I have been hearing reports that church leaderships across the country are opting to cancel church for Sunday, December 25th. Why? Because it's Christmas morning. Frown
Original Post
...and what will that achieve? Roll Eyes
Christmas is the whole point for churchgoers... to come together and celebrate, right?
I believe that everyone should celebrate (or not celebrate) the season in whatever way is suitable for them, but cancelling any type of 'ceremony' - particularly this one - achieves nothing and penalizes the wrong people.
.
kweli4real,

Yes, I have a big problem with it, and am quite saddened to hear of it.

If I have heard rightly, it seems to be the big churches that are cancelling services, which speaks to a kind of spiritual poverty in them--from the top down--that neeeds to be addressed.

We need a prophet to speak to the Church again, don't we?

Our church, happily, is not cancelling Sunday worship. I would be pleased if we had Communion then, for Christmas and Easter seem like very appropriate days to have it, but we only have it once a month, on the first Sunday, and this Theopneustos ("God-breathed") tradition is not to be changed, on pain of glower from the elders of the church.

Oh well. At least we'll be worshipping. I hope that means something good about us.
quote:
We need a prophet to speak to the Church again, don't we?


The church has one already but it's spelled a little differently.

While these mega-churches have the potential to do a great deal of good with it's 6-figure weekly take; but it seems to condition it's service on, not the recipients need; but rather, his/her believing [or at least pretending to believe] as their are told to. Frown
kweli,

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The church has one already but it's spelled a little differently.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ouch.

This last year I saw the play, "God's Man in Texas," about the trials of a very sincere associate pastor called to a mega-church which he eventually left. It reminded me a bit of Joseph Bailey's little book, "The Gospel Blimp." Both show that it is a temptation to replace worship and obedience with gimmickery and numbers, and trade worship for entertainment.

I wonder: what would it take to start a spiritual awakening in the American Church?
quote:
I wonder: what would it take to start a spiritual awakening in the American Church?


I'd be about the last person to hazard a guess. Seeing as I have not stepped foot into a church since shortly after 9/11 ... When every preacher in america felt the need to preach that islamic=terrorist.

But if I were to guess, the spiritual awakening will come when Christians [and others] accept that religion is a personal matter, not subject to the judgment of other christians.
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
quote:
I wonder: what would it take to start a spiritual awakening in the American Church?


I'd be about the last person to hazard a guess. Seeing as I have not stepped foot into a church since shortly after 9/11 ... When every preacher in america felt the need to preach that islamic=terrorist.
But if I were to guess, the spiritual awakening will come when Christians [and others] accept that religion is a personal matter, not subject to the judgment of other christians.


tfro
quote:
I'd be about the last person to hazard a guess. Seeing as I have not stepped foot into a church since shortly after 9/11 ... When every preacher in america felt the need to preach that islamic=terrorist.


Maybe I should explain. I was born and raised in a church that was racially/ethnically diverse, even though it is located in a 99+% Black neighborhood.

From an early age, I noticed and questioned the contradictions in the Bible; but more I questioned the contradictions between what the Bible commanded and how most church-folks acted. But it was all good because the church was extremely service oriented, youth supportive and had a Pastor that actually lived the life that he preached about. I was able to make peace with my doubts.

However, the combination of moving out of my birth city, my continued study of religion in general and the rise of the corporate church, I began to feel out of place. I didn't believe what christians believed; or practice as christians practiced.

The final straw came when the pastor of the church [a mega-church, BTW] in attended preached 3 consecutive sermons on the evil of Islam, equating every follower of Islam with being a terrorist, either by action or thought. When I called him on his taking verses of the Koran out of context and promoting the idea of Islam being inherently evil, he dismissed me as ignorant and told me that true christian belief and tolerance of Islam are incompatible and mutually exclusive concepts.

With that, I realized that I could no longer support this idealogy through my participation.
So let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival [feast day] or a new moon or sabbaths.

----- Colossians 2:16 NKJV (emphasis added)

Christians are not under the law of Moses.

It's nobody's business as for how you chose to keep the sabbath.

That's only between two persons, and that's you and God.
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
The final straw came when the pastor of the church [a mega-church, BTW] in attended preached 3 consecutive sermons on the evil of Islam, equating every follower of Islam with being a terrorist, either by action or thought. When I called him on his taking verses of the Koran out of context and promoting the idea of Islam being inherently evil, he dismissed me as ignorant and told me that true christian belief and tolerance of Islam are incompatible and mutually exclusive concepts.

With that, I realized that I could no longer support this idealogy through my participation.


Although I would consider myself an atheist, I find it's a damn shame when religion (in particular) is used to exclude any group of people. It is hypocritical and ugly. And either creates more bigots, or turns people away from their faith. A lose-lose situation.
.
.
quote:
Originally posted by Iam:
It's nobody's business as for how you chose to keep the sabbath.

That's only between two persons, and that's you and God.


I absolutely agree with this.
I agree, Twin, that it is frustrating to have a church empty on Christmas Day - the very day that started the Christian faith. I also understand that Christmas has ceased to be a spiritual observance for a very long time. It's all about the Benjamins, baybee, and people want to enjoy their temperal "stuff" rather than focus on things that are eternal.

There are no true religious observances in the Christian arena anymore. It is not politically correct for this "In God we Trust" nation. It's just printed on the "god" that far too many serve. Confused
Not at all K4R...I only attend church for funerals and weddingss, otherwise I would not be caught dead in one....

But then again -- look at it this way....that's less money that folk will have to dig in their pockets for to help pastor...
Last edited {1}
They had reports about this. The reason that SOME churches have decided to be closed is because the last time Christmas fell on a Sunday, most of the people decided to stay home instead of attend church.

So it's not JUST the shame of the Churches but the church goers as well.

Add Reply

Post
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×