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However, Charter Schools also represent a double-edged sword for African American youth/students because the vast majority do not and will not have the opportunity to attend the few really good Charter Schools across America, while these very Charter Schools are siphoning even more monies from the very public schools the majority of African American students have no choice but to attend.  

 

 

Originally Posted by skuderjaymes:
Originally Posted by Xumbrarchist:

Is the reason we don't have National Recommended Reading Lists the simple fact that lots of people want education to be expensive?

 

4 Trillion Dollars!

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/...lion-and-is-growing/

 

This is news that represents an opportunity, not a conspiracy.  The existing model has failed African American communities..  Change is here.. and the questions we should be asking are:  how can we get our needs met in the midst of these changes?  How can we take advantage of this shift.

 

 

Change is here in the form of these devices:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgBBCgKqu88

 

The problem is the traditional educational system figuring out what to do with them.  Since they could not come up with a suggested reading list in 50 years I am pretty sceptical about how they will use them.

 

Project Gutenberg has 45,000+ books FOR FREE and the count is rising constantly.  It was fewer than 3,000 in 2000.  So even if only 5% of those books are worthwhile that is all it takes for $200 to be worth it for a tablet.

 

But our problem is wading through all of the DRECK out there.  I wish someone had told me about this when I was in high school:

 

The Tyranny of Words (1938) by Stuart Chase
http://www.anxietyculture.com/tyranny.htm
http://archive.org/details/tyrannyofwords00chas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9H1StY1nU8

 

The automobile industry may not be a conspiracy, but if engineers could design a plane to do 2000 mph in 1964 is it really believable that redesigning cars every year makes sense 50 years later when they still just roll along the ground at less than 130 mph?   All of that fancy electronics could be retrofit to a '57 Chevy.

 

I think the educational system is largely a scam.  Physics at Harvard does not work differently at any community college.  So students are expected to pay a lot more for the name.  But shouldn't a really intelligent student at a cheap school be able to learn more than a not so smart student at an expensive school?  But do Big Name schools want to promote that idea.

 

Xum

Last edited by Xumbrarchist
Originally Posted by Xumbrarchist:
Originally Posted by skuderjaymes:
Originally Posted by Xumbrarchist:

Is the reason we don't have National Recommended Reading Lists the simple fact that lots of people want education to be expensive?

 

4 Trillion Dollars!

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/...lion-and-is-growing/

 

This is news that represents an opportunity, not a conspiracy.  The existing model has failed African American communities..  Change is here.. and the questions we should be asking are:  how can we get our needs met in the midst of these changes?  How can we take advantage of this shift.

 

 

Change is here in the form of these devices:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgBBCgKqu88

 

The problem is the traditional educational system figuring out what to do with them.  Since they could not come up with a suggested reading list in 50 years I am pretty sceptical about how they will use them.

 

Project Gutenberg has 45,000+ books FOR FREE and the count is rising constantly.  It was fewer than 3,000 in 2000.  So even if only 5% of those books are worthwhile that is all it takes for $200 to be worth it for a tablet.

 

But our problem is wading through all of the DRECK out there.  I wish someone had told me about this when I was in high school:

 

The Tyranny of Words (1938) by Stuart Chase
http://www.anxietyculture.com/tyranny.htm
http://archive.org/details/tyrannyofwords00chas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9H1StY1nU8

 

The automobile industry may not be a conspiracy, but if engineers could design a plane to do 2000 mph in 1964 is it really believable that redesigning cars every year makes sense 50 years later when they still just roll along the ground at less than 130 mph?   All of that fancy electronics could be retrofit to a '57 Chevy.

 

I think the educational system is largely a scam.  Physics at Harvard does not work differently at any community college.  So students are expected to pay a lot more for the name.  But shouldn't a really intelligent student at a cheap school be able to learn more than a not so smart student at an expensive school?  But do Big Name schools want to promote that idea.

 

Xum

 

Peace Xrumbachist,

 

good to see you over here..

 

I see you're still on your national reading list kick..

I'm still not really understanding though.. why you believe that to be

so important.  What's wrong with State-level reading lists?

 

Regarding traditional education:  it's a business.. and like other businesses, it's number one priority is profit.. and that's the way it

will always be..   And if this was 1960 that might be a problem.. but

this is 2014 and everything you need for a quality education is available online.. and in digital format.. for free..  It's just a matter of putting your

program together and sticking to it.  but the sad sad truth is, very very very many parents are too lazy to get involved and take control of their

children's education.  I remember back when i was Chairman of my kids elemetary school's School Site Council..  at one of the meetings, one of the parents jumped up and said indignantly,  "it's almost like you gotta teach your kids yourself!"..   and that really sums up the attitude of very very very very many parents..  they really feel like it's the schools job to educate their children..  and that they have nothing more to do with it than dressing them and sending them off and picking them up.
.  That's the real problem..  and it wouldn't matter one bit if their was a national reading list or not..  Parents have to take their children's education far more seriously.

 

 

 

 

Originally Posted by skuderjaymes:
  What's wrong with State-level reading lists?

 

Regarding traditional education:  it's a business.. and like other businesses, it's number one priority is profit.. and that's the way it

will always be..   And if this was 1960 that might be a problem.. but

this is 2014 and everything you need for a quality education is available online.. and in digital format.. for free..  It's just a matter of putting your

program together and sticking to it.  but the sad sad truth is, very very very many parents are too lazy to get involved and take control of their

children's education.

How many Americans are living in states different from where they grew up?  Are the Laws of Physics in Oregon different from the Laws of Physics in Florida?

 

I was interested in electricity in grade school.  My mother sent me to what she thought was a good school.  My mother was not stupid but I don't think she could have found me a good book about electrical devices.  Ain't it interesting how those devices have become more complicated in 40 years?

 

Teach Yourself Electricity and Electronics (2006) by Stan Gibilisco
http://www.electronics-tutoria...-and-electronics.htm

EveryCircuit  by Igor Vytyaz
https://play.google.com/store/...erycircuit&hl=en

 

Ohm's Law is the same as it was when I was in grade school.

 

But then the grade school she paid for me to attend did not teach me anything about it either.

 

I don't have a problem with every state making a list.  But with the Internet everyone would have access to all of the lists.  So redundant suggestions could be eliminated.  But it is the biases of the people making the lists that would matter.  Like Liberals would make lists different from Conservatives and Christians versus atheists.  State boundaries would be arbitrary nonsense like national boundaries.  Physics is the same in England as in Australia.  But between  some nations there would be language problems.

 

But how big a list are we talking about?  I am thinking of 100 books for kindergarten, 200 for 1st grade and 100 more with every increase in grade.  That would be 9,100 by 12th grade.

 

Actually I think the schools are designed to maintain controlled ignorance except in people's specialities.  We must all glorify European culture.  But no matter what job people get they must deal with money.  If double-entry accounting is 700 years old, why hasn't it been mandatory in schools for decades?  Of course that never crossed my mind when I was in school.  But it is so ironic that they say it was invented in Italy 700 years ago.  So why is that aspect of European culture shoved under the rug even for White kids?

 

My objective for the list is getting children's minds outside the box controlled by educators.  But WE tend to be in a box controlled by palefaces.  Grade school seems to be about killing curiosity.  That is why I suggest science fiction.  There was so much there that my grade school teachers never mentioned.  But science fiction has gotten dumber since the 70s and Star Wars.

 

Xum

Last edited by Xumbrarchist

  I agree my brotha.  And for me it makes SENSE.  Lead has been the leading component to behavioral and cognitive problems in children.  I thought it was lead paint too.  But as they say what molecule covers the entire country...that would be gasoline.  So I am interested in seeing what research will reveal next.  Since crime rates were ALWAYS blamed on the poor...which most times included black people.  So if this research gets us off the hook from being the sole agent/producer of crimes committed [robbery, murder, gangs etc] in America[in urban areas]....then what other social issue will they blame us on next?  That's the million dollar question.  But!

Last edited by Kocolicious

"then what other social issue will they blame us on next?  That's the million dollar question.  But!"

***************************************************************************

 

Hell, I'm looking for them to try to blame Global Warming on Black people next.  They will probably come up with a "scientific theory" that our dark skin is attracting too much sun on the planet.  

Reach Higher

Complete Your Education. Own Your Future.

"Education is the key to success for so many kids. And my goal specifically is to reach out directly to young people and encourage them to take charge of their futures and complete an education beyond high school."

Originally Posted by sunnubian:

Like everybody needs to go to college and we can't even create a National Recommended Reading List.

 

Pay someone to make you read crappy books.

 

This is better than the economics courses I took in college:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hN8yPLaBVm8

 

Xum

Music Notation and Terminology, by Karl W. Gehrkens

http://www.gutenberg.org/files.../19499-h/19499-h.htm

 

Yeah, it is from 1914 but how much has European music notation changed since then?  And it includes midi sound files to play back the notation.  How many expensive music books do not have that?

 

This book seems to have an extensive history.  It was updated and rereleased in 1921 and 1930.  But it has been published again in 2007.

 

http://www.unz.org/Pub/GehrkensKarl-1921

 

http://www.bookdepository.com/...hrkens/9781406528213

 

So it should be decent if it was published over so many years.  They are charging $16 for the printed version probably without sound files.

 

Xum

Last edited by Xumbrarchist

Kindergarten teacher: My job is now about tests and data — not children. I quit.

Susan Sluyter is a veteran teacher of young children in the Cambridge Public Schools who has been connected to the district for nearly 20 years and teaching for more than 25 years. Last month she sent a resignation letter ( “with deep love and a broken heart&rdquo explaining that she could no longer align her understanding of how young children learn best in safe, developmentally appropriate environments with the testing and data collection mandates imposed on teachers today.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/...not-children-i-quit/

 

Xum

Her assessment of what America's education system has been brought down to sure is correct.  It's unfortunate that her resignation means that American education has lost yet, another dedicated teacher.

 

I wouldn't be surprised that in the future, American students will be called customers and be taught by Customer Service Representatives working for all the taxpayer revenues sucking tentacles of corporate America.  

http://www.citypages.com/2011-...oring-business/full/ :

 

 ". . . 

In 2002, President George Bush signed the infamous No Child Left Behind Act. While testing around the country had been on the rise for decades, NCLB tripled it.

 

"The amount of testing that was being done mushroomed," says Kathy Mickey, a senior education analyst at Simba Information. "Every state had new contracts. There was a lot of spending."

 

The companies that create and score tests saw profits skyrocket. In 2009, K-12 testing was estimated to be a $2.7 billion industry." . . . 

 

 

***************************************************

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/...sting/companies.html :

 

 

When Congress increased this year's budget for the Department of Education by $11 billion, it set aside $400 million to help states develop and administer the tests that the No Child Left Behind Act mandated for children in grades 3 through 8. Among the likely benefactors of the extra funds were the four companies that dominate the testing market -- three test publishers and one scoring firm.

 

 

 

 

. . . 

That's basically what is being said in the articles referenced above, but more specifically with emphasis on the fact that it is all being driven by the multi-millions being made by The companies that create and score tests and by just four companies that dominate the testing market.  

 

It's a Ponzi Scheme to begin with, therefore, of course has nothing to do with the education of American children/students.  

Last edited by sunnubian

What Powerful and Greedy Elites Are Hiding When They Scapegoat the Schools

Poverty and inequality, not teachers, are the drivers of deficits in education. (Public domain)Our economy is changing in ways that are alarming. Income inequality and wealth inequalityare at their highest point in many decades; some say we are back to the age of the robber barons. Most of the gains in the economy since the great recession of 2008 have benefited the 1 percent, or even the 1 percent of the 1 percent. The middle class is shrinking, and we no longer have the richest middle class in the world. The U.S. has the highest child poverty rate of any of the advanced nations of the world (and, no, I don't count Romania as an advanced nation, having visited that nation, which suffered decades of economic plunder and stagnation under the Communist Ceausescu regime).

Forbes reports that there were 442 billionaires in the U.S. in 2013. Nice for them. Taxes have dropped dramatically for the top 1 percent since the 1970s. But don't call them plutocrats. Call them our "job creators," even though they should be called our "job out-sourcers."

Now what caused these changing conditions? My guess would be that unbridled capitalism generates inequality. Deregulation benefits the few, not the many. People with vast wealth give large sums to political candidates, who when elected, protect the economic interests of their benefactors. Anyone who wants to run for president must raise $1 billion or so. Where do you raise that kind of money? You go to the super-rich, who have the money to fund candidates of both parties, as well as an agenda to keep their money and make more.

A recent paper by Martin Gilens of Princeton University and Benjamin I. Page of Northwestern University concludes: "...economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy, while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence. Our results provide substantial support for theories of Economic Elite Domination and for theories of Biased Pluralism, but not for theories of Majoritarian Electoral Democracy or Majoritarian Pluralism." Recent decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court removing limits on campaign contributions by corporations and individuals reinforce elite control of our political system. The danger signals for democracy are loud and clear.

We often hear talk of the "hollowing out" of the middle class. We know that many regions in our country are economically depressed because they lost the local industries that provided good jobs for high school graduates. Some of those jobs were lost to new technologies, and some were outsourced to low-wage countries. Free trade sounds good, but did the politicians realize how many millions of jobs and thousands of corporations would move to Mexico, China, Bangladesh, and other countries that do not pay what Americans consider a living wage?

Instead of looking in the mirror, our politicians blame the schools. They say that we lost those jobs because our schools were preparing students poorly, not because the "job creators" wanted to export jobs to countries that pay their workers a few dollars a day.

The politicians say we must send everyone to college so we can be "globally competitive," but how will we compete with nations that pay workers and professionals only a fraction of what Americans expect to be paid and need to be paid to have a middle-class life? How can we expect more students to finish college when states are shifting college costs onto individuals and burdening them with huge debt? How can we motivate students to stay in college when so many new jobs in the next decade -- retail clerks, fast-food workers, home health aides, janitors, construction workers, truck drivers, etc. -- do not require a college degree? (The only job in the top 10 fastest growing occupations that requires a college degree is registered nurse.)

So here we are, with politicians who could not pass an eighth grade math test blaming our teachers, our schools, and our students for economic conditions that they did not create and cannot control.

In a just and sensible world, our elected officials would change the tax rates, taxing both wealth and income to reduce inequality. There is no good reason for anyone to be a billionaire. When one man or woman is worth billions of dollars, it is obscene. A person can live very handsomely if their net worth is "only" $100 million. How many homes, how many yachts, how many jets, does one person need? In terms of income taxes, consider this:under President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the marginal tax rate for the very rich was 91 percent; it is now 35 percent. The tax on long-term capital gains has dropped from 25 percent to 15 percent. No wonder that billionaire investor Warren Buffett famously said that there has indeed been class warfare, and "my class has won." Buffett noticed that secretaries in his office were paying a higher tax rate than he was. He even took to the op-ed page of the New York Times to complain that the tax code unfairly spared the richest Americans.

Will the "job creators" lose all ambition if they can't pile up billions and billions? I doubt it very much. Surely there will be even more people yearning to get very rich, even if their wealth has a limit of $100 million or even $200 million.

We need to spend more to reduce poverty. We need to spend more to make sure that all children get a good start in life. We need to reduce class sizes for our neediest children. We need to assure free medical care for those who have none. We have many needs, but we won't begin to address them until we change our tax codes to reduce inequality.

Less than half of 12th-graders can read or do math proficiently

The high school graduation rate might be at an all-time high, but less than half of American high school seniors are proficient in reading and math, according to new data released by the Education Department on Wednesday.

 

There is little good news in the results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Just 26 percent of 12th-grade students scored as proficient or better in mathematics in 2013. In reading, 38 percent were proficient or better. And there has been no improvement in 12th-graders' scores since 2009, the last time students took the tests.

 

http://www.vox.com/2014/5/7/56...do-math-proficiently

 

They couldn't get me to read Catcher in the Rye but I read more stuff that they did not require than they did require.  So I certainly knew how to read well enough.  So what happens to kids that don't find anything interesting to read?  I didn't have big screen color TV.  I didn't have color.

 

Those Red Shirts weren't read.  LOL

 

Xum

Charter schools are cheating your kids: New report reveals massive fraud, mismanagement, abuse

Just in time for National Charter School Week, there’s a new report highlighting the predictable perils of turning education into a poorly regulated business. Titled “Charter School Vulnerabilities to Waste, Fraud and Abuse,” the report focused on 15 states representing large charter markets, out of the 42 states that have charter schools. Drawing on news reports, criminal complaints, regulatory findings, audits and other sources, it “found fraud, waste and abuse cases totaling over $100 million in losses to taxpayers,” but warned that due to inadequate oversight, “the fraud and mismanagement that has been uncovered thus far might be just the tip of the iceberg.”

http://www.salon.com/2014/05/0...mismanagement_abuse/

 

Now what kid of fraud could occur in a National Recommended Reading List?

 

But I bet a lot of authors and publishers would not like it.

 

The Tyranny of Words (1938) by Stuart Chase
http://www.anxietyculture.com/tyranny.htm
http://archive.org/details/tyrannyofwords00chas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9H1StY1nU8

 

Who could make money off a great book that was FREE?

 

But isn't having kids learn a lot more important than adults making money?

 

Not to the people making the money.  But do the palefaces want us learning a lot?  Especially learning when they are talking bullsh!t.

 

Xum

They are trying to do the same thing with Public Education Funds as they are trying to do with Social Security, convince the American public that it's better off Privatized, so that corporate America, 'the private sector' can get their grimy hands on all the billions in taxpayers' revenues to divvy up among themselves.  

 

Charter Schools and giving tax dollars/government grants to "Private" schools are just creating a 'backdoor' entrance for them.  

Last edited by sunnubian

How a ‘New Secessionist’ Movement Is Threatening to Worsen School Segregation and Widen Inequalities

Classroom

(Photo Courtesy of Don Harder, CC2.0)

A new secessionist movement, anchored in the South, provides yet another reminder that “separate” still means “unequal” when it comes to the racial dynamics of the nation’s public schools.

The small middle-class town of Gardendale, Alabama, outside Birmingham, voted on November 12 to secede from the Jefferson County school district and then to raise taxes on themselves to finance the solo venture. Then, in March, Gardendale’s 14,000 residents finally got their own Board of Education. Soon after his appointment, one new board member, Clayton “Dick” Lee III, a banker and father of two, said he aspires to build a “best in class” school system “which exceeds the capabilities of the system which we are exiting.”

As Gardendale officials try to construct that “best in class” system in their prosperous community, they’ve relied on advice from their neighbors to the east in Trussville, a wealthy white suburb that broke away from the county schools in 2005. Gardendale, where about 86 percent of residents are white, is the fourth district since the late 1980s to secede from Jefferson County’s schools. About half the students in Jefferson County’s schools are either African-American or Latino, and 57 percent of students receive free or reduced lunch, the standard marker for poverty in public education.

With 36,000 students, Jefferson County’s shrinking catchment area is emblematic of a new secessionism in which cities, towns, even unincorporated areas renounce membership in a larger school district to strike out on their own. A trend befitting our individualistic times, secessionism, in many cases, cracks apart well-established, broadly defined educational communities into ever more narrow and ever more racially homogeneous ones. Sixty years after Brown v. Board of Education, new break away districts threaten to exacerbate resource disparities between wealthy and poor communities and sweep away any remnants of desegregation.

In Baton Rouge, Louisiana, an organized group of residents from an unincorporated, predominantly white, relatively affluent area with a strong tax base are trying to form an entirely new eighty-five-square-mile city for the express purpose of separating from the East Baton Rouge Parish Schools, which, by the way, enroll a majority of black and economically disadvantaged students. At the same time, a bill that would create four semi-autonomous school districts in this same southern section of Baton Rouge is being considered by the Louisiana legislature. The proposed new city, St. George, would not be the first secession from East Baton Rouge Parish schools. In recent years, three municipalities have created their own school districts, though not all were particularly affluent or predominantly white.

Next fall, the rapidly growing, predominantly white Alabama community Pike Road, with only 6,500 residents, will open its first K-8 school post-divorce from Montgomery County Public Schools, where 83 percent of its some 32,000 students are either African-American or Latino and 76 percent qualify for free and reduced lunch. Since the mid-2000s, six suburban, predominantly white unincorporated areas outside Atlanta incorporated and became cities. A bill being debated in Georgia’s legislature would amend the state constitution to give the new municipalities authority to secede from county school districts to create their own systems.

Secession efforts are not limited to the South, with efforts cropping up recently in Malibu, California, and in northeast Pennsylvania. But the movement is centered in the South because the region’s districts tend to be larger, often enrolling students who live in cities and towns throughout an entire county as opposed to a small municipality.

Several years ago, Memphis, Tennessee, briefly appeared to be going against the secession trend. In 2010, the cash-strapped city school board voted to dissolve its mostly African-American urban district and merge with Shelby County’s racially and economically diverse public school system. After the vote, the Shelby County School Superintendent John Aitken welcomed new students from the city, telling reporters, “My family just got bigger.”

“A lot of people did see this merger as a foundation on which to build something better,” said Daniel Kiel, a law professor at the University of Memphis who grew up in the city and attended racially diverse magnet schools there. “We looked at as a first step for bridging racial divides and economic divides. We thought maybe we had a place from which to begin creating something more cohesive.”

But not long after Memphis entered the county system, six predominantly white, relatively affluent suburbs promptly voted to leave it. Then, in 2013, Tennessee lawmakers passed a bill that lifted a prohibition on creating new school districts. In turn, each suburb created its own school district last summer. The new school board in one of those suburban districts, Collierville, hired Aitken, the Shelby County superintendent who had spoken such welcoming words, to be its superintendent.

“Within these movements, you hear a lot about a desire for local control and academic excellence. No one is going to say, ‘We don’t want to share our schools with poor black people.’ But the effect matters, no matter the intent,” said Dennis Parker, director of the Racial Justice Program at the American Civil Liberties Union. “And the effect will not be positive for the families in the larger system. The damage to school communities of color is very real.”

New municipalities and neighborhoods take a variety of resources with them when they leave bigger systems. Most obviously, they take students on which tax dollar distributions to schools are based. In most cases, newly created districts capture all taxable property within tighter boundary lines, cutting off the larger district from revenue that had been shared. Rapidly developing or well-developed suburbs, thus, have a huge advantage over older communities that typically suffer from declines in population and shrinking tax revenue. The creation of St. George, one study estimates, would result in a $53 million shortfall for East Baton Rouge Parish. According to a report from the Baton Rouge Area Chamber of Commerce, the incorporation would impede economic development by “the interjection of sales tax competition between two cities currently considered one community.”

Other losses are more difficult to measure. Student test scores are closely correlated with students’ socioeconomic class. If a new district enrolls a large share of affluent students, that district’s aggregate test scores, now the default measure of “quality,” will likely be high. Immediately, the new district will appear far more “successful” than the nearby larger district. For example, Louisiana publicly awards A to F letter grades to its school districts. In 2011, East Baton Rouge earned a D, but by 2013 had brought that grade up to a C, though secession advocates still routinely refer to it as a “failing” district. Meanwhile, the more affluent districts nearby, Zachary and Central, which not long ago were part of the East Baton Rouge district but now enroll relatively small shares of students from low income families, earned As from the state in 2013.

“It’s a form of branding,” said Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Stephen Nowlin, who publicly opposed Gardendale’s efforts to secede from his district. “The idea is that more affluent school district can attract businesses, increase property value, bring in a certain type of resident who can lend economic stability and enhance a particular image. I can respect the interest in that and their right to do this. I just worry that we’ve gotten away from thinking about the larger community.”

The desire for “good schools” drives people’s decisions about where to live. And as research by Professor Jennifer Holme of the University of Texas–Austin has shown, white people’s presumptions about “good schools” are driven by “status ideologies” formed by race and class biases. Secessionism makes it even easier to act on such prejudices because it creates school districts that are starkly identified by the race and social class of students. Home values, tied to a school district’s reputation, will likely go up or go down accordingly, further aiding a community’s ascension or decline.

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Parents and educators fighting against secessionism in their communities caution that the phenomenon shouldn’t be seen only as a manifestation of white people’s desire to avoid sharing classrooms with African-Americans. In many places—Memphis, Baton Rouge, much of Alabama—housing segregation is so extreme that post-desegregation, individual schools tend to be racially segregated even if a school district as a whole enrolls a racial mix of students. Beginning in the 1990s, a series of Supreme Court decisions made it easier for school districts that had been under desegregation orders to be freed from judicial oversight. Post-desegregation, many school boards in the South went on to redraw school attendance boundaries coterminous with racially segregated neighborhood configurations. The proposed new city of St. George in Louisiana would be nearly a quarter African-American, according to some estimates.The city of Baton Rouge is about 55 percent African-American.

Nowadays, it may be tax dollars, benefits of economic growth, or power on school boards that secessionists would prefer not to share. Perhaps secessionists don’t want to be associated with a lower-status school district that posts lackluster test scores. Even if we assume non-racial motivations, secessionism could still undermine the hard-won racial diversity lingering in some schools.

East Baton Rouge provides a case in point. Like a lot of other big districts in the South, it operates several well-regarded racially diverse magnet schools. Originally created under desegregation, the popular programs were retained even after they were released from court supervision. East Baton Rouge Parish’s school superintendent Bernard Taylor has said that magnet schools may not survive under St. George’s incorporation. The new district would siphon a large share of the district’s white students and a chunk of the tax dollars that pay for the specialized programs.

“I very strongly prefer that my children attend racially diverse schools,” said Tania Nyman, a white mother of two, who is trying to prevent creation of new districts in Baton Rouge. “I believe that a public school system that is truly public and welcomes all children in the entire community is a really, really important foundation for democracy. But I suppose that sounds very old-fashioned. Doesn’t it?”

 

Read Next: Patricia Williams explains why the latest affirmative action decision isn’t just about race.

Africans in America join the military to "help keep this country safe".  This country hates the very air Africans breathe.  Is the reason Africans join the military to continuously allow the very country that detests them, that forced them to live here, to keep kicking their ass with racial hatred??  If so, why???  Maybe we need to ask them "Are we citizens of this country, and if we are, why do you continually treat us in this manner?"  "If we're not, leave us alone!!"  The military was segregated until 1948.  Segregation, segregation, segregation.  We die for the country, in the country and by the country. Once Lincoln said "No more free labor", HATRED and RACISM came out 100-fold against us. Life's too short for this crap!! We need to LIVE somewhere in damn PEACE!!!!!!

Ever consider that intellectual segregation from White folks is necessary because European culture depends on brainwashing White kids to be stupid.

 

Education is critical because it puts children's minds into a box.  It amazes me how long it took me to think it was really peculiar the double-entry accounting is not mandatory in schools designed by Whites and yet they say it was invented in Italy 700 years ago.  Why would Shakespeare be more important and all kids get 4 years of English literature?

 

Xum

I checked the web site of my Catholic high school a few days ago.

 

The tuition is $9,500 now.

 

I looked over the curriculum.  I think a recommended reading list could be made better than their curriculum but it would only work for self motivated kids.  But how many self-motivated kids have parents who can't afford $10,000 a year for tuition?

 

I think such a reading list would mess up the over-priced  educational system.

 

The well to do need to keep the poor ignorant.

 

psik

Last edited by Xumbrarchist

New Orleans Nearly Finished Killing Off Its Public Schools

City now home to first all-charter school district in country

- Sarah Lazare, staff writer

New Orleans is now home to the first and only school district in the United States that is all-charter.

(Photo: Kyla Duhamel / Flickr Creative Commons)

The Recovery School District on Wednesday shuttered its last remaining traditional public school, meaning that almost all New Orleans schools are now privatized. The shutdowns moved forward despite opposition from local communities.

"The right to public education is fundamental human right," said Monique Harden of the New Orleans-basedAdvocates for Environmental Human Rights in an interview with Common Dreams. "Profit motive drives insane, reckless, unsafe decisions that are not in the best interests of children."

Benjamin Banneker Elementary, which closed Wednesday, is one of the five remaining traditional public schools in the Recovery School District that will not re-open this fall, according to theWashington Post. This leaves only five remaining public schools in New Orleans, all of them under the control of the Orleans Parish School Board, The TImes Picayunereports.

The state-run RSD was created in 2003 with the expressed purpose of improving school performance. Yet, in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the agency embarked on an aggressive campaign to prevent public schools from re-opening and divert public funds to charter schools, rapidly privatizing the education system.

"[T]he Recovery School District took over four fifths of the city's schools after the storm, and now it has closed or chartered every school it reopened," according to The TImes Picayune.The RSD also controls schools in other areas of Louisiana.

Author Naomi Klein has cited mass privatization of New Orleans public schools in the aftermath of Katrina as an examples of what she calls the "shock doctrine," in which crises are exploited to push otherwise unpopular and neoliberal policies on communities.

The sabotage of New Orleans public schools included the mass-firing of 7,000 teachers, most of them African-American, and subsequent hiring of disproportionately white and young teachers, some of them hailing from Teach for America, the Post reports. While the teachers have since won a $1 billion lawsuit for wrongful termination, the privatization drive continues.

Critics charge that the rapid privatization further segregated New Orleans schools by shepherding white students into the best charter schools while sending African American students into poorly resourced ones. The RSD has been hit by at least one civil rightscomplaint alleging discrimination.

“Under the guise of education reform, corporate profiteers and politicians have zeroed in on black communities, leaving behind devastation and destabilization,” said Debra Jones of the New Orleans organization Conscious Concerned Citizens Controlling Community Changes in a statement released earlier this month.

report by the Institute on Race and Poverty at the University of Minnesota Law School, published in 2010, found that, "The increasingly charterized public school system has seriously undermined equality of opportunity among public school students, sorting white students and a small minority of students of color into better performing OPSB and BESE schools, while confining the majority of low-income students of color to the lower-performing RSN sector."

alleging discrimination in Newark, New Jersey; Chicago and New Orleans - See more at: http://www.advancementproject....sthash.eWRizlRo.dpuf

Despite evidence of climbing segregation and inequality, the New Orleans model of privatization is taking root in cities across the United States, including Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, DC.

Tracie Washington of the Louisiana Justice Institute told Common Dreams that the "draconian" spread of charter schools leaves communities with "no fallback plan." She asked, "What happens when one of your charters, two, three, or all of them fail? What does a community do then?"

_____________________

I love the sinister role the word "privatization" takes on in the public/charter school debate.   And that sign that says "our children are not revenue units" is hilarious.  Our children are indeed revenue units.. to public schools and also to charter schools..  nothing has changed there.   The public education system in New Orleans was atrocious..  I don't care what color the teachers where.. those children were underserved..  it was time to change.  And I hope it spreads nation wide..   break the lock teachers unions have on our kids education.  The system as is is so locked in, the teachers don't have to give a dam about what parents want or need or think..  that has to change..  Parents should be applying for the schools they want their kids to attend..  it should not be up to some public worker.. or some arbitrary line to determine what school a kid attends. 

 

I'd love to see it splinter even further to the point where we have Single grade schools run by individual teachers and their staffs.  The schools with the best performance will have the greatest demand..  and the greatest competition to get in..  like in japan..  the market will respond with study programs and after-school schools to help kids prepare for entrance exams for the schools they wish to attend.   The system in use in America right now is crippling American kids... especially African American kids..  it trips me out to see folks out there up in arms about changes occurring to the system that has undeserved them for decades.

 

 

New Orleans Nearly Finished Killing Off Its Public Schools

City now home to first all-charter school district in country

- Sarah Lazare, staff writer

New Orleans is now home to the first and only school district in the United States that is all-charter.

(Photo: Kyla Duhamel / Flickr Creative Commons)

The Recovery School District on Wednesday shuttered its last remaining traditional public school, meaning that almost all New Orleans schools are now privatized. The shutdowns moved forward despite opposition from local communities.

"The right to public education is fundamental human right," said Monique Harden of the New Orleans-basedAdvocates for Environmental Human Rights in an interview with Common Dreams. "Profit motive drives insane, reckless, unsafe decisions that are not in the best interests of children."

Benjamin Banneker Elementary, which closed Wednesday, is one of the five remaining traditional public schools in the Recovery School District that will not re-open this fall, according to theWashington Post. This leaves only five remaining public schools in New Orleans, all of them under the control of the Orleans Parish School Board, The TImes Picayunereports.

The state-run RSD was created in 2003 with the expressed purpose of improving school performance. Yet, in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the agency embarked on an aggressive campaign to prevent public schools from re-opening and divert public funds to charter schools, rapidly privatizing the education system.

"[T]he Recovery School District took over four fifths of the city's schools after the storm, and now it has closed or chartered every school it reopened," according to The TImes Picayune.The RSD also controls schools in other areas of Louisiana.

Author Naomi Klein has cited mass privatization of New Orleans public schools in the aftermath of Katrina as an examples of what she calls the "shock doctrine," in which crises are exploited to push otherwise unpopular and neoliberal policies on communities.

The sabotage of New Orleans public schools included the mass-firing of 7,000 teachers, most of them African-American, and subsequent hiring of disproportionately white and young teachers, some of them hailing from Teach for America, the Post reports. While the teachers have since won a $1 billion lawsuit for wrongful termination, the privatization drive continues.

Critics charge that the rapid privatization further segregated New Orleans schools by shepherding white students into the best charter schools while sending African American students into poorly resourced ones. The RSD has been hit by at least one civil rightscomplaint alleging discrimination.

“Under the guise of education reform, corporate profiteers and politicians have zeroed in on black communities, leaving behind devastation and destabilization,” said Debra Jones of the New Orleans organization Conscious Concerned Citizens Controlling Community Changes in a statement released earlier this month.

report by the Institute on Race and Poverty at the University of Minnesota Law School, published in 2010, found that, "The increasingly charterized public school system has seriously undermined equality of opportunity among public school students, sorting white students and a small minority of students of color into better performing OPSB and BESE schools, while confining the majority of low-income students of color to the lower-performing RSN sector."

alleging discrimination in Newark, New Jersey; Chicago and New Orleans - See more at: http://www.advancementproject....sthash.eWRizlRo.dpuf

Despite evidence of climbing segregation and inequality, the New Orleans model of privatization is taking root in cities across the United States, including Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, DC.

Tracie Washington of the Louisiana Justice Institute told Common Dreams that the "draconian" spread of charter schools leaves communities with "no fallback plan." She asked, "What happens when one of your charters, two, three, or all of them fail? What does a community do then?"

_____________________

I love the sinister role the word "privatization" takes on in the public/charter school debate.   And that sign that says "our children are not revenue units" is hilarious.  Our children are indeed revenue units.. to public schools and also to charter schools..  nothing has changed there.   The public education system in New Orleans was atrocious..  I don't care what color the teachers where.. those children were underserved..  it was time to change.  And I hope it spreads nation wide..   break the lock teachers unions have on our kids education.  The system as is is so locked in, the teachers don't have to give a dam about what parents want or need or think..  that has to change..  Parents should be applying for the schools they want their kids to attend..  it should not be up to some public worker.. or some arbitrary line to determine what school a kid attends. 

 

I'd love to see it splinter even further to the point where we have Single grade schools run by individual teachers and their staffs.  The schools with the best performance will have the greatest demand..  and the greatest competition to get in..  like in japan..  the market will respond with study programs and after-school schools to help kids prepare for entrance exams for the schools they wish to attend.   The system in use in America right now is crippling American kids... especially African American kids..  it trips me out to see folks out there up in arms about changes occurring to the system that has undeserved them for decades.

It's really like a double-edged sword for Black parents.  On the one hand, Black parents want their child to get the best education available to them, on the other hand, not all Black parents can send their child to a Charter School or a Private School, and for all those who can't, Private Schools and Charter Schools are siphoning off much needed funds from the very public schools most Black children have no other choice but to attend.  

 

But, it's not teachers unions that are the main problems facing public schools, I mean, teachers unions may very well be causing some problems in public education, but they are not and never have been the primary reason for problems with public school education.  I live in the south and trust me, there are no or few and far between "teachers unions", or unions of any kind for that matter, in most of the south, and the same problems are being faced in public school education here, especially where Black children are concerned.  

 

The main problem [as I see it] is the fact that Education has been taken out of the hands of teachers, professional educators and the very people who are naturally gifted to teach or who are have been trained to be teachers in the first place.  

 

Politicians and corporate America have turned America's schools into one big Ponzi Scheme, to be fleeced for all the tax-payer funding they can siphon out of public school dollars.  So, on it's face, Charter Schools and assisting private schools appears to be an approach that should be available to parents where public schools are failing their child, but when you look deeper, you realize that most of the "charter schools" are doing no better than the public schools and most of these "private schools' are merely taking advantage of an opportunity to increase their own private funds, while teaching from the exact same public school curriculum and policy, then a clearer picture of a public school funding Ponzi scheme begins to appear.  

 

It is now politicians and corporations that dictate, manipulate, change and control the curriculum, the rules and regulations, school policy, testing and even how teachers must [and must not] teach.  As it stands now, teachers actually have little to do with teaching in America's public schools, beyond showing up and following what has been laid out for them by politicians and/or some obscure corporate entity.  So, whatever problems teachers unions may be causing as well, teachers unions are not the primary cause for so much failure in America's public education.

 

American parents and American voters are going to have to find a way to come together to get politics and corporate America out of public education and demand equal funding  for all public schools and a universal curriculum and that private schools and so-called Charter Schools not be allowed to siphon the public school funding needed to do so.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last edited by sunnubian

Now we have an option that has only existed for the last 8 years or so.

 

Do you really think Charter or Public or Catholic schools are going to try to make the best use of them?  At best they are going to cram them into their existing agenda.

 

I was looking at schools reading list sites.  20 of the books in high school reading lists I found available for free in Project Gutenberg.  Would those books be free at a charter school?

 

https://arkansashomeschool.org...school-reading-list/

 

When I was in high school you could not get a mini-computer for $10,000.  That is now the tuition at my high school.  But these tablets now have more computing power than a mainframe that cost $3,000,000 in 1980.

 

I AM NOT JOKING!!!

 

I doubt that any schools are going to try to really apply these machines to education.  They will fool around with them to make it look good.

 

I have not seen any school mention this:

 

https://play.google.com/store/...erycircuit&hl=en

 

I would have killed for that in 7th grade.

 

Xum

The Top 100 Best-Selling Education Books of 2014 (So Far)

 

http://learning.blogs.nytimes....=blogs&_r=1&

 

Psychologist Madeline Levine, author of the New York Times bestseller The Price of Privilege, brings together cutting-edge research and thirty years of clinical experience to explode once and for all the myth that good grades, high test scores, and college acceptances should define the parenting endgame.

Teach Your Children Well is a toolbox for parents, providing information, relevant research and a series of exercises to help parents clarify a definition of success that is in line with their own values as well as their children’s interests and abilities. Teach Your Children Well is a must-read for parents, educators, and therapists looking for tangible tools to help kids thrive in today’s high-stakes, competitive culture.

 

http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780061824746

 

Xum

Here is an interesting point:

The (Dis)information Age: The Persistence of Ignorance (Digital Formations)

The (Dis)information Age challenges prevailing notions about the impact of new information and media technologies. The widespread acceptance of ideas about the socially transformative power of these technologies demands a close and critical interrogation. The technologies of the information revolution, often perceived as harbingers of social transformation, may more appropriately be viewed as tools, capable of positive and negative uses. This book encourages a more rational and even skeptical approach to the claims of the information revolution and demonstrates that, despite a wealth of information, ignorance persists and even thrives. As the volume of information available to us increases, our ability to process and evaluate that information diminishes, rendering us, at times, less informed. Despite the assumed globalization potential of new information technologies, users of global media such as the World Wide Web and Facebook tend to cluster locally around their own communities of interest and even around traditional communities of geography, nationalism, and heritage. Thus new media technologies may contribute to ignorance about various «others» and, in this and many other ways, contribute to the persistence of ignorance.

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Dis-...stence/dp/1433115026

 

We now live in a world of infoDRECK.  The problem is sorting out the DRECK.

 

Just because we have LOTS of so called information does not mean we have lots of GOOD INFORMATION.  How do you sort out bullsh!t when you don't know what is bullsh!t and 50 different sources are distributing what they CLAIM is INFORMATION?

 

Xum

That might be a good read, especially since no one seems to notice that our Media is now no more than tabloid information and even that is being decided and controlled by predominately right-wing owned and operated companies.  

 

That and the fact that what you are able to or not able to locate and access on the internet is for sale.  

Last edited by sunnubian

Why Do Only White People Get Abducted by Aliens?: Teaching Lessons from the Bronx

 

"Why Do Only White People?" is a richly drawn report on inner city schools, but also a great story that I couldn't put down. Each chapter focuses on one of the author's students in a public Bronx high school, and together the stories trace the author's first years as a teacher. Garon brings the students to life--endearing and maddening, manipulative and sincere, persevering and self-destructive--and I loved her good-natured tone and honesty about her successes and failures. Garon never condescends, and is refreshingly open about the persistent cultural gulf between teacher and students even when they come to love each other. Just like a good lesson, the book is fun and moving, and only when I put it down did I realize just how much I've learned about a world very different from my own.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Only-Whi...txt?showViewpoints=1

 

Xum

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