DNA reminds me of the tireless work done by the "GREAT" Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop--the late Senegalese scholar who stated "...In practice it is possible to determine directly the skin colour and hence the ethnic affiliations of the ancient Egyptians by microscopic analysis in the laboratory; I doubt if the sagacity of the researchers who have studied the question has overlooked the possibility..." -- http://home3.inet.tele.dk/mcamara/antadiop.html
and successfully linked the Eyptian Dynastic Era to an Ancient African civilization.

sagacity: (noun) -- The quality of being discerning, sound in judgment, and farsighted; wisdom.

****************

http://www.infoplease.com/spot/slavery2.html
NOT LONG AGO, an African American trying to trace his or her genealogy came up against a seemingly insurmountable obstacle: slavery. Even if a person's ancestry could be traced back through the slave years in this country, it was considered virtually impossible to determine where in Africa one's family originated.

However, science is now solving the riddles of the past. Some time next year Howard University plans to begin offering genetic testing so Americans of African ancestry can determine where on the continent their ancestors came from. In the meantime, Cambridge University Press, North America, is now offering a CD-ROM containing the records of two-thirds of all slave ship voyages.

World's Largest West African Data Base
Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C., has assembled the largest collection of DNA records from West and Central Africa in the world, some 3,800 samples in all. The collection concentrates on ethnic groups in areas where most slaves in the United States came from.

Howard University has assembled the largest collection of DNA records from West and Central Africa in the world, some 3,800 samples in all

Most blacks brought to the U.S. came from what are now Nigeria, Benin, Togo, Ghana, and Sierra Leone, all of which are in West Africa. Smaller numbers came from Senegal, the Gambia, the Congo River basin, and Angola.

When they came to the U.S., the groups of Africans were dispersed, and mixed with other ethnic groups, so they usually quickly lost their tribal connections.

African Americans With European Ancestry

The collection also includes various European, Native American, and Asian samples for comparison. Researchers point out that many African Americans will also indicate European ancestry, while others may also have Native American blood.

The project will be set up to test either mitochondrial DNA, which is passed from mother to child, and the Y chromosome, which is handed down from father to son.

While the cost has yet to be determined, some press reports placed it as high as $300.

CD-ROM Lists the Voyages
Titled The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, the Cambridge University Press CD-ROM contains records on an amazing 27,233 slave ship voyages between 1595 and 1866. In subsequent editions, it is hoped to include up to 80 percent of all voyages.

It is likely that records on the remaining 20 percent have been lost, according to scholars to name, its owners, where it acquired slaves, and where they were taken.

Virginia's Ibo Past
The records are surprisingly detailed because, after all, slaves were considered valuable property and investors wanted an accounting of their money.

Interesting patterns emerge from all the figures. For instance, Ibo people from what is today eastern Nigeria were a leading ethnic group in Virginia. On the other hand, slaves from Senegambia, today the nations of Senegal and Gambia, were more prominent in the Carolinas. This is probably because Carolina rice planters favored slaves already familiar with rice, which was commonly grown in Senegambia.

Barbados and Cuba received the most varied African populations, with slaves coming from most of the continent. Central America's slave population was heavily drawn from the Gold Coast, what is now Benin, Togo, and parts of Ghana.

Five Percent to the U.S.
Only five percent of the 12 million African men, women, and children were brought to the U.S., while 40 percent went to Brazil. Conditions were so much better in the U.S. that slaves survived to have children, while in Brazil, and other tropical countries, the carnage was massive, requiring a steady supply of new labor.

Always Remember that: "Anytime We As A People Are Not Having Our WaySomeone Else Is Having Theirs...And It's Never To Our Advantage."

Original Post
quote:
Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop

tfro

I didn't finish his book, "Civilization or Barbarism"... but love what i did read.

This may turn into something very interesting and divisive. I saw someone on a talk show who used this DNA type testing and found that eventhough he "looked" AFRICAN American his DNA said he was white.
so all of those negroes, who cry i dont know where im from in africa, can now get a simple swab and it will be matched to a living relative on the continent through DNA matchin, i saw an excellent documentary on this on LINK TV,so i think it should be given to all people of african decent.When you can identify a specific people and group that you know one of your family members came from is a liberating feeling.
they aren't charging for the service, on their site they said they are so backed up with requests that they have had to direct people and or still directing incoming people who wish to have the test done to another organization that charges a fee but they themselves aren't charging but not taking on any new cases.

truessence brung up a series on PBS that had a whole episode on this very subject. i saw the episode and it was really good. The interesting thing was henry louis gates jr.( the conducter of the series who is also big into african culture, has done several documentaries on africa and heads the african studies program at harvard) came out with very little african origin to his DNA he was mostly european.

i would love to get this done but i don't know if i would trust the results really, they may make something up and i would never know- i know nothing about DNA testing and genetic code and whatnot.
quote:
Originally posted by MidLifeMan:
quote:
Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop

tfro

I didn't finish his book, "Civilization or Barbarism"... but love what i did read.

This may turn into something very interesting and divisive. I saw someone on a talk show who used this DNA type testing and found that eventhough he "looked" AFRICAN American his DNA said he was white.
I have all Mr. Diop's books...... I hold this man in great esteem.... for many reasons....


Peace,
Virtue
quote:
Originally posted by ZAKAR:
Mr Gates turned out to be 50/50 Mulatto



This is very interesting.....

I wish I knew more about DNA testing...

Perhaps I'll read up on it when I have time...


Peace,
Virtue
quote:
Originally posted by virtue:
quote:
Originally posted by ZAKAR:
Mr Gates turned out to be 50/50 Mulatto
[colorRazzurple][i]


This is very interesting.....

I wish I knew more about DNA testing...

Perhaps I'll read up on it when I have time...




Ahhhh, a bunch of crap... I visit one of the websites about this, all excited, and came away thoroughly disappointed.

There are two types of tests: one that tests your mitochondrial dna and one that tests you y-DNA. The Y-dna comes through your paternal lineage, and only men can get that test. The mtdna test only goes through your maternal line, but both men and women can have that done.

The problem is this: if it goes through your maternal line, that means it only will identify where, for example, your mother's mother's mother's mother's mother's... etc. mother came from. If that takes you back 10 generations, that is a painfully tiny percentage of your lineage. Ditto your y-dna. Just one person. Out of thousands of ancestors... out of many thousands from that one woman's generation, at that.

The only way you can really get any truly meaningful information from this is if you get members of your family to go along, who, by virtue of their gender, can help plug in some more distant relatives. For example, if I want to know my mother's father's line, I would need one of my mother's brothers, or one of my uncles' (mother's brother's) sons, to do that. If I want to know about the line from my mother's paternal grandmother, let's see... I would need one of my great aunts, or one of my great aunt's daughters or granddaughters, to get her mtDNA tested.

With this tremendous and confusing effort, we could possibly uncover around one half of one percent of my background? There has to be a better way than this. I was so disappointed when I figured that out. Frown

So Skip Gates probably had his Y-DNA run, and it identified exactly one white ancestor's DNA... his father's father's father probably was a slaveholder, and the test identifed where that slaveholder's father's father's father's father came from. Gates is still probably mostly African by descent; it's just that these tests can't come close to telling us anything like that. Is it still worth it?
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:
quote:
Originally posted by virtue:
quote:
Originally posted by ZAKAR:
Mr Gates turned out to be 50/50 Mulatto
[colorRazzurple][i]


This is very interesting.....

I wish I knew more about DNA testing...

Perhaps I'll read up on it when I have time...




Ahhhh, a bunch of crap... I visit one of the websites about this, all excited, and came away thoroughly disappointed.

There are two types of tests: one that tests your mitochondrial dna and one that tests you y-DNA. The Y-dna comes through your paternal lineage, and only men can get that test. The mtdna test only goes through your maternal line, but both men and women can have that done.

The problem is this: if it goes through your maternal line, that means it only will identify where, for example, your mother's mother's mother's mother's mother's... etc. mother came from. If that takes you back 10 generations, that is a painfully tiny percentage of your lineage. Ditto your y-dna. Just one person. Out of thousands of ancestors... out of many thousands from that one woman's generation, at that.

The only way you can really get any truly meaningful information from this is if you get members of your family to go along, who, by virtue of their gender, can help plug in some more distant relatives. For example, if I want to know my mother's father's line, I would need one of my mother's brothers, or one of my uncles' (mother's brother's) sons, to do that. If I want to know about the line from my mother's paternal grandmother, let's see... I would need one of my great aunts, or one of my great aunt's daughters or granddaughters, to get her mtDNA tested.

With this tremendous and confusing effort, we could possibly uncover around one half of one percent of my background? There has to be a better way than this. I was so disappointed when I figured that out. Frown

So Skip Gates probably had his Y-DNA run, and it identified exactly one white ancestor's DNA... his father's father's father probably was a slaveholder, and the test identifed where that slaveholder's father's father's father's father came from. Gates is still probably mostly African by descent; it's just that these tests can't come close to telling us anything like that. Is it still worth it?


19

I wonder if there's something to this though... admittedly all of this is a bit over my head....

my mind is making a connection to the matriarchial societies..... and the Egyptian right of Kingship system, through the female....


please.... someone help process this for me.... why is your mother's mother's mother's mother's line only a tiny percent... why not half?


Peace,
Virtue
quote:
Originally posted by virtue:
someone help process this for me.... why is your mother's mother's mother's mother's line only a tiny percent... why not half?




Because your mother's mother's mother's mother's mother would be one of your great-great-great-grandparents. That means she is only one person out of the 32 great-great-great-grandparents you have. The further back the testing places you (and I don't understand how they limit it), the more great-whatevers you have, which means the smaller the percentage that one person represents.

Obviously, there's a good chance of recombination (where people who don't know they are 6th cousins or something get married and have kids), and that will reduce the numbers slightly, but still.
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:

Because your mother's mother's mother's mother's mother would be one of your great-great-great-grandparents. That means she is only one person out of the 32 great-great-great-grandparents you have.


Okay... that makes complete sense as a proportion...

I can understand fractions (Virtue says duh to self)

but...

that is only if you're comparing each mother to the potential other mothers.....

I guess I'm asking why does there have to be a comparison made? My great-great-great-great-great-great grandmother still carries an identifiable gene (remember Lucy???) that represents me in some fashion...

it survived, and there's a lot of information packed in....

isn't this worth it?



ummm... feeling a bit vulnerable here in unfamiliar territory, so excuse me if my thinking is too simplistic....

so go reeeeeealll sllllooooooowwwww in your explanation, please... Smile


Peace,
Virtue
No, you're right, there's a lot of information in there... and that one component is no less than any other component.

I was disappointed, because I guess I was looking for a fuller ppicture. I wanted to know all of the places where most of my lineage is from. I'll probably get over it eventually, and see the value in this someday. But I was clearly extremely naive about the science of this test before I explored, and I guess I just got a little too big of an idea as to what it was really capable of.

Supposedly, there are also tests that supposedly determine what percentage you are of what. But aparently even that's limited, because it can only tell you what percent African, vs. European, vs. Native American, without being able to tell you which parts of Africa, and which relatives they trace there. Also, there is doubt as to the validity of them.

At least we can take heart that if science can somehow continue to advance, someday a more complete picture will become available...
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:
No, you're right, there's a lot of information in there... and that one component is no less than any other component.

I was disappointed, because I guess I was looking for a fuller ppicture. I wanted to know all of the places where most of my lineage is from. I'll probably get over it eventually, and see the value in this someday. But I was clearly extremely naive about the science of this test before I explored, and I guess I just got a little too big of an idea as to what it was really capable of.

Supposedly, there are also tests that supposedly determine what percentage you are of what. But aparently even that's limited, because it can only tell you what percent African, vs. European, vs. Native American, without being able to tell you which parts of Africa, and which relatives they trace there. Also, there is doubt as to the validity of them.

At least we can take heart that if science can somehow continue to advance, someday a more complete picture will become available...


Sorry to answer so fast..... got a lot of energy tonight... so I'm like glued to the board for the next few minutes....

but correct me if I'm wrong... but I hear in your post impatience... ummmm.. maybe it's better to say... frustration....

which leads me to think why so frustrated with what info. is given?

and that leads me to think... "because he wants a full scale picture of his heritage"....

which leads me to believe the counter of what you're not getting... and that is.....

you have a passionate desire to reconnect with what was lost...

am I making sense? sorry I have a tendency to psychoanalyze everyone...

family trait..

smile....



Peace,
Virtue
Maybe we should ask the Jews. They we're the ones that bought us over here to begin with.
Dr. Farrakahn is right.

It ain't Whitey, its the Jews, that screwed things up.
quote:
PWG said: Maybe we should ask the Jews. They we're the ones that bought us over here to begin with.
Dr. Farrakahn is right.

It ain't Whitey, its the Jews, that screwed things up.
I agree with you in part.


However, IMHO it has always been a process of collusion between the Gentiles and the Jews--therefore neither are blameless.

http://www.trinicenter.com/kwame/20010615 b.htm
A. The Grandees, "the money managers of Spain, mostly Sephardic Jews," financed the Afrikan Holocaust, "the greatest single crime in the world" against a people. Over 100 million human beings died during this Holocaust. Many Jews converted to Catholicism. They practiced Catholicism by day and Judaism by night. They were called the Marranos or the "silent Jews."
June 15, 2001
Dr Kwame Nantambu

Other Source: http://www.chivalricorders.org/nobility/ grandee.htm
quote:
Originally posted by msprettygirl:
quote:
Originally posted by ma'am:
Anyone do this DNA African lineage thing yet?
yeah


I didnt do an African Lineage Test because they're a bit too expensive but I participated in the National Genographic Project that tested out my yDNA using STR polymorphism patterns. $99.99 and it gave me a few things to think about.

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