Detroit Schools Teach Students How To Work At Wal-Mart





Original Post
The caption makes this sound funny, but at the high school level this should be good training for teenagers, besides, any job that they could aquire would require training and young people's first jobs are often either in fast food or retail.  I hope they are teaching these kids that what they need to remember (re their future endeavors) is the fact that Walmart is such a vast corporation that there's not many fields of study they may major in in college that a company this large does not have a positions for (same with McDonalds).
Sunnubian, I totally agree.


Wal-Mart, McDonalds, Burger King, K-Mart and many fast food and retail corporations are considered Blue Chip corporations; some of the oldest and most respected business corporations in the U.S. loaded with a multitude of vast & varying career employment opportunities around the country in all levels of upward mobility/career opportunities in those corporations.


 And as you said, hopefully that those teachers, principles (and the entire school district) are bringing in and not solely focusing on not only on the visual; lower level floor workers to assist in teaching those kids the fundamentals of shelf stocking and check-out/register/customer service duties but the unseen: store department managers, the store manager/regional store managers to allow those kids to see the leaders and that that working at Wal-mart (through hard work and persistance) can be a long-term, high paying, career opportunity with vast work/educational opportunities.


Quote: "Donna Stern, a representative of the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, Integration & Immigrant Rights And Fight for Equality By Any Means Necessary (BAMN) is outraged. “They’re going to train students to be subservient workers. This is not why parents send them to school.”


The majority of everybody are trained to work for somebody so IMO, the words "subservient workers" is completely null & void and even if you work for yourself, you still work for Uncle Sam.
Its not good that our kids are being sent to school to learn how to work at Wal-Mart and McDonalds! What should be happening is they are going to vo-tech schools and learning how to open their own businesses using their trade. Working at Wal-Mart is some bs. and at $4.25 at that. I'd be mad as hell if my kids were going through some program like that.
I have to agree with Sunnubian and Cholly!  (Guess it's that 'generational' thing kicking in again!  )

The majority of smaller, private-sector jobs do not offer room for advancement into upper management.  For kids who do not (and cannot because of academic inadequacies) pursue an actual career - which is by far the majority of any and ALL young people of any race!) the JOB they get will not lead them into any position much higher than the one they are hired at.

Learning to work at Walmart (or any other retail store) is as much of a "trade" as any other vocational education; i.e., a dental asst., data entry specialist, etc.  "Training" them for the job gives them more of a headstart going in than most of the entry-level youngsters that just 'walk in' and want to work there .. or worse, those that have no skills and can't get a job there, so they don't even apply.

And let's face it ... probably the majority of the kids coming out of school districts like those in Detroit are not 'educated' to do much of anything ... even read at grade-level in some cases!    For many of them, having the knowledge of being able to do ANY job after leaving high school will be an opportunity that many other of their peers simply do not have.
Yemaya, why are you calling this b.s.?


When I lived in Shreveport, LA, they elected a new Mayor and he proposed an initiative to do exactly what you just noted; have schools prepare programs for many students to focus on attending vo-tech/trade schools versus attending college/universities and the Mayor stated his reasoning and he said "let's be honest, some students are not prepared, does not have the mental capacity and will not attend college".


The entire community freaked out and were outraged. "Who does he think he is and how could he possibly say something like that!".


But IMO, he was absoluty correct. To me, this is just another avenue to allow certain kids the opportunity to prepare themselves, with experienced, on-the-job training, either to get a job as part-time/full time (in the summer months or part-time while still in school) and upon school graduation can go directly to work for Wal-Mart.


And with that infusion of work experience and making money for themselves and now living in the real world, then maybe, instead of these kids, without the initial work experience, screwing around, either gettin' in trouble, Facebook, video gaming, cell phone, I-Pod listening, chatting and Twittering all day, not wanting to work and just killing the parents, laying around, depending on Mom and Dad (but they consider themselves "grown") to finance their livelihood and it's all about me, me, me, then maybe, that light bulb moment will arrive where they finally realized that there are many opportunities (to improve on that $4.25 per hour) is available through higher educationan/training (either through Wal-Mart, Vo-Tech, community or regular college) and those "let's be honest, some students are not prepared, does not have the mental capacity and will not attend college" can achieve higher success.



To me, it's just another door for future advancement.
Reference:
Well perhaps I think too highly our the ability and potential of our children. Regardless, they have to get a higher education to be competitive in those upwardly mobile positions. That's a fact.

Well, I don't think you can think "too highly" of our kids!  They are capable of great things ... when given the opportunity! 

But, that's just the thing ... many of them are not given or are not in a position to capitalize on the opportunity for higher learning/college/being competitive coming out of high school.  And that's just the sad, cold, hard, ugly truth.   

Many of the schools in inner cities such as Detroit are not educating our children enough to even truly deserve the high school diploma that they receive.  They give them the paper, but haven't taught them to read, write, do simple math, etc.   And until that's corrected ... we shouldn't allow those kids to automatically 'left behind' due to something that's beyond their control.

The opportunity may be small (an entry-level job at Wal-Mart) ... but it's more of an opportunity than many of them would otherwise have.

For those that are able to graduate from high school and go on to and succeed in college .. that's great!  For those (the many) who are not, giving them the chance to work and earn money anyway is a good thing too!

There ... does that make it better?? 
Quote by Yemaya: "Well perhaps I think too highly our the ability and potential of our children. Regardless, they have to get a higher education to be competitive in those upwardly mobile positions. That's a fact."


True that, but in our community, as you well know, just as in all other race communities you have to admit that initially, right out of high school "some just don't have it" at that moment (tired of going to school and also glad: some prayed to GOD, suprised that they even graduated) to attend any type of higher learning and some "just don't have it" at all.


Many people are gifted mechanically (hands-on learning), gifted technically and many are gifted academically (college ready) and many in our community don't have any of these attributes or have gone in a different direction all together (drugs, gangs, baby mama drama, just plain 'ole lazy etc) and the potential and abilities of many of those those kids (to have successful, high paying careers) can still be highly educated and opportunities attained by many having to go "the long way around" to get there instead of getting that initial high-paying job (with benefits) from the jump.


Wal-mart/McDonalds/Burger King/Subway can assist with that.


Many franchise owners of McDonalds/Burger King/Subway/KFC stores started working right out of high school with those corporations and by takng "the long way around" are now self-employed business franchise owners.


And also, with that "long way around" experience as a franchise owner running your own business (if they choose to go that direction) also gives you an experienced education to be competitive and probably better prepared in those upwardly mobile positions.
Quote: "Donna Stern, a representative of the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, Integration & Immigrant Rights And Fight for Equality By Any Means Necessary (BAMN) is outraged. “They’re going to train students to be subservient workers. This is not why parents send them to school.”
__________________________________________________________________



I still say that this person is seeing this training through a narrow minded view.  Does she know how many corporate attorneys, accountant, engineers, marketing and advertising, business management, human resources, fashion and retail merchandising and on and on positions that are/will be available to these same young people after moving up with via OJT/experience or upon completion of college or position specific training, not to mention the 'subserviant' jobs that 99.9% of young Americans ususally get as their first job. Any corporation the size of Walmart is really a microcosm (or should I say macro, actually) of the greater society's workforce.

Search for a U.S. job

<input id="Walmart" name="job" type="radio" value="Walmart" /> <label for="Walmart">Walmart stores,
Sam's Clubs and
Distribution Centers</label>
<input id="Pharmacy" name="job" type="radio" value="Pharmacy" /> <label for="Pharmacy">Pharmacist</label>
<input id="Optometry" name="job" type="radio" value="Optometry" /> <label for="Optometry">Optometrist</label>
<input id="Corporate" name="job" type="radio" value="Corporate" /> <label for="Corporate">Corporate</label>
<input id="Walmartcom" name="job" type="radio" value="Walmart.com" /> <label for="Walmartcom">Walmart.com</label>
<input id="Driving" name="job" type="radio" value="Driving" /> <label for="Driving">Truck Driving</label>




Now you are assuming that no Detroit high school student is going on to college.  In fact, anyone in high school now that are not going to get either some degree or another or are willing to start at the bottom and work their way up, are going to be working all the low-level 'supserviant' jobs anyway.


I know people who started out working the 'subserviant' positions with a company when they were teenagers, still in high school, but worked their way up into management, (local, regional, etc.).  It is rediculous for anyone to think that teenagers still in high school are going to be doing anything else employment wise.  I know a couple that started working at McDonalds when they both were teenagers but now they own their own McDonalds franchise.  I guess I'm not getting what is supposed to be so insulting for teenagers to get training as a cashier, in customer service, professionalism or the exposure of working with the general public, etc.


I do believe personally that all school districts should have vocational training as a requirement for students' last two years of school.  Where I am from vocational training is offered (but not required) and students can earn an associates degree in several different disciplines by the time they graduate from high school.  It is a program that is in conjunction with the local colleges, but vocational training not in conjuction with a local college toward an associates degree has long been offered.  Detroit (and any other district) would benefit their students for the long term if they offered something like this (as well as training like what is mentioned re Walmart for the short term).
Reference:
Now you are assuming that no Detroit high school student is going on to college. In fact, anyone in high school now that are not going to get either some degree or another or are willing to start at the bottom and work their way up, are going to be working all the low-level 'supserviant' jobs anyway.
So when do we come to the obvious conclusion that SCHOOL is a SCAM!

You have to go into debt to pay to have your time wasted to learn things you either didn't need to know or could have learned from reading a few books.  But because we have allowed this society to evolve in ridiculous ways though it is mostly controlled by Whites you can't get hired without having a piece of paper that is inherently worthless but the employers arbitrarily require.

We need to waste time on what people CLAIM is education just to get relatively menial jobs.  With all of these cheap computers why does anyone need to go to school to even become a SOPHISTICATED computer programmer?  I have met programmers with degrees that were a JOKE.  In the 70s you had to go to school just to get to the keypunch machine but now a netbook is more powerful than the mainframes from those days.

We need to change the whole culture of economic thought.

http://www.toxicdrums.com/econ...s-by-dal-timgar.html

No, we listen to economists to stupid to notice the planned obsolescence of automobiles.  Unless they notice but don't talk about it.  Now why would they do that?

http://www.gutenberg.org/files.../23197-h/23197-h.htm

http://www.gutenberg.org/files.../29458-h/29458-h.htm

Xum
At my high school students who enrolled in "Co-op" courses did exactly what these students are doing, although they weren't working at walmart.  They did however get school credits and pay for working part of the day at an area business and attended school when they weren't working.
I agree with teaching our children how to work, as it establishes a good work ethic early on (one of the reasons my son comes to work with me). However, a corporation like Wal*Mart showing them the ropes is questionable to me given that they don't tend to treat their employees right. Wal*Mart is well known for their lack of "care" when it comes to taking care of its workers on such issues as workplace injuries and the like. I can think of two ladies right off who've had problems with them in this regard, just in the last five years.

A child needs to learn to work for others simply to learn the ropes of business and really to develop dealing with various types of people...if we are going to teach our children how to treat others "right" and engage in good business practices, how does sending them to corporations that treat their people "wrong" help them?

Now I know there's no such thing as a perfect company, but why aren't we teaching our kids how to set up businesses and encouraging them to pursue Junior Achievement or Future Business Leaders of America type activities? If they are only going to strive to "show up" at a Wal*Mart or McDonald's type job, how will they know to go for more? How will they build the self esteem necessary to sustain their own product development and corporate environment? How will they learn the necessary financial management needed to keep a business afloat? How will they develop the boldness they will need to do more than quip, "The customer is always right?"

I'm all for giving our "young" people a leg up and I've always believed that a job is a job...but at some point, we need to teach them to have and sustain careers and not just jobs...or they will ALWAYS be working for somebody else while gaining little or nothing to be able to one day work for themselves and their community.

"Wisdom Is A Woman Who Knows!"
Reference:
I'm all for giving our "young" people a leg up and I've always believed that a job is a job...but at some point, we need to teach them to have and sustain careers and not just jobs...or they will ALWAYS be working for somebody else while gaining little or nothing to be able to one day work for themselves and their community.

I think you bring up a good point, Savvy ... however, I think you're talking about 2 different types of educations!  And one doesn't necessarily negate the other.  In fact, I would think the one could and would help to facilitate the other!

Taking a-soon-to-be high school graduate - and giving them retail skills is probably just the thing to make them want to strive higher, to give them the desire and knowledge that there is something more ... and make them want to pursue it!!

Contrast that with a soon-to-be high school graduate with no skills, no job, no college prospects ... who is more likely to get out of school and have nothing to do and do nothing!  If they don't even know what's possible, they're not going to look for any possibilities ... which, as studies have shown, is often what leads to several children being born out of wedlock and/or the eventual interaction into the (in)justice system.

Having lived in the South this long ... (and being from a different environment all together!) ... I can tell you one of the most debilitating things that hold our children back is the lack of knowledge and opportunity that exists beyond their little 'cocoon' that they live in ... which is mostly relegated to their neighborhood or immediate surroundings.

For those that get to see or experience something (far) away from the only thing they know ... it's like a big, giant LIGHTBULB comes on and shines over them ... and then the creative juices start to flow .. and the sky's the limit from that point on.  I've seen it happen with my very own eyes!  And, I truly believe that if more inner city youth had that opportunity to go beyond the small little world they are raised in ... the motivation to do and learn and see and be more would actually feed and nourish itself!

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