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Commentary: Today's Black Leaders Support Issues that Actually Hamper Our Progress

Date: Wednesday, June 15, 2005
By: Joseph C. Phillips, BlackAmericaWeb.com


As I continue to ponder the question of partisanship, I find myself considering principles. Do the principles we hold apply to all men or are they simply preferences that can change with the seasons?

It's the difference between objective and subjective morality. One holds forth a standard of behavior that is true for all men no matter their station. The other subjects men to the whims of an elite who determine for the rest of us when and what the standards are. The former are principles upon which this nation was founded and represent the greatest harbinger of success for minority American populations.

If charges of partisanship are going to be levied, perhaps they need be directed at the prevailing black "leadership," which has aligned itself with causes and supported issues increasingly hostile to the principles that have been beneficial to Americans in general and black Americans specifically.

It was not a benevolent federal government that loosed the shackles of black America. The evils of slavery and Jim Crow persisted until government met its obligation to secure the individual rights of each citizen, regardless of race or ethnicity. A commitment to the principles upon which this nation was founded, and an unyielding belief that God desires freedom and justice for all men is solely responsible for unleashing the talent and industriousness of millions of black citizens.

Yet, the prevailing black political wisdom is married to the welfare state. Black "leadership" opposes reforms of welfare, public education and Social Security in spite of evidence that change will empower parents and families and they demonize the free market, the source of job creation. So ingrained is the political orthodoxy that they have even turned their backs on the traditional institution of marriage, which has long been a key to stable and productive communities.

Most ironic is the notion that endorsing ideas counter to the prevailing hot air being blown by black civil rights leaders or questioning black allegiance to the Democratic Party makes one not just un-black, but downright anti-black.

The grand poohbahs of race are rarely willing to argue the failure of their ideas. Nor are they very willing to argue the more broad philosophical questions. Instead, they are content to launch ad hominen attacks or offer sardonic quips such as, "Exactly what is it that you black conservatives are seeking to conserve?" A better question might be, "Toward what is the new liberalism progressing?"

What I seek to preserve are those principles and values taught us by generations of black folk who demanded that America live up to the meaning of her creed. That's right. Far from longing for the good old days of Jim Crow and tap dancing, black conservatism means embracing the founding principles of self-reliance and the concept of individual rights and responsibilities. That's black pride, baby!

Black conservatism affirms the ability of black fathers to lead and provide for their families. Black conservatism insists that black children are as creative, industrious and academically capable as any other children. Black conservatism proclaims to the world that our American culture benefits when the creative energy of individuals is unleashed.

Contrast that with the progressive notion so prevalent among the current anointed elites that rights flow not from God but from government, and not to individuals but through group affiliation -- that true black success is the result of government programs or sheer luck.

I suppose it is open for debate as to whether the black devotee of new liberalism has truly forsaken principle in the name of racial identity. What is unmistakable, however, is that they are, in the words of Thomas Jefferson, "the timid men who prefer the calm of despotism to the boisterous sea of liberty."
 
 BLACK by NATURE, PROUD by CHOICE.
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Well, let's just start electing our leaders then we will know without a doubt who are chosen leaders are and our leaders will know to whom they are accountable.

And I will patiently await Part II of this article where the author details the issues Black CONservatives support that hamper our progress. That way will have it all out on the table and we can make an informed decision come BLACK ELECTION time... Big Grin

It is funny though to see how hard "they" try to sell Black CONservativism. There is a long tradition of self-reliance in the Black Community but somehow this Black CONservativism seems pretty much against talking about it. It's as if it doesn't exists to "them" (until they want to use it in the Sales Pitch, at which time they promptly misappropriate...)

Hmmm... And how exactly is this Black CONservatism based on Self-Reliance if it is extolling the "principles upon which this nation was founded" on and esteeming them as "the greatest harbinger of success"??

What??? There are Black Principles to RELY on or something?

That just seem pretty contradictory to talk about SELF-RELIANCE when one's principles are borrowed from someone else. And, yes, INDIVIDUALISM is a very WHITE/European idea. So, tell me how am I to regard Black CONservativism and its claims about promoting Self-Reliance when it borrows and relies heavily on such "founding principles" that don't at all exhibit any sort of BLACK PRIDE... given that it can't or won't even rely on the rich tradition of Black Self-Help and Self-Reliance that has its own concepts and embraces those that are a part of our own historical/cultural experience and not someone else's.

And with the Black CONservatives... like their White counterparts... if it ain't the WHO'S THE BETTER WHITE MAN CONTEST? they're quick to put on the WHO'S THE BETTER NEGRO? show. That is, IMO, B-Con's only want to replace "prevailing" Black "Leadership" in the White Man's Favor. No more, no less... IMO.

All the more reason why I say it's time for a BLACK ELECTION. Maybe we can cut some of this dumb shit out.
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I think he must mean socially conservative blacks...politically conservative blacks are against anything the black majority finds beneficial......so now someone has to be wrong in their philosophy...is it the majority of the black race or is it the few george bush loving negroes who are willing to help turn back all legislative gains by blacks the last 40 years? I don't think it takes a rocket scientist to figure that one out.....
I agree with some areas of social conservatism such as the fact pro-homosexuality is not beneficial to blacks. He talks about the importance of the black family, which is fine, and I agree...But to blame blacks for the consequences of cultural practices is wrong also. Blacks aren't the only ones receiving public assistance, whites get it more then they do with no backlash. Some of these same conservative churches criticizing poor blacks also survive by taking their money. What some black conservatives do is listen to these white folks preaching as if George Washington, the white power structure, and other whites are straight out of the bible... When they were in fact nothing but evil racist who invented the real welfare system whereby blacks are exploited and denied progress in favor of white only privileges. Then they pretend this has no bearing on anything.

So what if there are jobs, if the job market is controlled by racist whites what good does that do blacks...they have to be at their mercy and perform their racist dirt in an attempt to maintain a position. Just like the old plantation days. We need to band together to empower ourselves economically. However, if our women and children remain at the bottom in terms of being shown compassion and respect as opposed to white women and their offspring, we have no place to go. Also, since blacks are considered such a small fraction of the overall voter turnout I suspect that is why once blacks are elected they often start playing up to whites by acting racist.
Wow! What an interesting article. Isn't Joseph C. Phillips the actor that played Denise Huxtable's Navy husband? Hhhhmmmmmm

There's a flip side to this coin that Mr. Phillips is dismissing as well. The fact that when welfare and all of these other social projects were first started, blacks as usual were excluded from participating and benefitting from them. Including programs like the G.I. Bill, sadly which would've assisted many of our people.
I think that the reason that some politicians are against cutting social welfare programs is because they are trying to give poor people the opprotunity to play catch up with white America.
Secondly, they may be geniunely concerned about the welfare of the american majority working class. Third, they are responsible to accounting to their constituents about how they represented their concerns in government.
Most ironic is the notion that endorsing ideas counter to the prevailing hot air being blown by black civil rights leaders or questioning black allegiance to the Democratic Party makes one not just un-black, but downright anti-black.---Phillips

It is indeed a strange phenomenon.

I have concluded that it a behavior that is largely about turf.

Power, pure and simple.

The latest demonstration of this bassakwards behavior is the petition being circulated by rainbow/PUSH Coalition.

It says extend the Voting Rights Act instead of making it permanent.

And here's the kicker...

Because it will (make Charlie mad) and cause a challenge as to constitutionality.

Such utter bullshit!!!!!!!!!!

THIS IS NOT LEADERSHIP BY ANYONE'S DEFINITION!!

AND...I have heard NO OTHER VOICE challenging the credibility of this idiocy.

Let alone the quality of leadership.

IT IS BECAUSE OF THIS AMAZING SILENCE THAT THIS PALTRY EXCUSE FOR LEADERSHIP GOES ON.

WE GET WHAT WE ALLOW.


PEACE

Jim Chester
I wonder about this group...with their hands out buying into that faith-based bullschit the at relieves gov't of its responsibility...........

______________________________________________________________________________________

Black Southern Baptist Pastors Say Slavery Issue Far in the Past

DiversityInc.com news briefs are purchased from The Associated Press or written by the staff of DiversityInc.com. They cannot be duplicated or reproduced in any way. Our in-depth articles, published six days a week, are reported and written by our staff of full-time journalists.

It might seem odd for a black person to join a faith that once supported slavery, but black pastors of the Southern Baptist Convention say much has changed since the issue split Baptists in America nearly 200 years ago.

"Yesterday and today, they are different days," said Robert Anderson, president of the African American Fellowship of the Southern Baptist Convention and pastor of Colonial Baptist Church in Randallstown, Md. "The convention as a whole has come a long way, obviously from the days of slavery and Jim Crow. We have a lot more African Americans involved in the convention than ever before."

Anderson will be among a number of blacks attending the annual two-day meeting of the convention beginning Tuesday in Nashville. About 3,000 black churches are affiliated with the convention of about 16.2 million members.

It's a far cry from the denomination's early years when such incorporation was unheard of.

During the 1830s tensions among Baptists in the North and South began to mount, mainly over slavery. It was a major economic resource in the South and was embraced by Baptists there. But those in the North opposed it, contending God doesn't condone treating one race superior to the other.

The bickering came to a head in May of 1845 when Baptists in the South met and organized the Southern Baptist Convention.

But since then, Anderson said, Southern Baptists have taken steps to repair their tarnished past. One of the biggest moves came about 10 years ago when the convention issued a resolution apologizing for slavery.

In addition, the denomination has 23 ethnic fellowships, of which the black group is among the largest with nearly 300 churches.

Robert Parham, executive director of the Baptist Center for Ethics in Nashville, said he still finds it unusual that blacks in particular would support a denomination that strongly supports President Bush, who received less than 10 percent of the black vote in the last election.

But E. W. McCall Sr., pastor of St. Stephen Baptist Church in La Puente, Calif., said many of the convention's black members are Republicans who are frustrated with the Democratic Party's support of abortion and homosexuality.

He also said Southern Baptists don't have the slave-mentality they had nearly three centuries ago. (AP)
quote:
Originally posted by Kevin41:
Robert Parham, executive director of the Baptist Center for Ethics in Nashville, said he still finds it unusual that blacks in particular would support a denomination that strongly supports President Bush, who received less than 10 percent of the black vote in the last election.


Most Black folk are followers of the religion they are because that's what they were told to do/be. It's no more surprising that some of them are Baptists than it is that they are any other sect of the Christian religion which was used to justify slavery or than it is that some are Republicans or support companies that help to advance racist policies ... here and all over the world.

Independent investigation of truth is more the exception than the rule when it comes to us. Most of us just take what is told to us, accept it and never question it.
Could Tennessee Congressman Be Next Barack Obama?
Compiled by the DiversityInc staff

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June 22, 2005

Analysis of today's diversity news from RollCall.com, The Wall Street Journal, The Miami Herald, the San Francisco Chronicle and more:

Members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) are putting together plans to help elect Rep. Harold Ford Jr., D-Tenn., in 2006 to succeed retiring Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, Roll Call reports. Although the CBC has not taken a formal position on Ford's candidacy yet, caucus members said they will help him raise money and campaign in Washington, D.C., and Tennessee.

Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-Mo., described Ford as the new face of the Democratic Party. "I will do whatever he needs," Clay said. "This is a historic election since he could be the first African American elected from the South since Reconstruction. I want to be a part of that historic event."

The caucus (subscription required) pulled out all the stops in 2004 to elect then-Illinois state Sen. Barack Obama, now the only black U.S. senator.
This I like.

It is a power-based mentality necessary to leverage to political currency of African America.

Tennessee is a State where only one of its Senators chose to co-sponsor the Apology-for-lynching Resolution.

Rep. Ford's candidacy will be a difficult uphill fight.

I would love to see it happen.

I am not optimistic, however, that he can expand his victory in a Congressional District to the entire State of Tennessee which is still reluctant to acknowledge national (documented) anti-racial behavior.
quote:
Originally posted by shemika:
I agree with some areas of social conservatism such as the fact pro-homosexuality is not beneficial to blacks.


This is just plain silly.

You seem to be under the impression (as evidenced by your comments on another thread, as well as here) that gay-bashing and anti-gay hate-mongering is somehow beneficial to blacks.

It's certainly not beneficial to the approximately 10% of blacks who are gay, nor their families.

In fact, black families are disproportionately negatively impacted by homophobic laws and policies.

You need to stop looking for scapegoats.
ricardo,

you sound like a Jew calling everything anti-semantic...when someone speaks out against their behavior. I do not have nothing against gays but I agree with the sister....we have had our goals defined and pursued as black people for ages without sexual orientation being an issue. I have nothing against gays...but them trying to parallel their social reality next to mine because of THEIR personal choices is bullschit. They can fight their own fight and not use their issues to pair up with mine based on being born black and nothing else...I did not have a choice....they do...especially the white gays....they can change their behavior and their whole social perception as a result....I can't do not such schit.......so i do not have a problem with gays....but crying that homophobe schit everytime someone tells you about you imposition of your lifestyle on others is BS....it really is........
quote:
Originally posted by Kevin41:
ricardo,

you sound like a Jew calling everything anti-semantic...when someone speaks out against their behavior. I do not have nothing against gays but I agree with the sister....we have had our goals defined and pursued as black people for ages without sexual orientation being an issue. I have nothing against gays...but them trying to parallel their social reality next to mine because of THEIR personal choices is bullschit. They can fight their own fight and not use their issues to pair up with mine based on being born black and nothing else...I did not have a choice....they do...especially the white gays....they can change their behavior and their whole social perception as a result....I can't do not such schit.......so i do not have a problem with gays....but crying that homophobe schit everytime someone tells you about you imposition of your lifestyle on others is BS....it really is........


Kevin,

You will note that I referenced other comments that she has made earlier on another thread around here somewhere.

If it were only a matter of the short comment that she made in this thread, I might have still have responded, but not quite as strongly as I did.

She has made extremely hateful and malicious comments about gays, comparing gays to child molestors. (I forget exactly where, but I'm sure that I could find them if you want.) This is no different from white supremicist websites that claim that all blacks are rapists or child molestors or whatever.

There's a difference between not being interested in a particular struggle, or even disliking a group of people, and making hateful and malicious remarks designed to induce violence against those people.

Her comments are no different from comments that you might read about gays on a KKK or Nazi website.
Thanks Kevin41! You're so right.

Ricardomath,

If you had an issue with my other comments why didn't you say so on the other board rather than come over here and take them out of context? Obviously your motives are not genuine.

Your effort to parallel the black struggle to the PRACTICE of homosexuality is a self serving form of exploitation advanced by white homosexuals and their followers. They love to pay lip service to the black struggle as an introduction to their own agenda. Then insert their topic, and any benefits gained go toward their extremist, cry-baby, pro-homosexual propaganda and unhealthy laws. While black's end up with nothing tangible.

Because blacks are often reeled in by their intro of black-friendly subject matter, this strategy exposes them to a lot of pro homo rhetoric. As blacks embrace that lifestyle they are also weakening their family structure and population growth...Just what white supremacists want.

Homosexual advocates are also so arrogant no one is even allowed to disagree with their lifestyle. Pro-homosexuality has to do with contempt for healthy sexual boundaries and the traditional white sense of entitlement that makes them willing to say and do ANYTHING to justify their actions.

I also disagree with adultery and other forms of sexual misconduct and those who practice them aren't so bold as to accuse me of bashing them for doing so. They respect my value system and we usually remain friends because they know when I tell them I believe what they are doing is wrong it is because I care.

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