@Sista Norland

Im not a phone person either.  So  I hear ya.  And….my braids gone stay in for a while too.  We know how to care for our hair regardless of what's going on in the world.  Its in our history....it's in our bones too.     So you will still be looking good no matter what!  But!

Who knows how long this shit is going to last? This COVID-19 could go on forever. No one has an answer for this pandemic. God help any of us if we have to go to the hospital. God help all the wayward men locked up in cages with a cell mate in the Human Zoo. I'll bet they're sorry for whatever got their black asses in that predicament. Their families must be beyond worry, because they might NEVER see them EVER again. That's what you crazy dudes get for FOLLOWING THE WRONG CROWD and killing your brothers. Now, COVID-19 might KILL YOU, and you're going to be surrounded by wardens and guards who give a shit about you. Payback's a bitch!! 

I have my own to worry about and hope we can keep their heads "screwed on tight", to keep them OUT of the Human Zoo or the Graveyard, plus ourselves.

When people can't go to work; no money's coming in; bills have to be paid; food has to be bought; rent has to be paid; car payments have to be made; these "people" are going to lose their ever-loving/hating minds. Bullets might fly; what'll we do then? We've never seen CRAZY like it could get. These "folks" will be shooting everyone darker than a biscuit. Are we ready for that?  I'm not!!

Have a good day everyone!! My thoughts are with all of you. God bless!!

Koco:  

I want to know how hand washing can kill a virus that cannot be killed by heat or freezing temperatures, and can stay alive on paper, plastic, and steel.

There is nothing that can kill the virus, but rubbing hands together under running water.

That all sounds like bullshit to me.

I'm not suggesting that people NOT wash their hands, etc., but if something as simple as hand washing can kill the Corona Virus, how in the hell could there not be A-N-Y-T-H-I-N-G else on this planet that could kill it?

Either it is THAT easy to kill, or telling people that hand washing will kill Corona Virus is damn lie.  

If we keep reading this shit, the best thing all of us can do is make our funeral arrangements, because nothing can cure this shit and it seems like washing hands is not going to do a damn thing other than clean your hands. They test by shoving a swab up your nose!! You can get a sore throat, get a wet cough. get diarrhea and puke your guts up. What does the swab do in your nose?? Make your nose bleed, make you sneeze until you pee your pants?? What???

If you're not sick, watching this shit on TV 247/365 will MAKE you sick, psychologically. What the fuck is Syria doing? Are there any people alive there anymore?? America still bombing?? Do the Troops have COVID-19?? What  about Afghanistan?? Anyone alive there?? Any COVID-19??

How many "folks" have gone broke with the Stock Market?? Is the Orange Bozo still a "billionaire?" Why is it his test took only what seems a few minutes?? How do they really know HE doesn't have it?? He talks like he has something; definitely sounds like he does.

How in the hell are we going to vote for whatever/whoever, when we won't be able to stand in a line of hundreds in order to cast our vote??

America's giving me a headache. I might get COVID-19 just by reading all this shit and looking at my TV. Got a 49 inch TV, damn, I can see the wrinkles and makeup now.  Orange Bozo's missing a clown suit with those white circular eyes. Getting more Satanic looking by the hour.

A white guy came on TV the other day without TV makeup and all I could see were two little eye holes and an itty bitty hole where his mouth was opened and a little fur on his head. Everything was Casper-the-Ghost-like. Sure was funny!! They need makeup!! They can say what they want about us; they're funnier than hell!! McConnell looks like a turtle. I am "white people" worn the fuck out!!

I hope we all can get through this mess!! I truly do!!

 

Last edited by Norland

 @ sista Sunnubian

From my understanding it was broke down to me like this:  The coronavirus is surrounded by fat cells i.e. around that ball image is fatty cells.  Soap breaks down the fatty cells and dismantle it.  So when you are rubbing your soapy hands together for at least 20 seconds with hot water, the fiction from the rubbing enables the soap to dissolve the fat [in the virus] away from your hands and the weaken residue goes down the drain.    But!   

 

The Washington Post
 
THE CORONAVIRUS ISN'T ALIVE.  THAT'S WHY IT IS SO HARD TO KILL.
Sarah Kaplan, William Wan, Joel Achenbach March 23, 2020

Viruses have spent billions of years perfecting the art of surviving without living — a frighteningly effective strategy that makes them a potent threat in today’s world.
 
a close up of a cake: This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab.
 
That’s especially true of the deadly new coronavirus that has brought global society to a screeching halt. It’s little more than a packet of genetic material surrounded by a spiky protein shell one-thousandth the width of an eyelash, and leads such a zombie-like existence that it’s barely considered a living organism.
 
That’s especially true of the deadly new coronavirus that has brought global society to a screeching halt. It’s little more than a packet of genetic material surrounded by a spiky protein shell one-thousandth the width of an eyelash, and leads such a zombie-like existence that it’s barely considered a living organism.
But as soon as it gets into a human airway, the virus hijacks our cells to create millions more versions of itself.

There is a certain evil genius to how this coronavirus pathogen works: It finds easy purchase in humans without them knowing. Before its first host even develops symptoms, it is already spreading its replicas everywhere, moving onto its next victim. It is powerfully deadly in some but mild enough in others to escape containment. And, for now, we have no way of stopping it.
 
As researchers race to develop drugs and vaccines for the disease that has already sickened 350,000 and killed more than 15,000 people, and counting, this is a scientific portrait of what they are up against.
‘Between chemistry and biology’

Respiratory viruses tend to infect and replicate in two places: In the nose and throat, where they are highly contagious, or lower in the lungs, where they spread less easily but are much more deadly.
 
This new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, adeptly cuts the difference. It dwells in the upper respiratory tract, where it is easily sneezed or coughed onto its next victim. But in some patients, it can lodge itself deep within the lungs, where the disease can kill. That combination gives it the contagiousness of some colds, along with some of the lethality of its close molecular cousin SARS, which caused a 2002-
2003 outbreak in Asia.
 
Another insidious characteristic of this virus: By giving up that bit of lethality, its symptoms emerge less readily than SARS, which means people often pass it to others before they even know they have it.
 
It is, in other words, just sneaky enough to wreak worldwide havoc.
Viruses much like this one have been responsible for many of the most destructive outbreaks of the past 100 years: the flus of 1918, 1957 and 1968; and SARS, MERS and Ebola. Like the coronavirus, all these diseases are zoonotic — they jumped from an animal population into humans. And all are caused by viruses that encode their genetic material in RNA.
That’s no coincidence, scientists say. The zombie-like existence of RNA viruses makes them easy to catch and hard to kill. Outside a host, viruses are dormant. They have none of the traditional trappings of life: metabolism, motion, the ability to reproduce.
 
And they can last this way for quite a long time. Recent laboratory research showed that, although SARS-CoV-2 typically degrades in minutes or a few hours outside a host, some particles can remain viable — potentially infectious — on cardboard for up to 24 hours and on plastic and stainless steel for up to three days. In 2014, a virus frozen in permafrost for 30,000 years that scientists retrieved was able to infect an amoeba after being revived in the lab.
When viruses encounter a host, they use proteins on their surfaces to unlock and invade its unsuspecting cells. Then they take control of those cells’ own molecular machinery to produce and assemble the materials needed for more viruses.
 
“It’s switching between alive and not alive,” said Gary Whittaker, a Cornell University professor of virology. He described a virus as being somewhere “between chemistry and biology.”
 
 
Among RNA viruses, coronaviruses — named for the protein spikes that adorn them like points of a crown — are unique for their size and relative sophistication. They are three times bigger than the pathogens that cause dengue, West Nile and Zika, and are capable of producing extra proteins that bolster their success.
 
“Let’s say dengue has a tool belt with only one hammer,” said Vineet Menachery, a virologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch. This coronavirus has three different hammers, each for a different situation.
 
Among those tools is a proofreading protein, which allows coronaviruses to fix some errors that happen during the replication process. They can still mutate faster than bacteria but are less likely to produce offspring so riddled with detrimental mutations that they can’t survive.
 
Meanwhile, the ability to change helps the germ adapt to new environments, whether it’s a camel’s gut or the airway of a human unknowingly granting it entry with an inadvertent scratch of her nose.
 
Scientists believe the SARS virus originated as a bat virus that reached humans via civet cats sold in animal markets. This current virus, which can also be traced to bats, is thought to have had an intermediate host, possibly an endangered scaly anteater called a pangolin.
 
“I think nature has been telling us over the course of 20 years that, ‘Hey, coronaviruses that start out in bats can cause pandemics in humans, and we have to think of them as being like influenza, as long term threats,’” said Jeffery Taubenberger, virologist with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
 
Funding for research on coronaviruses increased after the SARS outbreak, but in recent years that funding has dried up, Taubenberger said. Such viruses usually simply cause colds and were not considered as important as other viral pathogens, he said.
 
Once inside a cell, a virus can make 10,000 copies of itself in a matter of hours. Within a few days, the infected person will carry hundreds of millions of viral particles in every teaspoon of their blood.
 
The onslaught triggers an intense response from the host’s immune system: Defensive chemicals are released. The body’s temperature rises, causing fever. Armies of germ-eating white blood cells swarm the infected region. Often, this response is what makes a person feel sick.
 
Andrew Pekosz, a virologist at Johns Hopkins University, compared viruses to particularly destructive burglars: They break into your home, eat your food and use your furniture, and have 10,000 babies. “And then they leave the place trashed,” he said.
 
Unfortunately, humans have few defenses against these burglars.
Most antimicrobials work by interfering with the functions of the germs they target. For example, penicillin blocks a molecule used by bacteria to build their cell walls. The drug works against thousands of kinds of bacteria, but because human cells don’t use that protein, we can ingest it without being harmed.
But viruses function through us. With no cellular machinery of their own, they become intertwined with ours. Their proteins are our proteins. Their weaknesses are our weaknesses. Most drugs that might hurt them would hurt us too.
 
For this reason, antiviral drugs must be extremely targeted and specific, said Stanford virologist Karla Kirkegaard. They tend to target proteins produced by the virus (using our cellular machinery) as part of its replication process. These proteins are unique to their viruses. This means the drugs that fight one disease generally don’t work across multiple ones.
 
And because viruses evolve so quickly, the few treatments scientists do manage to develop don’t always work for long. This is why scientists must constantly develop new drugs to treat HIV, and why patients take a “cocktail” of antivirals that viruses must mutate multiple times to resist.
 
“Modern medicine is constantly needing to catch up to new emerging viruses,” Kirkegaard said.
 
 
SARS-CoV-2 is particularly enigmatic. Though its behavior is different from its cousin SARS, there are no obvious differences in the viruses’ spiky protein “keys” that allow them to invade host cells.
 
Understanding these proteins could be the key to developing a vaccine, said Alessandro Sette, head of the Center for Infectious Disease at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology. Previous research has shown that the spike proteins on SARS are what trigger the immune system’s protective response. In a paper published this week, Sette found the same is true of SARS-COV2.

This gives scientists reason for optimism, according to Sette. It affirms researchers’ hunch that the spike protein is a good target for vaccines. If people are inoculated with a version of the spike protein, it could teach their immune system to recognize the virus and allow them to respond to the invader more quickly.
 
“It also says the novel coronavirus is not that novel,” Sette said.
And if SARS-CoV-2 is not so different from its older cousin SARS, then the virus is likely not evolving very fast, giving scientists developing vaccines time to catch up.
 
In the meantime, Kirkegaard said, the best weapons we have against the coronavirus are public health measures like testing and social distancing and our own immune systems.
 
Some virologists believe we have one other thing working in our favor: the virus itself.
 
For all its evil genius and efficient, lethal design, Kirkegaard said, “The virus doesn’t really want to kill us. It’s good for them, good for their population, if you’re walking around being perfectly healthy.”
 
Evolutionary speaking, experts believe, the ultimate goal of viruses is to be contagious while also gentle on its host — less destructive burglar and more of a considerate house guest.
 
That’s because highly lethal viruses like SARS and Ebola tend to burn themselves out, leaving no one alive to spread them.
 
But a germ that’s merely annoying can perpetuate itself indefinitely. One 2014 study found that the virus causing oral herpes has been with the human lineage for 6 million years. “That’s a very successful virus,” Kirkegaard said.
Seen through this lens, the novel coronavirus now killing thousands across the world is still early in its life. It replicates destructively, unaware that there’s a better way to survive.
 
But bit by bit, over time, its RNA will change. Until one day, not so far in the future, it will be just another one of the handful of common cold coronaviruses that circulate every year, giving us a cough or sniffle, and nothing more.

He's a mess isn't he?? Every time that little hole below his nose opens up, I expect a turd to come flying out. Never seen a "President" the likes of this one EVER before, and I've seen quite a few!! He's a serious "UGH" to me.

Last edited by Norland
Kocolicious posted:
The Washington Post
 
THE CORONAVIRUS ISN'T ALIVE.  THAT'S WHY IT IS SO HARD TO KILL.
Sarah Kaplan, William Wan, Joel Achenbach March 23, 2020

Viruses have spent billions of years perfecting the art of surviving without living — a frighteningly effective strategy that makes them a potent threat in today’s world.
 
a close up of a cake: This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab.
 
That’s especially true of the deadly new coronavirus that has brought global society to a screeching halt. It’s little more than a packet of genetic material surrounded by a spiky protein shell one-thousandth the width of an eyelash, and leads such a zombie-like existence that it’s barely considered a living organism.
 
That’s especially true of the deadly new coronavirus that has brought global society to a screeching halt. It’s little more than a packet of genetic material surrounded by a spiky protein shell one-thousandth the width of an eyelash, and leads such a zombie-like existence that it’s barely considered a living organism.
But as soon as it gets into a human airway, the virus hijacks our cells to create millions more versions of itself.

There is a certain evil genius to how this coronavirus pathogen works: It finds easy purchase in humans without them knowing. Before its first host even develops symptoms, it is already spreading its replicas everywhere, moving onto its next victim. It is powerfully deadly in some but mild enough in others to escape containment. And, for now, we have no way of stopping it.
 
As researchers race to develop drugs and vaccines for the disease that has already sickened 350,000 and killed more than 15,000 people, and counting, this is a scientific portrait of what they are up against.
‘Between chemistry and biology’

Respiratory viruses tend to infect and replicate in two places: In the nose and throat, where they are highly contagious, or lower in the lungs, where they spread less easily but are much more deadly.
 
This new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, adeptly cuts the difference. It dwells in the upper respiratory tract, where it is easily sneezed or coughed onto its next victim. But in some patients, it can lodge itself deep within the lungs, where the disease can kill. That combination gives it the contagiousness of some colds, along with some of the lethality of its close molecular cousin SARS, which caused a 2002-
2003 outbreak in Asia.
 
Another insidious characteristic of this virus: By giving up that bit of lethality, its symptoms emerge less readily than SARS, which means people often pass it to others before they even know they have it.
 
It is, in other words, just sneaky enough to wreak worldwide havoc.
Viruses much like this one have been responsible for many of the most destructive outbreaks of the past 100 years: the flus of 1918, 1957 and 1968; and SARS, MERS and Ebola. Like the coronavirus, all these diseases are zoonotic — they jumped from an animal population into humans. And all are caused by viruses that encode their genetic material in RNA.
That’s no coincidence, scientists say. The zombie-like existence of RNA viruses makes them easy to catch and hard to kill. Outside a host, viruses are dormant. They have none of the traditional trappings of life: metabolism, motion, the ability to reproduce.
 
And they can last this way for quite a long time. Recent laboratory research showed that, although SARS-CoV-2 typically degrades in minutes or a few hours outside a host, some particles can remain viable — potentially infectious — on cardboard for up to 24 hours and on plastic and stainless steel for up to three days. In 2014, a virus frozen in permafrost for 30,000 years that scientists retrieved was able to infect an amoeba after being revived in the lab.
When viruses encounter a host, they use proteins on their surfaces to unlock and invade its unsuspecting cells. Then they take control of those cells’ own molecular machinery to produce and assemble the materials needed for more viruses.
 
“It’s switching between alive and not alive,” said Gary Whittaker, a Cornell University professor of virology. He described a virus as being somewhere “between chemistry and biology.”
 
 
Among RNA viruses, coronaviruses — named for the protein spikes that adorn them like points of a crown — are unique for their size and relative sophistication. They are three times bigger than the pathogens that cause dengue, West Nile and Zika, and are capable of producing extra proteins that bolster their success.
 
“Let’s say dengue has a tool belt with only one hammer,” said Vineet Menachery, a virologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch. This coronavirus has three different hammers, each for a different situation.
 
Among those tools is a proofreading protein, which allows coronaviruses to fix some errors that happen during the replication process. They can still mutate faster than bacteria but are less likely to produce offspring so riddled with detrimental mutations that they can’t survive.
 
Meanwhile, the ability to change helps the germ adapt to new environments, whether it’s a camel’s gut or the airway of a human unknowingly granting it entry with an inadvertent scratch of her nose.
 
Scientists believe the SARS virus originated as a bat virus that reached humans via civet cats sold in animal markets. This current virus, which can also be traced to bats, is thought to have had an intermediate host, possibly an endangered scaly anteater called a pangolin.
 
“I think nature has been telling us over the course of 20 years that, ‘Hey, coronaviruses that start out in bats can cause pandemics in humans, and we have to think of them as being like influenza, as long term threats,’” said Jeffery Taubenberger, virologist with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
 
Funding for research on coronaviruses increased after the SARS outbreak, but in recent years that funding has dried up, Taubenberger said. Such viruses usually simply cause colds and were not considered as important as other viral pathogens, he said.
 
Once inside a cell, a virus can make 10,000 copies of itself in a matter of hours. Within a few days, the infected person will carry hundreds of millions of viral particles in every teaspoon of their blood.
 
The onslaught triggers an intense response from the host’s immune system: Defensive chemicals are released. The body’s temperature rises, causing fever. Armies of germ-eating white blood cells swarm the infected region. Often, this response is what makes a person feel sick.
 
Andrew Pekosz, a virologist at Johns Hopkins University, compared viruses to particularly destructive burglars: They break into your home, eat your food and use your furniture, and have 10,000 babies. “And then they leave the place trashed,” he said.
 
Unfortunately, humans have few defenses against these burglars.
Most antimicrobials work by interfering with the functions of the germs they target. For example, penicillin blocks a molecule used by bacteria to build their cell walls. The drug works against thousands of kinds of bacteria, but because human cells don’t use that protein, we can ingest it without being harmed.
But viruses function through us. With no cellular machinery of their own, they become intertwined with ours. Their proteins are our proteins. Their weaknesses are our weaknesses. Most drugs that might hurt them would hurt us too.
 
For this reason, antiviral drugs must be extremely targeted and specific, said Stanford virologist Karla Kirkegaard. They tend to target proteins produced by the virus (using our cellular machinery) as part of its replication process. These proteins are unique to their viruses. This means the drugs that fight one disease generally don’t work across multiple ones.
 
And because viruses evolve so quickly, the few treatments scientists do manage to develop don’t always work for long. This is why scientists must constantly develop new drugs to treat HIV, and why patients take a “cocktail” of antivirals that viruses must mutate multiple times to resist.
 
“Modern medicine is constantly needing to catch up to new emerging viruses,” Kirkegaard said.
 
 
SARS-CoV-2 is particularly enigmatic. Though its behavior is different from its cousin SARS, there are no obvious differences in the viruses’ spiky protein “keys” that allow them to invade host cells.
 
Understanding these proteins could be the key to developing a vaccine, said Alessandro Sette, head of the Center for Infectious Disease at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology. Previous research has shown that the spike proteins on SARS are what trigger the immune system’s protective response. In a paper published this week, Sette found the same is true of SARS-COV2.

This gives scientists reason for optimism, according to Sette. It affirms researchers’ hunch that the spike protein is a good target for vaccines. If people are inoculated with a version of the spike protein, it could teach their immune system to recognize the virus and allow them to respond to the invader more quickly.
 
“It also says the novel coronavirus is not that novel,” Sette said.
And if SARS-CoV-2 is not so different from its older cousin SARS, then the virus is likely not evolving very fast, giving scientists developing vaccines time to catch up.
 
In the meantime, Kirkegaard said, the best weapons we have against the coronavirus are public health measures like testing and social distancing and our own immune systems.
 
Some virologists believe we have one other thing working in our favor: the virus itself.
 
For all its evil genius and efficient, lethal design, Kirkegaard said, “The virus doesn’t really want to kill us. It’s good for them, good for their population, if you’re walking around being perfectly healthy.”
 
Evolutionary speaking, experts believe, the ultimate goal of viruses is to be contagious while also gentle on its host — less destructive burglar and more of a considerate house guest.
 
That’s because highly lethal viruses like SARS and Ebola tend to burn themselves out, leaving no one alive to spread them.
 
But a germ that’s merely annoying can perpetuate itself indefinitely. One 2014 study found that the virus causing oral herpes has been with the human lineage for 6 million years. “That’s a very successful virus,” Kirkegaard said.
Seen through this lens, the novel coronavirus now killing thousands across the world is still early in its life. It replicates destructively, unaware that there’s a better way to survive.
 
But bit by bit, over time, its RNA will change. Until one day, not so far in the future, it will be just another one of the handful of common cold coronaviruses that circulate every year, giving us a cough or sniffle, and nothing more.

It may be dead, but it can be arrested. After all it's manmade and weak!

1585416634560.png

 

Doctor's Note: Does ibuprofen make coronavirus worse?

A doctor explains how anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen can affect our immune systems and why this may be dangerous.

by
 
 
There has been some confusion over which medications are safe to take for the fever associated with coronavirus [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
There has been some confusion over which medications are safe to take for the fever associated with coronavirus [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

Don't take ibuprofen. That was the advice tweeted by France's health minister, Olivier Veran, a couple of days ago. Veran, who also happens to be a qualified doctor, wrote: "Anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen, cortisone …) could aggravate the infection. If you have a fever, take paracetamol."

The infection he was speaking about was, of course, COVID-19, the coronavirus that is sparking fear and panic all around the globe. He also added that if you take this type of anti-inflammatory drug regularly, you should seek the advice of a doctor.

More Doctor's Notes:

Anti-inflammatories are important drugs that are used by millions of people around the world to help treat pain, different types of arthritis, headaches, sore throats and colds.

So why should we suddenly be cautious about using them?

Despite all of their beneficial effects, it has long been known that anti-inflammatories can have a depressive effect on parts of our immune systems.

When it comes to taking them to help ease the symptoms of the common cold, we do not really have to worry about this slight but important reduction in the strength of our immune systems: We are very unlikely to develop complications from the common cold, let alone die from it. 

But we need our immune system in top working order in order to battle the coronavirus and win. 

When the virus enters the human body, it induces mild to severe respiratory problems, a high fever, cough and, potentially, multi-organ dysfunction, which can lead to death.

An early part of our body's immune response to a virus of this sort is to release cells called mast cells, which form our first line of defence against the virus.

These are released very quickly from our respiratory tract - the nasal passageway and linings of the lungs. 

When the mast cells come into contact with the virus, they then trigger a much bigger immune response, which involves inflammatory chemicals being released.

We need these inflammatory chemicals to help tackle the virus in the medium to long term. It is the effectiveness of these chemicals that decides whether a person develops complications from the coronavirus or makes a full recovery.

If we take medicines that dampen this immune response, such as ibuprofen, this can lead to us not fighting off the infection as effectively, potentially leading to a longer illness with a higher risk of complications.

 

 

Commonly used anti-inflammatories include ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac and steroids such as prednisolone.

Some people rely on these medications every day to help manage crippling pain and long-term health conditions. 

Often anti-inflammatories are the only type of medication that can be used with some health conditions, so any changes to taking them should be discussed with your doctor first.

For some, it will have to be a careful balance between managing the symptoms of their long-term health condition and risking the devastating effects of the coronavirus.

An alternative medication for pain and fever may be paracetamol or acetaminophen.

Paracetamol is not an anti-inflammatory medication and can be used to effectively treat fever as well as mild to moderate pain and can, therefore, be used safely to help treat the fever associated with the coronavirus.

A common trade name for paracetamol is Panadol, while acetaminophen is sold widely as Tylenol.

SOURCE: AL JAZEERA NEWS

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Up to 200K deaths foreseen in US as Spain, Italy demand help

The coronavirus outbreak could kill 100,000 to 200,000 Americans, the U.S. government’s top infectious-disease expert warned on Sunday, as authorities urged people in and around the nation’s deadliest hot spot, New York City, to limit their travel to contain the scourge.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, made the dire prediction on CNN’s “State of the Union,” adding that millions in the U.S. could become infected.

As of Sunday morning, the U.S. had about 125,000 infections and 2,200 deaths, according to the running tally kept by Johns Hopkins University, though the true number of cases is thought to be higher, because of testing shortages and mild cases that may have gone unrecognized or unreported.

Around the world, doctors were forced to make tough choices about which patients to save with their limited breathing machines, and Spain and Italy demanded more European help as they fight still-surging coronavirus infections in the continent’s worst crisis since World War II.

The confirmed global death toll surpassed 32,000 and new virus epicenters emerged in U.S. cities like Detroit, New Orleans and Chicago. Even rural America has not been immune, as virus hotspots erupt in Midwestern towns and Rocky Mountain ski havens.

Medical staff wearing protective gear are seen at Severo Ochoa Hospital, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Leganes, Spain, March 26, 2020. Photo by Susana Vera/Reuters.

Spain and Italy alone account for more than half of the world’s death toll, and are still seeing over 800 deaths a day each.

Experts say, however, that virus toll numbers across the world are being seriously under-represented because of limited testing and political decisions about which bodies to count. Unlike the U.S., France and Italy do not count deaths that take place at home or in nursing homes, even though nursing homes are known coronavirus incubators around the world.

‘’Europe must demonstrate that it is able to respond to this historic call,’’ Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte said late Saturday. “I will fight until the last drop of sweat, until the last gram of energy, to obtain a strong, vigorous, cohesive European response.”

President Donald Trump backtracked on a threat to quarantine New York and neighboring states amid criticism and questions about the legality of such a move. But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a travel advisory urging all residents of New York City and others in New York state, New Jersey and Connecticut to avoid all nonessential travel for 14 days.

Shocking as that is for Americans, that stopped short of the restrictions imposed in Europe or elsewhere. Parisians are fined if they try to leave the city, South Africans can’t even buy liquor, and Serbians are upset over a ban on walking their dog. In Italy, burials are being held with only one family member.

Spain moved to tighten its lockdown and ban all nonessential work Sunday as it hit another daily record of 838 dead. The country’s overall official toll was more than 6,500.

Spain’s health emergencies chief, Fernando Simón, said the country’s infection rate fell Sunday to 9%, down from 18% three days before. But he said the number of people in intensive care units keeps rising and hospitals are at their limits in several regions.

“That is why we have to strictly apply the control measures,” he said.

The crisis is pummeling world economies and putting huge strains on national health care systems. Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez called for a more vigorous response from the 27-nation European Union.

“It is the most difficult moment for the EU since its foundation and it has to be ready to rise to the challenge,” he said.

FDNY Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) secure a patient that was identified to have coronavirus disease (COVID-19) into an ambulance while wearing protective gear, as the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in New York City, New York, U.S., March 24, 2020. Photo by Stefan Jeremiah/Reuters.

Spain, Italy, France and six other EU members have asked the union to share the burden by issuing European debt, dubbed coronabonds, to help fight the virus. But the idea has met resistance from Germany and the Netherlands.

European countries have also resisted sharing masks with their neighbors for fear that they, too, will need them in mass quantities soon. Many countries have turned to China, where the outbreak is easing, flying in cargo planes to get protective medical equipment.

These tensions have raised new fears about whether the EU will survive this crisis.

“It’s really, really important that we achieve better coordination,” German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said.

Worldwide infections surpassed 680,000, according to Johns Hopkins. The United States leads the world in reported cases, but five other countries have higher death tolls: Italy, Spain, China, Iran and France. Italy has more than 10,000 deaths, the most of any country.

Egypt shut its beaches as cases in the Mideast surpassed 50,000. Police in the Philippines stepped up arrests of quarantine violators, and more tourists were evacuated from Mount Everest and the Indonesian island of Bali.

Poland is considering delaying its May 10 presidential election, and Russia ordered borders to close on Monday. A prominent French politician with the virus died, France’s first death of a senior official.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who has the virus himself, warned: “Things will get worse before they get better.”

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. But for others, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, the virus can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and lead to death.

More than 145,000 people have recovered, according to Johns Hopkins.

Pope Francis called Sunday for a cease-fire in all conflicts around the globe ‘’to focus together on the true fight of our lives.’’ He also urged authorities to take special care of those in nursing homes, military barracks and jails.

In Detroit, which has a large low-income population, the death toll rose to 31 with about 1,400 infections in a rate that shocked health officials.

“This is off the charts,” said Dr. Teena Chopra, medical director of infection prevention and hospital epidemiology at the Detroit Medical Center. “We are seeing a lot of patients that are presenting to us with severe disease, rather than minor disease.”

Some U.S. states began to try to limit exposure from visitors from harder-hit areas. Rhode Island National Guard troops were going door to door in coastal communities to find New Yorkers. Florida is setting up checkpoints to screen visitors from Louisiana.

As others tightened controls, China eased more restrictions ,following the ruling Communist Party’s declaration of victory over the coronavirus. Airline flights from Hubei province at the center of the coronavirus outbreak resumed Sunday. Subway and bus service resumed Saturday in the province’s hard-hit capital of Wuhan.

___

Angela Charlton in Paris, Joe McDonald in Beijing, Geir Moulson in Berlin, Vanessa Gera in Warsaw and other Associated Press journalists around the world contributed to this report.

 

Source: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/w...fNOrRCNmJMvlR5hdYBDk

If this was black people dying by the thousands every 2 minutes would white people give 2 shits??

How are the AFRICANS doing?? How are the 2 million BLACK PRISONERS doing?? All you BLACK INMATES locked up in the HUMAN ZOO during this pandemic, was whatever the hell you did to get your ass in there, worth your trouble?? NOBODY's watching over YOUR BLACK ASS now!!!!!!!! That's what you get for following the WRONG PEOPLE, NOT THINKING for YOURSELVES. Now, whatever you did, might fall BACK ON YOU!!!!! Payback's a bitch, isn't it???

The prisoners in NYC jails are fearing for their lives, said the News on the computer. This is NOT the time for your asses to be locked up in CLOSE QUARTERS. If you guys survive this, I doubt you'll EVER want to get in this kind of situation EVER AGAIN. Your family can't get to you, NO ONE can reach you. This is a hell of a predicament you find yourselves in. My thoughts are with you all, but you did this to YOURSELVES. Everything starts with YOU. Now look who's taking care of you, or NOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I bet those plantation whores can't show their face in a Black community.

They-Are-Literally f--king PROSTITUTES!

I have more respect for $2.00 Crack Whores than these two jim crow plantation sluts!

COVID-19 has the White Man by his baby balls. It's something they can't slaughter and it's sending them straight to their graves. We're going too, but not in their quantities.

 

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