Associated Press

BERLIN -- South Africa's track and field federation had been asked to conduct a gender test on an 800-meter runner amid concerns she does not meet the requirements to compete as a woman.

Caster Semenya, 18, is a favorite in Wednesday's 800 final at the world championships.

The world track and field federation requested the gender test about three weeks ago, after Semenya burst onto the scene by improving her personal bests in the 800 and 1,500 by huge margins.


IAAF spokesman Nick Davies said the "extremely complex, difficult" test has been started but that the results were not expected for weeks.

The verification requires a physical medical evaluation, and includes reports from a gynecologist, endocrinologist, psychologist, an internal medicine specialist and an expert on gender.

"So we're talking about reports that are very long, very time consuming," Davies said.

Semenya qualified for Wednesday's final with the best time of 1 minute, 58.64 seconds. She posted the world's top time this year of 1:56.72 three weeks ago at the African junior championships in Bambous, Mauritius.

It was not clear what would happen if Semenya were to medal in Wednesday's final and the test results determined she does not meet the requirements to compete.

"I can't say that if 'X' happens in the future that we will, for example, retroactively strip results. It's legally very complex," Davies said.

"If there's a problem and it turns out that there's been a fraud . . . that someone has changed sex, then obviously it would be much easier to strip results," Davies added. "However, if it's a natural thing and the athlete has always thought she's a woman or been a woman, it's not exactly cheating."

He said a decision in such instances is "done on a case by case basis."

"It's something that would have to be considered by the legal experts at that time," Davies said.
Original Post
quote:
"If there's a problem and it turns out that there's been a fraud . . . that someone has changed sex, then obviously it would be much easier to strip results," Davies added. "However, if it's a natural thing and the athlete has always thought she's a woman or been a woman, it's not exactly cheating."


WTH does that mean?? Confused 19 Confused

Caster Semenya

I saw he/she run the 800 meter semis yesterday and the finals today and he/she made it look way to easy, did not break a sweat, smoked the other runners and she looked like he/she did not even try hard at all.

She made Usain Bolt's world record 100 meter win look hard.

They stated that Semenya said that she played soccer her whole life and running is just a game to he/she.

Also, it did not help after he/she won the race and he/she did the Jay-Z "brush off your shoulder" move, flex those huge biceps and lifted his/her arms in victory that showed enough underarm pit hair to start a barbershop.

I know that some Africans have issues with hygiene but daaaaaaag!!

He/she? It might be close.
fro I don't know. Women in certain parts of Europe don't shave under their arms either...and they STILL look like girls. You're right Brotha Cholly...this "IS"close. Cuz from where I stand there's nothing about her that SCREAMS "woman." I know a lot female jocks....no matter how great they are as athletes....still maintain their femininity even if "running" long term has taken away most of their breast muscle mass. They STILL look like women.... Semenya? The jury/vote remains OUT in her/his case. I think a GYN examine is in order....but!

fro






"If the teasing hurt her, she kept the hurt to herself and didn't show what she was feeling".

Maphuthi Sekgala
Caster Semenya's grandmother
------------------------------------------------
Watch the end of the race: Video kinda grainy (hand held camera phone) but pay attention to how easy she runs away from the pack.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...4NaU&feature=related

Post race interview:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...2vEU&feature=related

Family insist SA runner is female.

The family of the new 800m world champion, South African Caster Semenya, has insisted she is a woman.

She has been dogged by controversy about her gender and the International Association of Athletics Federations has asked her to take a gender test.

"I know she's a woman — I raised her myself," the 18-year-old's grandmother told South Africa's Times newspaper.

The ruling ANC party congratulated Ms Semenya and called on South Africans to rally around "our golden girl".

"We condemn the motives of those who have made it their business to question her gender due to her physique and running style," the African National Congress said in a statement.

"Such comments can only serve to portray women as being weak."

Her mother Dorcus Semenya told the Star newspaper that doubts about her daughter's gender were motivated by "jealousy".

"If you go at my home village and ask any of my neighbours, they would tell you that Mokgadi [Caster Semenya] is a girl," she said.

"They know because they helped raise her. People can say whatever they like but the truth will remain, which is that my child is a girl. I am not concerned about such things."

Her 80-year-old grandmother Maphuthi Sekgala said Ms Semenya had been teased when younger for her boyish looks.

She was also the only girl in the football team in Fairlie, a village in South Africa's northern Limpopo Province, Ms Sekgala told The Times.

"If the teasing hurt her, she kept the hurt to herself and didn't show what she was feeling," she said.

Ms Semenya won gold at the Athletics World Championships in Berlin on Wednesday, leaving her rivals trailing.

South Africa's athletics federation also says it is "completely sure" that Ms Semenya is a female

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8211319.stm
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Second Story:

Semenya left stranded by storm.

When Usain Bolt is no longer the main topic of conversation at the World Championships, you know something dramatic must have happened.

There had been whispers circulating about South African 800m prodigy Caster Semenya ever since she ran a spectacular 1 minute 56.72 seconds in a low-key meet on 26 July.

Not only was it the fastest time in the world this year by more than a second, it meant she had improved her personal best by seven seconds in less than nine months. And, she said afterwards, she could have run even quicker had it not been for a strong wind on the back straight.

For once, the tittle-tattle was not the usual sort about performance-enhancing substances. This was more basic and a whole lot nastier: was the 'she' actually a 'he'?

It wasn't just the rapid time. Semenya has a well-muscled physique. She also has a dusting of facial hair. Mix those three things together and ugly rumours spread like wildfire.

What no-one quite expected was the way the story would suddenly develop with the 800m final just hours away.

Earlier in the week, it had been the stuff of bar-room banter. The favourite quote was from Semenya's coach Michael Seme, who had told reporters: "I can give you the telephone numbers of her room-mates in Berlin. They have already seen her naked in the showers and she has nothing to hide."

Seme also recounted how, when Semenya recently tried to use the women's toilets at a petrol station in Cape Town, the attendants tried to direct her to the gents instead.

"Caster just laughed and asked if they would like her to take off her pants to show them she was a woman," said Seme. "We understand that people will ask questions because she looks like a man. It's a natural reaction and it's only human to be curious."

So far, so amusing - but the atmosphere began to change when Semenya charged through her heat and semi-final in such dominant fashion that she was suddenly the red-hot favourite for gold.

What had been a story known only to athletics aficionados suddenly had legs. Questions started being asked of athletics' ruling body, the IAAF. The jokes started getting more unpleasant. The 'c' word - cheat - rose to the surface.

Cynics recalled the famous case of German high jumper Dora Ratjen, who won gold at the Olympics here in Berlin in 1936 but was later revealed to be a chap named Hermann. The comparison was ridiculous - Ratjen was forced to conceal his gender by the Nazi government and had been born and raised a man - and the reaction from the South African team indignant.

'She is a female," insisted general manager Molatelo Malehopo. "We are completely sure about that. We would not have entered her into the female competition if we had any doubts."

Then, with just three hours to go until the final, news broke in Berlin that the IAAF had asked Semenya to take a gender test.

The story fizzed round the Olympiastadion. What did the test involve? When would the results be known? Would Semenya even be allowed to run?

Gradually the prevailing mood shifted. Why was this coming out now? In the case of a doping test, the media are not notified unless both 'A' and 'B' samples have tested positive. Until then there is silence. Yet here a cloud of official suspicion was being allowed to gather before anything had been proved.

That any woman would be confronted with such serious accusation in front of a worldwide audience of millions struck many as callous. That it was an 18-year-old from Limpopo province at her first major senior championships seemed cruel in the extreme.

Semenya was on the warm-up track while inside the gossip flew round the adjacent main stadium. "The timing has caught us out," admitted an IAAF spokesman as the eight finalists were called together.

As Semenya emerged onto the track from the pre-race call-room, the photographers' long lenses swung in unison and locked on her face.

She looked implausibly calm under her neat corn-rows. On the blocks she waited for the television camera to come in close on her and then mimed brushing something from her shoulders. That there were two British girls in the final - Jenny Meadows and Marilyn Okoro, both with a chance of a medal - had almost been forgotten.

As if trying to escape the furore, the South African went off at breakneck speed. Reigning champ Janeth Jepkosgei took over for a few brief seconds on the back straight but was left struggling as the teenager took them through the bell in under 57 seconds, a blistering pace.

While the rest of the field went backwards, Semenya went again. Coming into the final straight she had a lead of five metres. At the line it was two and a half seconds, the biggest margin in World Championship history and another big personal best.

Yet while Jepkosgei and Meadows - a brilliant third - went off for laps of honour, Semenya was ushered away by officials, straight past the hordes of waiting journalists.

At the winner's news conference half an hour later, there was no sign of the teenager. "To protect her," explained a weary IAAF secretary general Pierre Weiss.

For the hundreds of reporters waiting, this was not enough. Where were the tests done? "At a special hospital here and in South Africa." When were they finished? "They are ongoing." Why was this not sorted earlier? Semenya had run the 800m at the Commonwealth Youth Games as long ago as last October, albeit in a vastly slower time. "She was unknown three weeks ago. Nobody could have anticipated this. We are fast, but we are not a lion."

What had Weiss heard so far? "Personally," he said, his moustache drooping even lower than normal, "I have no clue what is going on. I rely on and trust our doctors."

One thing was made clear: if the tests, whenever they do come out, subsequently show that Semenya cannot legally compete as a woman, she will be stripped of her medal and the placings revised.

The trouble is, those results could be weeks away. From all accounts they are also incredibly complicated and open to various interpretations. In the meantime, Semenya will be under media siege. The most private aspect of her life will be the subject of intense public scrutiny.

"Running is just a game to me," she had said after her semi-final win. Not any more.

On Thursday she is due to be awarded her medal. No-one could blame her if she asked for it to be posted to her instead.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/tom...randed_by_storm.html
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Gender verification in Sports - Wiki:

"Gender verification in sports (also sometimes loosely referred to as sex determination) is the issue of verifying the eligibility of an athlete to compete in a sporting event that is limited to a single gender.

The issue arose a number of times in the Olympic games where it was alleged that male athletes attempted to compete as women in order to win, or that a natural intersex competed as a woman.

Sex testing began at the 1966 European Track and Field Championships in response to suspicion that several of the best women athletes from the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe were actually men.[1] At the Olympics, testing was introduced at the 1968 Olympic Games in Grenoble.

While it arose primarily from the Olympic Games, sex determination affects any sporting event. However it appears it most often becomes an issue in elite international competition".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G...rification_in_sports
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Indian runner fails gender test, loses medal.


Indian runner Santhi Soundarajan, who won a silver medal in the women's 800 meters at the Asian Games, failed a gender test.

http://sports.espn.go.com/oly/...source=ESPNHeadlines
------------------------------------------------
How is gender testing done?

Exerpt:

"You can't tell for sure if an athlete is a man or a woman just by glancing at his or her genitalia. That's because some people are born with ambiguous sex organs, and others have a visible anatomy that doesn't match up with their sex chromosomes. Fears that male Olympic athletes might be competing as women led to mandatory physicals for females in the 1960s, which soon gave way to chromosome-based gender testing.

Officials collected mouth scrapings and ran a simple test for the presence of two X chromosomes. The method proved to be unreliable, since it's possible for a biological male to have an extra X chromosome (XXY) or a female to only have one X chromosome".

The gender of an embryo is determined during its early development. If certain sex-determining genes are present, the fetus will develop testes, which in turn produce testosterone.

It's the testosterone that makes the fetus into a boy. The genes that are important for this switch are generally located on the Y chromosome. By the 1992 Winter Games, officials started testing for one of these genes, called SRY—if you had it, you couldn't compete as a woman.

That test didn't work, either. Having the SRY gene material, or even a Y chromosome, doesn't always make you a man. Some people born with a Y chromosome develop all the physical characteristics of a woman except internal female sex organs.

This can result from a defect in one of the genes that allows the body to process testosterone. Someone with this condition (known as "androgen insensitivity syndrome") might be XY, and she might develop testes. But she'll end up a woman, because her body never responds to the testosterone she's producing. Other signs of AIS include hairless genitalia and the absence of menstruation. (There are reports that Soundararajan had "not attained puberty yet.")

Since testosterone helps in building muscle and strength, a case of androgen insensitivity syndrome wouldn't give an XY-female athlete any kind of competitive advantage; if anything, it would be a liability. Seven of the eight women who tested positive for Y-chromosomal material during the 1996 Summer Games in Atlanta had some form of AIS. They were allowed to compete.

By the late 1990s, the International Olympic Committee turned to a more comprehensive evaluation by a panel of specialists to account for all these ambiguities. The panel now includes gynecologists, endocrinologists, psychologists, and experts on transgender issues.

The examiners still test for the Y-chromosomal genes; gynecologists perform physical exams; endocrinologists diagnose gene disorders and resulting hormonal conditions; and athletes may be given psychological help to deal with the situation".


http://www.slate.com/id/2225810/
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:

How is gender testing done?

Exerpt:

"You can't tell for sure if an athlete is a man or a woman just by glancing at his or her genitalia. That's because some people are born with ambiguous sex organs, and others have a visible anatomy that doesn't match up with their sex chromosomes. Fears that male Olympic athletes might be competing as women led to mandatory physicals for females in the 1960s, which soon gave way to chromosome-based gender testing.

Officials collected mouth scrapings and ran a simple test for the presence of two X chromosomes. The method proved to be unreliable, since it's possible for a biological male to have an extra X chromosome (XXY) or a female to only have one X chromosome".

The gender of an embryo is determined during its early development. If certain sex-determining genes are present, the fetus will develop testes, which in turn produce testosterone.

It's the testosterone that makes the fetus into a boy. The genes that are important for this switch are generally located on the Y chromosome. By the 1992 Winter Games, officials started testing for one of these genes, called SRY—if you had it, you couldn't compete as a woman.

That test didn't work, either. Having the SRY gene material, or even a Y chromosome, doesn't always make you a man. Some people born with a Y chromosome develop all the physical characteristics of a woman except internal female sex organs.

This can result from a defect in one of the genes that allows the body to process testosterone. Someone with this condition (known as "androgen insensitivity syndrome") might be XY, and she might develop testes. But she'll end up a woman, because her body never responds to the testosterone she's producing. Other signs of AIS include hairless genitalia and the absence of menstruation. (There are reports that Soundararajan had "not attained puberty yet.")

Since testosterone helps in building muscle and strength, a case of androgen insensitivity syndrome wouldn't give an XY-female athlete any kind of competitive advantage; if anything, it would be a liability. Seven of the eight women who tested positive for Y-chromosomal material during the 1996 Summer Games in Atlanta had some form of AIS. They were allowed to compete.

By the late 1990s, the International Olympic Committee turned to a more comprehensive evaluation by a panel of specialists to account for all these ambiguities. The panel now includes gynecologists, endocrinologists, psychologists, and experts on transgender issues.

The examiners still test for the Y-chromosomal genes; gynecologists perform physical exams; endocrinologists diagnose gene disorders and resulting hormonal conditions; and athletes may be given psychological help to deal with the situation".


Of course the karyotype is going have downstream effects on the endocrinology and physiology! It's a flawed test to "prove" or disprove sex and this, imo, is an example of where physician/scientific deference to the karyotype in exclusion of socialization goes too far.

What they are doing to the South African runner and did to the Indian runner are humiliating. As the genetic complexity of sex/gender varies from person to person ... at this point the individual should be accepted as what they are socialized/self-identified to be. There is no reason to humiliate these young women - as neither gain real societal benefits from being men trying to "pose" as women (the U.S. would be a different story).
fro Well I finally got to see a video of "her/him." And...I'm starting to move toward...."WOMAN!"Eek I know I know. But I got a real good look at her/him... She just reminds of the female wrestlers/body builders who overdo it...but! she's just smaller in size...but has that "masculine" muscle mass." I looked at her/his face and said" ummm19 if she had her eyebrows waxed and some lipstick was added...could she then pass the visual test?"Probably. She lives in Africa...those who question her gender are most likely used to the western intrepretation of what a "woman" is "supposed" to look like...but! she lives in a village...without those images to follow or grow up with. So maybe from her....this is ALL you get. She's only like 18 or 19. So. There's still time to damage her brain with what westerner folks say how women should look. I'm being positive here in saying she's a girl until I know "more."

fro
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Kocolicious:
fro Well I finally got to see a video of "her/him." And...I'm starting to move toward...."WOMAN!"Eek I know I know. But I got a real good look at her/him... She just reminds of the female wrestlers/body builders who overdo it...but! she's just smaller in size...but has that "masculine" muscle mass." I looked at her/his face and said" ummm19 if she had her eyebrows waxed and some lipstick was added...could she then pass the visual test?"Probably. She lives in Africa...those who question her gender are most likely used to the western intrepretation of what a "woman" is "supposed" to look like...but! she lives in a village...without those images to follow or grow up with. So maybe from her....this is ALL you get. She's only like 18 or 19. So. There's still time to damage her brain with what westerner folks say how women should look. I'm being positive here in saying she's a girl until I know "more."

fro

------------------------------------------------
yeah

Koco, that convincing win and her dominance scared the shyt out of pro female track and field.

And the other major problem that professional track & field and Olympic officials have? If the test proves negative, is how to promote, advertise & market ($$$) her?

Women in track and field, to it's fans, is also somewhat of a glamourous thing with running magazines, women's magazines etc and track event promotions, especially outside of the U.S.

Are they going to try and doll her up and for her, there will be big bucks to make off the track.

If it's proven (and I hope not) that she is biologically more male than female, doesn't that leave her out of track and field completely?

To male to run with the women but to female to run with the guys?

And I hope that they don't pull any BS and rig the test results just to get rid of her.

With her young age, training (Africans have a lock on professional distance running) and superior running skills, she will be on top of women's running at the 800 meter distance and any other distance running she chooses (barring serious injury) for a very long time.

And for the American/Euro women, they may have to stick heavily to outside activities, self-promotion, beauty ads and marketing (running magazines etc) to cash in because they certainly won't be winning any races and making serious dollars competing against her.

She could become the Usain Bolt of female track.

Absoluty no competition. tfro


Warm welcome home to world champion athlete Caster Semenya.

"We are not going to allow Europeans to describe and define our children," the president of Athletics South Africa, Leonard Chuenetold told a news conference. Semenya attended although she did not address reporters."

Contentious athlete world champion Caster Semenya has returned home in South Africa. Hundreds turned out to welcome Ms Semenya and fellow medal winners, men’s 800 meters champion Mbulaeni Mulaudzi and long jump silver medallist Khotso Mokoena.

Police controlled singing and dancing crowds as Caster left the airport. South Africans was after Ms Semenya, who was expected to do a gender test just hours before winning the 800m final in Berlin last week. The entire team is likely to meet President Jacob Zuma. People assembled at the OR Tambo airport wearing the national colours of gold and green, and singing and dancing as they waited.

There were supporters holding messages saying “our first lady of sport”, “welcome home Caster, our champ” and “Caster 100 percent female”. After the arrival, the athletics team moved quickly to the parking area of the airport where more crowds had gathered to get a glance of them. Ms Semenya’s family was at also present at the airport to welcome their daughter home.

The ANC Youth League has blamed, International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) of racism. ANCYL’s national spokesperson Floyd Shivambu said they would celebrate athlete’s victory despite of efforts made by racist institution she has achieved and we are proud of her.

Ms Semenya’s family in Limpopo notifies that her birth certificate, states she is a female. IAAF told Ms Semenya to take the “gender verification test” IAAF also stresses that they do not suspect her of deliberately cheating but questions remains condition, which gives her an unfair advantage.

http://www.dailynewsjunction.c...lete-caster-semenya/
Originally posted by Cholly
quote:
Ms Semenya’s family in Limpopo notifies that her birth certificate, states she is a female. IAAF told Ms Semenya to take the “gender verification test” IAAF also stresses that they do not suspect her of deliberately cheating but questions remains condition, which gives her an unfair advantage.


fro By asking for a "test" does indicate in my view that they SUSPECT sumthin'. Come on. I see more whitefolks as drag queens MORE than I do blackfolks....and especially coming from Africa I don't EVER remember seeing any[I mean if they are some...I haven't seen them...but!]

And what unfair advantage? Africans/blackfolks have been on top in field and track...for a LONG....time. So....what are they REALLY sayin?Confused

fro
quote:
Caster Semenya.

What Is Caster Semenya?
August 23 2009
http://running.competitor.com/...-caster-semenya_4836

There are many intersex conditions that make it difficult or impossible to assign a gender to those - perhaps including the newly crowned South African 800m world champion - who have them.

Written By: Ross Tucker, PhD

Caster Semenya has become an overnight sensation. Regrettably it has been for her role in sport’s biggest current controversy – the question whether she might in fact be biologically part male. Some have simplified this question to a debate over whether Semenya is male or female, which is incorrect. Rather, the true question is whether Semenya may be intersex, which refers to a condition where ambiguous genitalia are present, and the genes don’t match up with the physiological development and appearance, making the classification of the person as either male or female is very difficult.

Intersex conditions result from what are called disorders of sexual development (DSDs). Authorities have suggested three broad categories of this condition. The first is that of a masculinized female; the second is an under-masculinized male; and the third is true hermaphroditism. In Semenya’s case, it would seem that one of the first two categories – the masculinzed female or under-masculinized male – may apply.

The complexity of assigning sex can be daunting, and is even impossible in some cases. What follows is a very brief overview of some of the possibilities. If it leaves you feeling more confused than ever, then you’ve understood the complexities of sex verification more than most!

With A Spotlight Comes Scrutiny

Born and raised in a remote rural community in the Limpopo province of South Africa, Semenya shot to prominence by running 1:56.72 in Mauritius in July. Her star continued to rise in Berlin, until it emerged that her sex was being investigated by the IAAF. A gold medal later, an international fall-out and a desperately sad situation for Semenya, yet still no answer is in sight. So what is Semenya, and how might we know?

The typical response to the question is “just check,” and rather embarrassingly, many of the officials from Athletics South Africa have dared all to check Semenya for female genitalia. If only it were this simple; a well-known joke asks how you know the sex of a chromosome. Answer: pull down its genes. On both counts, sex determination is much more complex than this, and neither the genes nor the “jeans” have the answer!

On the first count, conventional wisdom says that males have an X and a Y chromosome (XY) and females have two X chromosomes (XX). The chromosomes determine whether you develop male or female reproductive organs. Unfortunately, the nice, clear lines we are taught to believe exist often become blurred, and you do get XY females and XX males.

A number of conditions can explain these aberrations. For example, sometimes, some cells are XX, but others are XY – this is called mosaicism, and depending on which cells you looked at, you might incorrectly conclude that a person is male or female. XX-male syndrome can also occur as a result of a transolcation (movement) of part of the Y chromosome that contains genes for male sexual development onto the X chromosome. The result is the presence of two X chromosomes (a female), with a gene that causes the development of testes, and the person will appear male but is in fact genetically female. If that is not complex enough, sometimes the growing fetus is exposed to too much testosterone, and develops male genitalia.

The same can happen the other way – too little circulating testosterone and a growing fetus that is XY (that is, male) may fail to develop male genitals, leading to a female appearance, despite an XY chromosome being present.

Another condition is androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), where the hormone testosterone is present, but has little to no effect because the receptors are insensitive to it. The result is that a person who is XY fails to develop as a male. The result? An XY female. This was one of the most common conditions identified by the IOC’s testing (until compulsory screening was scrapped), with seven of the eight “failed” sex tests in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics being accounted for by this condition. The IAAF allows athletes with this condition to participate as females, despite their being genetically male, highlighting how simple genetic analysis alone does not suffice.

Nor does external examination of the genitalia. In all the above examples, the genitalia may be ambiguous or the opposite from what would be expected from the genes, making the oft-cited (in Semenya’s case) “shower check” just about irrelevant. Perhaps the most famous case of an intersex athlete was Stella Walsh, a Polish sprinter who was the Olympic champion in 1932, and a runner-up in 1936. The 1936 race was particularly notable, since she was beaten by Helen Stephens of the USA, whom she accused of being a man. Autopsies on these two athletes, in the 1980s, revealed that both had ambiguous genitalia, though neither autopsy went into detail to establish the specific DSD.

History of Gender Verification in Athletics

These two examples highlight the problem with a straightforward observation, which is actually what the sex verification process used to consist of. When sex verification was introduced in 1966, female competitors had to stand naked in front of a committee and were subjected to inspection of their external genitalia, in what where called “nude parades”.

That ill-conceived standard was replaced by a chromosome test of sorts, which looked for something called a Barr Body, which only exists when there are two X chromosomes. As we’ve seen, those two X chromosomes don’t necessarily indicate female gender, and so this test was not accurate by itself either.

The limitations discovered in these early verification procedures are the reason the current sex verification process is so complex. It now involves a multidisciplinary approach, which includes genetic, gynecological, psychological, internal medicine and endocrine experts, and is only done when suspicion or a challenge arises (compulsory screening having been scrapped in 2000).

We’ve already explained why the first two specialists are needed. The internal medicine specialist investigates the presence of internal structures that are male or female, while the psychological assessment involves assessment of the brain, since testosterone and other sex hormones influence the brain as well.

Finally, there is an endocrine assessment, and this is where the real functional differences are often found. Endocrine experts assess hormone levels, and the biggest difference between males and females is the level of testosterone, and other hormones like it. Collectively, they are called androgenizing hormones, and they’re responsible for the biggest differences between men and women with respect to exercise.

Effects on Performance

These differences include stronger, larger muscles, lower body fat levels, and differences in the shape of the skeleton, including a larger jaw bone, narrower hips and broader shoulders. Other masculinizing effects, not related to performance, include deepening of the voice and the growth of facial hair, both of which were cited as “signs” in the case of Semenya, particularly after an interview with her spread like wildfire on the internet.

It is the effect of testosterone on muscle development that confers an athletic advantage to males (or, in theory, to intersex individuals, if it manifests as increased testosterone levels). Advantages also arise from testosterone’s effect on body fat levels and distribution, and the biomechanical advantage caused by narrower hips. A stronger skeleton also helps, particularly in running events.

So testosterone holds the key, at least to performance advantages. After all, both men and women have sought to abuse testosterone as a drug since the 1960s. Many of the East German women received such large doses in an attempt to improve their strength that they developed male characteristics. One, famously called Hormone Heidi, was shot-put athlete Heidi Kriegler, who became Andreas Kriegler after retiring.

Hormonal Conditions

By now, given the complexity of gender biology, you may not be surprised to learn that there are a few medical conditions that affect hormone levels quite separately from the genes. For example, in a condition known as alpha-5-reductase deficiency, males cannot convert testosterone into another hormone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). That’s a mouthful, but let’s just say that DHT is a hormone that is responsible for the development of the external male genitalia, and so if you can’t make it, then you fail to develop male testes and end up with the appearance of a female. In fact, persons with this condition may have male genitalia, ambiguous genitalia, or female genitalia. However, because they still produce testosterone, they get all the other masculinizing effects.

If that is not enough, a number of other enzyme deficiencies can lead to under-masculinization of males or masculinization of females. Any single expert has a real chance of making a mistake, and only an integrated approach can reduce this likelihood. For Caster Semenya, this discussion will be academic, and traumatic, being played out on the world stage when she herself has lived for 18 years as a female.

In time, the outcome of the testing may be known (there is a chance it will never be known, since it is meant to be kept confidential. However, given the profile of the story, this would seem unlikely), and then the myriad of other conditions, not even touched on here, may come up again. For now, let’s just say the problem is infinitely more complex than a simple sneak peek, and wait on the authorities to take the next steps.

***

Ross Tucker, PhD, is an exercise physiologist based in Cape Town, South Africa, and coauthor of The Runner’s Body.
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:
IAAF also stresses that they do not suspect her of deliberately cheating but questions remains condition, which gives her an unfair advantage.


This is very stupid logic to use in this young lady's case. Every sport has naturally occuring prodigies, which is all she is. For the IAAF to carry on like this is misguided and plain cruel.

I'm glad her country is behind her.
quote:
Originally posted by ocatchings:
This may not make much sense but, as I looked at the pics in print she looked like a man. When I saw her on the news at the stadium, she looked like a femwale.
So could the medium that people are viewing her cause some of the issues?


O, I thought the same exact thing about her appearance.

Back at home, relaxed and feeling comfortable around family, friends and fans, when she smiled, I saw the face of a female but when she was competing on the track, looking determined, being constantly photographed in Berlin and being grilled by the press, she was serious, tight lipped and seemed angered at all the media scrunity.

And the media, via photos and discussion, seemed purposely to support the accusation instead of looking at who she really is.

In addition, reported by CNN's Campbell Brown last night, her gender tests concluded that she has a very high levels of testostorone in her system, and the news anchor purposely tried to allude that instead of biology, she may have been injesting performance enhancing drugs, therefore placing that doubt in everyone's mind.

That doubt will possibly kill her career since in today's society, the court of public opinion is the real guilt, not actually being guilty of doing anything.

I can see where this might be going.

Now that the gender test are underway, even if it has been determined that she has naturally high levels of testostrone in her body, giving her more of a genetic muscular/masculine make-up, they will willingly avoid/not trust the gender test results and label her as a performance drug enhancer or either, according to the end test results, as a freak; half man/half woman athlete which violate the gender rules, causing her stress, jepodizing her mental state/preparadeness to compete, keeps the skeptics/protesters critizing/pressuring professional track and field to clean up the sport and try to drive her out of track and field.

And why? because she is so dominant. And barring future injuries, these other female runners, especially White women, who need the marketing dollar, will not be winning any championship races/Olympic gold medals or first place $$$ for a very long time.

She's not an ass kisser, does not project the Usian Bolt personality needed for world wide self promotion and selling event tickets and any 800 meter race (or any other race) that she competes in, will probably be no contest and constantly broken world records will have her name all over it.

For the international track and field officials, they don't control her and she has the entire Black African continient behind her.

Screw her and all African runners (male & female) and coaches will rebel against the system.

For professional track & field, not really good for business if they don't play this right. fro
Runner Semenya forced to take gender test is a woman ... & a man: has both female & male organs.

World 800-meter champion Caster Semenya of South Africa has male and female sexual organs, the Sydney Morning Herald said on Friday, posing an ethical and political quandary for athletics' ruling body.

The Herald said extensive physical examinations of 18-year-old Semenya ordered by the IAAF have shown she is technically a hermaphrodite.

Medical reports indicate she has no ovaries, but rather has internal male testes, which are producing large amounts of testosterone.

The newspaper said the IAAF was trying to contact Semenya to inform her of the results. After dominating her race at the world titles in Berlin last month, Semenya was given blood and chromosome tests as well as a gynecological examination.

"This is a medical issue and not a doping issue where she was deliberately cheating," IAAF spokesman Nick Davies was quoted as saying by the newspaper.

"These tests do not suggest any suspicion of deliberate misconduct but seek to assess the possibility of a potential medical condition which would give Semenya an unfair advantage over her competitors. There is no automatic disqualification of results in a case like this."

The IAAF has said Semenya would probably keep her medal because the case was not related to a drug matter. But the Herald said an alternative possibility was to award a second gold to the runner-up, Janeth Jepkosgei from Kenya.

http://msn.foxsports.com/other...sex-organs?GT1=39002
GET OUTTA HERE!!! Eek Eek

I knew something was up ... mostly from the comments of her family ... that she was 'raised' a girl ... not that she was 'born' one! 19

Anyway ... I was coming to this tread to post a picture of a South African magazine cover that I saw on the news of her all dolled up!! I was like Eek Eek ... and I thought maybe someone had already posted it. But ... here goes:



That's a big contrast from her gold-medal winning picture ....

She looks like a Williams sister to me.

I have a question.

Based on her magazine cover shoot make over, if she has entered track & field looking like that (hair, light make-up and that smile) instead of her braided hair, non-make-up, aggressive, strictly business look and still win her races with her dominating running abilities, would this even be an issue?

Does appearance matter?


quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:

She looks like a Williams sister to me.




I disagree, Semanya has no breasts, no hips and no feminine curve whatsoever. The Williams sisters are tall, muscular, and darkskinned but they have feminine physiques with boobs and butts. The bone structure in Semanya's face even appears male. The Williams sisters have their daddy's facial features, but they have female figures. They have the body fat distribution typical of women. There is definitely some estrogen flowing through Serena. Caster Semenya does not like like this:





I do feel sorry for Caster Semanya though, because she is only 18 and does not deserve to have the entire world scrutinizing her, or putting their noses into her medical condition like this. I hope she gets some counseling.
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:

The newspaper said the IAAF was trying to contact Semenya to inform her of the results. After dominating her race at the world titles in Berlin last month, Semenya was given blood and chromosome tests as well as a gynecological examination.


wait a minute. you're telling me the media got this girl's medical test results before she did? Eek That's major breech of confidentiality.

i hope that's a lawsuit.
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:

The newspaper said the IAAF was trying to contact Semenya to inform her of the results. After dominating her race at the world titles in Berlin last month, Semenya was given blood and chromosome tests as well as a gynecological examination.


wait a minute. you're telling me the media got this girl's medical test results before she did? Eek That's major breech of confidentiality.

i hope that's a lawsuit.

------------------------------------------------
Yep, that was the goal of the IAFF; have the media spread this contraversial story, have the court of public opinion determine her fate first and to permenantly eliminate her from professional track & field.

Now she can't compete professionally as a woman or compete as a man in her track & field events so therefore, her career is officially over.

And yes there may be a lawsuit and a large $$$ payout (hopefully she will be set for life) but the IAFF may view that as a victory since she will be banned from competing in the big money IAFF sanctioned track & field events forever.

And, barring injuries, she would have shatterd the 800 meters world record and win the gold medal in the next Olympics.

What a shame. Frown
quote:
Originally posted by Cholly:

She looks like a Williams sister to me.

You need to come to Newark, New Jersey, and expose yourself to the world of drag queens and pre-op transsexuals. There are FAR more feminine looking specimens than this among that crowd.

quote:

Based on her magazine cover shoot make over, if she has entered track & field looking like that (hair, light make-up and that smile) instead of her braided hair, non-make-up, aggressive, strictly business look and still win her races with her dominating running abilities, would this even be an issue?

Does appearance matter?
She would have a hard time racing while concealing that masculine body of hers. If I saw someone with that body, with her hair done and makeup on her face while she's supposed to be trying to run a competitive race, it would have been obvious that she was trying to fool people.

Personally, somebody needs to be beaten within an inch of their life for publicizing the results of this poor girl's test results. What a shameful, horribly cruel thing to do. That has to be highlighted and investigated, and deemed unacceptable. This is an 18 year old, for whome those results were undoubtedly shocking to her and her family. And they just put it out there with no regard. Bitch asses.

However. She should NOT be allowed to race against women anymore. She's not "really" a woman. These races are tests of physical prowess, and it would be entirely unfair for women to have to compete against a woman whose physical prowess is the result of her biological masculinity.

I think she should be allowed to keep any medals she has won, but I would disregard any world records she may have set, because of the unfairness to any other woman who may set the record among fully biological women.

Any reporter who publicized that she is a hermaphrodite should be CASTRATED themselves, fired, and barred from ever working in the media again. Caster may not be biologically female, but these reporters are not spiritually human.

Also, I doubt she should race against women anymore, unless they're prepared to give the same medal and prize money to whomever comes in second place against her, and they're prepared not to count any records she sets as official records.
Okay, my area of expertise is not the biological sciences, but would it be possible to treat her hormonally. In other words, suppress her natural testosterone such that it is in the normal range for women.

One might even remove one or both of the internal testes and then put her on a combined hormone regime of T and estrogen.

This is simply a case where we as people run into physical evidence that are simplistic and naive dualism fails. The world is always already more complicated and nuanced than we tend to admit. Things are seldom black and white, but rather gradations along a continuum of gray.
Ok. somebody help me here. Jackie Joyner Kersee

This Hall Of Fame, former Olympic champion athlete, ranked among the all-time greatest athletes in the women's heptathlon as well as in the women's long jump. She won three gold, one silver, and two bronze Olympic medals, in those two different events. Sports Illustrated for Women magazine voted Joyner-Kersee the Greatest Female Athlete of the 20th century, just ahead of Babe Didrikson Zaharias


Jackie Joyner Kersee









As I watched her compete, I have always wondered about her because IMO, she always seems, at the peak of her abilities with that natural muscular build (enhanced through weight training and diet) was way stronger physically than her competitors. Even when she was on the downside of her career and often injured, she still managed to remain top three in Olympic events with her physicality alongside her will and determination.

I wonder, if they tested back then, if Jackie Joyner Kersee was questioned or had a gender test at some point in her career?

Also, Babe Didrikson Zaharias



Mildred Ella ("Babe") Didrikson Zaharias (June 26, 1911–September 27, 1956) was an American athlete named by the Guinness Book of Records, along with Lottie Dod, as the most versatile female competitor. She achieved outstanding success in golf, basketball, and track and field.

Zaharias broke the accepted models of femininity in her time, including the accepted models of female athleticism. Although just 5'5" tall, she was physically strong and socially straightforward about her strength. Although a sports hero to many, she was also derided for her "manliness".

****Zaharias' manliness claim may have been based a whole lot on era based White male bias at the time competing against men but still she completely dominated female sports.

Both Jackie Joyner Kersee and Babe Didrikson Zaharias married. Zaharias never had children and I don't think that Jackie Joyner Kersee has any.

Not having children naturally may have nothing to do with this, but I'm just sayin'.
That is an interesting question. Caster Semenya may be a victim of the technology of modern times. It makes sense that women who unknowingly were hermaphrodites would, due to their testosterone levels, end up in sports like track... and excelling. This sheds a new perspective on this.
quote:
Originally posted by Vox:
That is an interesting question. Caster Semenya may be a victim of the technology of modern times. It makes sense that women who unknowingly were hermaphrodites would, due to their testosterone levels, end up in sports like track... and excelling. This sheds a new perspective on this.


This has been my point. She's a female prodigy, as many of them are. She's just further along the "continuum" toward maleness, as kresge mentioned, than her other prodigy counterparts.

That is no reason to disqualify her from competing as a woman.

Cholly, she ought to sue all of them for putting her personal medical information out there. Hope she gets an excellent lawyer.
South African official lied about Semenya gender tests



PRETORIA, South Africa (CNN) -- The president of Athletics South Africa has admitted that he lied about gender tests on runner Caster Semenya before her gold-medal win at the World Athletics Championships last month.

The national sports body has always denied that it agreed to the tests before the race in Berlin, Germany -- an event that kicked off international controversy over the 18-year-old Semenya's gender.

But after South Africa's Mail & Guardian newspaper printed e-mails on Friday showing that ASA President Leonard Chuene was aware of the tests, he held a news conference to apologize.

"I now realize that it was an error of judgment and I would like to apologize unconditionally," Chuene said on Saturday, according to South Africa's SAPA news agency.

After receiving the results of the tests, the South Africa team doctor requested the 18-year-old Semenya be withdrawn from the 800-meter race she ended up winning, Chuene said.

But Chuene said he refused to do it because the sport's international governing body did not request withdrawal. He also said withdrawing Semenya might have looked bad.

"If we did not let her run, we would be confirming that she is not normal," Chuene told the news conference in the capital, Pretoria.

The e-mails printed by the Mail & Guardian are an exchange between team doctor Harold Adams and ASA General Manager Molatelo Malehopo, with Chuene copied in.

"After thinking about the current confidential matter I would suggest that we make the following decisions," Adams wrote on August 5, more than a week before the Berlin race.

"1. We get a (gynecological) opinion and take it to Berlin. 2. We do nothing and I will handle these issues if they come up in Berlin. Please think and get back to me ASAP."

An e-mail response from Malehopo to Adams, sent the same day, says: "I will suggest that you go ahead with the necessary tests that the IAAF might need."

The controversy over Semenya erupted after she crushed her rivals in the 800 meters and secured victory in one minute, 55.45 seconds -- the best women's time in the world this year.

Semenya's masculine build and dominant performance fueled existing questions about her gender, and the International Association of Athletics Federations -- which oversees the sport worldwide -- ordered tests on her.

Reports in two newspapers last week said the results of the tests showed Semenya has both male and female characteristics. The IAAF declined to confirm those reports and said a decision in the case would come in late November.

The IAAF said it sought tests on Semenya's gender before the Berlin championships because questions had been raised after her winning performance at the African junior championships in July.

South Africans have rallied behind Semenya, angrily dismissing reports about her gender. Semenya's relatives and the South Africa team manager have maintained she is female.

This week, South Africa's minister for women, children and people with disabilities wrote to the United Nations to complain that Semenya had not been treated in line with international protocols on gender and quality.

Noluthando Mayende-Sibiya sent a letter to the U.N. Division for the Advancement of Women, urging it to investigate, SAPA reported.

"The questioning of her gender is based on a stereotypic view of the physical features and abilities attributable to women," she wrote in the letter, according to SAPA. "Such stereotypes demonstrate the extent of patriarchy within the world's sporting community."

The process of gender verification has undergone big changes since it was first introduced for international competition in the 1960s, the IAAF said.

The first mechanism involved "rather crude and perhaps humiliating physical examinations," which soon gave way to mouth swabs to collect chromosomes.

There were too many uncertainties with mouth swabs, so the IAAF abandoned them in 1991 and the International Olympic Committee discontinued them in 2000.

A proper test has yet to be found, the IAAF said, and the current tests are considered a good interim solution.




Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2009/SPORT/...ya.chuene/index.html
Track chief sorry for lying about Semenya

Updated: September 19, 2009, 2:23 PM EDT
PRETORIA, South Africa (AP) - South Africa's top track official apologized Saturday for denying knowledge of gender tests done on champion runner Caster Semenya in South Africa, saying he lied to protect the athlete's privacy.

Athletics South Africa president Leonard Chuene told reporters that his constant denials of the tests were an "error of judgment" and that he never meant to "deceive" the public.

South African officials have repeatedly said tests were done on the 18-year-old runner only abroad, not in South Africa.

"I can no longer stand before you and say that I am not aware of gender tests conducted on Caster Semenya," Chuene said. "I felt that at the time I was acting in the best interests of Caster Semenya as a person. I believed at the time my consistent denials would help protect her."

Semenya won the 800-meter race at the world championships in Berlin in 1 minute, 55.45 seconds to finish 2.45 seconds ahead of her closest competitor on Aug. 19. It was the fastest time in the world this year.

The International Association of Athletics Federations ordered tests done on the runner in Berlin, saying questions had been raised about her muscular physique, running style and recent stunning improvement in times.

It has refused to confirm or deny Australian media reports that Semenya has both male and female characteristics, saying it is reviewing test results and will issue a decision in November on whether the athlete will be allowed to continue to compete in women's events.

Chuene said tests had been done at a Pretoria hospital on Aug. 7 at the behest of the IAAF, adding that it was unclear whether Semenya was informed of the nature of the examinations.

Chuene said that despite medical advice and a request from the IAAF, he refused to withdraw Semenya from the race because there were no results yet from the tests.

"I was not going to stop her talent because of rumors," he said. "On what basis should I have withdrawn her? My only crime committed was to take a decision that she must run, and she won."

Chuene accused the IAAF, who announced the day of the 800 finals that tests had been ordered, of violating her rights and privacy.

"The IAAF publicly revealed her name. The IAAF betrayed her. The IAAF has a lot to answer for," he said.

Chuene is returning to the IAAF board after he resigned over the handling of the matter, but Saturday's news conference is unlikely to ease tensions between the ASA and the international body.

The IAAF has said Semenya probably would keep her medal because she is not accused of cheating by trying to mask her sex.

On Saturday, Chuene repeated his claims that he saw no reason for Semenya to be tested and said he would not accept the outcome of results.

He said the ASA was not in possession of any test results and that he could not confirm media reports about her gender.

Semenya, who has dropped out of sight, grew up in a poor village in the north of the country. Her impressive performances in meets earlier this year caught the attention of athletic officials.

Chuene denied that Semenya, who was seen as the team's best chance for gold, had been "sacrificed" for a medal."

He said he continued to be in contact with Semenya, a university student in Pretoria who is sitting for her final exams.

"It has been deeply disturbing for me to bear witness to the relentless and ongoing controversy surrounding Caster Semenya," he said. "Tell me someone who has not lied to protect a child."

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