Ok, I need some input from the brothas on this one...

I work with an organization whose mission includes services to male inmates. An issue that always comes up is men/brothas who have lost contact with their children and would like to become a better father. I have noticed that the majority of these men/brothas never known their fathers or have had very little contact with their own fathers. Is there any way to help these fatherless fathers reclaim their role as "Dad"? Any tips? Any organizations you'd recommend? Thanks in advance

Everybody can be great... because anybody can serve. You don't have to have a college degree to serve. You don't have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.  


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

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quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
Ok, I need some input from the brothas on this one...

I work with an organization whose mission includes services to male inmates. An issue that always comes up is men/brothas who have lost contact with their children and would like to become a better father. I have noticed that the majority of these men/brothas never known their fathers or have had very little contact with their own fathers. Is there any way to help these fatherless fathers reclaim their role as "Dad"? Any tips? Any organizations you'd recommend? Thanks in advance


I did some work with the education department at SCI Huntingdon and Smithfield in PA several years ago. One interesting program for fathers was tied to literacy education. We taped fathers reading stories that would then be sent to thier children. The programs was supported through some state and local grants and meet with what we percieved to be a good response. You accomplish to things: teaching the men to read and facilitating a connection with thier children.

God has told you, O man and woman, what is good; and what does the SOVEREIGN ONE require of you but to do justice, and to be compassionate, and to walk humbly with your God?
Kresge,
Great idea! I like the idea of the children connecting with their father's voice. Of course there remains the issue of "my baby mama is crazy and don't want me to see/know my kids"

Hi Darkbuck,
U R right...a man should have a relationship with his kids...but i'm concerned that generations of fatherless fathers may not have a clue as to the impact of being in his child's life. Isn't it left up to black churches, and black social service organizations to try to heal this wound?
I know what you are talking about. I was raised by a single mom who was an alcoholic.

The black church played a very important part in my life as with a lot of kids in the area. If you ever been to Detroit, a lot of their churches are CATHEDRALS, take up a whole city block. They teach you everything, about drugs, sex, even how to fill out a job application and the proper way to dress. They take up a LOT of things that most inner city kids don't get from home.

St. Cecilia's have been producing college and professional athletes for over 30 years. Derrick Coleman and Chris Webber are some of their latest ones but it goes back to the 70's when Magic Johnson played there when he was still in high school. I practically lived in their gym as a kid, played against some of everybody. I was gifted in math so I was pushed towards engineering, I was told we had plenty of athletes. I got my college degree and moved on.

So trust me, I know what you are saying because I've experienced it myself. That was many years ago but the experience and what you learn stays with you for a life time.

Now back in those days, they tried the same thing with the fatherless fathers but once a man is grown, they have a tendency to have their own agendas. Unless they receive God in their lives to change their old habits, things will not change. Their bad habits just gets worse which is why some of the women don't want to be bothered with them.

I'm saying what I saw from experience. They tried to do that with my father but he had to have his drugs, nothing and no one came before that.

I don't mean to come off harsh but it was better he WASN'T at home. I was able to pick who I wanted to admire as a father figure and there were plenty in the church I went to.

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