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Former secretary of state writes about her family during segregation


In her memoir, “Extraordinary, Ordinary People,” former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice takes a deeply personal look at her childhood in the segregated South and shares how her story is an example of the quintessential American dream.

Starting early
My parents were anxious to give me a head start in life — perhaps a little too anxious. My first memory of confronting them and in a way declaring my independence was a conversation concerning their ill-conceived attempt to send me to first grade at the ripe age of three. My mother was teaching at Fairfield Industrial High School in Alabama, and the idea was to enroll me in the elementary school located on the same campus. I don’t know how they talked the principal into going along, but sure enough, on the first day of school in September 1958, my mother took me by the hand and walked me into Mrs. Jones’ classroom.

I was terrified of the other children and of Mrs. Jones, and I refused to stay. Each day we would repeat the scene, and each day my father would have to pick me up and take me to my grandmother’s house, where I would stay until the school day ended. Finally I told my mother that I didn’t want to go back because the teacher wore the same skirt every morning. I am sure this was not literally true. Perhaps I somehow already understood that my mother believed in good grooming and appropriate attire. Anyway, the logic of my argument aside, Mother and Daddy got the point and abandoned their attempt at really early childhood education.

I now think back on that time and laugh. John and Angelena were prepared to try just about anything — or to let me try just about anything — that could be called an educational opportunity. They were convinced that education was a kind of armor shielding me against everything — even the deep racism in Birmingham and across America.

They were bred to those views. They were both born in the South at the height of segregation and racial prejudice — Mother just outside of Birmingham, Alabama, in 1924 and Daddy in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 1923. They were teenagers during the Great Depression, old enough to remember but too young to adopt the overly cautious financial habits of their parents. They were of the first generation of middle-class blacks to attend historically black colleges — institutions that previously had been for the children of the black elite. And like so many of their peers, they rigorously controlled their environment to preserve their dignity and their pride.

Objectively, white people had all the power and blacks had none. “The White Man,” as my parents called “them,” controlled politics and the economy. This depersonalized collective noun spoke to the fact that my parents and their friends had few interactions with whites that were truly personal. In his wonderful book Colored People, Harvard professor Henry Louis “Skip” Gates Jr. recalled that his family and friends in West Virginia addressed white people by their professions — for example, “Mr. Policeman” or “Mr. Milkman.” Black folks in Birmingham didn’t even have that much contact. It was just “The White Man.”

Certainly, in any confrontation with a white person in Alabama you were bound to lose. But my parents believed that you could alter that equation through education, hard work, perfectly spoken English, and an appreciation for the “finer things” in “their” culture. If you were twice as good as they were, “they” might not like you but “they” had to respect you. One could find space for a fulfilling and productive life. There was nothing worse than being a helpless victim of your circumstances. My parents were determined to avoid that station in life. Needless to say, they were even more determined that I not end up that way.

Video: Queen of Soul, Condi Rice do a duet
 

My parents were not blue bloods. Yes, there were blue bloods who were black. These were the families that had emerged during Reconstruction, many of whose patriarchs had been freed well before slavery ended. Those families had bloodlines going back to black lawyers and doctors of the late nineteenth century; some of their ancestral lines even included political figures such as Hiram Rhodes Revels, the first black United States senator. There were pockets of these families in the Northeast and a large colony in Chicago. Some had attended Ivy League schools, but others, particularly those from the South, sent their children to such respected institutions as Meharry Medical College, Fisk, Morehouse, Spelman, and the Tuskegee Institute. In some cases these families had been college-educated for several generations.

My mother’s family was not from this caste, though it was more patrician than my father’s. Mattie Lula Parrom, my maternal grandmother, was the daughter of a high-ranking official, perhaps a bishop, in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Though details about her father, my great-grandfather, are sketchy, he was able to provide my grandmother with a first-rate education for a “colored” girl of that time. She was sent to a kind of finishing school called St. Mark’s Academy and was taught to play the piano by a European man who had come from Vienna. Grandmother had rich brown skin and very high cheekbones, exposing American Indian blood that was obvious, if ill-defined. She was deeply religious, unfailingly trusting in God, and cultured.

My grandfather Albert Robinson Ray III was one of six siblings, extremely fair-skinned and possibly the product of a white father and black mother. His sister Nancy had light eyes and auburn hair. There was also apparently an Italian branch of the family on his mother’s side, memorialized in the names of successive generations. There are several Altos; my mother and her grandmother were named Angelena; my aunt was named Genoa (though, as southerners, we call her “Gen-OH-a” ); my cousin is Lativia; and I am Condoleezza, all attesting to that part of our heritage.

Video: Cancer hits home for Sec. Rice

Granddaddy Ray’s story is a bit difficult to tie down because he ran away from home when he was thirteen and did not reconnect with his family until he was an adult. According to family lore, Granddaddy used a tire iron to beat a white man who had assaulted his sister. Fearing for his life, he ran away and, later, found himself sitting in a train station with one token in his pocket in the wee hours of the morning. Many years later, Granddaddy would say that the sound of a train made him feel lonely. His last words before he died were to my mother. “Angelena,” he said, “we’re on this train alone.”

In any case, as Granddaddy sat alone in that station, a white man came over and asked what he was doing there at that hour of the night. For reasons that are not entirely clear, “Old Man Wheeler,” as he was known in our family, took my grandfather home and raised him with his sons. I remember very well going to my grandmother’s house in 1965 to tell her that Granddaddy had passed away at the hospital. She wailed and soon said, “Somebody call the Wheeler boys.” One came over to the house immediately. They were obviously just like family.

I’ve always been struck by this story because it speaks to the complicated history of blacks and whites in America. We came to this country as founding populations — Europeans and Africans. Our bloodlines have crossed and been intertwined by the ugly, sexual exploitation that was very much a part of slavery. Even in the depths of segregation, blacks and whites lived very close to one another. There are the familiar stories of black nannies who were “a part of the family,” raising the wealthy white children for whom they cared. But there are also inexplicable stories like that of my grandfather and the Wheelers.

We still have a lot of trouble with the truth of how tangled our family histories are. These legacies are painful and remind us of America’s birth defect: slavery. I remember all the fuss about Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings a few years back. Are we kidding? I thought. Of course Jefferson had black children. I can also remember being asked how I felt when I learned that I apparently had two white great-grandfathers, one on each side of the family. I just considered it a fact — no feelings were necessary. We all have white ancestors, and some whites have black ancestors. Once at a Stanford football game, my father and I sat in front of a white man who reached out his hand and said, “My name is Rice too. And I’m from the South.” The man blanched when my father suggested we might be related.

It is just easier not to talk about all of this or to obscure it with the term “African American,” which recalls the immigration narrative. There are groups such as Mexican Americans, Korean Americans, and German Americans who retain a direct link to their immigrant ancestors. But the fact is that only a portion of those with black skin are direct descendants of African immigrants as is President Obama, who was born of a white American mother and a Kenyan father. There is a second narrative, which involves immigrants from the West Indies such as Colin Powell’s parents. And what of the descendants of slaves in the old Confederacy? I prefer “black” and “white.” These terms are starker and remind us that the first Europeans and the first Africans came to this country together — the Africans in chains.


LINK TO VIDEO
 
 BLACK by NATURE, PROUD by CHOICE.
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or to obscure it with the term “African American,” which recalls the immigration narrative. There are groups such as Mexican Americans, Korean Americans, and German Americans who retain a direct link to their immigrant ancestors. But the fact is that only a portion of those with black skin are direct descendants of African immigrants as is President Obama, who was born of a white American mother and a Kenyan father. There is a second narrative, which involves immigrants from the West Indies such as Colin Powell’s parents. And what of the descendants of slaves in the old Confederacy? I prefer “black” and “white.” These terms are starker and remind us that the first Europeans and the first Africans came to this country together — the Africans in chains.

I get so tired of seeing African Americans and the diaspora try to do this - try to force us into a type of caste system of identity.  I also am sick of Carribeans (West Indies/ans) claiming to be everything on the planet except of African descent, do they really think that Black people were already in the Carribean before slavery?  Come on! (And it is funny how so many that look pure African at best, mixed at least will claim every heritage except African)  First of all Africans were not the only people to come to this country in chains.  Second, the first Africans to come to this country (and Europe) were not slaves.  Third, why is there constantly some portion of the diaspora that is ALWAYS that is always trying to make up ways to divide us into castes? 


The first Africans to come to this country during the times of European exploration were free, journeyman or aprentices.  The next wave of Africans would be indentured arriving with indentured Europeans.  It was later that slavery had been made racial.  At any rate, what does it matter when identifying our race and nationality.  It does not matter that Koreans, Mexicans, etc., did not come as slaves first; that is not the reason they refer to themselves and feel that they are Mexican Americans, Korean Americans.  This is true especially because of the type of enslavement Africans found themselves in.  It like if one sibling was kidnapped and held hostage into slavery then gains freedom and citizenship and the other one merely migrated to the same country and gained citizenship, they still would be the same race and the same nationality now, i.e., African Americans. 
How could any African American not be direct descendants of Africans?  What? Is she splitting hairs (years) of descent? In otherwords, the fact that it is not soDIRECT  does not change the fact that it IS.  Further, the first Europeans and Africans did come to this country together, and not in chains, at least, not at first; that would be true in later later instances of slavery.


It is amazing how many Black people still live on d'nile; otherwise this was a quaint story.
Quote By ER: "Condoleezza Rice recalls complexities of her heritage"......who gives two cents and a good grunting shit about her hertiage.......it's her professional legacy that the real concerning issue and the "constant flowing of blood on her hands" false war and the thousands of military personnel that she put in harm's way on purpose: a war that she illegially help devise, supported and purposely help orchestrate, causing the massive killings and the seriously wounding along with a million plus dead Iraqui citizens and that's a permanent stain on her soul that she will live with for the rest of her life.......no amount of shelter, storytelling, interviews, book sales or paid speeches on the talk circuit in this country and around the world about her life as a youngster living in the deep South with her parents (millions of Blacks have similiar experiences) won't change that reality so I don't give her any consideration at all and if she had learned anything from the teachings of her parents about being honest, having a sense of duty,  strong personal convictions about herself and for others and not allow yourself to get caught up in unworthy, distrusting and unsavory people and harmful situations, no matter the circumstances, it would have made her a better person as an adult and a political professional, an upstanding and righteous individual and political figure, someone to look up to admire and be a role model for Black youth, then she would have forseen all the lies and deception from her last former employer and not embrace and particpate in those illegial actions that have scarred this nation and the entire world for generations........maybe if her parents would have taught her (and if they tried, she didn't listen) to be a strong indivudual instead of a deceptive, boot licking, ass kissing monoric Black bitch I would have some sympathy for her dirty Black ass but I don't and I hope that her current life of permanent exile from the African American community and the larger American population as a whole continues until the day she dies....she deserves a makeshift shallow grave in the bosum of the deep swamp woods and not full funeral honors, especially a miltary one at Arlington Cemetary, which is an option granted to American politicans.



Condoleezza Rice is a upright walking and air breathing cancer in this country and she does not deserve the privledge of a normal living existance.


Lying evil bitch.
Last edited by Cholly
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Certainly, in any confrontation with a white person in Alabama you were bound to lose. But my parents believed that you could alter that equation through education, hard work, perfectly spoken English, and an appreciation for the “finer things” in “their” culture. If you were twice as good as they were, “they” might not like you but “they” had to respect you. One could find space for a fulfilling and productive life. There was nothing worse than being a helpless victim of your circumstances. My parents were determined to avoid that station in life. Needless to say, they were even more determined that I not end up that way.
Sunnubian's response was right on target.


ahhh yes, the old american "hard work" rhetoric.  Although she doesn't think of herself as a "blue blood" Black,  It's quite clear that she is of the mindset that she is different than other blacks due to her education, perfect speech, grooming, and oh yeah, "indian heritage" as evidenced by high cheekbones and rich brown skin   But all parents want their children to groom themselves, finish school and speak appropriately (whether the kid actually does is a different story).  What is the reader to glean from this?

Surely in her travels she has become aware that high cheekbones and rich brown skinare

also present throughout Africa?   


The "nothing worse than being a helpless victim of your circumstances" bit is interesting as well.  Given this passage, one can see how she convinced herself to be aligned with and in defense of the indefensible.


I can't believe i'm saying this but i'd like to read the book because i want to see if she reveals any deeper REFLECTIONS rather than recitation of her background.  Did miss not quite blue blood Black, Italian and Native American  Heritage delve deep for this book?
It like if one sibling was kidnapped and held hostage into slavery then gains freedom and citizenship and the other one merely migrated to the same country and gained citizenship, they still would be the same race and the same nationality now, i.e., African Americans.---Dr. Condolezza Rice

I admire Dr. Rice for her achievement(s).

Her conclusions on identity demonstrate again how difficult it is conceive our own identity.

I selected the quote above for this conclusion: '...same race and the same nationality now, i.e., African Americans.'

In her example, she chose persons of the same generation, and the same ancestral knowledge of who they were.

African Americans are descendants of African who did not know the origin of their African ancestry.

The siblings in this example would be of a different 'history and experience', have common knowledge of their ancestry...since children who could not feed themselves were not (known) to be taken into slavery.

Both would in actuality be 'Ghanaian'...as in Ghanaian-American.

Both would be legal residents.

Both are citizens.

Both KNOW themselves to be Ghanaian.

PEACE

Jim Chester
  Her memoir is just an example of how fragmented we are as a people.  We will go and pull up every other nationality to justify who we are...for example...I have in native American in my family, or Irish, or Italian....anything but!  The full recognition of being BLACK.  We wanna talk about how the other culture was soooo positive..or if you will..leaving almost  a cotton ball bad taste in our psyche about being BLACK and descendants of slaves.  She noted the blue bloods when she actually meant the BLUE VAINS...or the Talented Tens, the high yella folks who thought they were BETTER than the average dark coal skinned coloreds   And those who wanted to separate from the colored population cuz they felt they were NOT colored..they felt they were the "cream of the top negro" based on their being highly educated with high cheek bones and light skin ...well.....I take issue with that....cuz I got sooooooooooo many other cultures in my family..we look more like a rainbow coalition than just an average black family...some embrace their blackness....others don't.  This is classic behavior and to me it's straight denial.  And I have always fought this.  Relatives who come to town expecting to be treated like they walk on water merely cuz they have a light tinge in their skins....so focking WHAT!  There are REASONS why you have that tingue...and most times [white man vs black woman and not the other way around...and for the most part]it wasn't of free will!  For the record for 1every  high yella acceptee or acceptor[back in the day]....there were 100 dark skins folks FIGHTING for our freedom...and a lot of times it was MORE black women doing this....than men.  I hate it when blackfolks subliminally reject their hertiage by attaching other folks culture to appear worthy.  As in Ms. Condo's case. 


Most times, well in my experience, these  bougie "elites" have sooooo many psychological issues/problems....stemming from childhood that NEVER get resolved as adults.  And that's why MANY of 'em hid behind so called "massa's" education...cuz that's really ALL they had as proof of being better than those ignorant "darkies." When truth be told...it was ALWAYS the darkies who came up with brilliant outcomes that benefitted the WHOLE world.  There are a few Condoleezzas is my family.  As a product of the south, I have witnessed these folks being treated as if they had the ability to bring back the death.  In Condo...I see a whole lotta stuff unresolved.  Her memoir is part of her getting it out....but!  She got to tell the entire truth, the festering truth of being who she was as a young child growing up in the "envied" [at the same time] skin color.  The funny thing is...which is completely off topic.... I have a feeling that she DID have some sort of  twisted sick "affair" with Bush.  As is why she had the famous slip of the tongue heard around the world.....but!  As she continues to peel away from the fake that has been her life for sooooooo long, the real Condo will emerge and when she does she will indeed have a story to tell.  Cuz it will be then [when she evolves into her real self] she will able to tell the truth and nothing but the truth....but until then!  This form of conjecture or the "smelly onion" is ALL we're gonna get from her....but!  I'm just sayin
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The funny thing is...which is completely off topic.... I have a feeling that she DID have some sort of twisted sick "affair" with Bush. As is why she had the famous slip of the tongue heard around the world.....but!

Giiirrrllllll .... don't even say that in jest!!   

Ewwwwwwwwwww ... That is just NASTY!!!     YUCK!!!!! 

Whatever's beyond GROSS ... that's IT!!!!! 
Quote by ER: "Hmmmm ... so Im'a go out on a limb here, Cholly .....  and just take a guess that I can't interest you in a first-year FREE, complementary, annual membership to the Condoleezza Rice Appreciation Fan Club this time around, eh?  "


No comment.


I have nothing further to say regarding my opinion but I heard the same scuttle butt gossip that Koco did about Condi and her "benefits" partner, George W.......hangin' out at the Bush Ranch in Crawford, Texas........I guess ole' George was down there choppin' wood!


Sloppy seconds anyone?
Last edited by Cholly
Clearly you people are not reading her comments on race in the context it was written in that chapter. She said she mentioned color due to the effects slavery had on Blacks in regards colorism. She also clearly stated she sees herself as Black, no where in the book does she mention being Indian outside the one time describing a relative. When commenting on inter- racial dating. She mention prefering to marry an AA/Black and wanting to maintain Black American traditions and culture. Which is more than many Black women these days who do their best to distance themselves from Black American culture, replacing it with some sort of pseudo pan African one.
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Clearly you people are not reading her comments on race

  I READ very clearly what she said. And saw through those words...like I see through words of other African Americans who profess to say something of significant when it is the TOTAL opposite.  No one's stupid or crazy here.  A lot of us are very WELL-READ individuals.  So in her commentary this is WHAT many of us see.  Or I should say....what I see.  She's not fooling me.  Nope!  Not a bit....but!  I'm just sayin
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What you mean to say is you see her through the haze of your preconceived notions. I am sure you are well read  and smart but that doesn't make you unbiased.
  Correction!  I SAID what I meant to say....bottom line.  And for being unbiased....well that  may be YOUR opinion...which has NOTHING to do with me.   Nope...not a thang....but!
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What you mean to say is you see her through the haze of your preconceived notions. I am sure you are well read and smart but that doesn't make you unbiased.
You need to speak for yourself and not make blanket statements about the accuracy of other people's perceptions judged through the haze of your own preconceived notions. 


You wrote: Clearly you people are not reading her comments on race in the context it was written in that chapter.--- 


As if you had some insight into Ms. Rice's musings that others do not
 and as if you have actually read "that chapter" of the book and have it within your possession 
and as if you, and you alone are privvy to the context within which she MEANT it.   


The point of a book discussion (or excerpt in this case) is that readers, like you and the posters here, glean things from it and discuss what the book means to them.  Unless you are Ms. Rice or her ghost writer, you are not the final arbiter of "context" regarding her comments for anyone other than yourself.  You are encouraged to say what you think she meant, but it's foolish to attempt to enforce your interpretation as THE interpretation.


I note that you have not answered JWC's question about how Ms. Rice's comments on racial identity were taken out of context and why only your interpretation is the accurate "context"?  

"But my parents believed that you could alter that equation through education, hard work, perfectly spoken English, and an appreciation for the “finer things” in “their” culture. If you were twice as good as they were, “they” might not like you but “they” had to respect you. One could find space for a fulfilling and productive life. There was nothing worse than being a helpless victim of your circumstances. My parents were determined to avoid that station in life. Needless to say, they were even more determined that I not end up that way.

For what it's worth, I'm not mad at this comment from Condi.  I feel like it is the truth, and even though it's conformist and Eurocentric, I'm not sure what the alternative is.  The opposite approach is something we fight to move away from; something many of us think of as a result of the DeGruy-Leary Syndrome (post-tramatic slave syndrome).

My beef with Condi's comments is that she tries to present her story as some kind of twisted, perverse version of "black pride," when her work history alone shows how bullshit that is.  This here bothers me in particular:

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It is just easier not to talk about all of this or to obscure it with the term “African American,” which recalls the immigration narrative. There are groups such as Mexican Americans, Korean Americans, and German Americans who retain a direct link to their immigrant ancestors. But the fact is that only a portion of those with black skin are direct descendants of African immigrants as is President Obama, who was born of a white American mother and a Kenyan father. There is a second narrative, which involves immigrants from the West Indies such as Colin Powell’s parents. And what of the descendants of slaves in the old Confederacy? I prefer “black” and “white.” These terms are starker and remind us that the first Europeans and the first Africans came to this country together — the Africans in chains.
Ohhhhh, so you mean to tell me that the Condoleezza Rice we all know actually prefers a term that she feels emphasizes the difference between blacks and white.  Oh, MY bad, here I thought she was one of those right wing loving post-racial types.  All along, we were dealing with a clench-fisted, black boot stompin' pro-black revolutionary!!!!  "Nah, 'African-American,' that's too namby-pamby and wannabe-white for a sista!  We straight up, in yo face BLACK!  Take DAT, white devil!!"  PUH LEEZE.  We all know a lot of these kind of people are scared of the term "African-American" in part because it asserts ethnicity, and therefore equality.  Who does she think she's fooling by trying to twist it around like that?
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Correction!  I SAID what I meant to say....bottom line.  And for being unbiased....well that  may be YOUR opinion...which has NOTHING to do with me.   Nope...not a thang....but!
I find my assertion to still be correct, you dislike her thus want to paint her comments in a negative light. 
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You need to speak for yourself and not make blanket statements about the accuracy of other people's perceptions judged through the haze of your own preconceived notions.  You wrote: Clearly you people are not reading her comments on race in the context it was written in that chapter.---  As if you had some insight into Ms. Rice's musings that others do not  and as if you have actually read "that chapter" of the book and have it within your possession  and as if you, and you alone are privvy to the context within which she MEANT it.
I think it is clear one's perception is faulty when they go on to call someone an evil bitch. I'm pretty sure she isn't scrutinizing Condi's words objectively.
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Oh, MY bad, here I thought she was one of those right wing loving post-racial types. All along, we were dealing with a clench-fisted, black boot stompin' pro-black revolutionary!!!! "Nah, 'African-American,' that's too namby-pamby and wannabe-white for a sista! We straight up, in yo face BLACK! Take DAT, white devil!!"
RFOTFLMBAO
I find my assertion to still be correct,

Oh....by whose standards? Gotta be YOURS...cuz it sho' aint mine.  As a matter of fact, YOU DO NOT THINK for me....so your assessment in regards to my comment or anything that comes outta my mouth is and will always be INCORRECT!  Got that?

you dislike her

It's sooooooooo apparent you are full of shyte...cuz you DON'T and will NEVER have the ability to KNOW who I may or may not dislike...Geez.   Damn!   Who let the door open again?  We got another one!  I guess it's been too quiet lately with no real discord. Oh well.

thus want to paint her comments in a negative light?

She did that ALL on her own.  I had not a thang to do with it,  Nada.   I call it how I see it....again...straight!  No chaser.  And that's the bottom line.  Ooooooh I get it!  You want some attention....that's why you step in here like you're some kind of Condi Rice demi god.... swinging your powerless wand in judgement of other folks opinions and perceptions in an OPEN discussion forum as if you're ALL knowing of the motivation of Rice's book..........well...not!  Ummmm   I know!  You need to REALLY get over yourself...and that "thingy" you tryin so hard to hide is SHOWIN like a neon LIGHT.  BTW:  Just so you know and don't get it twisted....I can give a sweet fock what you THINK.......but!  I'm just sayin
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I find my assertion to still be correct, Oh....by whose standards? Gotta be YOURS...cuz it sho' aint mine.  As a matter of fact, YOU DO NOT THINK for me....so your assessment in regards to my comment or anything that comes outta my mouth is and will always be INCORRECT!  Got that? you dislike her.  It's sooooooooo apparent you are full of shyte...cuz you DON'T and will NEVER have the ability to KNOW who I may or may not dislike...Geez.   Damn!   Who let the door open again?  We got another one!  I guess it's been too quiet lately with no real discord. Oh well. thus want to paint her comments in a negative light? She did that ALL on her own.  I had not a thang to do with it,  Nada.   I call it how I see it....again...straight!  No chaser.  And that's the bottom line.  Ooooooh I get it!  You want some attention....that's why you step in here like you're some kind of Condi Rice demi god.... swinging your powerless wand in judgement of other folks opinions and perceptions in an OPEN discussion forum as if you're ALL knowing of the motivation of Rice's book..........well...not!  Ummmm   I know!  You need to REALLY get over yourself...and that "thingy" you tryin so hard to hide is SHOWIN like a neon LIGHT.  BTW:  Just so you know and don't get it twisted....I can give a sweet fock what you THINK.......but!  I'm just sayin 
Yawn. You are trying way to hard. You were incorrect, you statements were illogical making you opinion irrelevant. It like most of your opinions contained no substance. Fact is you dislike her so you are incapable of coming to an unbiased conclusion. No biggy many people suffer from such an affliction.
I'm sure you care what I say, hence the aggressive and angry response.
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Yawn. You are trying way to hard. You were incorrect, you statements were illogical making you opinion irrelevant. It like most of your opinions contained no substance. Fact is you dislike her so you are incapable of coming to an unbiased conclusion. No biggy many people suffer from such an affliction. I'm sure you care what I say, hence the aggressive and angry response.
  Nope!  That's where you're WRONG.  You insulted this board with your obvious ignorance and stupidity....and charged at us with your empty/apparent groundless troll-type conjecture and THAT is why I responded.  Doesn't mean you have any influential power here.  Nope!  Just making YOU aware that we see your combative insigation to get sumthing started.  That's all.  You are one of these passive/aggressive bullies and not fooling  no one...definitely not me.  You consistently ignore poignant questions aimed at you to avoid an intelligent convo....cuz why?  That's not your motivation.   You're only to HERE to sling bullshyte...which is typical for someone suffering from some sort of mental defect.  Otherwise, you'd answer the questions posed to you and defend your position. 


BTW:  Just so you know....I'm not angry or aggressive....you don't wanna see me angry or aggressive. Quite frankly I'm just disgusted with your immature angst.  Plus!  Here you are....a mere STRANGER!!! Busting in this site with YOUR bullish street corner attitude as if we [who do not KNOW you one lick]  are supposed to CARE about your weak pointless opinion you have unsucessfully tried to attack us with.   Question!  Who are you?  Nothing in my life!   Trust me.  I'll say it again.  I can give a sweet FOCK what you think.....your opinion...but!  to clarify to you once MORE that you ARE exposing exactly WHO YOU ARE!  You are BUSTED!  Now answer the man's question.....and stop playing these childish games to get attention.  Cuz from where I stand...you haven't contribute one solid positive note on your position regarding Rice.  Answer the man....otherwise it is CLEAR you're just a brainless troll in here to start trouble.  Advice:  Grow the fock up!   
Last edited by Kocolicious

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