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As of recently, many black women have been
leaving Black salons to go to Dominican salons. And
the reason being? They enjoy the famous Dominican
blowout technique, which involves stylists giving
clients a wet roller set,sit them under a
hair dryer for about oh, 45 minutes. Then
they smooth out the roller bumps with a
vigorous blowdryer and round brush combo.


Then out comes the super straight hair, at
a lower cost than black salons' prices. Dominican
blowouts can cost about $15-30. Oh yes, and
I also wonder what is exactly so appealing about
super straight hair? Maybe it's too many commercials
with superstraight hair. Lets find some commercials
with natural hair. I sit here and think about my hair,
satisfied that my hair is at it's maximum length, no
shrinkage! I do a jig and dance just for that!

With so many women going to Dominican salons,
what is this doing to Black salons? Based on
the findings of THe Wall Street Journal, the
answer is grim. "It's hard enough in these times,
but Dominican salons are undercutting our prices,
even passing out fliers to our own clients, says
Atlanta Hairdresser Jannifer Jackson.

The situation has become so serious that
last year, New Jersey based hairstylist/barber
Gina Brydie created the National Black
Cosmetology Association to help salons protect
their business against Dominican competition.
 "We have Asians coming in with the beauty
supplies and Dominicans coming in and taking
over our industry "Byrdie said in an interview
with The Wall Street Journal.

    Many African American hairstylists also
present the issuewith the actual Dominican
blowout technique, informing that they
use too much heat and yank the hair too hard
while blowdrying, which causes breakage.
A prominent Atlanta hairstylist  Bad Boy
Romeosays this "Let me tell you, they
are helping my business because people
are coming to me after the Dominicans
 make their hair fall out.

    People, I got an attitude just reading the story and
never visited the place. Sounds like somebody
needs a whoopin. Why would they even use such
methods as too much heat and yanking to
damage people's hair like that? I personally
would stick to the black salons if I went to salons.
We need more money in the black salons.

 That's why things go flat, when people
go take their business to the Chinese
and Dominicans and the black salons
right in front of their face. That is why
people go broke. It is not enough
support for the black salons.

It is sad. Yet, I'm sure they learned their
lesson after the hair incidents. It seems like
no matter what black people in competition
with other races.

          It sounds like the other salons are
 incompetents with the way they damage
the hair. Are they jealous of our HAIR?
Who gave them a license? And
take this as warning. You gotta really
investigate where you get your hair done,
especially if it is a new and unusual place and it
sounds really good or too good to be true.
If you want to sell out your money, sell it
back to black. We really need it in our
black community. You see alot of other businesses
are managed by other races. We must keep
black businesses around. It's a self pride
thing, it's a money thing, just keep it around!
         
          Thank you!!!

http://www.essence.com/hair/sa...on_from_domincan.php

"Black History, All Day, Everyday, All The Time."
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The situation has become so serious that last year, New Jersey based hairstylist/barber Gina Brydie created the National Black Cosmetology Association to help salons protect their business against Dominican competition.
HBO...help a brother out.  Is the issue about straightening black hair and thus inferiorizing the afrikan aesthetic in the first place or is it about outsiders straightening black hair and thus inferiorizing the afrikan aesthetic?

You know, the good ol Mafia used to set up "insurance" and associations for business owners.  Nevertheless it was a way to curtail free enterprise and promote discrimination upon which the functions of America are supposedly based.  It amazes me that we are still fighting for some of the precepts of the American way yet at the same time establishing "protectionist" policies and associations to undermine it.

The NBCA was set up by Gina Brydie to protect their businesses against the Dominican competition by what means?

Remember in the movie Tombstone, the Earps were greeted by the president of the "anti-chinese business league".  Many condomimiums and neighborhoods set up homeowners associations for the same reasons.  Whats the difference? 

I remember the good ol saying that if you build a better mousetrap, they will bead a path to your door, especially if it is cheaper.  Perhaps we forgot about the Woolworth 5-10 business model.  Perhaps the salon owners didnt refinance their Lexus SUVs and have to charge high rent to the stylists and now they can't compete.  No different from how the American steel industry with their union wages could not compete against 10 cent an hour Chinese and Mexican labor.

But anyway, it seems to me that this is bickering over the likes of black store owners being mad that the arab store owners are dominating the sales of beer, wine, lottery, smokes, not to mention high-sodium, high-sugar and high-fat, rotten food.   So why dont we also formulate a "black gang reefa selling association" because the west side  latino gangs are starting to sell openly on the east side...and they got DA BOMB...and for cheaper too.  My cousin Benny can't move his quarter sacks no more.

There is absolutely nothing that "black hair care" does for black people except for perpetuate the image and mindset of the european aesthetic and line the pockets of those who take advantage of this exploitative industry.  In fact, there are studies that show that cellulite is a direct result of all of the toxic chemicals that particularly women put on their sacred temples day in and day out.

Lock your hair sisters.  Unlock your spiritual connection to the Earth and Sun. 

Your savings will be much more than what you would pay to eat whole/organic/netjer-all foods.

Love thyself...both internally and externally.

-shem htp
Last edited by discipleofmaat
discipleofmaat I see the issue as outsiders trying to inferiorize the african aesthetic.
You know how they even discriminate against some people for wearing dreadlocks
which really should not be called dreadlocks but lovelocks. There's nothing
dreadful about them. Some employers don't want to see dreadlocks in the workplace.
I say it's not even worth working with them if they make it about hairstyles like that.
For any place, who accepts dreadlocks, I believe will have better opportunities
and will be less stress. That's the best enviornment. Anyways, if they trying
to destroy black hair then they must secretly admire it. They know the result
of too much straightness. Straight hair ain't everything. It's not worth all the
money or gold in the world. I seen alot of people with hair that isn't superstraight
look really good.


The businesses are competing race against race. If more black people come together
in unity we will have more businesses.


Oh and your point about black people being mad that Arabs dominate beer wine lottery,etc...I could think of more positive things us black people could be dominating.
Let's dominate more positions in Congress and law..Let's dominate something
that's powerful. I'm going into mass communications which is a very powerful field.
I would get a joy out of seeing more black people camera operating and
things of that nature, directors,etc.



I agree that locking the hair is a great idea...Question though...does locking
the hair prevent split ends?


And good point about putting the best stuff inside and outside...


I have to get back to you on the way they set up the industry to
protect against Dominican businesses.....I will look more into it.
Reference:
Question though...does locking the hair prevent split ends?
Well you got me there.  I thought just simply cutting of the ends would prevent split ends.  How do our indigenous relatives prevent split ends?

In the meantime while I wait for you to get back to me, I will look up all of the chemicals you put on yourselves.

But lets face it.  Nappy/kinky hair is the natural state of hair for most of those of Afrikan descent.  There is nothing wrong nor ugly nor unhealthy about kinky hair.  It is a continuation of the destruction of our esteem and aesthetic by psychological terrorism since slavery that is perpetuated by us...no different from complexionism.

ANYYTHING associated with lightness/whiteness is held in higher regard in our communities.

I plan to do a search on these boards about topics regarding the phenomenon of skin bleaching also.  Both the same animal.

-give thankhs
But Dominicans are of AFrican Ancestry too, right? 


I've always heard that if you want your hair straightened and/or blowdried in a way that will make it "swing like a white girl" go to the Dominicans...  I currently enjoy having nappy hair so i never found a Dominican Salon


but the Essence position seems a bit weird to me.
Well I have a few questions:

Are we complaining that the Dominican procedure is damaging hair or damaging black pockets?

I dont understand why it takes a Black Association to protect black hair business when all it takes is informing people of the (alleged) dangers...or even initiating an investigation by whatever state agency monitors haircare and issues licenses.  There just has to be numerous complaints from sisters whose hair has been damaged by this "destructive Dominican process".

But this teaming up against others is no different than mob-run unions organizing against and intimidating firms that don't pay "insurance".

If the real issue is that Dominicans are taking all the business, well that is America.  Build a better mousetrap and sell it cheaper.  That's all you need to do. 

Like I said before, the black hair care industry is actually what has been traditional psychological slavery that is based upon the negative stigma of nappy/kinky Afrikan hair.  So the industry is exploitative and perpetuates this counter-aesthetic in the first place.  While we're at it, we might as well complain that the A-rabs are taking all of the malt liquor wine and cigarette business from the black-owned corner stores.

This seems to do more with protecting dollars than protecting black hair.

Let's be honest.  Call a spade a spade.
Hello, I'm complaining about both the hair process and the loss of money in the black hair care company. They are complaining about their loss of Business. The National Black Cosmetology Association has a mission to support their own business. Go to this page: http://www.nationalblackcosmet...n.com/about-nbca.php I think they could do better with their hair practices by not limiting them to just straight hair. That's what I see advertised on their website border at the top. They do want to transform their beauty business, so say maybe they will include natural hair. All they would need is a petition or people to bring it up at the meetings or somewhat.


I said this before, but if the arabs want to dominate the liquor and cigarette stuff, that's not
anything special to control. Liquor and cigarette is paying to damage the body anyways.
Getting high is not anything positive, making/selling those products is also nothing to
be proud of...so really the Arabs can have that! It's not a need, plus Black people especially
don't need it! We need more positive things for our black race!
Last edited by Charismaallover
Reference:
Like I said before, the black hair care industry is actually what has been traditional psychological slavery that is based upon the negative stigma of nappy/kinky Afrikan hair. So the industry is exploitative and perpetuates this counter-aesthetic in the first place. While we're at it, we might as well complain that the A-rabs are taking all of the malt liquor wine and cigarette business from the black-owned corner stores. This seems to do more with protecting dollars than protecting black hair
Like I said before, the black hair care industry is actually what has been traditional psychological slavery that is based upon the negative stigma of nappy/kinky Afrikan hair.  So the industry is exploitative and perpetuates this counter-aesthetic in the first place.

While I do agree with you with the psychological slavery concept of having kinky hair, that's true, however this industry for Black hair equipped African American women with a source of power of self-help/entreprenuism,  independence, self-sufficiency and of course [separate from whites]IDENTITY....implemented by C.J. Walker for years. The exploitation comes when other cultures such as asian merchants sell [on a retail/large scale] "hair" used primarily by Blacks to other merchants.  Instead of selling this  specialized "hair" to black merchants who can then sell them to their black customers.  In other words, asian merchants will only do business other asian or white merchants...and NOT do business [with the hair thang]with black merchants.  This is sooo wrong on many many levels. 

While we're at it, we might as well complain that the A-rabs are taking all of the malt liquor wine and cigarette business from the black-owned corner stores.

Malt liquor and cigarettes are unhealthy habits for African Americans who can use that money to educate their children and improve the lifestyle of their families instead of facing alcoholism and cancer-something we DO NOT need in our communities.  Black owned corner stores should store products that will keep us HEALTHY.   

This seems to do more with protecting dollars than protecting black hair

I agree...but!  I'm just sayin

 

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