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Top Cheney aide Libby indicted, quits post

WASHINGTON - Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, was indicted Friday on five charges that include obstruction of justice, making false statements and perjury in the investigation into the leak of a covert CIA agent's name.

Moments after the indictment was announced, the White House said that Libby had resigned.

The five-count indictment accuses Libby of lying about how and when he learned about CIA official Valerie Plane's identity in 2003 and then told reporters about it. The information was classified.

"The charges allege that Libby lied to FBI agents who interviewed him on October 14 and November 26, 2003; committed perjury while testifying under oath before the grand jury on March 5 and March 24, 2004; and engaged in obstruction of justice by impeding the grand jury's investigation," prosecutors said in a news release.

Full Article: http://msnbc.msn.com/id/9837835/
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Former Bush spokesman contradicts Libby's timeline
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WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Former White House spokesman Ari Fleischer testified Monday that Lewis "Scooter" Libby told him about a CIA operative three days before the date Libby claims he received the information from a reporter.

Defense lawyers for Libby then sought to shoot down Fleischer's testimony.

Fleischer, press secretary to President Bush from 2001-2003, first testified that Libby told him during lunch on July 7, 2003, that administration war critic Joseph Wilson was married to CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilson.

The timing of Libby's revelation is crucial because he is on trial for lying to investigators about when he learned the identity of Wilson's wife. (Watch how the timeline is keyVideo

Libby told investigators he learned the identity from "Meet the Press" moderator Tim Russert on July 10, 2003.

Libby is not charged with leaking Valerie Plame Wilson's name or her CIA connection. He is charged with lying to the FBI and a grand jury investigating who leaked the CIA employee's identity to reporters in 2003. (Full story)

In his testimony Monday, Fleischer, who has an immunity deal with the prosecution, recalled that he and Libby discussed Fleischer's plans and their mutual love of the Miami Dolphins football team at the lunch. Libby then turned the conversation to Joseph Wilson, Fleischer said.

Joseph Wilson had written an op-ed piece for The New York Times, in which he challenged Bush's claim in his 2003 State of the Union that Iraq was trying to buy uranium from the African nation of Niger.

Before the war, Wilson had made a fact-finding trip to the African country at the request of the CIA, where his wife worked on matters regarding weapons of mass destruction, according to court testimony. He said he had found no evidence of Bush's claim.

Libby said Wilson was given the assignment to go to Niger by his wife, according to Fleischer.

Valerie Plame Wilson and her husband filed a sweeping federal civil lawsuit last year over what they charge was a conspiracy to intentionally expose Plame's classified CIA job to reporters in 2003 to punish Wilson for questioning the administration's rationale for invading Iraq.
Defense challenges Fleischer

Under cross-examination by Libby's attorney, Fleischer admitted he could not remember whether Libby called Wilson's wife by name.

"On the name piece I think he told me the name," Fleischer said.

"But you can't be certain of that," defense lawyer William Jeffress prodded.

"With absolute certainty, no," Fleischer replied.

Jeffress also picked at a discrepancy in Fleischer's testimony.

In questioning about a CIA report on Wilson's trip to Niger, Fleischer said the report referred to the former ambassador by name.

When confronted with an assertion the report includes no such reference, Fleischer testified that perhaps the name was in the redacted portion not available at the trial.

Jeffress then said, "The blacked-out portions of the report do not contain Mr. Wilson's name." Special Counsel Patrick Fitzgerald agreed with Jeffress.

Fleischer remained certain about his basic assertion, that Libby told him that Wilson was assigned to go to Niger by his wife.

Fleischer testified that because Libby didn't tell him that Valerie Wilson's identity was classified, he passed the disclosure off as inside Washington gossip.

"My thought was nepotism," Fleischer said. "Somebody got a job because of a family member's position."
Fleischer granted immunity

Prosecutors had sought to inoculate Fleischer against attacks on his credibility by having him first describe to jurors details of a grant of immunity he received before testifying.

"My understanding is that I could not be prosecuted for what I did with the information that was provided [by Libby] but could if my statements were untruthful," Fleischer said.

Prosecutor Fitzgerald used testimony by Fleischer and a former Cheney press secretary to paint Libby as someone who used lies and deception in his ranking position at the White House to try to discredit Joseph Wilson.
Cheney's press aide testifies

Before Fleischer took the stand, Cathie Martin, then the top press aide to Cheney, concluded several days of testimony that cast a sometimes harsh light on the inner workings of the White House and other federal agencies.

Martin, who now is an aide to Bush, testified she was excluded from high-level talks to decide how to respond to the media in Libby's favor. It was during the controversy sparked by Bush's 2003 State of the Union address, in which he claimed Iraq was trying to buy uranium from Niger -- and the ensuing rebuttal by Wilson.

Martin ended her testimony Monday by saying that she had been asked to do something she was not comfortable with -- to potentially reveal to reporters classified information intended to help defend the claim that Iraq was trying to acquire nuclear material.

That information would have come from a report known as the National Intelligence Estimate, that she knew was ordinarily classified. Judge Reggie Walton, who continues to take questions from the jury to directly ask the witnesses, asked Martin on their behalf why she did not push back on the request.

Martin testified that "the vice president of the United States had told me to say it, and so I didn't know where I was going to go."

She learned that Bush had declassified those portions of the report, Martin said.
Cheney aid testifies

Cheney's current chief of staff, David Addington, took the stand after Fleischer finished. His testimony will continue Tuesday, and he will be followed by former The New York Times reporter Judith Miller.

Miller served 85 days in jail in 2005 for refusing to testify before the grand jury investigation of the leak of Mrs. Wilson's CIA position.

Copyright 2007 CNN. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Associated Press contributed to this report.



Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/01/29/cia.leak/index.html
I have to admit ... I was tempted to agree with you, Kweli ... but keep your day job, sweetie! Your career as a psychic may be in question! kiss But, who would have thought this would/could actually happen!?!

BREAKING NEWS: Libby Guilty in CIA Leak Case

Date: Tuesday, March 06, 2007
By: Michael J. Sniffen and Matt Apuzzo, Associated Press

Former White House aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby was convicted Tuesday of obstruction, perjury and lying to the FBI in an investigation into the leak of a CIA operative's identity.

Libby, the former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, was accused of lying and obstructing the investigation into the 2003 leak of CIA operative Valerie Plame's identity to reporters.

He was acquitted of one count of lying to the FBI.

Libby had little reaction to the verdict. He stood expressionless as the jury left the room. His lawyer, Theodore Wells, said they were "very disappointed" with the verdict.

Special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald said he was gratified by the verdict.

"The results are actually sad," he added. "It's sad that we had a situation where a high level official person who worked in the office of the vice president obstructed justice and lied under oath. We wish that it had not happened, but it did."

The verdict was read on the 10th day of deliberations. Libby faces up to 30 years in prison, though under federal sentencing guidelines likely will receive far less.

U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton ordered a pre-sentencing report be completed by May 15. Judges use such reports to help determine sentences.

Libby faced two counts of perjury, two counts of lying to the FBI and one count of obstruction of justice. Prosecutors said he discussed Plame's name with reporters and, fearing prosecution, made up a story to make those discussions seem innocuous.

Libby's defense team said he learned about Plame from Cheney, forgot about it, then learned it again a month later from NBC newsman Tim Russert. Anything he told reporters about Plame, Libby said, was just chatter and rumors, not official government information.

Special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald said that was a lie. But Libby's defense team had argued that it would be unfair to convict Libby in a case where so many witnesses changed their stories or had memory problems.

Wells said he would ask the court for a new trial by April 13. Such requests are common following criminal convictions.

"Despite our disappointment in the jurors' verdict, we believe in the American justice system and we believe in the jury system," Wells told reporters outside the federal courthouse. "We intend to file a motion for a new trial and if that is denied, we will appeal the conviction. We have every confidence that ultimately Mr. Libby will be exonerated.... We intend to keep fighting to establish his innocence."

Libby will be allowed to remain free while awaiting sentencing, which is set for June 5.

As the verdicts were read, Libby's wife choked out a sob and sank her head. Moments later, she embraced the defense attorneys.

The jury acquitted Libby of one count of lying to the FBI about his conversation with Time magazine reporter Matthew Cooper.

Libby and his lawyers walked into the courthouse after Wells' statement, holding on to each other by the wrists, apparently so they wouldn't be separated in the crush of reporters and camera crews. They paused briefly when a cameraman fell.

During the trial, prosecutors said Libby made up a ludicrous lie to save his job during the CIA leak investigation by telling investigators he'd forgotten Cheney told him about the CIA status of Wilson's wife. Cheney had passed the information to Libby more than a month before Plame's identity was outed by conservative columnist Robert Novak.

Libby told investigators he learned of Plame's identity from NBC reporter Tim Russert, saying that he'd forgotten at the time he talked to the reporter that he'd been told of it earlier by Cheney.

Russert testified he never told Libby about Wilson's wife, and underwent a grueling cross-examination as Libby's legal team tried to discredit Russert's testimony.

Wells and Fitzgerald clashed over how important Libby and Cheney considered CIA officer Plame.

"The wheels were falling off the Bush administration" in the summer of 2003, Wells argued. How could Libby, serving Cheney as both chief of staff and national security adviser, remember Plame's job when 100,000 U.S. troops were in Iraq and hadn't found the weapons of mass destruction the administration had cited to justify the war? Wells asked.

"And he still had his day job of trying to prevent another 9/11" terrorist attack, Wells said.

Fitzgerald noted that eight witnesses, including an undersecretary of state, two CIA officials, two top Cheney aides, two reporters and former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer said they discussed Wilson's wife with Libby in a one-month span before Plame's CIA employment was publicly revealed.
Yep, I guess I'll have to continue just reviewing facts and leave the predications of outcomes to others.

With that said, I wonder how far the investigation will go? The reports on the evidence seem to suggest that both Rove and Cheney were directly involved in Plame's "outing" and that their reason for doing so was purely political payback.
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
With that said, I wonder how far the investigation will go? The reports on the evidence seem to suggest that both Rove and Cheney were directly involved in Plame's "outing" and that their reason for doing so was purely political payback.



Hmmmmm ...19 Is that the word "impeachment" I'm not hearing you say?? music
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
Pelosi has already promised no impeachment and i believe the special prosecutor has stopped investigating hasn't he?


He has stopped investigating Libby; but as all officers of the court, he is required to report on any crimes he covers in the course of his investigation.

Rove and Cheney are on the hook; but probably not with Fitz. If the democrats value justice/democracy over politics, there will be another special prosecutor appointed shortly.
My view: The jury has spoken. Lock him up.


CRITICAL IRONY - "Lying Under Oath" IS NOW IMPORTANT to some people though this was not the case several years ago. (It was the subject of the lie but not the FACT THAT ONE LIED) fo

What some people will do for their "Permanent Friends"
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
Kweli4Real's predictions:

Scooter will be acquitted and his accusations that he is being thrown under the bus to protect Cheney/Rove will fade from the media's memory.
quote:
From the ER:
I have to admit ... I was tempted to agree with you, Kweli ... but keep your day job, sweetie! Your career as a psychic may be in question! kiss But, who would have thought this would/could actually happen!?!
Fear not K4R... Oliver North was "convicted" too... and he got off...
quote:
Originally posted by AudioGuy:
Fear not K4R... Oliver North was "convicted" too... and he got off...


Tookie Williams and Mubia Abu Jamal were both convicted as well but we know the crowd that gathers outside of their prisons to support them despite them having killed people. It is indeed funny how these convictions are handled by the populous.
quote:
CRITICAL IRONY - "Lying Under Oath" IS NOW IMPORTANT to some people though this was not the case several years ago. (It was the subject of the lie but not the FACT THAT ONE LIED)


There you go again with that [albeit veiled], "But ...But ... Clinton did it, too" bs

CF, in all but the most fundamentalist partisan mind, there is a huge difference between lying about a highly personal matter, e.g., a consentual affair in which BTW, no one died, and this matter, which is fundamentally about the lies related to:
quote:
3,185 American soldiers dead in a war based on lies. With more to come.
23,785 wounded American soldiers in the same war, based on the same lies. With more to come.
Approx. $400 billion of our tax money that cannot/will not/did not get spent on domestic matters. With more to go.
.

At any rate, in a Good Morning America interview with one of the Jurists, it was stated that the general sentiment was that Libby was thrown under the bus to protect Rove and/or Cheney.

This ain't done. munch
In Wake of Guilty Verdicts for Libby, All Eyes Turn to Vice President Cheney for Answers

Date: Wednesday, March 07, 2007
By: Tom Raum, Associated Press




WASHINGTON - (AP) Campaigning in 2000, George Bush promised he would swear on the Bible to restore honor and dignity to a sullied White House and give it "one heck of a scrubbing." The conviction of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby gave the White House a scrubbing -- but not the one Bush had in mind.

The case laid bare the inner workings of a presidency under siege and the secretive world of Vice President Dick Cheney.

It showed the lengths to which Cheney went in early summer 2003 to discredit administration critic Joseph Wilson. The former ambassador's assertions had cast doubt on the administration's justification for having taken the country to war in Iraq. And the Libby case showed the president assisting Cheney in the leaked attacks on Wilson.

Libby, who was Cheney's chief of staff, was found guilty on Tuesday of four of five counts of obstructing justice, lying and perjury during an investigation into the administration's disclosure of the identity of undercover CIA official Valerie Plame, Wilson's wife.

The verdict "does great damage to the Bush administration," said Paul C. Light, professor of public service at New York University. "It undermines the president's pledge of ethical conduct. But the most serious consequence is that it will raise questions about Cheney's durability in office. It may be time for Cheney to submit his resignation."


But don't count on it. Bush in the past has repeatedly come to the defense of his vice president.

The trial, which included a month of testimony, is also relevant as the U.S. seeks to build a case that Iran is providing sophisticated munitions to Shiite insurgents in Iraq who are using them against U.S. troops. Administration critics have suggested the administration is trying to lay the groundwork for isolating or even attacking Iran - using flawed intelligence, like in Iraq.

Wilson, a retired career diplomat, had accused the administration of manipulating intelligence to build its case to invade Iraq.

The trial leaves a trail of unanswered questions leading to the doorsteps of Bush and Cheney.

Testimony and evidence did not clear up whether they directed the leaking of Plame's identity to the news media.

But the trial did show Bush declassified prewar intelligence that Libby leaked to New York Times reporter Judith Miller, a plan carried out in such secrecy that no one in the government except Bush, Cheney and Libby even knew about it.

Testimony showed the vice president was aware early on that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA and told Libby about it. Cheney even scribbled a note to himself a week before Wilson's wife was exposed asking whether she had sent her husband on the CIA mission to Africa that triggered the controversy.

Cheney also directed Libby to speak with selected reporters to counter Wilson's accusations. Cheney developed talking points on the matter for the White House press office. He helped draft a statement by then-CIA Director George Tenet. And he moved to declassify some intelligence material to bolster the case against Wilson.

Lanny Davis, a lawyer who worked in the Clinton White House during several investigations, said Tuesday that, while Libby was the defendant, "it was Vice President Cheney who was on trial today and who has the responsibility for what Libby did. The vice president has a personal and moral responsibility to take responsibility for what Mr. Libby did at his instruction - and to apologize to Valerie Plame."

Cheney said in a statement that he was "very disappointed with the verdict" and that Libby had "served our nation tirelessly and with great distinction." Cheney said he would withhold further comment because Libby was seeking a new trial or, if necessary, an appeal.

Prosecutors said Libby concocted a story to avoid losing his job for disclosing classified information to reporters without authorization. Libby's attorneys said any errors resulted from memory flaws.

The White House refused to comment on the possibility that Bush would pardon Libby. He was the only one charged in the case, and he was not charged with deliberately disclosing Plame's identity, which can be a federal crime, but with lying to investigators and a grand jury. Testimony showed there were other leakers, including adviser Karl Rove, former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer and former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage.

The White House has never corrected the denials it issued in the fall of 2003 saying neither Rove nor Libby was involved in the leak of Plame's CIA identity. Political observers doubt any correction will be made.

"What's really focused people's attention is the loss of American troops in Iraq and it's allowed Bush, Cheney and Rove - once he wasn't indicted -- to kind of be pushed off the radar screen" regarding the Plame affair, said presidential historian Robert Dallek.

Democrats used the verdicts to attack Cheney. "Lewis Libby has been convicted of perjury, but his trial revealed deeper truths about Vice President Cheney's role in this sordid affair. Now President Bush must pledge not to pardon Libby for his criminal conduct," said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.).

White House spokeswoman Dana Perino would not characterize the verdict as embarrassing for the White House. "I think that we have been able to continue on in moving forward on all sorts of different fronts," she said.

It's not the administration's first ethics-related conviction. Two former Bush administration officials have been convicted in investigations related to jailed Republican lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

Last June, a former White House aide, David H. Safavian, was convicted of lying to government investigators about his ties to Abramoff. He faces an 180-month prison sentence. Roger Stillwell, a former Interior Department official, pleaded guilty in August to a misdemeanor charge for not reporting tickets he received from Abramoff.
quote:
Originally posted by James Wesley Chester:
I'm wondering how long the appeal process can be drawn out.

Election 2008 is 20 months away...20 months.

If 'Scooter' goes to jail before that date, He might be really pissed.

He might decide to rollover on 'somebody'.

And water does not 'roll' uphill.

PEACE

Jim Chester

I would wager that Scooter has a pardon coming his way. I do not think that they want to make him a real scapegoat or he will turn into a "song bird."
Yeah, a couple of the news programs were discussing that. The consensus was that he probably will get pardoned before Bush leaves office ... but, he will have to do some jail time, maybe a year, before that happens. And it will probably be the promise of a pardon that keeps him from "singing".

Also, it was estimated that his sentence will probably only be between 1-3 years, instead of the possible 30 that the sentence can carry.
quote:
I would wager that Scooter has a pardon coming his way. I do not think that they want to make him a real scapegoat or he will turn into a "song bird."


Or, a Dead Duck. Remember we ARE talking about Dick "Shoot-Your-Friend-In-The-Face-And-Then-Make-HIM-Apologize" Cheney, here. If he'll do that to a friend, what would he do to a man in a position to send him to prison?

Here's an interesting tidbit, that makes much more sense then outing a wife to punish the man's husband.

quote:
It is also coming out that plans to destroy Plame's covert CIA operation Brewster -Jennings was the real target and decided upon before Joe Wilson even wrote his article. The Joe Wilson smear spin is just that, spin that the MSM has swallowed hook line a sinker.

Brewster-Jennings was our Nations most important intelligence operation tracking Nuclear and WMD acquisition and development in the Middle East. Cheney and Bush wanted tnis destroyed so there would be no ˜pissant' cia trying to meddle in their Iran and Iraq war plans.It is also rumored that Plame's Brewster-Jennings just prior to Plames exposure had been instrumental in stopping a load of WMD headed for Iraq through Turkey, and it has been conjectured that this was the shipment and Bush operation to plant the WMD's in Iraq.

When Brewster-Jennings was destroyed, people were killed as a result and a multi-year and multi-million dollar covert front company was destroyed. Covert front companies are the most complicated covert operations to create, and maintain, and they historically provide the best intelligence.

http://www.opednews.com/maxwrite/print_friendly.php?p=o...e_s_brewster_jen.htm


disclaimer: this piece is taken from an op-ed piece and, as such, has not been fact-checked by this poster.
Last edited {1}
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
CF, in all but the most fundamentalist partisan mind, there is a huge difference between lying about a highly personal matter, e.g., a consentual affair in which BTW, no one died, and this matter, which is fundamentally about the lies related to:



Kweli - Did YOU THINK that I THOUGHT YOU THOUGHT any differently. Any lawyer with RESPECT FOR THE LAW will call you a DAMNED FOOL. The enforcement of the OATH - regardless of the subject is important.



quote:
3,185 American soldiers dead in a war based on lies. With more to come.
23,785 wounded American soldiers in the same war, based on the same lies. With more to come.


Please tell me the LIE again Kweli?

Can you tell me if the basis of the Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 WERE LIES?

quote:

At any rate, in a Good Morning America interview with one of the Jurists, it was stated that the general sentiment was that Libby was thrown under the bus to protect Rove and/or Cheney.

This ain't done. munch


Kweli- Let us back up for a minute. I noticed that based on the SLANT of the news organization THE FACTS get frayed.

Fact:
The PROSECUTOR was initially engaged to INVESTIGATE THE QUESTION AS TO IF A LAW WAS BROKEN in the alleged "outing" of a CIA agent.

[B]
FACT:
The PROSECUTOR FAILED TO DELIVER AN INDICTMENT ON THE MAINLINE CHARGE[B]


REGARDLESS OF THE SENTIMENTS OF THE JURY - they were NEVER ASKED TO CONSIDER THE MAINLINE QUESTION because THE PROSECUTOR DID NOT HAVE THE EVIDENCE AND COULD NOT PROVE HIS CASE ON THE MATTER.

FACT - the indictment against Libby for lying was a TANGENTIAL CHARGE to the MAIN QUESTION that the prosecutor was dealing with

FACT - it was later found that RICHARD ARMETIGE of the STATE DEPARTMENT was the person that provided the news of Plame but not in a malicious manner.


Today I hear so many biased news oracles GOING TO WORK concerning getting their digs in regarding how this conviction on LYING (BUT NOT THE MAIN CHARGES) is symptomatic of "this administration".

It floors me as to how some of you are so willing to NEGATE A JURY'S VERDICT THAT YOU DISAGREE WITH (Mumia, Tookie, etc) but let that jury rule in a way that is favorable to you AND YOU THING, once again, that this is the best system of justice in the world.

THE PROSECUTOR WAS UNABLE TO PROVE THE MAIN CHARGE THAT HE WAS BROUGHT TO THE TABLE TO CONVICT UPON.
quote:
Kweli - Did YOU THINK that I THOUGHT YOU THOUGHT any differently. Any lawyer with RESPECT FOR THE LAW will call you a DAMNED FOOL. The enforcement of the OATH - regardless of the subject is important.



Context, CF ... It's all about context. If you can't see that you are partisanly blinded beyond hope. I will state again, there is a huge difference between lying about a highly personal matter, e.g., a consentual affair in which BTW, no one died, and this matter, which is fundamentally about the lies related to this military mis-adventure that you so ardently defend.

quote:
Please tell me the LIE again Kweli?


Which lie are you referencing? The one about the Iraqi involvement in 911? Or, the one about the Iraqi/Al Quaeda terrorist partnership? Or, the one about WMDs? Or, the one about bring democracy to a democracy clamoring people? Please be more specific, because you couldn't possibly be referring to my use of EbonyRose's American's killed or maimed in Iraq figures.

quote:
Can you tell me if the basis of the Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 WERE LIES?


dance "Blah, blah, blah, CLINTON, blah, blah blah ...

quote:
Fact:
The PROSECUTOR was initially engaged to INVESTIGATE THE QUESTION AS TO IF A LAW WAS BROKEN in the alleged "outing" of a CIA agent.


Wrong.
quote:
A major focus of the Grand Jury Investigation was to determine which government officials had disclosed to the media prior to July 14, 2003 information concerning the affiliation of Valerie Wilson with the CIA, and the nature, timing, extent, and purpose of such disclosures, as well as whether any official making such a disclosure did so knowing that the employment of Valerie Wilson by the CIA was classified information.
http://www.newsfollowup.com/libby_indictment.htm#Libby%20indictment%20text


Fitzgerald was commissioned to investigate who broke the law by "outing" Plame. This is more than a sementic difference rooted in criminal procedure. There was no [little] question that "A LAW" had been broken; the question was by whom.


quote:
FACT:
The PROSECUTOR FAILED TO DELIVER AN INDICTMENT ON THE MAINLINE CHARGE


This is true. But as in most racketeering/criminal enterprise cases, you grab the exposed thread and pull; it will lead to its anchor. As I said before this ain't over [unless politicians lose their nerve].

The Libby case has revealed direct involvement in the outing by both Rove and Cheney. The Office of the Prosecutor is now reloading for Round Two-The United States v Rove [if not Cheney] to determine the Why of this matter.

quote:
Today I hear so many biased news oracles GOING TO WORK concerning getting their digs in regarding how this conviction on LYING (BUT NOT THE MAIN CHARGES) is symptomatic of "this administration".


"Biased" What makes the conservative owned media biased? Is it because they finally watched a re-run of "All the President's Men" and remembered that their role is to report and act as the watchdog on government?

But don't cry, there's always FoxNews, well not really FoxNews, the "News" segments are reporting a connection to the whitehouse, but you still have Bill and Sean. Roll Eyes

quote:
THE PROSECUTOR WAS UNABLE TO PROVE THE MAIN CHARGE THAT HE WAS BROUGHT TO THE TABLE TO CONVICT UPON.


Again, it ain't over.

On a side note: Boy, you really do buy into the NRC Talking Points [as communicated through Rush, Bill and Sean] as a prayer book, don't you?
Democrats to Bush: Don't pardon Libby


WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Democratic leaders urged President Bush not to pardon former vice presidential chief of staff I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, who was convicted on federal charges Tuesday.

Libby's attorneys, meanwhile, vowed to seek a new trial, or, failing that, to appeal the jury's verdict.

Libby was convicted of lying and obstructing an investigation into the Bush administration's actions leading into the Iraq war. (Watch Democrats use verdict to pressure presidentVideo)

He resigned after being indicted in October 2005.

Vice President Dick Cheney, in a written statement, said he was "disappointed with the verdict."

"I am saddened for Scooter and his family," Cheney said. "As I have said before, Scooter has served our nation tirelessly and with great distinction through many years of public service."

Federal officials began an investigation in December 2003 into how the identity of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame was divulged to reporters in the weeks before Robert Novak named her in a July 14, 2003, column. Libby was not charged with the actual leak.

Novak attributed his information to "two senior administration officials" -- later identified as President Bush's political adviser, Karl Rove, and Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage. Neither testified in Libby's trial.

Plame's husband, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson, had openly questioned part of Bush's basis for invading Iraq. He wrote a controversial New York Times op-ed piece that was published July 6, 2003.

Prosecutors argued Libby lied about how he learned of Plame's CIA role to protect his job. Her role, they said, was deliberately released in retribution for her husband's report. (Watch how the conviction played outVideo)
Democrats seize chance to criticize administration

"It's about time someone in the Bush administration has been held accountable for the campaign to manipulate intelligence and discredit war critics," said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

"Lewis Libby has been convicted of perjury, but his trial revealed deeper truths about Vice President Cheney's role in this sordid affair. Now President Bush must pledge not to pardon Libby for his criminal conduct."

Added House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, "This trial provided a troubling picture of the inner workings of the Bush administration. The testimony unmistakably revealed -- at the highest levels of the Bush administration -- a callous disregard in handling sensitive national security information and a disposition to smear critics of the war in Iraq."

Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean said the investigation should go deeper.

"There's a lot more going on here than just this," Dean said on CNN's "The Situation Room."

"We know that the president was not truthful with the American people when he sent us to war," he said. "We don't know if the president committed a crime or not; it would be interesting to find that out." (Watch Dean tar Bush and CheneyVideo)

However, Dean did not recommend appointing a special prosecutor to investigate Bush.

The leading Democratic presidential hopefuls, Sen. Hillary Clinton of New York and Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois, weighed in as well.

"While justice has been served in the Libby case, the real lesson to come from it is that we must be vigilant in ensuring that the intelligence on burgeoning threats to our nation is beyond reproach," read a statement on Clinton's Web site.

Obama said in a statement that Libby's conviction "underscores what happens when our foreign and national security policies are subverted by politics and ideology."
Defense blames memory lapses

During 14 days of evidence and testimony, Libby's lawyers argued that Libby's heavy workload caused memory lapses when he spoke with investigators.

Jurors who found Libby guilty also found him worthy of sympathy, one juror said. (Full story)

"We're not saying we didn't think Mr. Libby was guilty of the things we found him guilty of, but it seemed like ... he was the fall guy," Denis Collins said. (Watch a juror explain how there was sympathy for 'fall guy' LibbyVideo)

Wilson and Plame have filed a lawsuit against Libby, Cheney, Bush political adviser Karl Rove and Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage. Wilson told reporters in a teleconference call that the verdict won't stop that legal action.

"The vice president was quoted as saying he was sorry for Mr. Libby and his family," Wilson said. (Watch Wilson's reaction to verdictVideo)

"I wish that he would express his sorrow for what has happened to my wife, whose career was destroyed as a result of this, and to the [military] service people for a war that was justified by lies and disinformation."
Libby appears 'somewhat surprised'

As the verdicts were read, Libby blinked and "it seemed as if he was somewhat surprised," CNN's Brianna Keilar reported. (Watch Keilar describe Libby's wife weepingVideo)

Libby was fingerprinted and released on his own recognizance.

"We are very disappointed in the verdict of the jurors," lead defense attorney Ted Wells said. "Despite our disappointment in the jurors' verdict, we believe in the American justice system, and we believe in the jury system.

"We intend to file a motion for a new trial and, if that is denied, we will appeal the conviction, and we have every confidence that ultimately Mr. Libby will be vindicated."

He took no questions.

"The jury worked very long and hard and deliberated at length," said Patrick Fitzgerald, the special prosecutor who led the leak probe. "The jury was obviously convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant had lied and obstructed justice in a serious manner."

"I do not expect to file any further charges," Fitzgerald said. "We're all going back to our day jobs."

Libby, 56, faces a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison and a fine of $1 million. A hearing on a presentencing report is scheduled for June 5.

CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin said, "He is virtually certain to go to prison if this conviction is upheld." (Watch Toobin assess Libby's chances of being pardonedVideo)

Libby initially told investigators he learned about Plame from NBC's Tim Russert. He later said he got the information from Cheney a month before the telephone conversation with Russert, but forgot about it.

Russert testified that there was no discussion of Plame in that conversation.

CNN's Kevin Bohn and Paul Courson contributed to this report.



Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/03/06/cia.leak/index.html
Bush commutes Libby's prison sentence

* Story Highlights
* White House aide Lewis "Scooter" Libby faced 30 months in prison
* Libby will not serve that sentence but will pay $250,000 fine
* Libby convicted in relation to investigation into 2003 leak of CIA operative's identity
* Bush called 30 months in prison "excessive"



WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Bush commuted Monday the prison term of former White House aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, facing 30 months in prison after a federal court convicted him of perjury, obstruction of justice and lying to investigators.

A commutation is distinct from a pardon, which is a complete eradication of a conviction record and makes it the same as if the person has never been convicted.

Bush has only commuted the jail term, which means that the conviction remains on Libby's record and he must still pay a $250,000 fine.

Commutations are rarely granted, says CNN's chief legal analyst, Jeffrey Toobin. A commutation is a total right of the president and it cannot be challenged by any attorney or court, he said.

It's the fourth time Bush has issued one.

Earlier Monday, a federal appeals court unanimously ruled that Libby could not delay serving his sentence, which would have put Libby just weeks away from surrendering to a prison.

In a written statement commuting the jail sentence, issued hours after Monday's ruling, Bush called the sentence "excessive," and suggested that Libby will pay a big enough price for his conviction.

"The consequences of his felony conviction on his former life as a lawyer, public servant, and private citizen will be long-lasting," he said.

The president, who has been under great pressure to pardon Libby, said Libby was given "a harsh sentence based in part on allegations never presented to the jury."

The commutation does nothing to prevent Libby from appealing his conviction. And if the appeal fails or is still in process at the end of Bush's term, there is nothing to prevent the president from granting Libby a full pardon before he leaves office.

Libby's conviction is linked to the investigation into the 2003 leak of CIA operative Valerie Plame's identity.

An outraged Joe Wilson, Plame's husband, spoke to CNN shortly after the ruling. Wilson had gone public with allegations that the Bush administration had "twisted" the evidence used to justify the invasion of Iraq, and prosecutors argued that Libby disclosed her employment as part of an effort to discredit him.

"I have nothing to say to Scooter Libby," Wilson said. "I don't owe this administration. They owe my wife and my family an apology for having betrayed her. Scooter Libby is a traitor."

Libby was not accused of disclosing Plame's identity himself. But at trial, special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald told the jury that Libby's actions left "a cloud over the White House" by obstructing the leak probe.

In a statement issued Monday night, Fitzgerald took issue with Bush's description of the sentence as "excessive," saying it was "imposed pursuant to the laws governing sentencings which occur every day throughout this country."

"It is fundamental to the rule of law that all citizens stand before the bar of justice as equals," Fitzgerald said. "That principle guided the judge during both the trial and the sentencing."

Plame had worked in the CIA's counter-proliferation division before the March 2003 invasion. She told a congressional committee in March that her exposure effectively ended her career and endangered "entire networks" of agents overseas.

Her husband said Bush's action today demonstrates that the White House is "corrupt from top to bottom."

Clemency petitions are normally reviewed by the Justice Department, which investigates the case and seeks input from the federal prosecutor who brought the case before issuing a recommendation to the president. A government official told CNN that Bush did not consult with the Justice Department before rendering his decision.

Reaction on Capitol Hill was swift. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, said the president had "abandoned all sense of fairness when it comes to justice."

"The president's commutation of Scooter Libby's prison sentence does not serve justice, condones criminal conduct, and is a betrayal of trust of the American people," she said.

One of the few members of the GOP backing Bush, House Republican Whip Roy Blunt of Missouri, said the commutation was "the right thing to do."

"The prison sentence was overly harsh and the punishment did not fit the crime," said Blunt.

Plame's name became public when Robert Novak named her in his column on July 14, 2003.

Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage has admitted he disclosed the information to a reporter. Novak pointed to another "senior administration official" -- Bush political adviser Karl Rove -- as the second source for his column.

No one has been charged with leaking classified information in the case, but a jury found Libby guilty of trying to deceive investigators and a grand jury during the investigation.

Bush was under great pressure to grant a pardon to Libby.

Libby, the former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, is the highest-ranking White House official ordered to prison since the Iran-Contra affair.

Polls suggest the American public may not be happy with Libby's commutation.

A CNN/Opinion Research Corp. poll taken in March asked if Bush should pardon Libby -- 69 percent said no, 18 percent said yes.

Ted Wells, an attorney for Libby, issued a statement late Monday saying that Libby and his family "wish to express their gratitude for the president's decision."

"We continue to believe in Mr. Libby's innocence," Wells said. "Scooter and his family appreciate the many Americans who have supported them over the last two years."


Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/07/02/libby.sentence/index.html
Didn't Bush, when he was Governor of Texas, on one occasion, mockingly refuse to commute the death sentence of a Black woman convicted of killing her husband who by all accounts had been beating her for over a decade? Didn't he also refuse to commute the death sentence of a retarded man convicted of killing a man who had a history of harassing those he perceived as weaker than him?

Wasn't his reasoning in both cases that the convicts had "received a fair trial and had been convicted by a jury of their peers"? Didn't he argue that it would be a denial of justice for him to become involved?

bs
These guys dont give a dam about America period, this a a corporation and they are at the head of it. Their plan is to secure and much resources and cash as possible period. We are caught up in this America bullshyt, these people are Internationalist. Think about it, what in the hell can anyone do about these people. Absolutely nothing.
It's surprising that Bush didn't issue a full out pardon and be done with it. Democrats were going to decry whatever he did, anyway. And Republicans wanted him to issue a pardon, so the commutation, to a lot Repub leaders, probably seems like not enough.

At 20 percent approval in the polls, it's not likely Bush was going to hurt his political standing any further. And a commutation (which still requires that Libby pay assessed fines, and possible loss of Libby's right to practice law) keeps this issue alive as an issue into the 08' elections, which is baffling as to why Republicans would want to do that.
quote:
Originally posted by TruthSeeker:
It's surprising that Bush didn't issue a full out pardon and be done with it. Democrats were going to decry whatever he did, anyway. And Republicans wanted him to issue a pardon, so the commutation, to a lot Repub leaders, probably seems like not enough.

At 20 percent approval in the polls, it's not likely Bush was going to hurt his political standing any further. And a commutation (which still requires that Libby pay assessed fines, and possible loss of Libby's right to practice law) keeps this issue alive as an issue into the 08' elections, which is baffling as to why Republicans would want to do that.

I think that the logic might be that he can say that Scooter is still being punished, he still has a felony on his record, he still has to pay a fine of $250,000, and he still has to be on parole for a couple years. With a felony, he may also loose his law license.

He is bascially trying to split the difference. Many Republicans were against a pardon. It was rather a small core that seemed to be really pushing for the pardon. He may also have thought that a pardon out right might have garnered even more of a backlash.

Finally, this is probably enough to keep Scooter from squealing like a stuck pig, and bringing everyone down with him. The message was clear from the courts that they were going to make him do the time otherwise. There was even a similar case to Libby's that went to the Supreme Court where they upheld the decision, so appeals did not look good.

What I don't know is whether he can still be pardoned and have the felony expunged by Bush when he leaves office.
Of course he will fully pardon him the day before he leaves office. Its a very smart move. Dont hurt the Republican Party any further and once the elections are over and the New Administration is selected then in the final hower he will remove the felony nullify the fine and Scooter will then join a private law firm and Represent Halliburton and The Carlise Group
quote:
Originally posted by ZAKAR:
Of course he will fully pardon him the day before he leaves office. Its a very smart move. Dont hurt the Republican Party any further and once the elections are over and the New Administration is selected then in the final hower he will remove the felony nullify the fine and Scooter will then join a private law firm and Represent Halliburton and The Carlise Group


I don't agree it's smart. How does this not hurt the Republican party now? It forces all the Republican candidates to "react" to and at least have to dodge -- if they won't outright answer -- the media's speculative questions about "what the president will/won't/should do vis-a-vie Scooter Libby?"

If the Dems are smart (a huuuuuuuge if, I grant you) their candidate will ride this issue like a 2008 Escalade through election day, stoking the irritation of voters still rankled by it at that point.

A pardon today, and it's a non-story (for most voters) by the end of the month, just more background "noise" about the foibles of the Bush presidency.

According to CNN, the White House says a pardon remains an option, so apparently the commutation was a lesser first-step option.
A part of me is actually surprised that the media has still refused to start reporting on the link between the Bush Administration and the Project for the New American Century, the right wing (well, neoconservative, or probably more accurately, "neo-fascist") think tank/cartel. Scooter Libby was/is a member, just like Cheney, Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz, Perle, and most of Bush's major players. As their website shows, they had the Iraq war all planned out in the 1990s, and this administrations entire reason for being is to carry out this group's agenda. Libby was not some lackey; he is a central member of that organization, and he probably has more power than Bush does within their circle. So they probably used him (with his agreement) to shield Cheney & Bush, but there was no way he was going to end up being thrown under the bus. Anything they could do to keep him out of jail, they will do.

They may still have Bush pardon him, too.

But there's no point anymore in discussing ANYTHING the Bush Administration does without reference to the P.N.A.C. and the plans they laid out before Bush ever even ran for president. EVERYTHING they do is tied to that group, and that effort. Think about it: even their World Bank nominees -- first Wolfowitz, and now Zoellick -- are PNAC members. Disregarding that is a mistake, and it bothers me that the media-- and I mean, ALL of the media-- insists on making that mistake.
quote:
Originally posted by Kweli4Real:
quote:
democracy is dead ain't it?


And the fatal wound was this administration's pissing on the rule of law. Mad


Well, what democracy we had is being killed by this administration (and the Democrats are in on it too, sometimes passively and sometimes actively supporting some of shit shit).

But we haven't seen the end. We'll see more members of the Inner Party get away with things that the government would be all too willing to pull the electric chair switch about if the perpetrator was an Outer Party member (middle-class/income citizen) or prole (lower-income/class citizen).

And they say Fascism is dead? Methinks the public bellyfeel supports the doubleplusungood doublespeak about 'democracy' from the Minilov. The Inner Party is plusthankful for the Minitrue goodthink from the Outer Party and proles.
quote:
Originally posted by TruthSeeker:
It's surprising that Bush didn't issue a full out pardon and be done with it.


To issue a pardon would preclude Libby from invoking his 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination. Should the Democratically-controlled Congress call him on the carpet, he wouldn't be able to invoke it. A commutation, on the other hand, allows him to invoke the 5th.

By the way, the 250k fine is peanuts. His legal defense fund, headed up by Fred "Herman Munster" Thompson (presidential wannabe) raised over 4 million dollars. Paying that pittance ain't gonna' hurt him one bit.
As usual, Isome, you're spot on with your commutation versus pardon analysis. [I was going to post something similar, but you beat me to the punch.]

Further, about the 250K ... Hell, Scoot Scoot is a multi-millionaire. He doesn't need the defense fund cash ... It would be like you or I paying a parking ticket.

Vox, you are quite correct about the PNAC connection. Why oh why has the media neglected this angle. Could it be that the PNAC controls the media?

Isome, good catch on the Fred Thompson connection ... So we can only assume that the next president of this United States ... Fred Thompson ... pledged his support/made his bones by coming to the rescue of a PNACer?
Well ... looks like a pardon is on the way!!

Judge questions Libby's probation after Bush clemency


WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Bush spared former White House aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby from prison, and his clemency order may wipe out Libby's 2-year probation as well, the trial judge told lawyers Tuesday.

Strictly interpreted, the statute authorizing probation indicates that supervised release "should occur only after the defendant has already served a term of imprisonment," U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton wrote.

Walton ordered lawyers to weigh in with their arguments on the matter by Monday.

----------------------

Bush on Tuesday defended his decision and said he wouldn't rule out a pardon for Libby, Vice President Dick Cheney's former chief of staff.

"I made a judgment, a considered judgment, and I believe it's the right decision to make in this case. I stand by it," Bush said.

"As to the future, I rule nothing in and nothing out," he said as he left a visit to Walter Reed Medical Center.

White House spokesman Tony Snow also discussed the possibility of a pardon in the daily White House briefing.

"There is always a possibility or there's an avenue open for anybody to petition for consideration of a pardon," Snow said. "As far as we know, that's not been done, and we don't know if it's contemplated by Scooter Libby or his defense team."

Snow said the conviction, fine and probation were "hardly a slap on the wrist."

"Scooter Libby has been convicted of a felony. ... The felony conviction has an impact on his life. He's not going to be able to practice law," Snow said.

FULL STORY

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