I speak to over 90% of the Black people I pass that are in close proximity to me and if I can make eye contact with them from afar and give them the whats up non verbal communication done by simply moving ones head in an upward motion, I do so. I love startling those Black folk who looked me in the eye from a distance but when I got up on them they looked away, I always speak to them in a voice that startles them, it gives me a great laugh and teaches them to not take their eye off of other Black folk coming their way. The only Black folk I do not speak to are those Negro men and women that have whitey on their arm, male or female. I give them a nice look of how said and sorry to see you have made that choice.
A Hispanic lady at work once told me that Black people where the friendliest people! She said she noticed when getting on an elevator, it there was a Black person in the crowd, they would always be the one's to speak! She said her people would just look each other up and down real funny. The same with Asians. And most White people!

Here in the South, anybody/everybody will say hi to you. So, I've learned now to smile and say hi much more than I used to!
Well Ebony,

I'm from the area of the country you are in...technically the southwest....and I always said that black people do not seem to hate each other overall....you know LA is not that type of a place where people speak like that....i always speak to black people in passing and I always acknowledge anyone black in the workplace the same....whether they are an executive or in the lower rungs of the organization.....many of us understand that when we see another black person in the workplace, we are seeing a person who accomplished something by getting hired alone....I leave the black conservs, clowns/bufoons and those who go to work just to be with white people alone....you know...those who cannot stop laughing at everything a white person says........Faheem, I am going to have to adopt your M.O......I like that approach
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
When you are out in public and pass by another black person, do you speak or in some way acknowledge the person? Should we?


I always try to speak with my peeps when in public!!

Although, I have found in recent yrs, brothers don't speak as much as they used to... In talking to some of my friends about this, it seems to be a consensus that "down low" brothers and the like have put a crimp in the male relationship.

Anybody else have thoughts on this?
Most of the time, I'll speak or smile especially if we make eye contact.

I'm a native southern, and I've noticed with the influx of people moving south from other states southern blacks aren't quite as friendly or courteous as in the pass. If you're too friendly folks think you're phony or have a hidden agenda. I'm always glad to encounter a brother or sister who is friendly because that's how I grew up. Black folks were friendly toward each other. Heck, I had aunts and uncles who were no biological kin to me.

While talking with a group of teens on last week, most of the young ladies were telling me that in school they have to be hard/unfriendly lest other girls will think they're weak. If that's not ass-backwards... Since when does showing common courtesy make one weak. If anything it takes more strength or courage to be friendly when others are unfriendly toward you. Anybody can be anal that don't take smarts or effort.
"...be hard/unfriendly lest other girls will think they're weak. If that's not ass-backwards... "Len

This 'speaking' thing has been going on a long time. All my life at least.

I can remember as a young man hearing people brag they don't speak to someone 'just because they're COLORED'. How's that for a date stamp?
Overtime, similar statements were made with the same intent. Namely, I don't have to speak just because we look like each other.

But then that time comes when you are in that strange, an lonely place.

There's a flip-side to this.

In my "other life" I was the only African American, of any description in the entire office. When a African American-American came into the building, the curiosity was to see how I would respond to, or otherwise treat that person. The interest was so high because everyone in the building work for me.

It is important that we acknowledge each other. This is particularly true when we are in a position to make a difference in the environment that person has to function.

I speak.

It makes a difference. If you don't think so, you haven't been in a strange lonely place.

In spite of sounding cynical, this is a hostile land we live in.


PEACE

Jim Chester
I and a friend were discussing this topic recntly. She was out to lunch with a white co-worker and the white co-worker noticed she spoken to a few Black folks and ask did she know them. My friend said no. The white co-worker was suprised my friend would speak to so many strangers.

I do the same thing. We were pondering whether this was left over influence of slavery to want acknowledge each other.
Too many blacks here in London, we hardly acknowledge each other in passing let alone to say hello.

I have just come back from going down the road to the shops. I guess I may have passed ten black people. Did we notice each other? Yep! Did we say hello? Nope! Guess we are a hard lot here in London Big Grin
I always speak, or at least acknowledge other African/Blacks with a head nod. I noticed I don't get as many responses anymore...but I'm not going to stop doing it. I couldn't even if I wanted to...It comes naturally. I noticed I was doing it in Africa...I was saying hello/Akuaba/Selam all day long...lol...it was automatic, I actually got more responses there than I do here...So maybe it's not necessarilly from slavery. I know it's rude in Senegal/Gambia if you don't greet people...
i make it a habit to speak, or smile at my sisters when passing them.

when its a man (in my age group) passing my path - i make eye contact and speak if spoken to, but i don't usually speak first. if i get the instinctual feeling that the man passing me is looking at my parts and not at my "whole" or at me as a person/woman...i don't usually try to encourage any conversation (even a simple hello).

i always speak to my elders - male or female.
quote:
Originally posted by Diamond:
Henry38 wrote:
Too many blacks here in London, we hardly acknowledge each other in passing let alone to say hello.

Henry38, Blacks in American are referred to as African Americans. What are Blacks born in London referred to? Just curious.

Gosh I don't know. London is a cosmopolitan place we mix quite well and we all get along wonderfully. Black people from the Caribbean or Africa are simply called black. Those with a white and black parent are usually called black or mixed race.. Among ourselves as black people we identify as African or Carribean. I hope that answers it.

Over here here race is not as much of an issue as we hear it is in the US so I guess that is why there is no need to identify ourselves like African-British. No we are simply known as black people
quote:
Originally posted by Faheem:

The only Black folk I do not speak to are those Negro men and women that have whitey on their arm, male or female. I give them a nice look of how said and sorry to see you have made that choice.


Aparently we've never crossed paths, because we've never sensed a negative reaction from any black men when we've been walking down the street together. Very rarely a black woman will give us a negative look, but it's still not common.

Most of the time, a black person will nod and/or say hi, as will we.
quote:

Henry38 wrote:
Over here here race is not as much of an issue as we hear it is in the US so I guess that is why there is no need to identify ourselves like African-British. No we are simply known as black people


Hmm, I find your comment interesting.
Henry38 wrote:
Over here here race is not as much of an issue as we hear it is in the US so I guess that is why there is no need to identify ourselves like African-British. No we are simply known as black people ---henry38

Yes. very interesting. Color still seems to be doninant in the system.

It is necessary that we do this not only because race is such an issue. We also have no (surviving) ancestral national identity.

Thus my declaration of self-determination. It corrects the erasure.

And yes, we are 'black' people as well.


PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:
We also have no (surviving) ancestral national identity.




As slavery was less of a factor in the UK, I would imagine that a much higher percentage of Africans there know exactly where they are from. I'm not sure I see any connection between Africans being called "black" and nationality.
I'm not sure I see any connection between Africans being called "black" and nationality.---MBM

He, henry39, referenced calling himself/themselves African British. I was not drawing an connection between 'black' and nationality.

As you will recall, I see no connection of 'black' and nationality.


I haven't changed.

PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley

_Yes. very interesting. Color still seems to be doninant in the system.


Colour is not dominant in the system as I suspect you are suggesting. Remember I said we all get on great even though it is a highly cosmopolitan place. The one thing most visitors comment about the UK is exactly how colour does not seem to affect how people relate to each other.

I am not saying there is no racism. There is but it is very subtle and underground. You would find it hard to find overt in your face kind of racism that one might experience in Germany and other European countries. You do that here you would get into trouble so fast your feet won't touch the ground. This is a country that though it is predominantly white, a white man would lose his job if an accusation of discrimination based on racism is proven.
henry38:

I believe you. And I think I understand. And I am not trying to aggravate the situation, or misrepresent it.

I have developed what I know is a 'sensitivity' to the lexicon of society. The use of 'white' and 'black' to distinguish oneself still gains my attention. I think part of the reason for 'black' and 'white' is that I/we in the United States seldom hear any other people (than Europeans and Africans) referenced by their color.

That's significant to me. Its says to me that it really isn't simply about 'color'. It's really about 'white' and 'black', or 'black' and 'white' if billing is important.

As further example, I am sensitive, as in aware, of the use of terms like 'West Africa', 'East Africa', 'North Africa', and 'South Africa' (not the nation). These are political-geographic designations. As in for instance 'East Berlin', 'West Berlin', 'East Germany', and 'West Germany'

Geographical terms carry the suffix 'ern.' Eastern (Africa), Western (Europe), Western (Germany), Western (United States), Southern (United States), Southern (Georgia), etc.

Most will say, "C'mon!! That doesn't make a difference."

I say, "If it didn't make a difference the distinguishing terms would not have been invented." And that's the short answer.

It's like being cursed with 'perfect pitch'. Everyone thinks it's great except those have the affliction. They hear the whole world as being out of tune, except themselves.

Ouch! Don't play that!!

Ouch! Don't say that.

PEACE

Jim Chester
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:

I say, "If it didn't make a difference the distinguishing terms would not have been invented." And that's the short answer.



The mere fact that something was invented has absolutely no bearing on its intrinsic value. As a matter of fact, there are all manner of things that have been created that are bad, devoid of any value whatsoever. The KKK was created. So what? Just because it was created you give it some weight and importance?

You still have yet to explain the connection between color and geo-politics and nationality. I might be able to better track with your reasoning if it were only "blacks" who were bundled into a term like that. When we talk about whites - they could be from anywhere in Europe. Anywhere. The fact that we call them white is in no way demeaning to them. It in no way takes anything away from their identity. It merely serves to describe them in a superficial way. We are "African". We are "black". That is our identity. The fact that we embrace a continent as opposed to a smaller geography is irrelevant. It's all man-made political nomenclature anyway.

So what?
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:

I say, "If it didn't make a difference the distinguishing terms would not have been invented." And that's the short answer.



The mere fact that something was invented has absolutely no bearing on its intrinsic value.

Beg to disagree.

If necessity is the 'mother of invention', then surely value is intrinsic to necessity.


As a matter of fact, there are all manner of things that have been created that are bad, devoid of any value whatsoever.

Neither 'good', nor 'bad' are parameters of 'value'. Your anticipated answer notwithstanding, I can't think of a single thing that was created, and had no value.

The KKK was created. So what? Just because it was created you give it some weight and importance?

Emphatically, yes. The KKK was created to meet a need (of the creator). It was important to the creator, and the all segments of the society in which it operated, then and now.

You still have yet to explain the connection between color and geo-politics and nationality.

You aren't listening again. I said there is no connection between 'color' and 'nationality'. You have injected geo-politics. I'm not sure that is the same as political-geography. But, I can accept the parity statement.

I treated the 'political-geography' separate from the issue of 'color and 'nationality'. 'Political-geography' is about imperialism, and militarily enforced occupation.

North Africa is 'North Africa' because some non-African, of any description, said so. And the military force to make it so. Clearly, the same is true for the segmenting of Germany, and Europe, used in my example.


I might be able to better track with your reasoning if it were only "blacks" who were bundled into a term like that. When we talk about whites - they could be from anywhere in Europe. Anywhere. The fact that we call them white is in no way demeaning to them.

I don't think I apply "demeaning" to either 'black' or 'white'. And, yes, I was/am applying the term 'white' exclusively to Europeans. And by the way, WE call them 'white' because they told us/taught us to. Why would demeaning ever become a part of their equation for themselves.

It in no way takes anything away from their identity. It merely serves to describe them in a superficial way.

Boy, I'll sure buy that. It is superficial. That very superficiality is what was/is applied to ALL those who are not. It is that same superficiality that was applied to 'black' and then applied/given to us. We embrace that superficiality are reality and rub it all over us, and in us. And then.... WE GIVE IT TO OUT CHILDREN!!! AS IDENTITY

We are "African". We are "black". That is our identity. The fact that we embrace a continent as opposed to a smaller geography is irrelevant.

You say. And clearly, you are entitled. Declaring 'smaller geography' irrelevant is up to you. You should confine to you and yours. I, for one, consider the difference defining. As to 'African' and 'black', I am both of those. And proudly I might add. Africa is my ancestry. Being 'black' is WHAT I am. It is NOT however, WHO I am. Identity is about WHO you are.

It's all man-made political nomenclature anyway.

EXACTLY!!! EXACTLY!!!!

And when it comes to identity, I SAY WHO I AM.


So what?


Like 'Defiant One' said, (paraphrasing) others have no say, zero, in my family business.

PEACE

Jim Chester
Well, there was slavery in the UK too. I ASSUMED Blacks in the UK would have similar history where they would not know their ancestors. I know slavery in America was the worst and different from slavery in the carribean. In the carribean Black slaves were permitted to keep some of their hertiage and traditions. But, I never considered UK being any different from America. Except, the UK had indentured servants in their society which I assumed make accepting slavery easier.
Living in our Nations Capital AKA Chocolate City, has become quite a strain to one of the few surviving Washingtonians. Since we are consider south of the mason dixie line, 15 years ago, maybe even 10, we still valued and embrace the ideals of southern hospitatlity, especially amongst one another. However, I have just relocated back to DC after living up north for almost 10 years and longed for the smiles, nods and warm hellos that the North lacked. I was truly taken aback to experience this blatant disregard and coolness that the city I grew up in and all it's new co-habitants were that of the North.

It is the very root of who I am to speak and smile geniunely at my people. You never know how a smile can affect someone, so what hell. It is our responsibility to acknowledge one another, especially in passing.
Simple fact of the matter is that once slavery was over in most Caribbean countries, it was over. Sure, countries like Suriname where I am from were colonized for a while longer (until 1975 to be precise) but there was no apartheid and no segregation. The different races lived side by side and they were encouraged by the ˜motherland' which was Holland to educate themselves.
Slavery in Suriname was brutal; my grandmother's mother left diaries, which tell tales similar to the ones you, read by American great, great grandmothers.
In Suriname and Holland where I grew up I have experienced friendlier black people than I have here in DC. I have been living here now for 3 and a half years, and am often disappointed at how I am being treated by the majority of black people I meet, on the streets, professionally and so on. Sure, there are black people who are really nice and open and friendly, and I have to say every one of them makes up for 10 rude, hostile and ignorant ones I meet.
I am one of the black women who walks on ˜whitey's arm and sometimes people judge me just for that fact. They clearly have an issue, but that is not my problem.
Maybe it is being born and raised somewhere else that gives me a different view of how things are.
I do the nod to Blacks a lot, but not much to men my age.

A lot of them think a hello means that I'm hitting on them or I'm giving them an invitation to hit on me. Roll Eyes

I would do it to more non-Black people if only they would answer back. Instead a common response I get is them looking away.

My mom says I used to demand my hi back when I was little, lol.

If I had to stereotype, I'd say that elderly Whites are the only non-Black exception to that look away thing.

I greet my head off in nursing homes.
I make eye contact with everyone that I see on the street (unless I'm in a crowd of course), for two reasons...

A) If I know that they are there, it's disrespectful to ignore them.

B) If I don't know they are there, or they think I don't know, I'm a potential victim in their eyes.

With Black folks, I always offer the head nod as well. The vast majority of the time I get it right back. If they take it the wrong way, I just keep on walking. I don't have time for a bunch of "What you lookin' at?" dick-swinging nonsense.

On the other hand, if I'm just out somewhere (not just walking down the street), I'll easily spark up a conversation with Black folks.
quote:
Originally posted by Black Viking:
On the other hand, if I'm just out somewhere (not just walking down the street), I'll easily spark up a conversation with Black folks.


Same here.

I sometimes get asked, "Do I know you?," when I do it to other people. That or that polite uneasy laugh, lol.
quote:
Originally posted by thayfen:
I guess I'm just crazy...I must-at least!--give the "'Sup, I see you!" Nod to my brothers and Sisters--and I walk around with a smile on my face, and I say "Goodmorning/afternoon/evening" to everybody.

I get strange looks from other black-people, but everyone else will smile and return the greeting--everyone else. Curious.
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
When you are out in public and pass by another black person, do you speak or in some way acknowledge the person? Should we?


I always try to speak with my peeps when in public!!

Although, I have found in recent yrs, brothers don't speak as much as they used to... In talking to some of my friends about this, it seems to be a consensus that "down low" brothers and the like have put a crimp in the male relationship.

Anybody else have thoughts on this?


What's the age group?

If it's under 35, he might not want to say hi to you because you don't have titties.

IMO, a lot of guys have turned a hello into a flirt thing.

So, you are seen as flirting if you say hello, too.

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