literation/position

Nahum--an original Akan/African name and not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Nana/Naal Afum.

Nahemi--an original Ga-Adangme/African name and not European Jewish/Hebrew.

Zephaniah--an original Akan/African name and not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Sapanin. The 'Sa' dropped. Then 'in' dropped. 'Z' added to prefix and 'iah' added to suffix.

"African Who Wrote the Bible" by Dr. Darkwah. Pages 311-313.

Note: I was so impressed with this book that I send Dr. Darkwah a personal email to which he did respond, humbly and gracefully, as only he could.

Fine

I have not read this book, but with what is given here, I have some linguistic and philological concerns.

Firstly, I believe that European languages belong to one family group (Indo-European) and Hebrew another (Semitic).

Secondly, why is the comparison being done with the Latinized form of these names instead of the Hebrew.

Why is he trying to associate the Bible with Ghana/Akan. There is ample evidence that shows the East African influence in the Biblical tradition as one would expect. Coptic, Ethiopic, are also Semitic languages, there is the geographical proximity, direct references to East African peoples, etc. The Ghanaian connection seems a bit of a reach.

Also, what I know of the myths of the Akan are quite different than those of the Near East/North East Africa. One would think that linguistic and philological connections would be associated with social, cultural connections.

Nevertheless, I may run this by a few of the profs in my religious studies program at Rice. Several of the faculty are knowledgeable in ancient and contemporary languages of the Near East and one of my advisers (who is from Cameroon) is an African religionist.
quote:
Daniel--an original Akan/African name not European Jewish/Hebrew. Pronounced Daani. One "a" was dropped; and then 'el' was added.


????

I mean absolutely no disrespect whatsoever with this... but did the author provide any linguistic analysis? These connections he's trying to make look pretty specious. Before we go embracing the idea that ancient Aramaic and ancient Kemetic names, from thousands of years ago, came from modern, present-day Akan, there really needs to be some kind of serious evidence. I don't mean to bash the brother, but it smacks of a form of self-hate when an author feels the need to invent false connections in order to demonstrate Africa's contributions to world history. Our contributions are manifest; we don't need to do that. Hopefully this author didn't, but how did he prove his assertions?
quote:
Originally posted by kresge:
I have not read this book, but with what is given here, I have some linguistic and philological concerns.

Firstly, I believe that European languages belong to one family group (Indo-European) and Hebrew another (Semitic).


I've read this book, and others on linguistics associating West/East African(Nile Valley origins) and Biblical as well as Greek and Latin.... There are some who think that the 'semetic' linguistic language grouping is nothing but a racist term created and used byt the Western Education system to disguise and remove the African base/link to the so-called Semetic speaking peoples, they have re-termed it Afro-semetic designating it's origin. I'm refferencing Cheik Anti Diop and Dr. Ben.

quote:
Secondly, why is the comparison being done with the Latinized form of these names instead of the Hebrew.


Good question. The author doesn't adress it...of course.

quote:
Why is he trying to associate the Bible with Ghana/Akan. There is ample evidence that shows the East African influence in the Biblical tradition as one would expect. Coptic, Ethiopic, are also Semitic languages, there is the geographical proximity, direct references to East African peoples, etc. The Ghanaian connection seems a bit of a reach.


Becuase, once again we have a person of West African heritage(much like Africans born in the Amerkkkas so often do) that wants to validate the fact they are dealing with the X-tian/Biblical tradition and not their OWN, by associating it with their direct ancestors traditions, when there is little, to know, association.

quote:
Also, what I know of the myths of the Akan are quite different than those of the Near East/North East Africa. One would think that linguistic and philological connections would be associated with social, cultural connections.


He actually does try to associate cultural connections. But what is missing is the association of cultural similarities that are similar all over Africa in general. And since the Hebrew plagerisms were directly copied from East African mythos...then yes...of course there are similarities.

This author doesn't deal with the Nile Valley civilizations and the similarities with the much earlier mythos of the Ausar/Osiris, Auset/Isis, Heru/Horus mythos nad the Biblical. IMO he doesn't do this , not because he is ignorant of the Nile Valley origins to Judaism and X-tianity, but because he does not want to deal with the fact that the possible cultural similarities between Akan/Asante and other West African(Yoruba) ect. cultures and the Hebrew one is a Nile Valley pre-Biblical one.

He still must validate his beliefs by associating them with the Bible...rather that dealing with the African origins of the Bible....IMO this is doing the readers a great disservice...I wonder who paid him to skip the Nile Valley/KMT/Egypt-Sudan-Ethiopian(Ta Merry/Ta Seti) and Great Lakes region pre-Biblical connection altogether. It was so glaringly obvious an ommission. It makes him suspect IMO.

Fine,

Here is some food for thought. The word Amose is actually Moshe/Mose...

If you look into Egyptian linguistics. Amos/Moses/Mose/Moshe is a commen name of several Pharopahs...Notice how all the Egyptian Pharoahs in the Helio Bibleo have no name...Yet Moses was "Learned in all the ways of Egypt".

'He'(I don't think he existed) came up with 'his' religion in the Hebrew mythos only after being raised and educated in Egypt...

Is that a coincidence?

I think you should check out this books.

African Origins of the Major "Western Religions"

By Yosef A. A. ben-Jochannan
Published by Black Classic Press (1970)
ISBN 0-933121-29-6

http://www.africawithin.com/jochannan/african_origins.htm

I think you will like it.
kresge -- "So you offered this without the intent of dialogue and discourse on the material.

This is a discussion forum, and you seemed at the very least to be endorsing its veracity. If so, on what grounds?"

----------

Discourse is best addressed directly at the Prestigious author/reseacher who is a native of from Ghana, is a Professor and is a Master Linguist--not me!

When you have read the entire book [which is very comprehensive] I will be more than happy to discuss in discourse it's contents with you.

Fine

Attachments

Images (1)
  • DarkwahBlueRobe
quote:
Originally posted by Fine:
kresge -- "So you offered this without the intent of dialogue and discourse on the material.

This is a discussion forum, and you seemed at the very least to be endorsing its veracity. If so, on what grounds?"

----------

Discourse is best addressed directly at the Prestigious author/reseacher who is a native of from Ghana, is a Professor and is a Master Linguist--not me!

When you have read the entire book [which is very comprehensive] I will be more than happy to discuss in discourse it's contents with you.

Fine

So you are unwilling or unable to deal with the questions that I have raised. Fine WinkRoll Eyes
As to the author's credentials, I may investigate them at some other time (although I did note that he is not a major research university) as my doctoral advisors are senior scholars in African American and African religion. At this point, however, the linguistic/philologic veracity of the claims as you present them are dubious at best.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×