Which do you think would be more advantageous? A Ph.D or an Ed.D? Which matters to you? Prestege or more bang for your buck i.e. does the benefit of getting a Ph.D outweigh the cost and time? Are holders of Ph.D's any smarter than people who hold an Ed.D?

Let's start building some hurtin' bombs!! --Tony "Duke" Evers

Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:

Which do you think would be more advantageous? A Ph.D or an Ed.D? Which matters to you? Prestege or more bang for your buck i.e. does the benefit of getting a Ph.D outweigh the cost and time? Are holders of Ph.D's any smarter than people who hold an Ed.D?


Both are comparable doctorate degrees with comparable work required to complete. It depends on what you plan to do with your degree. EdD (doctor of education) is more of a teaching degree whereas with certain PhD's you can go into research or medicine or whatever. Both are far too much work if you're just looking for "window dressing". 15
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
Which do you think would be more advantageous? A Ph.D or an Ed.D? Which matters to you? Prestege or more bang for your buck i.e. does the benefit of getting a Ph.D outweigh the cost and time? Are holders of Ph.D's any smarter than people who hold an Ed.D?

I think that the first question that you need to ask is what is your objective. Do you wish to be an administrator or an academic? If you want to be an administrator, the Ed.D will probably serve you well. However, if you wish to be an academic, it becomes a little more complicated. If you are looking to join the faculty in a department of education or school of education that awards Ed.D's, the Ed.D will be competitive with the PhD. However, if you wish to be part of a none education academic department, you will be better served by the PhD. Overall, the PhD gives you the most options.
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:

Which do you think would be more advantageous? A Ph.D or an Ed.D? Which matters to you? Prestege or more bang for your buck i.e. does the benefit of getting a Ph.D outweigh the cost and time? Are holders of Ph.D's any smarter than people who hold an Ed.D?


Both are comparable doctorate degrees with comparable work required to complete. It depends on what you plan to do with your degree. EdD (doctor of education) is more of a teaching degree whereas with certain PhD's you can go into research or medicine or whatever. Both are far too much work if you're just looking for "window dressing". 15


Thanks for the response. I'm already in an Ed.D program but what I keep running into is basically the same argument. The Ph.D opens more doors and has more prestige but the Ed.D gives more benefit v.s. cost effective. I know it also depends on what you want to do after post graduate school, which is why I chose the Ed.D program. My program offers a consultant component, which means I can go outside the realm of education into the business world.

I would like the option to teach on the college level if necessary but the business world is what I'm more interested in. Cost and time is also of great importance. I just don't have the time and I'm not in a position to drop everything and go to school full time, which is what a Ph.D program demands. It's a big turn-off to hear that a Ph.D makes relatively the same amount of money as a Ph.D--yes, salary is also very important. Considering the fact that I'll be in my 40's by the time I'm finished and working in my field of study I don't want to come out making only a few bucks more than I would already be making if I had just stayed in my current profession. Prestige isn't all that damn important even if it opens more doors if all that I get in return is a meager salary for a monumental investment.
quote:
Originally posted by kresge:
quote:
Originally posted by Romulus Burnett:
Which do you think would be more advantageous? A Ph.D or an Ed.D? Which matters to you? Prestege or more bang for your buck i.e. does the benefit of getting a Ph.D outweigh the cost and time? Are holders of Ph.D's any smarter than people who hold an Ed.D?

I think that the first question that you need to ask is what is your objective. Do you wish to be an administrator or an academic? If you want to be an administrator, the Ed.D will probably serve you well. However, if you wish to be an academic, it becomes a little more complicated. If you are looking to join the faculty in a department of education or school of education that awards Ed.D's, the Ed.D will be competitive with the PhD. However, if you wish to be part of a none education academic department, you will be better served by the PhD. Overall, the PhD gives you the most options.


Yeah, I am thinking more along the lines of the administrative division of a college campus rather than the classroom. I've been in too many classroom environments. I also want the flexibility of working in the corporate business sector.
Can't believe this question was asked.. or that I'm in this thread... or that I'm about to reveal this.. but there is an Ed.D. program that I'm salivating over.. but may not serve me well ultimately.. It is unknown, in a field that is not well funded... the PhD programs are not as narrow or specific as I'd like... so I have sort of the same dilemma..


My goal is entrepreneurial... working with the overly bureaucratic educational system...

Ed.D. program I'm looking at, is specifically what I want but at a third tier school in a locale where I would not want to live... but is closer to where I want to live (MD)... I know no one who has graduated from this school either..... But I have good rapport with a couple of professors who just "get it"... but I aint tryna be broke after alladat either.. but this progam is put together in a way that allows me to gain the specific training I want...

PhD programs are top tier in NY and Boston, in a subject that would require too much piece-mealing together to be worth my time... and both are in locales where I do not want to live... though I have many friends who have attended both schools and give them high marks... I have yet to find any of the work their professors/departments engaged in as relevant to me... so I don't even have the desire to reach out... sck But if I graduated from there, I would have better job opportunities in the field I want to go into...

ugh..

you know what? It may be just that American schools suck.. because Oxford has EXACTLY what I want ... and a few schools in Canada... I just don't want to move so far away... sck
quote:
Originally posted by Khalliqa:
Can't believe this question was asked.. or that I'm in this thread... or that I'm about to reveal this.. but there is an Ed.D. program that I'm salivating over.. but may not serve me well ultimately.. It is unknown, in a field that is not well funded... the PhD programs are not as narrow or specific as I'd like... so I have sort of the same dilemma..


My goal is entrepreneurial... working with the overly bureaucratic educational system...

Ed.D. program I'm looking at, is specifically what I want but at a third tier school in a locale where I would not want to live... but is closer to where I want to live (MD)... I know no one who has graduated from this school either..... But I have good rapport with a couple of professors who just "get it"... but I aint tryna be broke after alladat either.. but this progam is put together in a way that allows me to gain the specific training I want...

PhD programs are top tier in NY and Boston, in a subject that would require too much piece-mealing together to be worth my time... and both are in locales where I do not want to live... though I have many friends who have attended both schools and give them high marks... I have yet to find any of the work their professors/departments engaged in as relevant to me... so I don't even have the desire to reach out... sck But if I graduated from there, I would have better job opportunities in the field I want to go into...

ugh..

you know what? It may be just that American schools suck.. because Oxford has EXACTLY what I want ... and a few schools in Canada... I just don't want to move so far away... sck

Sister K,
You mention Oxford. Are there any other UK programs that have what you want. The reason I ask, is that the PhD from a good school in Britain may indeed be an option for you. The reason is that the PhD or DPhil is a research based degree. As such, there is little or no coursework, and often little or no residency requirement. That means that you do not have to relocate if you can spare say a 1-2 months abroad, perhaps not even that much. It really depends on the program and the adviser. I have a friend who is the University Chaplain at Princeton who got her PhD from the University of Bradford. She began it while she was Chaplain at Bucknell. She went abroad twice a year, once in the winter, the other in the summer, when students were not on campus.

Another possibility that might be a good fit: Union Institute and University. They are a distance learning school based in Ohio. They are not a University of Phoenix!!! They are fully accredited and some of their graduates wind up in respected institutions. The thing that most people do not understand about PhD's in most fields are that it is basically a mentor/mentee relationship. It is not so much the school, it is who your adviser is. With Union, they work through bringing you together with someone who is willing to serve as your adviser. This person is probably at another research university.

I know two people who got their degrees in this fashion who have been well received in academic and secular circles. They might no more, and you may want to contact either of them.

The first is Nancy Lynn Westfield
http://depts.drew.edu/tsfac/westfield/
She is an associate professor of Religious Education at Drew University.

The second is Gary Dorrien, Reinhold Niebuhr Professor of Social Ethics at Union Theological Seminary, NYC
https://www.utsnyc.edu/Page.aspx?pid=351

Update:
I remember another person, from my Chaplain days in Physical Education whose PhD is from Walden University, another distance program that may have a good rep. His information is below:

Thomas R. Johnson, Ph.D.

Department Position: Chair and Associate Professor

Years: 9

Educational History: B.A. Illinois State University - Health and Physical Education, State of Illinois Teaching Certificate - Secondary
M.A. Western Michigan University - Physical Education State of Michigan- Early Childhood Endorsement State of Michigan-Full Approval in Physical Education Program for the Handicapped State of Michigan Teaching Certificate- (Grades 7-12)
M.A. Western Michigan University-Educational Leadership Ph.D. Walden University - Education

Classes Taught @ Albion: Teaching of Elementary Physical Education; Teaching of Secondary Physical Education; Adapted Physical Education; Secondary School Health; Materials in Health Education; Movement, Physical Activity and the Classroom Teacher; Motor Learning; First Aid; Beginning Golf; Movement is Universal; Directed Studies; Seminar; Independent Study; Internships; Student Teacher Supervision; Departmental Honors Thesis Advisor; Student Academic Advisor.

Personal Interests: Golf, Early childhood Development; travel; history; sports; Eagle Scout; Honorary member of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity.

Campus Address: Office 213 Dow

Campus Phone: 517-629-0439

Email: trjohnson@albion.edu
quote:
Originally posted by kresge:
quote:
Originally posted by Khalliqa:
Can't believe this question was asked.. or that I'm in this thread... or that I'm about to reveal this.. but there is an Ed.D. program that I'm salivating over.. but may not serve me well ultimately.. It is unknown, in a field that is not well funded... the PhD programs are not as narrow or specific as I'd like... so I have sort of the same dilemma..


My goal is entrepreneurial... working with the overly bureaucratic educational system...

Ed.D. program I'm looking at, is specifically what I want but at a third tier school in a locale where I would not want to live... but is closer to where I want to live (MD)... I know no one who has graduated from this school either..... But I have good rapport with a couple of professors who just "get it"... but I aint tryna be broke after alladat either.. but this progam is put together in a way that allows me to gain the specific training I want...

PhD programs are top tier in NY and Boston, in a subject that would require too much piece-mealing together to be worth my time... and both are in locales where I do not want to live... though I have many friends who have attended both schools and give them high marks... I have yet to find any of the work their professors/departments engaged in as relevant to me... so I don't even have the desire to reach out... sck But if I graduated from there, I would have better job opportunities in the field I want to go into...

ugh..

you know what? It may be just that American schools suck.. because Oxford has EXACTLY what I want ... and a few schools in Canada... I just don't want to move so far away... sck

Sister K,
You mention Oxford. Are there any other UK programs that have what you want. The reason I ask, is that the PhD from a good school in Britain may indeed be an option for you. The reason is that the PhD or DPhil is a research based degree. As such, there is little or no coursework, and often little or no residency requirement. That means that you do not have to relocate if you can spare say a 1-2 months abroad, perhaps not even that much. It really depends on the program and the adviser. I have a friend who is the University Chaplain at Princeton who got her PhD from the University of Bradford. She began it while she was Chaplain at Bucknell. She went abroad twice a year, once in the winter, the other in the summer, when students were not on campus.

Another possibility that might be a good fit: Union Institute and University. They are a distance learning school based in Ohio. They are not a University of Phoenix!!! They are fully accredited and some of their graduates wind up in respected institutions. The thing that most people do not understand about PhD's in most fields are that it is basically a mentor/mentee relationship. It is not so much the school, it is who your adviser is. With Union, they work through bringing you together with someone who is willing to serve as your adviser. This person is probably at another research university.

I know two people who got their degrees in this fashion who have been well received in academic and secular circles. They might no more, and you may want to contact either of them.

The first is Nancy Lynn Westfield
http://depts.drew.edu/tsfac/westfield/
She is an associate professor of Religious Education at Drew University.

The second is Gary Dorrien, Reinhold Niebuhr Professor of Social Ethics at Union Theological Seminary, NYC
https://www.utsnyc.edu/Page.aspx?pid=351

Update:
I remember another person, from my Chaplain days in Physical Education whose PhD is from Walden University, another distance program that may have a good rep. His information is below:

Thomas R. Johnson, Ph.D.

Department Position: Chair and Associate Professor

Years: 9

Educational History: B.A. Illinois State University - Health and Physical Education, State of Illinois Teaching Certificate - Secondary
M.A. Western Michigan University - Physical Education State of Michigan- Early Childhood Endorsement State of Michigan-Full Approval in Physical Education Program for the Handicapped State of Michigan Teaching Certificate- (Grades 7-12)
M.A. Western Michigan University-Educational Leadership Ph.D. Walden University - Education

Classes Taught @ Albion: Teaching of Elementary Physical Education; Teaching of Secondary Physical Education; Adapted Physical Education; Secondary School Health; Materials in Health Education; Movement, Physical Activity and the Classroom Teacher; Motor Learning; First Aid; Beginning Golf; Movement is Universal; Directed Studies; Seminar; Independent Study; Internships; Student Teacher Supervision; Departmental Honors Thesis Advisor; Student Academic Advisor.

Personal Interests: Golf, Early childhood Development; travel; history; sports; Eagle Scout; Honorary member of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity.

Campus Address: Office 213 Dow

Campus Phone: 517-629-0439

Email: trjohnson@albion.edu


Okay I'm soooo loving you right now...

KRESGE! You touched on all my reservation points...

*relocation

*not tryna do no diploma mill degree thingy..

*and the worth of the degree with respect to my personal goals and academic opportunities...

*Re: an advisor...

SEE! I have a very good rapport with a couple of professors at the school in NJ.. but none any where else.. and I have a friend who butt heads with his advisor and his advisor basically tried (and still does) to sabotage his career.. and it is a shame because they are both headed in similar directions and must reference one another in their publications! lolol laugh and watching him go through that scares me a little...

I'm glad you pointed that out.. I will look into the online degrees.. I'm not averse to them in any way... :-)

Okay thank you for the links..

hug flowers

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