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Don't Believe The Hype
Public Enemy


Back
Caught you lookin' for the same thing
It's a new thing check out this I bring
Uh Oh the roll below the level
'Cause I'm livin' low next to the bass C'mon
Turn up the radio
They claim that I'm a criminal
By now I wonder how
Some people never know
The enemy could be their friend guardian
I'm not a hooligan
I rock the party and
Clear all the madness, I'm not a racist
Preach to teach to all
'Cause some they never had this
Number one, not born to run
About the gun...
I wasn't licensed to have one
The minute they see me, fear me
I'm the epitome - a public enemy
Used, abused without clues
I refused to blow a fuse
They even had it on the news
Don't believe the hype...

Yes
Was the start of my last jam
So here it is again, another def jam
But since I gave you all a little something
That we knew you lacked
They still consider me a new jack
All the critics you can hang'em
I'll hold the rope
But they hope to the pope
And pray it ain't dope
The follower of Farrakhan
Don't tell me that you understand
Until you hear the man
The book of the new school rap game
Writers treat me like Coltrane, insane
Yes to them, but to me I'm a different kind
We're brothers of the same mind, unblind
Caught in the middle and
Not surrenderin'
I don't rhyme for the sake of riddlin'
Some claim that I'm a smuggler
Some say I never heard of 'ya
A rap burgler, false media
We don't need it do we?
It's fake that's what it be to 'ya, dig me?
Don't believe the hype...

Don't believe the hype - its a sequel
As an equal, can I get this through to you
My 98's boomin' with a trunk of funk
All the jealous punks can't stop the dunk
Comin' from the school of hard knocks
Some perpetrate, they drink Clorox
Attack the black, cause I know they lack exact
The cold facts, and still they try to Xerox
Leader of the new school, uncool
Never played the fool, just made the rules
Remember there's a need to get alarmed
Again I said I was a timebomb
In the daytime the radio's scared of me
'Cause I'm mad, plus I'm the enemy
They can't c'mon and play with me in primetime
'Cause I know the time, plus I'm gettin' mine
I get on the mix late in the night
They know I'm livin' right, so here go the mike, sike

Before I let it go, don't rush my show
You try to reach and grab and get elbowed
Word to herb, yo if you can't swing this
Just a little bit of the taste of the bass for you
As you get up and dance at the LQ
When some deny it, defy if I swing bolos
Then they clear the lane I go solo
The meaning of all of that
Some media is the whack
You believe it's true, it blows me through the roof
Suckers, liars get me a shovel
Some writers I know are damn devils
For them I say don't believe the hype
Yo Chuck, they must be on a pipe, right?
Their pens and pads I'll snatch
'Cause I've had it
I'm not an addict fiendin' for static
I'll see their tape recorder and grab it
No, you can't have it back silly rabbit
I'm going' to my media assassin
Harry Allen, I gotta ask him
Yo Harry, you're a writer, are we that type?
Don't believe the hype
I got flavor and all those things you know
Yeah boy, part two bum rush and show
Yo Griff, get the green black red and
Gold down countdown to Armageddon
-88 you wait the S1Ws will
Rock the hard jams - treat it like a seminar
Teach the bourgeoise, and rock the boulevard
Some say I'm negative
But they're not positive
But what I got to give...
The media says this
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Turn Off The Radio
Dead Prez


Woohoohoohoohoohoo...
Crank up yo' speakers!
[Stic.]
To all my (niggaz)
Every hustlin (nigga)
Strugglin (niggaz)
Revolutionary (niggaz)
Gang-bangin (niggaz)
Chain-gangin (niggaz)
Tune yo' frequency...
I refuse to be a stereotype in ya box
Never wanna try to be somethin I'm not
I'm just a nigga from the block, if you got it twist it
Stay blowin on green, if you got it, twist it on up
DP's givin a fuck - R.B.G.'d up in some gangsta chucks
Throw ya fist up homie if ya know what's up
All my comrades puttin in soldier work
We rollin dirty wit it, fully dedicated
So real that the radio'll never play it
But that's cool, the enemy supposed to hate it

Freedom ain't gon' come til we regulate 'em
That's why I'm in the dojo, not just for the video
Really though, we really got beef with the po-po (woop-woop)
Never know when they gon' put you in a chokehold
This is for you new niggaz, holdin for the radio
[Chorus]
Turn off the radio!
Turn off that bullshit! (freak-freak y'all)
Turn off the radio!
Turn off that bullshit! (freak-freak y'all)
Turn off the radio!
Turn off that bullshit! (freak-freak y'all)
Turn off the radio!
*phone rings*
[M-1] People's Radio
[Stic.] Yo hang up, that's the police
[M-1]
What's on the radio, propoganda, mind control
And turnin it on is like puttin on a blindfold
Cuz when you bringin the real you don't get ro-tation
Unless you take over the station
And yeah I know it's part of they plans
To make us think it's all about party and dancin
And yo it might sound good when you spittin your rap
But in reality, don't nobody live like that
You wanna know what kinda nigga I am?
Lemme tell you 'bout the nigga I'm not - I don't fuck with the cops
Platinum don't mean that it gotta be hot
I ain't gotta love it, even if they play it a lot
You can hear it when you walk the streets
How many people they reach, how they use music to teach
A radio program ain't a figure of speech
Don't sleep, cuz you could be a radio freak
(freak-freak y'all)
[Chorus]
Turn off the radio!
Turn off that bullshit! (freak-freak y'all)
Turn off the radio!
Turn off that bullshit! (freak-freak y'all)
Turn off the radio!
[Stic.] People's Radio, you on the air
[caller] I got a phat chain, I got a phat whip
[caller] I got a... *hang-up*
[Stic.] Nigga get off that bullshit!
[*high-pitched voice*]
Crank up your speakers, your woofers and your tweeters
Turn up your receivers, we bangin off the meter
Crank up your speakers, your woofers and your tweeters
Turn up your receivers, we bangin for the people
Crank up your speakers, your woofers and your tweeters
Turn up your receivers, we bangin off the meter
[Stic.] - 2X
Freak-freak y'all, to the beat y'all
DP's dawg, we got the heat dawg
People's Radio, on ya stereo
For the ghettos, and the barrio
[*high-pitched voice*]
Crank up your speakers, your woofers and your tweeters
Turn up your receivers, we bangin off the meter
Crank up your speakers, your woofers and your tweeters
Turn up your receivers, we bangin for the people
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quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
Is this your piece? If so, tfro

I love it when young folk use tradition to expand THEIR mind.



Nice work, EP.


Thank you. Cool Although, this isn't my essay, it was written by someone else. I wish I had written it though. Frown

It expresses a lot of what I and a lot of other radical-minded Black people have known about modern Hip-Hop for years: it's gone from being a radical voice for the disenfranchised, voiceless African-Americans suffering from ghettoization in the inner city due to the American system, to being a mainstream voice preaching the values of rampant materialism ("I'm a #1 Stunna"), mindless consumerism ("Bling-Bling" culture), and cutthroat market values ("Get rich or die trying") to the poor Black masses.

It's sad that Hip-Hop has now become a predominant pop culture voice for the very thing that it set out against in the late 70's.

What happened to the late 70's, 80's and early 90's rap? What happened to radical rap that used to scare the bejeesus out of the White Establishment? What happened to Public Enemy, N.W.A. and Arrested Development? What happened to the Afrocentric rap of the late 80's and early 90's? What happened to the rap that scared Rerpublicans into decrying rap music as a public threat and caused them to send SWAT teams into the inner city? You know, the rap that made people love Africa and support Black Consciousness causes?
quote:
Originally posted by Empty Purnata:
What happened to the late 70's, 80's and early 90's rap? What happened to radical rap that used to scare the bejeesus out of the White Establishment? What happened to Public Enemy, N.W.A. and Arrested Development? What happened to the Afrocentric rap of the late 80's and early 90's? What happened to the rap that scared Rerpublicans into decrying rap music as a public threat and caused them to send SWAT teams into the inner city? You know, the rap that made people love Africa and support Black Consciousness causes?



Oh it's still out there, my brotha.... but the revolution will be neither televised nor broadcast on the radio
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
quote:
Originally posted by Empty Purnata:
What happened to the late 70's, 80's and early 90's rap? What happened to radical rap that used to scare the bejeesus out of the White Establishment? What happened to Public Enemy, N.W.A. and Arrested Development? What happened to the Afrocentric rap of the late 80's and early 90's? What happened to the rap that scared Rerpublicans into decrying rap music as a public threat and caused them to send SWAT teams into the inner city? You know, the rap that made people love Africa and support Black Consciousness causes?



Oh it's still out there, my brotha.... but the revolution will be neither televised nor broadcast on the radio


True, the powers-that-be will of course never let anything that could usurp their power and influence out into a mainstream circuit. fro

To find that kind of rap today, you have to go to the "underground rap" scene. It's kind of sad though, underground rap while popular to a certain degree, almost feels like "black market" rap music. It almost feels like you're listening to something "illegal" because of how alienated it is. Radical rap in the past, while still not "mainsteam" was much closer to mainstream than it is now. Back then, you could at least catch it on the radio sometimes.

But in a way, I kind of like the fact that radical rap is more underground. That keeps it more "pure" since it is less likely to be tampered with by mainstream pop culture (like mainstream rap has).
quote:
Originally posted by Empty Purnata:
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
quote:
Originally posted by Empty Purnata:
What happened to the late 70's, 80's and early 90's rap? What happened to radical rap that used to scare the bejeesus out of the White Establishment? What happened to Public Enemy, N.W.A. and Arrested Development? What happened to the Afrocentric rap of the late 80's and early 90's? What happened to the rap that scared Rerpublicans into decrying rap music as a public threat and caused them to send SWAT teams into the inner city? You know, the rap that made people love Africa and support Black Consciousness causes?



Oh it's still out there, my brotha.... but the revolution will be neither televised nor broadcast on the radio


True, the powers-that-be will of course never let anything that could usurp their power and influence out into a mainstream circuit. fro

To find that kind of rap today, you have to go to the "underground rap" scene. It's kind of sad though, underground rap while popular to a certain degree, almost feels like "black market" rap music. It almost feels like you're listening to something "illegal" because of how alienated it is. Radical rap in the past, while still not "mainsteam" was much closer to mainstream than it is now. Back then, you could at least catch it on the radio sometimes.

But in a way, I kind of like the fact that radical rap is more underground. That keeps it more "pure" since it is less likely to be tampered with by mainstream pop culture (like mainstream rap has).



Sadly though, underground rap too draws its audience largely from the burbs. It's alienated on multiple levels.
Underdogs
The Coup


(chorus)
This is for my folkers who got bills overdue
This is for my folkers, um, check one two
This is for my folkers who never lived like a hog
Me and you, toe to toe, I got love for the underdog
*repeat chorus*

I raise this glass for the ones who die meaninglessly
And the newborns who get fed intravenously
Somebody's mom caught a job and a welfare fraud case
When she breathe she swear it feels like plastic wrap around her face
Lights turned off and its the third month the rent is late
Thoughts of being homeless, crying till you hyperventilate
Despair permeates the air then sets in your ear
The kids play with that one toy they learned how to share
Coming home don't never seem to be a celebration
Bills they piled up on the coffee table like they're decorations
Big ol' spoons of peanut butter, big ass glass of water
Makes the hunger subside, save the real food for your daughter
You feel like swingin haymakers at a moving truck
You feel like laughing so it seems like you don't give a fuck
You feel like getting so high you smoke a whole damn crop
You feel like crying but you think that you might never stop
Homes with no heat stiffen your joints like arthritis
If this was fiction, it'd be easier to write this
Some folks try to front like they so above you
They'd tear this motherfucker up if they really loved you

*chorus*

There's certain tricks of the trade to try and hault your defeat
Like taking tupperware to an "all you can eat"
Returning used shit for new saying you lost your receipt
And writing four figure checks when your accounts deplete
Then all your problems pile up about a mile up
Thinkin about a partner you can dial up to help you out this foul stuff
Whole family sleepin on a futon while you're clippin coupons
Eatin salad tryin to get full off the croutons
'Crosstown, the situation is identical
Somebody's getting strangled by the system and its tentacles
Misconceptions raise questions to be solved
Alot of b-boys are broke, alot of homeless got jobs
You can make 8 bones an hour till you pass out and still be assed out
Most pyramid schemes don't let you cash out
They say this generation makes the harmony pray
But crime rises consistent with the povery rate
You take the workers and jobs, you're gonna have murders and mobs
A gang of preachers screamin sermons over murmurs and sobs
Saying pray for a change from the Lord above you
They'd tear this motherfucker up if they really loved you

*chorus*

You like this song cause it relates, it's you in this rhyme
We go to stores that only let us in two at a time
We live in places where it costs to get your check cashed
Arguements about money usually drown out the tec blasts
Work six days a week, can't sleep Saturdays though
Muscles tremblin like a pager when the battery's low
And you just don't know where the years went
Although every long shift feels like a year spent
And you can write your resume, but it wouldn't even mention
All the life lessons learned doing six years of detention
Or how you learned the police was just some handicappers
On the ground next to broken glass and candy wrappers
Now don't accept my collects on the phone
Just hit me at the house so I know I ain't alone
And we can chop it up about this messed up system
Homies that's been killed, how we always gonna miss them
It's almost impossible survivin on this fraction
Sip a 40 to the brain for the chemical reaction
You gotta hustle cause they're tryin to push and shove you
I'll tear this motherfucker up since I really love you

*chorus*
Some of the more popular rappers that have radical messages are rappers like Xzibit, Nas, Common, Kanye West, Talib Kweli, De La Soul, and Mos Def.

Kanye West has drawn a lot of heat due to his criticism of the American system (you can hear it in his music too) and Nas' "One Mic" song got a rise out of some White people since it urged street retaliation against police brutality and spoke about revolutionary plots against corrupt politics.
quote:
Originally posted by Empty Purnata:
Some of the more popular rappers that have radical messages are rappers like Xzibit, Nas, Common, Kanye West, Talib Kweli, De La Soul, and Mos Def.

Kanye West has drawn a lot of heat due to his criticism of the American system (you can hear it in his music too) and Nas' "One Mic" song got a rise out of some White people since it urged street retaliation against police brutality and spoke about revolutionary plots against corrupt politics.


I think Dead Prez was banned from performing in NYC - somebody called it "Music to riot to"
A To G
Blackalicious


We're going to learn to hear words with vowel A sound....Listen with care
(Gift of Gab)
I be the analog arsonist, aimin at your arteries
All-seeing abstract, analyze everything
Adding on, absolutely abolishing
Average amateur's arsenal just astonishing
--Next, we'll learn words that begin with letter B
I be the big, bad body rockin Bombay to boulevard bully BACK
Better bring a bomb to the battlefield
Bloody black beats bringing bottoms that boom
Basically build barriers bewilder buffoons
--Listen now to words that begin with letter C
Crazy character, constantly creating concontions
Catalyst, a cannabalistic rhymes conqueror
Correctly connecting, craniums crumble down
Consistent capacity
--Next we'll hear words that start with letter D
Done did that done did this diddle don
Domination don't dignify diction
Doin' it deep down dialect daring
Doomsday dut devastate during the duration
--Listen to our song for vowel E
Extraterrestrial electrical, effortless
Eons of energy, everyone affected
Efficiently epitomize excellent
Extravagant elevate where the essence is
--F is the letter with which these words begin
Blackalicious got funk for the future filling up fiends finally
Fabulous, furious, fatness, follow me
Niggers fall frequently, fact
Verbal felon fired up federally foundation fadin' all of this wack shit
-- You will listen carefully again to words with sounds for letter G
(scratched)
-I be the Gift of Gab
-The man with the given gift of gab
man with the gift of gab
-I possess the gift of gab
-Gift of gab, gab
-I use my gift of gab to boast and brag in every rhyme I
-Got the gift of gab
-When I shoot the gift, I shoot
-I use the gift of gab like a harpoon
-On the serious tip, I'm equipped with a gift
-The gift of gab, it don't waiver
-Yo man you gotta -- Grab the mic to show you got the gift of gab
--These are the letters B, C, D, and F, and then comes the letter G.
Deception
Blackalicious


[Gift of Gab]
Don't let money change ya!

Laaaaah, di-dah, da-da-dee-dah
Lah-di-dah, da-da-dee-dah (4X)

[Gift of Gab]
This is a story of a kid his name is Cisko (Cisko)
Who made more money than the Count of Monte Crisco (Crisco)
He lived a lavish style of life, fast money women cars
and he liked to frequent bars pubs and discos (discos)
Made his living as a world famous rap star (rap star)
When he first started mic respect's what he was af-ter (AF-ter)
And so he got inside his mind, day and night, and he'd write
constantly his art and craft he'd try to mas-ter (MAS-ter)
Started winnin local battles and his rep grew (rep grew)
Gave his crew a reputation as the best crew (best crew)
And what life would do to him, all the cards that was hard
pen and ped, stress relief would be his refuge (RE-fuge)
Paid his dues, doing shows, now he's on track (ON track)
In the lab, pumping demos, makin songs fat (SONGS fat)
Then he quit his nine to five, finally his time arrived
when he signed a major label record contract

Don't let money change ya!

Laaaaah, di-dah, da-da-dee-dah
Lah-di-dah, da-da-dee-dah (4X)

[Gift of Gab]
His first single was a overnight success hit (success hit)
And now he went from wearing rags to the best fits (best fits)
All his new acquaintances, gassed his head, takin it
to the point where he lost proper perspective ('spective)
Started cuttin off the people he came up wit (up wit)
Ego blown like his soul had been ab-ducted (ab-ducted)
Though his heart was once real, now material has filled
up his world, and he couldn't get enough of it (get ENOUGH of it)
Used to wanna be the best of the rap dons (rap dons)
Now his only one concern is goin plati-NUM (plati-NUM)
And his skills has since decreased, and the inner hunger ceased
Now content, just as long as fame and cash come (CASH come)
He's a Big Willie now, rappin bout cars (bout cars)
Thousand dollar shoppin sprees, hangin out with stars (out with stars)
I mean just a year ago, he was broke, bummin money
Drinkin out the 40 bottle, livin outdoors


Don't let money change ya!

Laaaaah, di-dah, da-da-dee-dah
Lah-di-dah, da-da-dee-dah (4X)

[Gift of Gab]
Second LP, my rap changes fast (changes fast)
Here today, gone tomorrow, now his label passed (label passed)
Now the new poster boy, with the hip now sound
second time around everything isn't stable as (stable as)
It once was, now he's lookin for the same hit (SAME hit)
But his sound is played, he forget to change wit (CHANGE wit)
Them old hit rhymes, no one feelin him, his rhymes ain't appealin
anymore, and his records ain't sellin shit (ain't sellin SHIT)
Now he's dropped from his label, and he's goin broke (goin broke)
Tried the underground return, ghetto pass revoked (pass reVOKED)
And the same faces that he dissed, on his way, to the top
laughed as they watched him do the downstroke (DOWNstroke)
Now the moral of the story is that some go (some go)
Why would money make the inner vision crumble? (crumble)
So if you're blessed with the talent, utilize it to the fullest
be true to yourself and stay humble

Don't let money change ya!

Laaaaah, di-dah, da-da-dee-dah
Lah-di-dah, da-da-dee-dah (4X)

Don't let money change ya!

Laaaaah, di-dah, da-da-dee-dah
Lah-di-dah, da-da-dee-dah (2X)

Don't let money change ya!

Laaaaah, di-dah, da-da-dee-dah
Lah-di-dah, da-da-dee-dah (2X)

Don't let money change ya!

Laaaaah, di-dah, da-da-dee-dah
Lah-di-dah, da-da-dee-dah (2X to fade)
quote:
Originally posted by Empty Purnata:
What happened to the late 70's, 80's and early 90's rap? What happened to radical rap that used to scare the bejeesus out of the White Establishment? What happened to Public Enemy, N.W.A. and Arrested Development? What happened to the Afrocentric rap of the late 80's and early 90's?


Afrocentric rap died out once the crack epidemic became a real problem in our communities. Once crack infiltrated our communities, and the people discovered there was a way to make large amounts of money without having to work or apply for a job from a discriminatory employment system, rapping about the "White Establishment" was over. From then on, the fight against the White Establishment turned into a life-threatening struggle to maintain your drug territory, keep yourself and your block protected and heavily armed, and kill any fool who dared to cross your boundaries. Consequently, because drug trafficing is how many young men survive in innercities, how successful they were as drug lords is all that present-day rappers can talk about. And interestingly enough, if a novice rapper has never sold drugs for a living, he must lie about having done so just to get respect from veterans in the rap game. Surviving a profitable drug business without dying in the process is a rite of passage for many young rappers.
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quote:
Afrocentric rap died out once the crack epidemic became a real problem in our communities. Once crack infiltrated our communities, and the people discovered there was a way to make large amounts of money without having to work or apply for a job from a discriminatory employment system, rapping about the "White Establishment" was over. From then on, the fight against the White Establishment turned into a life-threatening struggle to maintain your drug territory, keep yourself and your block protected and heavily armed, and kill any fool who dared to cross your boundaries. Consequently, because drug trafficing is how many young men survive in innercities, how successful they were as drug lords is all that present-day rappers can talk about. And interestingly enough, if a novice rapper has never sold drugs for a living, he must lie about having done so just to get respect from veterans in the rap game. Surviving a profitable drug business without dying in the process is a rite of passage for many young rappers.


Did art imitate life or did the establishment broadcast a destructive message to the disenfranchised inner city?

I believe the latter is in keeping with the theme of this thread.
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
Did art imitate life or did the establishment broadcast a destructive message to the disenfranchised inner city?


The establishment may have broadcasted a destructive message, but it's not a coincidence that the death of conscious rap occurred around same time the drug epidemic was becoming a problem in our communities. Today we hear rappers boast about having large sums of money, but it's no secrect as to what they had to do to earn this money. Therefore it's very difficult to maintain a sense of consciousness and positivity when you are out here doing things that are not positive. Now I am in no way condoning or making excuses for criminal behavior. In my opinion, no matter what is taking place in your life, you should ALWAYS do what is right. However, when you're faced with these kinds of challenges, making a choice to remain positive becomes a bit of a challenge.
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quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
Did art imitate life or did the establishment broadcast a destructive message to the disenfranchised inner city?


The establishment may have broadcasted a destructive message, but it's not a coincidence that the death of conscious rap occurred around same time the drug epidemic was becoming a problem in our communities. Today we hear rappers boast about having "bling bling" and large sums of money, but exactly what do you think they did to earn this money? It's very difficult to maintain an interest in being "conscious" and "positive" when you are out here doing things that go against the edicts of consciousness. I am in no way justifying or condoning criminal behavior. In my opinion, no matter what is taking place in your life, you should ALWAYS do what is right. However, when you're poor and the burden to provide for yourself and your family is all on you, the choice to remain "positive" becomes a challenge. For some folks, selling drugs was a way to finally end the complaining about "The White Establishment."


I believe both things are true. Art imitating life and the Establishment controlling the message.

Like any people, African American reality is complex. So you would think our art would be just as complex. But the Establishment has decided which part of our reality they want to promote.

So it's no accident we have 50 cent and his G-unit put out there as the hallmark of black authenticity. Then on top of the rap heap we have the hip hop Tarzan Eminem. The Establishment needs him too ... since their consumer base is largely white and needs to see itself in the dominant position even in this black man's game.
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quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
Reality will not be be televised Smile


<<<<

...and you know this, brother.

When I was growing up in Poughkeepsie the local radio station would not take any request for Public Enemy. My brother and I would call the station regularly and beg them to play PE. They weren't having it. If I recall correctly they banned PE from the air altogether.

That being said corportism killed conscious-minded Hip-Hop. Suddenly gangster crap, I mean rap, was being pushed by the record labels.

Conscious Hip-Hop is killed while self-destructive gangster crap flourished.
From what I can remember the only artist who's genre was considered gangster during the era of conscious-minded Hip-Hop was Schooly D. Never did Schooly get air time. His tapes were all underground. However, I move out to Southern California duing the late 80's and all I hear on the radio is local LA area gangster crap, rarely any conscious Hip-Hop. Now it's the mid 90's to the present and I travel to and from the East Coast to visit family and all I hear on the radio is gangster crap, no conscious Hip-Hop.

I don't believe it's simply supply and demand in this instance. Corporate executives have always intervened far too much influence of the style of Hip-Hop to be played on the local air waves and sales through mass distribution.
I never thought a bout a coordinated effort between gangsta rap and the crack epidemic... hhmmmm... I will have to give that some more thought...

From what I know, the music industry has been about creating an image in order to sell a product. If you know anything about marketing, you know that images make very powerful and lasting impressions on the populace.

When it comes to the image of Black people, we have been marginalized and demonized from day one... We have been left out of the process completly or made into chicken and watermelon eating fools... Most of the images of us are in fact negative...

Hip hop for the longest time was ignored when it came to images... it was thought to be a fad with a very small audience... When MTV started a show called yo MTV raps, the music industry took notice and started funnelling more and more of their budgets toward HH. When PE burst on the scene, they realized that they were sitting on top of a gold mine. They quickly figured out that this hip hop thing could make them some more money and that the audience was much larger than they had previously estimated. They also realized that this "thing" could be utilized to make huge statements via images alone. If you think back to PE's first 12inch/album cover, they were seemingly a bunch of hoodlums/thugs... complete with guns. What they hadn't realized was what PE was saying and it's impact on both the Black and the larger community. They simply had not listened to the message...

This was the birth of "conscious rap"...

For the next 3 - 4 yrs every rapper had some sort of "icon of consciousness"... they were all carrying medallions with Africa in them, they were wearing red black and green... they were all talking about uplifting the community, praising our sisters, giving us history lessons... etc. Masses of Black people were learning more about their history than ever before... We certainly were not being told the whole story in the school system and hip hop filled in the blanks... Young Blacks started questioning why all this info was being left out of the history books... Indeed a revoulution was the verge of exploding... All while maintaining the "negative" image.

Then somebody at the rec co. listened... and everything changed...

Rappers like Will Smith and Kwame were quickly brought to the forefront while the PE's and KRS-1's were put on the back burner...

But the revolution had gained too much momentum the demand for the images created by conscious rap were still high... It did not matter what Will S. had to say, his image was not street enough for him be accepted by the masses at that time - they (rec. cos.) needed an alternative to fill the void...

This was the birth of gangsta rap...

When it comes to hip hop the images created are now far more powerful than the words that they say... How many times have you watched a video where the images had nothing to do with what was being said? Nearly 100% of the time...

So now the rec. cos. have found away to continue the status quo (negative images of Black people) and make a whole lot of money doing it... Except now we are willing participants...
quote:
Originally posted by Dissident:
My brother and I would call the station regularly and beg them to play PE. They weren't having it. If I recall correctly they banned PE from the air altogether. That being said corportism killed conscious-minded Hip-Hop. Suddenly gangster crap, I mean rap, was being pushed by the record labels. Conscious Hip-Hop is killed while self-destructive gangster crap flourished.


That's a lie. Radio stations were just as opposed to playing hardcore gangsta rap as they were to playing pro-Black rap music (also known as "conscious" hiphop). Truthfully, neither genres could get air play. Radio stations argued that gangsta rap was too racist and promoted violence and hatred and conscious rap did the same thing, except with a lot less cussing and violence. In any event, both genres spoke out against oppression just in very different ways. But growing up, I did recall radio stations playing K-1's "Black Cop" all the time. They played that song a lot. But to expect them to play something by Dead Prez, forget it. Radio stations are not in the business of promoting Black Nationalism. We all know that they have to play music that is likely to appeal to everybody, not just one segment of America's population.
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
From what I know, the music industry has been about creating an image in order to sell a product. If you know anything about marketing, you know that images make very powerful and lasting impressions on the populace.

When it comes to the image of Black people, we have been marginalized and demonized from day one... We have been left out of the process completly or made into chicken and watermelon eating fools... Most of the images of us are in fact negative...



Some readers have argued that it was the media that ultimately destroyed Black people's interest in creating and enjoying conscious rap music, but I still disagree with this argument. I think what destroyed conscious rap music was that Black people could no longer identify with what was being said in the lyrics of conscious rappers. Each generation has its own objectives, needs, and interests. Times change. People change. And "conscious hiphop" (as we knew it in the 80's) had its time. Now it's time to move on. If I've learned anything about Black music, and rap music in particular, is that it is constantly evolving and changing, and we must change with it.
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
And "conscious hiphop" (as we knew it in the 80's) had its time. Now it's time to move on. If I've learned anything about Black music, and rap music in particular, is that it is constantly evolving and changing, and we must change with it.


Rowe, I don't get this. Why must we change with it? Especially when the market forces that drive hip hop are largely white?

Ya'll, I still listen to conscious rap (from the 80's and 90's) and a lot of current underground rap. That means I listen to a lot of tapes and CD's. I almost never listen to radio. But I control what I listen to. I don't have to change in any way that is detrimental to me.

I'm the same way with rock, jazz, and blues - I will have no parts of "smooth jazz" or Eric Clapton.
Last edited {1}
By the way, you ARE right about the way black music changes and evolves. That phenomenon is not new . It's as old as popular music. But I've always thought there was something pathological about the way we abandon our own cultural creations. We just fugetaboutit.

Whites remember and celebrate their people from 200 years ago. Mozart, Beethoven, etc.

We, on the other hand, think that Jazz is Kenny G, Gospel is Kirk Franklin, and hip hop is 50 and Eminem.

I just don't fuckin' get it ... Confused
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
By the way, you ARE right about the way black music changes and evolves. That phenomenon is not new . It's as old as popular music. But I've always thought there was something pathological about the way we abandon our own cultural creations. We just fugetaboutit.

Whites remember and celebrate their people from 200 years ago. Mozart, Beethoven, etc.

We, on the other hand, think that Jazz is Kenny G, Gospel is Kirk Franklin, and hip hop is 50 and Eminem.

I just don't fuckin' get it ... Confused


I read something stressing that point some time ago.

I can't remember where, but the writer cemented his pov by saying something along the lines of how Paul Whiteman is the King of Jazz, Benny Goodman is the King of Swing, Elvis is the King of Rock-'n'-Roll, Eric Clapton is the King of the Blues, and Eminem is the King of Rap.

The only Black monarch is Little Richard.

The self-appointed king of everything, lol.
quote:
Originally posted by ma'am:
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
By the way, you ARE right about the way black music changes and evolves. That phenomenon is not new . It's as old as popular music. But I've always thought there was something pathological about the way we abandon our own cultural creations. We just fugetaboutit.

Whites remember and celebrate their people from 200 years ago. Mozart, Beethoven, etc.

We, on the other hand, think that Jazz is Kenny G, Gospel is Kirk Franklin, and hip hop is 50 and Eminem.

I just don't fuckin' get it ... Confused


I read something stressing that point some time ago.

I can't remember where, but the writer cemented his pov by saying something along the lines of how Paul Whiteman is the King of Jazz, Benny Goodman is the King of Swing, Elvis is the King of Rock-'n'-Roll, Eric Clapton is the King of the Blues, and Eminem is the King of Rap.

The only Black monarch is Little Richard.

The self-appointed king of everything, lol.


I agree with both of you. The death of "conscious rap" is not some natural phenomenon any more than the death of the radical element of the Civil Rights Movement. It was a conscious effort on the part of the status quo establishment that brought it down.

As long as conscious rap remained, the status quo was never safe because there was still a widespread force among the Black Community encouraging self-reliance and non-compliance with the establishment. That couldn't be tolerated. Yes, the establishment hates gangsta crap, er "rap" too, but to them it was the "lesser of the two evils". It was decidedly "less evil" because it least gangsterism preached values similar to corporate values (ie. me first, cutthroat competition, get rich or die trying, bling-bling, being adorned with riches plundered from other countries, fuck haters [discontented have nots] and I'll just get mine, etc.). So they put millions of dollars into popularizing groups that they found the least threatening while appeasing the Darkies' need for hip-hop. Even today, rappers in record companies only make an average of $0.06 for ever $15 that their records sell for, while the manager and the company keeps the other $14.94.


The corporate establishment took an approach much like the one they did during the Cold War: support the side that most supports the establishment and encourages the least reaction against the wealthy elite. Like how our government openly supported totalitarian/authoritarian corporate Fascist regimes over democratic socialist governments.
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
And "conscious hiphop" (as we knew it in the 80's) had its time. Now it's time to move on. If I've learned anything about Black music, and rap music in particular, is that it is constantly evolving and changing, and we must change with it.


Rowe, I don't get this. Why must we change with it? Especially when the market forces that drive hip hop are largely white?

Ya'll, I still listen to conscious rap (from the 80's and 90's) and a lot of current underground rap. That means I listen to a lot of tapes and CD's. I almost never listen to radio. But I control what I listen to. I don't have to change in any way that is detrimental to me.


Really. I don't buy that gangsta crap is just a "natural progression". I think it's an artificially inflated phenomenon.

If gangsta crap is the best the Black Community can cough up these days, then we have nothing to look forward to.
quote:
Originally posted by ma'am:
I can't remember where, but the writer cemented his pov by saying something along the lines of how Paul Whiteman is the King of Jazz, Benny Goodman is the King of Swing, Elvis is the King of Rock-'n'-Roll, Eric Clapton is the King of the Blues, and Eminem is the King of Rap.

The only Black monarch is Little Richard.

The self-appointed king of everything, lol.



Rock N Roll

Mos Def
Album: Black On Both Sides
Year: 1999

[Mos Def]
Make me wanna HOLLA.. aowwWWWWWWWWWWWWW!
"Ah.. ah-ah, ah-ah.. ah-ah, ah-lert the squad.."
Rock and roll
"Ah.. ah-ah, ah-ah.. ah-ah, ah-lert the squad.."
Hehehe, rock and roll
"Ah.. ah-ah, ah-ah.. ah-ah, ah-lert the squad.."
Whoahhhhh-oh, oooh-weee-oooh
"Ah.. ah-ah, ah-ah.. ah-ah, ah-lert the squad.."
Whoahhhhh-oh

(Huh) My grandmomma was raised on a reservation
(Huh) My great-grandmomma was, from a plantation
They sang - songs for inspiration
They sang - songs for relaxation
They sang - songs, to take their minds up off that fucked up situation
I am... yes I am... the descendant (yes yes)
of those folks whose, backs got broke
who, fell down inside the gunsmoke
(Black people!) Chains on they ankles and feet
I am descendants, of the builders of your street
(Black people!) Tenders to your cotton money
I am.. hip-hop
"It's heavy metal for the black people"

I am.. rock and roll (rock and roll.. rock'n'roll)
BEEN HERE FOREVER!
They just ain't let you know.. (HA!)

I said, Elvis Presley ain't got no soul (huh)
Chuck Berry is rock and roll (damn right)
You may dig on the Rolling Stones
But they ain't come up with that style on they own (uh-uh)
Elvis Presley ain't got no SOULLLL (hell naw)
Little Richard is rock and roll (damn right)
You may dig on the Rolling Stones
But they ain't come up with that shit on they own (nah-ah)

Guess that's just the way shit goes
You steal my clothes and try to say they yo's (yes they do)
Cause it's a show filled with pimps and hoes
Tryin to take everything that you made or control (there they go)
Elvis Presley ain't got no SOULLLL
Bo Diddley is rock and roll (damn right)
You may dig on the Rolling Stones
But they ain't the first place the credit belongs

Say whoahhhh-oh (don't take it) oooh-weee-ohhh
(black music) whoahhhh-oh (don't take it) oooh-weee-ohhh
(black music) whoahhhh-oh (Jimi Hendrix say) oooh-weee-ohhh
(black music) whoahhhh-oh (Albert King and) oooh-weee-ohhh
(and Motown)

(huh) I ain't tryin to diss
but I don't be tryin to fuck with Limp Bizkit
"The fuck is on your mind?"
When I get down in my zone
I be rockin Bad Brains and Fishbone
I ain't tryin to slow your groove
But that ain't the way I'm tryin to move
I don't turn on Korn to get it on;
I be playin Jimi Hendrix 'til the dawn
That's my word is bond
Sittin up on my front lawn
Got the volume turned to ten
Playin Albert King the best again (black)
When the mornin in the cooker
Got to turn on some John Lee Hooker
When I want some rock and roll
Go to Otis Redding to get some soul

Say, James Brown got plenty of soul
James Brown like to rock and roll
He can do all the shit fo' sho'
that Elvis Presley could never know (black people)
Said, Kenny G ain't got no SOULLLL
John Coltrane is rock and roll (uh-huh)
You may dig on the Rolling Stones
but they could never ever rock like Nina Simone


Say whoahhhh-oh (don't take it) oooh-wee-ohh
(black music) whoahhhh-oh (don't take it) oooh-weee-ohhh
(black music) whoahhhh-oh (don't take it) oooh-weee-ohhh
(black music) whoah-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh

"ah-lert the squad.."

{*MUSIC PICKS UP PACE AND GETS LOUDER*}

Who am IIIIiiiiiiiiIiiiII, HUH!
GET YOUR PUNK ASS UP!
ELVIS PRESLEY AIN'T GOT NO SOUL
JIMI HENDRIX IS ROCK AND ROLL
YOU MAY DIG ON THE ROLLING STONES
BUT EVERYTHING THEY DID THEY STOLE
ELVIS PRESLEY AIN'T GOT NO SOUL
BO DIDDLEY IS ROCK AND ROLL
YOU MAY DIG ON THE ROLLING STONES
BUT WE SEND THEY PUNK ASS HOME
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii (ROCK AND ROLL)
Who am IIIiiiiiiiiiii!!!
Say, rock and ROLL!
Who am I? Rock and ROLL!
Who am I? Rock and ROLL!
Who am I? Rock and ROLL!
Who am I? Rock and ROLL!
Who am I? Rock and ROLL!
Who am I? Rock and ROLL!
GET YOUR PUNK ASS UP!!!!!!!
Company, MOVE!!!
For Harlem, Fort Greene, Compton
East St. Louis, Detroit (BO BO)
Chicago (BO BO) Bed-Stuy (BO BO)
Flatbush (BO BO) Brownsville (BO BO)
East New York (BO BO) Newark New Jersey (BO BO)
Illadelphia Cincinatti Atlanta the Dirty South
All towns GET YOUR PUNK ASS UP!!
"Rock and roll for the black people"
Hi ma..

"Well that was just wonderful"
Rakim Puts 50 Cent on Blast
courtesy of www.playahata.com

According to the website whudat.com Rakim the God MC puts 50 Cent style on Blast, in a interview, Rakim said it's a conscious decision to leave his street experiences and interactions with those doing street things (he knew and hung out with the original 50 Cent - one of the craziest Brooklyn killers in the 80's) on the street. The quote: "I never sold drugs or nothing. But coming up in the hood, I knew the code of the streets. I was in the hood since a young kid, man. And I was very observant. I watched how everybody did they thing. It wasn't cool to talk about what went on on the block. Especially on a record."

"I had people that was close to me that was doing what they do. I respect for doing what he got to do, I'll let him know if it ain't good, but still I respect that man he got to get his food. I got people that's close to me was doing real things in the streets. For me to get on the mic and start talking about certain things.. It's like three-dimensional right now, every time somebody get on the mic and mention some crime, you got 5-0 knocking at the door or tapping the phone or investigating this crew or this crew."

"So I kinda seen it early. I didn't want to extort the streets. I didn't want to extort the hood, my dudes, or hip-hop. So I try to just keep it real, but at the same time it is a limitation. A lot of people today respect me for that, cause they call it, I didn't give up the street codes. I respect what they do, but leave that over there and I used to just try to find words that sound good, man. See if I can move the crowd that way."
quote:
Originally posted by Rowe:
quote:
Originally posted by Dissident:
My brother and I would call the station regularly and beg them to play PE. They weren't having it. If I recall correctly they banned PE from the air altogether. That being said corportism killed conscious-minded Hip-Hop. Suddenly gangster crap, I mean rap, was being pushed by the record labels. Conscious Hip-Hop is killed while self-destructive gangster crap flourished.


That's a lie. Radio stations were just as opposed to playing hardcore gangsta rap as they were to playing pro-Black rap music (also known as "conscious" hiphop). Truthfully, neither genres could get air play. Radio stations argued that gangsta rap was too racist and promoted violence and hatred and conscious rap did the same thing, except with a lot less cussing and violence. In any event, both genres spoke out against oppression just in very different ways. But growing up, I did recall radio stations playing K-1's "Black Cop" all the time. They played that song a lot. But to expect them to play something by Dead Prez, forget it. Radio stations are not in the business of promoting Black Nationalism. We all know that they have to play music that is likely to appeal to everybody, not just one segment of America's population.


What the hell are you talking about? Looks like you made an incoherent and inaccurate observation of my post. Comprehend the difference of local radio stations such as Poughkeepsie where I lived as opposed to metro area NYC radio? Damn! You made it appear as if I was talking about every radio station throughout the continental United States. When you were younger did you know the content and the playlist for every radio station in amerikkka? Sure you did. Wink I can only speak for areas where I lived and frequented. I suggest you check yourself and take a chill pill before you start accusing people of lying.

Now allow me to refute you nonsense. Poughkeepsie area radio stations; no hip hop other than Kid 'N Play and that was a stretch. Travel down to metro NY and you had more variety of hip hop yet nothing that would spook the jews and other white folk. Rarely anything revolutionary or controversial on the major stations unless you had the opportunity to hear a two hour, once a week broadcast from a community college radio station such as BCC. This is pre 1989. There were no hardcore rappers who were considered gangster prior to 1989 other than Schooly D and he didn't get air time on NY stations to the best of my recollection.

Anything revolutionary is controversial to white folk. PE never aired in Poughkeepsie because they were revolutionary. Request PE or BDP on any of the stations in Metro or L.I. and you'll get a list of bullshit excuses why they don't air music from artist of this genre. And if somehow PE did get through on the major stations in lower NY - always late at night and never without some badgering ass cracker threatning the station with a lawsuit.

I moved to California in 1989. Totally different scenario. KDAY was the only station at the time that was entirely devoted to hip hop - and even more controversial gangster rap. I distinctively recall Bloods or Crips across the street from USC lounging to gangster rap on KDAY. NWA, King Tee, DJ Quick and a host of other gangster rappers was regularly played on KDAY. Conscious hip hop was rare on KDAY. Gangster rap was not. Post 1992 to the present gangster rap has been commonly pushed on mainstream stations on either coast. My, how times have changed.

But where is the conscious/revolutionary hip hop? There's always been a fan base for conscious hip hop which I previously mentioned although they have never received the same support from radio stations and record labels. Yet these same radio stations and record labels (which most are owned by non-blacks) have no problem pushing destructive hip hop music.

Now if you were clairvoyant and experienced what I did at the exact time and location that I did, perhaps you and Dionne Warwick could partner up and hustle people out of their hard-earned money. Otherwise don't read into things and try to avoid a rush to judgement, homeslice. nono

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