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Does anyone, other than me, have problems with the privitization of civilian law enforcement?

If not, let me ask you a question: To whom does a private security company swear allegience?

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11800942/
quote:
Greg Lagana, a DynCorp spokesman, said companies like his with experience in security and logistics have a lot to offer government agencies in emergency situations. "We do a lot of work for government that the government finds, for its own reasons, more convenient or more economical to contract out," he said. "Sometimes it's more efficiently done by the private sector. We don't make those determinations; they do. If there is work we can do, we'll do it."
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I can see where your problem lies. It sounds like guns for hire, in other words mercenaries. Companies who've robbed Africa of her resources use hired "security" to harass at will the locals. If you live near a military installation, you'll see that Wackenhut has been contracted out to do security instead of the soldiers. This started in Europe and now has spread to the U.S. I don't like it either. By the way, Wackenhut is one of the largest gov't contractors. They must be greasing some palms in D.C.
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
Does anyone, other than me, have problems with the privitization of civilian law enforcement?

If not, let me ask you a question: To whom does a private security company swear allegience?

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11800942/
quote:
Greg Lagana, a DynCorp spokesman, said companies like his with experience in security and logistics have a lot to offer government agencies in emergency situations. "We do a lot of work for government that the government finds, for its own reasons, more convenient or more economical to contract out," he said. "Sometimes it's more efficiently done by the private sector. We don't make those determinations; they do. If there is work we can do, we'll do it."

I agree, this is very scary indeed. As a private entity, there are certainly questions of accountability that arise (stockholders vs citizens, openess of practices and procedures vs. private information and trade secrets, etc.) What about training, what about law enforcement officers representing the communities which they serve? As deputized citizens, must they follow procedures with respect to searches (warrants)? Does Miranda hold for these guys?
quote:
I agree, this is very scary indeed. As a private entity, there are certainly questions of accountability that arise (stockholders vs citizens, openess of practices and procedures vs. private information and trade secrets, etc.) What about training, what about law enforcement officers representing the communities which they serve? As deputized citizens, must they follow procedures with respect to searches (warrants)? Does Miranda hold for these guys?


Are these mercenaries Deputized, or merely contract employees answerable to only those that pay them. And, for that matter, the security company is only answerable he/she that writes the check, not necessarily those of us that own the bank account. Remember this article observation:

quote:
Their strict style -- "no, sir," for example, instead of "How you boys doing?" -- has come to irritate St. Bernard Homeland Security Director Larry Ingargiola. "They're a little sterner, more military-type" than people from Louisiana, said Ingargiola, recounting how he has been denied entry to several FEMA sites.


Besides, Consitutional guarantees, e.g., the 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th Amendments, only applied to the State, not private companies.

quote:
I am having less of a problem when the municipal, State, and/or county police are failing.


JWC, first, where are the reports of civilian law enforcement failing to justify a privatization of the function? Second, even with the local law enforcement being stretched thin, would the better, and Democratically safer, alternative be to use the DHS money to hire, at better pay, more police?
JWC, first, where are the reports of civilian law enforcement failing to justify a privatization of the function?---K4R

Failure of local law enforcement was/is implicite in my response. I used local experience of residents considering such contracting as my example.

Such failure is the only basis I consider valid for even considering such an alternative.


Second, even with the local law enforcement being stretched thin, would the better, and Democratically safer, alternative be to use the DHS money to hire, at better pay, more police?---K4R

No.

When I say 'private', I mean privately as in citizen-based contracted protection.

The federal governament contracts an affiliate of NOI to protect federally-owned housing units.

In the instance I referenced, private citizens offered the services of the NOI to local city law enforcement should it continue to fail to protect private citizens.

I do not advocate federally-funeded mercernary force.

Self-defense is another matter.


PEACE

Jim Chester

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