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courtesy of the democratic underground
    GOP House "Leadership"

    Rep. Don Sherwood (R-Obviously) is accused of assaulting his mistress at his apartment in Washington DC.

    Originally he denied that he even had a mistress, then later admitted that he had in fact been cheating on his wife for five years. Although he continues to deny attempting to choke her.

    Not that any of this matters to the family values warriors nee' the Republican leadership. According to the Washington Post, Sherwood has recently received $26,000 in campaign contributions from:

    Keep Our Majority PAC (Speaker J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois), Rely on Your Beliefs Fund (Majority Leader Roy Blunt of Missouri), the Freedom Project (John A. Boehner of Ohio) and TOMPAC (Thomas M. Reynolds of New York).

    Sherwood's campaign also received $2,500 from the PRYCE Project PAC (Deborah Pryce of Ohio) and the Prosperity Helps Inspire Liberty PAC (Phil English of Pennsylvania); and $1,000 from the Help America's Leaders PAC (Harold Rogers of Kentucky).

    Now why would these stalwart supporters of family values decide to funnel such generous campaign contributions to a man who admits cheating on his wife and is still under investigation for assault and battery?

    Surely it couldn't be because they're despicable hypocrites.




    Dick Cheney

    Vice president Dick might be breathing a sigh of relief after narrowly escaping indictment, unlike Scooter Libby, but let's face it: the guy is still scum! Last week the Washington Post called Cheney the "Vice President for Torture" after he asked the Senate "to approve legal language that would allow the CIA to commit ... abuses against foreign prisoners it is holding abroad."

    The Post story went on to say:

  • It's not surprising that Mr. Cheney would be at the forefront of an attempt to ratify and legalize this shameful record. The vice president has been a prime mover behind the Bush administration's decision to violate the Geneva Conventions and the U.N. Convention Against Torture and to break with decades of past practice by the U.S. military. These decisions at the top have led to hundreds of documented cases of abuse, torture and homicide in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Racism systematically verifies itself anytime the slave

can only be free by imitating his master.

~ Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin ~
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:: More Idiots & Hypocrites ::

Tom Noe
    It seems that money laundering is the cool new thing for conservative big-wigs to do these days. But then, this is what happens when you have poor role-models. I imagine that half of these conservatives would jump off a bridge if Tom DeLay did it first. For shame.

    But anyway, Republican fundraiser Tom Noe of Ohio was indicted last week for "illegally funneling $45,400 to President Bush's re-election campaign," according to the Toledo Blade. Mr. Noe allegedly broke campaign finance laws while raising money for Bush in 2004. Comically, he was later named a "Pioneer" by the Bush campaign for raising more than $100,000.

    If you're wondering how big a deal this is, the chief of the Justice Department's public integrity section said, "This case represents one of the first and most important examples of this new enforcement posture under the new law and is one of the most blatant and excessive criminal campaign finance schemes we have encountered."

    ...advice to Mr. Noe: find some friendly interest group to create a TV ad accusing the prosecutor of being a rapacious weasel or a poisonous spider or some other uncomplimentary animal, and then go around complaining about the criminalization of conservative politics. After all, WWTDD (what would Tom Delay do)?





Tom Delay
    We all know that the Former Hammer, Tom DeLay (R-Shit Creek), was recently indicted on money laundering and conspiracy charges. But did you know that Mr. DeLay recently suffered a serious concussion? At least, that's what I'm gathering from his bizarre comments last week.

    Tom has decided to fight the charges against him by using a tried and true conservative tactic - blaming everybody else. In particular he's been going after the prosecutor Ronnie Earle, and, of course, those nasty mean Democrats who have apparently been engaging in "the politics of personal destruction."

    Not that Tom would ever indulge in such activity you understand. Have you seen that TV ad which compares Ronnie Earle to a snarling attack dog? Tom DeLay disapproves of it so much that he's, um, been echoing it's theme wherever he goes.

    The theme? "It's not a crime to be a conservative" - which brings us back to DeLay's bizarre comments. Last week he said, "What we're fighting is so much larger than a single court case or a single district attorney in Travis County. We are witnessing the criminalization of conservative politics."

    No Tom. What we're witnessing is people waking up to the fact that neo-conservative politics today are criminal. You probably should have figured out that out before you got yourself arrested. Oh well, too late now.
:: Crooks & Liars ::

Bill Frist
    Uh oh! Bill is another Republican leader to come under investigation for ethics violations. The Washington Post revealed that the Senate Majority Leader recently sold all his shares in a corporation "about two weeks before it issued a disappointing earnings report and the price fell nearly 15 percent." Oh, piffle, I hear you cry, surely that was just a coincidence! Senator Doctor Bill "Follow The Balloon" Frist would never attempt such an unethical maneuver!

    Oh really? Then you may be interested to know that the corporation in question was in fact his family's hospital corporation. But, uh, surely Bill had no idea that it was about to issue a disappointing earnings report... or... something.

    Subsequently, a spokesperson for Bill Frist attempted to spin the matter hard enough to make it zip right off the table and disappear under the sofa. See, in Bill's Bizarro World, insider trading is the right thing to do. "To avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest," said his spokesperson, "Senator Frist went beyond what ethics requires and sold the stock." Um, what?

    Allow me to explain. Apparently Frist had been criticized in the past for owning stock in a medical company while simultaneously handling legislation which could affect the medical industry, although the holdings were kept in a "blind trust" so he never knew how much money was actually involved. He could however, tell the trust manager when to sell the stock, which he did.

    So it seems that despite being previously criticized for a conflict of interest - and later cleared by the Senate Select Committee on Ethics - Bill decided to suddenly sell all of his stock out of the blue to avoid such a conflict of interest, which he was already cleared of.

    Therefore, as you can see, the fact that the his family's company was about to release a dismal earnings report which would cause the stock to drop precipitously clearly had nothing to do with it. ...

    New documents released last week reveal that the trust managers "routinely informed Frist whenever shares of Hospital Corp. of America Inc. were added to his portfolio," according to the Denver Post. The Post continued, "If Martha Stewart can be jailed for lying about a quarter-of-a-million episode of insider trading, Frist may be sweating."




Karl Rove
    Before we get started on Karl Rove's role in the leaking the name of CIA agent Valerie Plame, take a look at what George W. Bush had to say about the CIA leak case over the past two years (video hosted by CanOFun.com):

  • If there's a leak out of my administration, I want to know who it is. If the person has violated law, the person will be taken care of. - September 30, 2003

  • You know, there's a lot of leaking in Washington D.C. It's a town famous for it. And if this helps to stop leaks, this investigation, in finding the truth, it will not only hold someone to account who should not have leaked - it's a serious charge by the way, we're talking about a criminal action - and, uh, but, hopefully will help send a clear signal that we expect other leaks to stop as well, so I look forward to finding the truth. - October 6, 2003

  • I don't know if we're going to find out that the senior administration official. Now, this is a large administration, and there's a lot of senior officials, I don't have any idea. I'd like to. I want to know the truth. That's why I've instructed this staff of mine to cooperate fully with the investigators. Full disclosure, everything we know, the investigators will find out. I have no idea whether we'll find out who the leaker is. Partially because, in all due respect to your profession, you do a very good job of protecting the leakers. But we'll find out. - October 7, 2003

  • REPORTER: Given recent developments in the CIA leak case, particularly vice president Cheney's discussion with investigators, do you still stand by what you said several months ago, suggestion that it might be difficult to identify anybody who leaked the information, and do you stand by your pledge to fire anyone found to have done so?

    BUSH: Yes. And it's up to the U.S. attorney to find the facts. - June 10, 2004

  • If somebody did leak classified information I'd like to know it, and we'll take the appropriate action. And this investigation is a good thing. - July 12, 2005

  • I don't know all the facts, I want to know all the facts. Best place for the facts to be found is by someone spending time investigating it. I would like this to end as quickly as possible so we know the facts, and if someone committed a crime they will no longer work in my administration. - July 18, 2005

    Now, according to Scooter Libby's indictment, "On or about July 10 or July 11, 2003, LIBBY spoke to a senior official in the White House ("Official A") who advised LIBBY of a conversation Official A had earlier that week with columnist Robert Novak in which Wilson's wife was discussed as a CIA employee involved in Wilson's trip. LIBBY was advised by Official A that Novak would be writing a story about Wilson's wife."

    There's little doubt that "Official A" is Karl Rove, and that he was the person responsible for leaking Valerie Plame's identity - which was classified - to Robert Novak.

    Last Friday Rove was yukking it up with reporters outside his home, saying "I am going to have a great Friday and a fantastic weekend and hope you do too." Funny - if someone I worked extremely closely with for five years was about to be indicted, I probably would have been a bit less upbeat. But then I'm not a heartless bastard like Karl Rove.

    So what are we to make of all this? As I mentioned, George W. Bush had previously said "I want to know the truth. That's why I've instructed this staff of mine to cooperate fully with the investigators. Full disclosure, everything we know, the investigators will find out." Bush also said that he stood by his pledge to fire anyone who leaked the information.

    It's also probably worth taking another look at what the president's father, George H.W. Bush, said to the CIA back in April 1999:

  • Even though I'm a tranquil guy now at this stage of my life, I have nothing but contempt and anger for those who betray the trust by exposing the name of our sources. They are, in my view, the most insidious, of traitors.

    The labryinth of details, names and relationships may create some confusion in this case, but one thing is clear: George W. Bush doesn't give a damn about returning honor and integrity to the White House. If he did, he'd have fired Karl Rove already.
:: Criminals & Idiots ::

Lou Beres
    Won't somebody think of the children? Lou Beres, "longtime head of the Christian Coalition of Oregon," apparently has been. He stepped down from his position and said he will "withdraw from political life" after he was accused of sexual abuse by three of his relatives.

    According to the Seattle Times:

    The three women - now adults - allege they were abused by Beres as preteens. Their families called the child abuse hot line last month, after the three openly discussed the alleged abuse for the first time.

    "I was molested," one of the women, now in her 50s, told The Oregonian. "I was victimized and I've suffered all my life for it. I'm still afraid to be in the same room with him."

    According to their website, "The Christian Coalition of Oregon is committed to representing the pro-family agenda and educating America on the critical issues facing our society."

    Perhaps someone should explain to Lou Beres that "pro-family" doesn't mean "banging your pre-teen relatives."




Republican Gun-Jumpers

    Two curious cases of mistaken identity ...both perpetrated by dumbass Republicans who were way too quick to pounce when they smelled political blood in the water.

    First, Wisconsin Republican Party Chairman Rick Graber, along with local GOP lawmakers Rep. Jeff Stone and Sen. Joe Leibham, staged a news conference outside a Milwaukee home in order to decry voter fraud. According to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, "The politicians didn't release names, but their presence implicated the private home that formed the news conference backdrop."

    Just one problem - there was never any evidence that the couple who own the home, Stuart and Gayle Schenk, were involved in voter fraud. Nor was there any evidence to implicate their son, Joseph, who is currently in Chicago studying to join the Franciscan order of the Roman Catholic Church. Whoops. Still, it was nice of the Wisconsin Republican Party to make them look like a bunch of crooks.

    The second tale of mistaken identity is more serious. Fox News ran a report on a suspected "Islamic radical" living in La Habra, CA. And, Fox News being Fox News, they actually gave out the address of his home live on air.

    If only Fox News had checked their facts (yeah, right). See, it turns out that the "Islamic radical" Fox fingered actually moved out of the house three years ago. Currently living in the house are Randy and Ronnell Vorick, who, as far as anyone knows, are neither Islamic nor radical.

    Still, it hasn't stopped local wankers from shouting profanities at them on the street. The Voricks have also enjoyed the privilege of having someone spray-paint the word "terrorist" on their front of their house - spelled, if you can believe it, "terrist." And now they're living under police protection.

    Ah, Fox News, that bastion of quality broadcasting. And their viewers are such nice people too.
Your list of 'Idiots and Hypocrites' must include Pennsylvania's junior Senator Rick Santorum.

Lives in the Greater D.C. Area while asking for and receiving funding from a Pennsylvania school district to pay for his children's (3) education via the Internet.

This is a man who is behind by 20 points in the polls for an election in 2006, and his opponent hasn't spoken a word.

PEACE

Jim Chester
blkCons will even defend this:

Folk Song Angers Parents, NAACP in Mich.
Compiled by the DiversityInc staff
© 2005 DiversityInc.com®
November 15, 2005


A black parent and the NAACP are criticizing a middle school's decision to perform a song that they say glorifies slavery.



The song, "Pick a Bale of Cotton," is on the folk-music choir program Wednesday at predominantly white Anderson Middle School in the Berkley School District.



The song's lyrics include, "Jump down, turn around, pick a bale of cotton. Gotta jump down, turn around, Oh, Lordie, pick a bale a day."



Greg Montgomery told The Detroit News that he complained to school officials, and when he was dissatisfied with their response, decided to pull his 11-year-old daughter, China, from singing.



"It's mind-boggling that people don't understand sensitive issues," he said.



China said: "They were bringing back the memories of how African Americans picked cotton, and it wasn't a good memory. It was disrespectful to African Americans."



Berkley schools spokesperson Gwen Ahern said district officials would consider the song's origin and decide whether to leave it in the concert program. She also defended the choice.



"We used to sing that song when I was in school during the '50s," she said. "It's like a Southern type of folk song
quote:
The song's lyrics include, "Jump down, turn around, pick a bale of cotton. Gotta jump down, turn around, Oh, Lordie, pick a bale a day."


{Putting on his B-Con Right-wing Apologist Hat}

What's so offensive about that song? It merely promotes the cultural value of a strong and uncomplaining work ethic. And besides that, its historically correct.

Ouch, that hurt. Don't make me do that again.
George W. Bush... loser loser loser
    What's it like to be the captain of a sinking ship? Ask George W. Bush, whose political fortunes went from bad to worse to plain atrocious last week. First, our Great leader gambled that a campaign appearance with Virginia gubernatorial candidate Jerry Kilgore would push Kilgore over the top, thus causing pundits to flagellate themselves in an orgy of repentance while crying from the rooftops that George W. Bush is BACK!!!

    Bush was most complimentary of Kilgore. "I hope you'll work hard tomorrow to call up your friends and neighbors, and tell them they have a duty in this democracy of ours to vote..." he told the crowd. "Tell them if they want good government - good, solid, sound conservative government - to put this good man in the governor's chair in Richmond."

    "See, I know a man of character and integrity," Bush continued, "and he's standing right next to me. And that's Jerry Kilgore ... The thing I like about this fellow is he grew up in Virginia, and he grew up on a small farm. That means he's a down-to-earth person. He doesn't have a lot of fancy airs. That's the kind of guy you want to represent you, a person who understands how the common man thinks..."

    Bush is of course an expert on this subject, considering that he:

  • Comes from Connecticut
  • Has an Ivy League education
  • Once owned a Major League Baseball team
  • Vacations at a private compound in Kennebunkport...
  • on a yacht,
  • with champagne and caviar!!

    But I'm getting off the subject. The point of all this is that once the people of Virigina had done their duty in this democracy of ours, Jerry Kilgore was left in the dust by his opponent Tim Kaine. In 2004 Virigina went for Bush by 8 percentage points - in 2005, Virginia went for Kaine by 6 percentage points.

    All I can say is: please please please campaign for more candidates next year, George!
More Idiocy from GWB...

    Speechifying hasn't exactly been Our Great Leader's strong point lately - last week he decided to ruin a Veterans' Day event by turning it into a pre-2005 election campaign rally. Feeling the heat from critics over his administration's cooking of intelligence prior to the Iraq war, Bush clearly thought that the best place to strike back would be at a ceremony to honor America's veterans. How thoughtful.

    Bush started off by telling some lies about all the great things his administration has done for veterans (yeah, right) and then launched into his favorite topic - you guessed it - September 11. "Our nation has made a clear choice," he said. "We will confront this mortal danger to all humanity. We will not tire or rest until the war on terror is won."

    A clear choice, eh? That's odd - the last poll I looked at showed that a full 56% of Americans currently disapprove of Bush's handling of the war on terrorism. Almost 60% say he's dishonest too. But let's not get sidetracked - that poll has nothing to do with the real point of Dubya's speech, which was to honor veterans.

    I'm joking of course. The real point of the speech was for Our Great Leader to rehash his attacks on John Kerry from the 2004 election, and slam everyone who thinks he's is a liar - which according to that poll is most people.

    So let's skip the warmed-over stuff about Iraq, 9/11, Zarqawi, Zawahiri, the Taliban, Al Qaeda, Saddam Hussein - blah, blah, blah, you've heard it all before a million times. Let's move right along to...

    BUSH: Our debate at home must also be fair-minded. One of the hallmarks of a free society and what makes our country strong is that our political leaders can discuss their differences openly even in times of war.

    Oh really? Then I guess it wasn't Ari Fleischer who once told reporters that "all Americans ... need to watch what they say, watch what they do."

    BUSH: When I made the decision to remove Saddam Hussein from power, Congress approved it with strong bipartisan support.

    Interesting. So Bush made the decision to remove Saddam Hussein from power before the Iraq War Resolution vote? That doesn't jibe with statements he made at the time, such as, "Hopefully, we can do this peacefully. And if the world were to collectively come together to do so, and to put pressure on Saddam Hussein and convince him to disarm, there's a chance he may decide to do that. And war is not my first choice ... it's my last choice."

    BUSH: I also recognize that some of our fellow citizens and elected officials didn't support the liberation of Iraq. And that is their right, and I respect it.

    Liberation? If you mean invasion and occupation, then yeah, you're right. Some of our fellow citizens didn't support it then - and 64% of our fellow citizens don't support it now, accoring to recent polls.

    BUSH: As president and commander in chief, I accept the responsibilities and the criticisms and the consequences that come with such a solemn decision.

    That's a joke, right?

    BUSH: While it's perfectly legitimate to criticize my decision or the conduct of the war, it is deeply irresponsible to rewrite the history of how that war began.

    Yes, let's not rewrite history.





    BUSH: Some Democrats and anti-war critics are now claiming we manipulated the intelligence and misled the American people about why we went to war.


Well, because you did.
Pat Robertson... religious nut religious nut
    ...you may have noticed that proponents of so-called "Intelligent Design" have been very careful to avoid any mention of the word "God" while promoting their ideas. There's a good reason for this - Intelligent Design, which is intended to undermine the scientifically-sound theory of Evolution, is essentially Creationism wrapped up in a more politically correct package. The Intelligent Design Network describes ID thusly:

  • We believe objectivity in the institutions of science, government and the media will lead not only to good origins science, but also to constitutional neutrality in this subjective, historical science that unavoidably impacts religion. We promote the scientific evidence of intelligent design because proper consideration of that evidence is necessary to achieve not only scientific objectivity but also constitutional neutrality.

    Sounds good, right? And not a word about Genesis, or the Garden of Eden, or God.

    Unfortunately Pat Robertson just blew all their hard work out of the water by issuing one of his famous "Patwas" on the voters of Dover, PA, who last week swept local school board officials out of office for supporting Intelligent Design. Here's Pat's reaction to the voters' decision:

  • "I'd like to say to the good citizens of Dover. If there is a disaster in your area, don't turn to God, you just rejected Him from your city. And don't wonder why He hasn't helped you when problems begin, if they begin. I'm not saying they will, but if they do, just remember, you just voted God out of your city. And if that's the case, don't ask for His help because he might not be there."

    But... but... but... I thought Intelligent Design had nothing to do with Pat Robertson's god? I thought that it was "simply the science of design detection." I thought that it "should be conducted objectively, without regard to the implications of its findings." By the looks of Pat's reaction, I guess not.

    Funnily enough, a staunch proponent of ID changed his mind on the subject last week - on November 5 the Indianapolis Star reported that Rick Santorum "has put the Senate on record in favor of teaching both sides." But on November 12, Santorum said that he "doesn't believe that intelligent design belongs in the science classroom."

    Why would a senator of such strong convictions suddenly flip-flop on the teaching of Intelligent Design? Surely the fact that his likely 2006 opponent Bob Casey is currently holding a 20 point lead in the polls has got nothing to do with it.

Worked @ Ground Zero? Don't expect us to treat any illness you may develop as a result. Suck it up!!

  • WASHINGTON - Congressional budget negotiators have decided to take back $125 million in Sept. 11 aid from New York, which had fought to keep the money to treat sick and injured ground zero workers, lawmakers said Tuesday.

  • The tug-of-war over the $125 million began earlier this year when the White House proposed taking the money back because the state had not yet spent it.

  • New York protested, saying the money was part of the $20 billion pledged by
    President Bush to help rebuild after the Sept. 11 attacks. Health advocates said the money is needed to treat current and future illnesses among ground zero workers.
quote:
Originally posted by Isome:
Pat Robertson... religious nut religious nut
    ...you may have noticed that proponents of so-called "Intelligent Design" have been very careful to avoid any mention of the word "God" while promoting their ideas. There's a good reason for this - Intelligent Design, which is intended to undermine the scientifically-sound theory of Evolution, is essentially Creationism wrapped up in a more politically correct package. The Intelligent Design Network describes ID thusly:

  • We believe objectivity in the institutions of science, government and the media will lead not only to good origins science, but also to constitutional neutrality in this subjective, historical science that unavoidably impacts religion. We promote the scientific evidence of intelligent design because proper consideration of that evidence is necessary to achieve not only scientific objectivity but also constitutional neutrality.

    Sounds good, right? And not a word about Genesis, or the Garden of Eden, or God.

    Unfortunately Pat Robertson just blew all their hard work out of the water by issuing one of his famous "Patwas" on the voters of Dover, PA, who last week swept local school board officials out of office for supporting Intelligent Design. Here's Pat's reaction to the voters' decision:

  • "I'd like to say to the good citizens of Dover. If there is a disaster in your area, don't turn to God, you just rejected Him from your city. And don't wonder why He hasn't helped you when problems begin, if they begin. I'm not saying they will, but if they do, just remember, you just voted God out of your city. And if that's the case, don't ask for His help because he might not be there."

    But... but... but... I thought Intelligent Design had nothing to do with Pat Robertson's god? I thought that it was "simply the science of design detection." I thought that it "should be conducted objectively, without regard to the implications of its findings." By the looks of Pat's reaction, I guess not.

    Funnily enough, a staunch proponent of ID changed his mind on the subject last week - on November 5 the Indianapolis Star reported that Rick Santorum "has put the Senate on record in favor of teaching both sides." But on November 12, Santorum said that he "doesn't believe that intelligent design belongs in the science classroom."

    Why would a senator of such strong convictions suddenly flip-flop on the teaching of Intelligent Design? Surely the fact that his likely 2006 opponent Bob Casey is currently holding a 20 point lead in the polls has got nothing to do with it.


While it may be hard to believe, Pat is actually tame compared to some real religious nuts in this country, his problem is that he is so visible that what he says gets front page coverage.

For instance you have the Rev. Phillips from Kansas, his church is made up of family and in-laws, they are going around to funerals of serviceman killed in Iraqi and protesting saying that they were killed because we are a godless country because we allow gays to live in this country, and that is when he is probably taking his medication.

Then there is the religious leader, his name escapes me that says the idea of evolution is wrong and that in fact we lived with dinosaurs and used them as domesticated animals, oh heah, just tie the plow to the T-Rex and away you go.

Somedays Pat is the sane one.
:: Bob Woodward :: partisanship partisanship hypocrisy hypocrisy covering your ass

    ...one of America's most famous investigative reporters, was shamed last week and forced to apologize to his newspaper the Washington Post after he revealed that Valerie Plame's secret identity was leaked to him by a senior administration official before Scooter Libby outed her.

    Bob Woodward apparently declined to mention this earlier because he was afraid of being subpoenaed - but now he's neck-deep in the investigation, and as Rolling Stone's Eric Boehlert put it, "It looks like what people have been saying about Bob Woodward for the past five years, that he's become a stenographer for the Bush White House."

    Of course, the fact that Woodward knew all along that White House officials were dropping Plame's name to reporters didn't stop him from frequently appearing on television to trash prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald - whom he referred to as a "junkyard dog" - and do his best to undermine the investigation. According to the Post:

    Woodward has criticized the Fitzgerald probe in media appearances. He said on MSNBC's 'Hardball' in June that in the end 'there is going to be nothing to it. And it is a shame. And the special prosecutor in that case, his behavior, in my view, has been disgraceful.' In a National Public Radio interview in July, Woodward said that Fitzgerald made 'a big mistake' in going after [Judith] Miller and that 'there is not the kind of compelling evidence that there was some crime involved here.'"

    And this guy is supposed to be the standard-bearer for investigative journalism? Kinda goes to show how far the bar's been lowered since Bush came into office.
:: House Republicans ::
    Of course, it didn't take long for desperate House Republicans to jump on board the White House's swiftboat. Last week, John Murtha introduced a resolution which proposed that:

  • Section 1. The deployment of United States forces in Iraq, by direction of Congress, is hereby terminated and the forces involved are to be redeployed at the earliest practicable date.

  • Section 2. A quick-reaction U.S. force and an over-the-horizon presence of U.S Marines shall be deployed in the region.

  • Section 3 The United States of America shall pursue security and stability in Iraq through diplomacy.

    But Republicans, who are forever whining about Democrats "playing politics," submitted a different resolution which read:

  • Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the deployment of United States forces in Iraq be terminated immediately.

  • Resolved, That it is the sense of the House of Representatives that the deployment of United States forces in Iraq be terminated immediately.

    Why they couldn't debate Murtha's original resolution I don't know. Well, actually I do know - it's because they would rather turn to cheap political tricks than debate the merits of his proposal. But here's an example of how the Republicans then went on to "debate" John Murtha last week:

    REP. JEAN SCHMIDT: A few minutes ago I received a call from Colonel Danny Bubp, Ohio Representative from the 88th district in the House of Representatives. He asked me to send Congress a message: Stay the course. He also asked me to send Congressman Murtha a message, that cowards cut and run, Marines never do.

    Schmidt remarks were later stricken from the record. She said, "Mr. Speaker, my remarks were not directed to any member of the House and I did not intend to suggest they applied to any member, most especially the distinguished gentleman from Pennsylvania."

    Odd - I could have sworn that the remark was aimed directly at Murtha. (I think the line about "sending Congressman Murtha a message" was a bit of a giveaway.)

    ...rather than debate the substance of Murtha's original resolution, House Republicans decided to introduce their own faux resolution and then called a decorated 37-year veteran of the Marine Corps a coward on the House floor. ...
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
Do Sean [Ins]annity, Rush "Where's my drugs" Limbaugh, Bill O'really, and Ms. "I'm a lawyer, but whoring pays better" Coulter count as conservative idiots? If so, I can probably fill this thread with interest, humorous if it weren't so true stories of these right wing propagandists.


I know you're just being polite, but I'll play along: Oh' yes, they qualify as idiots, conservative or otherwise. Please, feel free to add them K4R.

Wink
http://www.democraticunderground.com/top10/index.html

Rush Limbaugh
America's most famous gasbag has just come up with a despicable new way to exploit the troops. (Or as he likes to call it, "support the troops.")

Here's how it works: non-military members sign up to adopt a soldier on Rush's website, while current military members sign up to be adopted. Once an adopter and an adoptee are matched up, the adopted soldier receives a free subscription to "The Limbaugh Letter" and to the premium content on Rush's website.

Fabulous! And all at the low, low cost of $50, which goes directly into Rush's pocket.

Oh, I'm sorry - you didn't think he was doing this out of charity did you? Nope, despite the fact that Rush's site claims to be offering "complimentary RUSH 24/7 subscriptions," if you want to be able to say you've adopted a soldier through Rush's program then you have to cough up the cash. Because someone's got to pay for those "complimentary subscriptions," and it sure as hell ain't gonna be Limbaugh.

Bottom line: Rush's idea of supporting the troops is to use them as a prop in his scheme to flog more subscriptions. Nice.

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