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I've been quite clear in my feelings about both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. I don't need to restate them here other than to say that I strongly support Barack for president. Selecting a vice presidential running mate is the next big step in the race to November and it is a decision that, we can only imagine, is being taken most seriously. I've pondered this move, as have many of you, going over the various "would be" veeps: Webb, Clark, Biden, Kaine, Hagel, Edwards, Dodd, Richardson, Vilsack, Bayh, Nunn, Daschle, etc. Some are fresh and new names. Many are retreads from previous races. Not many generate much in the way of any real excitement or strategic advantage.

Being as strong an Obama supporter as I am, I think he needs to select someone who can meaningfully add to the ticket; someone who can help Barack in some fundamental way. That's why I think he should select . . . . . (I hope you're sitting down) . . . . Hillary Clinton.

Choosing a vice president isn't like selecting a spouse. Barack doesn't have to like Hillary. He doesn't even, really, have to deal with her much once in office. He does have to get elected though or all of this is for naught.

To my sensibilities, Hillary is the only potential running mate who could bring a significant level of excitement and energy to the ticket. Sure, some say that choosing her would undermine the Obama 'change platform'. I think it extremely easy to handle that argument by focusing on the change that both Barack and Hillary would represent versus John McCain. They'd be making extraordinary American history.

Yes, Bill would be someone to watch, but we all know the adage that one must keep their friends close, but their enemies even closer. I even think that Bill would actually get into the notion that it would take the Clintons' to get a black man elected president and bend over backward to get his wife back in the White House!

Hillary brings all those disaffected white women back into the fold. Together, Barack and Hillary galvanize the core of the party - energizing the Democratic machine all over the country. Perhaps she even helps in important states like Florida and Ohio and even further sparks the amazing Obama fundraising engine!

They say that the selection of a VP running mate is the first move revealing the kind of decision making that the nominee would make as president. Choosing Hillary, to my way of seeing things, would demonstrate real strength and confidence. The easy thing would be to dismiss her. The harder thing would be to embrace Hillary and Bill and use them as strategic assets to get himself elected.

Yes, I think Barack should select Hillary as his running mate. It would create the biggest bounce from the convention (by far) that just might be needed in November. The only person who might be able to eclipse this choice on the Republican side would be if McCain convinced Colin Powell to run - and that ain't happening.

Of course we don't know the role that racism will play as the curtains close behind Americans in early November. It would be foolish to think that it will play no role. Having Hillary out there as your attack dog - not only countering McCain's veep pick but also taking McCain on directly as well - is something that can't be overstated. No other potential running mate can come close to her name recognition and political presence. Yes, she may scare some conservative voters to come out to vote against her, but I'll have to take my chances on the over-all benefit that she brings to the ticket.

It's well known that John Kennedy didn't like LBJ. He selected him as his VP though and it helped him win the White House. Choosing a running mate is a cold, hard strategic decision. It's not personal. It's business. Barack should choose Hillary. It makes sense. It would give him the greatest opportunity to be president of the United States of America and therefore it's the right thing to do. He would just need to watch his back though . . . . and stay the heck out of Arkansas. We all know what happened when JFK went to LBJ's Texas.
Eek 16

© MBM

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The VP pick will be Biden.

HRC would likely galvanize as many presently dispirited Republicans as she would disaffected women. (who still, in the final tally are not likely to go Repub)

Sebilius would tick off the HRC supporters.

Kaine reinforces Obama's perceived negatives -- youth, lack of foreign policy bona fides.

Bayh ....not a great campaigner, supported the Iraq invasion. and would probably not bring Indiana.

Biden, while he can be undisciplined on the stump is a beast of a campaigner and will get after McCain day in and day out on the campaign trail, something Obama has not shown a taste for doing to this point. Additionally, Biden has Pennsylvania roots -Scranton-. HRC played her Pa. "roots" in the primary to good effect. It would likely do no less for Biden.

For all Obama's desire to run a 50-state race, you must first win, before you dominate. This race will turn on Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania and their 20, 18, 21 electoral votes.
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:

An Obama / Clinton ticket is the only unbeatable ticket possible.


I don't think its the "only" ticket that can win. I just think its the best one; the one that gives Barack the best chance to win.


Then you still don't get it. Smile

Obama needs enough votes to 1) counter the on-going attack the Republicans are/are going to assault him with from now until November; and 2) overcome the underhanded cheating tactics (the disqualification of Dem voters) the Republicans are going to use on Election Day.

If the election were held today, he'd lose. Though I think the polls are inaccurate, he just doesn't have enough of a margin to win ... nor has he been successful in being able to convince any more people who aren't already in his corner to vote for him. His numbers are flat ... and ... there's not a whole lot else he can do that's going to suddenly catapult him into favor with the amount of voters he needs right now.

His V.P. pick can give him that, though.

Hillary is the only choice that could/would bring him enough votes for a definite win. Any other choice might bring in (a few) additional votes ... but Hillary already has enough of those behind her.

The pundits are saying that Obama needs to pick somebody who has what he doesn't, i.e., foreign policy experience, an economic background, a political vet, etc. But what he needs are votes, or none of what he does or doesn't have behind him will matter one bit. He doesn't need a 'good' choice as much as he needs a 'popular' choice.

Hillary can bring everything the Dems need to win to the platform. And I can't think of any other Democrat in the entire Party for whom the same could be said. Can you?? Confused
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quote:
Originally posted by TruthSeeker:

Biden, while he can be undisciplined on the stump is a beast of a campaigner and will get after McCain day in and day out on the campaign trail, something Obama has not shown a taste for doing to this point. Additionally, Biden has Pennsylvania roots -Scranton-. HRC played her Pa. "roots" in the primary to good effect. It would likely do no less for Biden.


as much as i think a strong female veep candidate would do, you're probably right about Biden. Obama needs an attack dog to balance out his "thoughtful/nice guy" approach, and to rip john mccain's ***'s off. Hopefully, he'll get a good one, and not make the mistake john kerry did in choosing john edwards. Initially edwards looked like an attack dog, but turned out to be a softy against cheney et al. Biden just might be the ticket to shake things up for Obama...
August 19, 2008
Political Memo
The Lingering What-If Question: Clinton?
By PATRICK HEALY

No power brokers in the Democratic Party are openly campaigning for Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton as their vice-presidential nominee this year, and even Mrs. Clinton's closest aides have stopped talking her up. Yet privately, some Democrats continue to see her as exactly the partner that Senator Barack Obama needs.

Clinton supporters have tried to make this point in recent weeks, winning language in the party's convention platform that acknowledged Mrs. Clinton's history-making candidacy, and praising her as a smart, seasoned policy wonk who could add ballast to Mr. Obama's message of hope and change.

Indeed, a recent New York Times/CBS News poll of convention delegates found that 28 percent preferred Mrs. Clinton for vice president "” by far the largest bloc supporting a candidate. (More than a third offered no opinion; 6 in 10 of Clinton-pledged delegates wanted her, but only 3 percent of Obama delegates named her.)

"I've gotten literally hundreds of letters over the last week from women saying they would still love it if she were the nominee, or if he would pick her," said Geraldine A. Ferraro, a Clinton supporter and the only woman to be on a major-party ticket, as the Democratic vice-presidential nominee in 1984.

Now if only the two former rivals could get past ... oh, where to begin?

Think back to high school: In interviews on Monday, Clinton aides said they thought Mr. Obama did not like Mrs. Clinton. Clinton aides also said they thought Mr. Obama thinks Mrs. Clinton does not like him. And, like him or not, she is skeptical that he can win, her aides continue to say. Bottom line, chemistry might be a problem here.

While Mrs. Clinton, as running mate, might shepherd her blue-collar supporters in Ohio and Pennsylvania to the ticket, her earlier criticisms of Mr. Obama before those same voters might undercut a unity message. And what her fans see as "seasoned" experience is what many Obama supporters rejected during the primaries as "old Washington tactics," a phrase that Mr. Obama has used to describe Clintonian politicking.

The Obama camp would also have to figure out former President Bill Clinton's role in the months and years to come "” a tricky task, perhaps, given that the arrangement of his speaking role at the convention was a protracted, somewhat clumsy affair.

"There's a case for Hillary to be on the ticket, but the real question is, Is Bill a voice for the campaign and the administration, and what do you do about disclosing all of the donors to his foundation and his library?" said Robert Shrum, a veteran strategist of Democratic campaigns, referring to donor lists that the Clintons would not release during the primaries.

As for Mrs. Clinton, she is increasingly looking at the advantages of staying off the ticket, whether to run again in four or eight years or to capitalize on her presidential run to become an enduring national voice for women and working-class Americans.

"Picking her would have a groundswell impact on Democrats, but not picking her will leave her to have a new role leading on her issues "” and supporting Barack for president," said Alan Patricof, a longtime fund-raiser and friend of the Clintons.

An uninformed observer could be forgiven for assuming that next week's Democratic convention in Denver was an Obama-Clinton affair: Michelle Obama speaking on Monday night, Mrs. Clinton on Tuesday, Mr. Clinton on Wednesday and Mr. Obama on Thursday. Women's groups are also planning a parade and rally in Mrs. Clinton's honor for next Tuesday in Denver. (A Clinton spokeswoman said Monday that she did not know whether Mrs. Clinton had been invited.)

If Mr. Obama does not select Mrs. Clinton, this four-night lineup will simply serve as another reminder that steps are needed to heal the wounds of the long primary season fight.

"I think the convention will help bring the wings of the party together, especially the fact that Senator Clinton's name will be put in nomination for a roll-call vote; that will make a big difference," said former Gov. Tom Vilsack of Iowa, a Clinton supporter. "As for picking Senator Clinton as vice president "” that's Senator Obama's decision."

That last line has been the official Clinton talking point this summer; even Ann Lewis, Mrs. Clinton's former spokeswoman and one of her most unabashed champions, declined to comment on Monday about whether Democrats still wanted Mrs. Clinton as the running mate.

While never the most subtle bunch, Mrs. Clinton and her aides have maintained a low profile this summer, given that campaigning outright for the vice presidency has rarely paid off. Recently, as it became clear that Mr. Obama was nearing his choice, Mrs. Clinton's aides stopped talking publicly about the vice presidency altogether.

Mr. Obama has given little indication that he is preparing to pick her "” even though, her supporters note, she could help him in swing states and with key blocs of voters, and she could help raise millions of dollars. One donor to Mrs. Clinton attended a recent Obama fund-raiser in New York that netted about $500,000; if Mrs. Clinton had been the headliner, the donor wagered, it would have reaped $1 million.

Some Democrats do not rule out the possibility that Mr. Obama and Mrs. Clinton could be playing it supercool, only to increase the splash of seeing Mr. Obama, the junior senator from Illinois, reach out to his old bête noire, Mrs. Clinton, the junior senator from New York, to become the first black man and the first woman to seek the White House as nominees.

"If he determines that Hillary after all is the best choice to help him to win and to govern," said Dan Gerstein, a Democratic consultant in New York, "they are capable of pulling off what would be the greatest head fake in American political history."

Dalia Sussman contributed reporting.
August 19, 2008

Biden: 'I'm not the guy'
Posted: 07:00 PM ET

From CNN Political Producer Alexander Marquardt


Biden said Tuesday he will not be Obama's VP.


(CNN) – Responding to a fresh wave of rumors he may soon be named to the Democratic presidential ticket, Sen. Joe Biden told reporters camped outside the gates of his Delaware home Tuesday that he isn't "the guy."

"You got better things to do guys, I'm not the guy," Biden said.

Asked where he would be on Saturday "” when Barack Obama is reportedly scheduled to hold a campaign event in Springfield, Illinois that may feature his new running mate – Biden replied, "Here," pointing to his driveway.

Biden's VP stock has risen in recent days following a visit to the Republic of Georgia that spotlighted his national security and foreign policy credentials – a policy area where Obama's resume is relatively thin.

The Obama camp has kept the details on both the timing and selection of the presumptive Democratic nominee's running mate under wraps. Biden is reportedly on a shortlist for the spot, along with Indiana Senator Evan Bayh and Virginia Governor Tim Kaine. Obama will visit Virginia on Wednesday and Thursday before returning home to Illinois, where a Saturday event in Springfield – where he first kicked off his presidential run – will mark the official start of his "roll into the convention," which will include a tour of battleground states.
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:

An Obama / Clinton ticket is the only unbeatable ticket possible.


I don't think its the "only" ticket that can win. I just think its the best one; the one that gives Barack the best chance to win.


Personally, being from Georgia, I'm kinda disappointed that Sam Nunn isn't in the VP running.
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by MBM:
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:

An Obama / Clinton ticket is the only unbeatable ticket possible.


I don't think its the "only" ticket that can win. I just think its the best one; the one that gives Barack the best chance to win.


Then you still don't get it. Smile

Obama needs enough votes to 1) counter the on-going attack the Republicans are/are going to assault him with from now until November; and 2) overcome the underhanded cheating tactics (the disqualification of Dem voters) the Republicans are going to use on Election Day.

If the election were held today, he'd lose. Though I think the polls are inaccurate, he just doesn't have enough of a margin to win ... nor has he been successful in being able to convince any more people who aren't already in his corner to vote for him. His numbers are flat ... and ... there's not a whole lot else he can do that's going to suddenly catapult him into favor with the amount of voters he needs right now.

His V.P. pick can give him that, though.

Hillary is the only choice that could/would bring him enough votes for a definite win. Any other choice might bring in (a few) additional votes ... but Hillary already has enough of those behind her.

The pundits are saying that Obama needs to pick somebody who has what he doesn't, i.e., foreign policy experience, an economic background, a political vet, etc. But what he needs are votes, or none of what he does or doesn't have behind him will matter one bit. He doesn't need a 'good' choice as much as he needs a 'popular' choice.

Hillary can bring everything the Dems need to win to the platform. And I can't think of any other Democrat in the entire Party for whom the same could be said. Can you?? Confused


I agree, BHO needs to set aside his pride and go with Billary but he will also need a food taster. LOL Eek
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
For me, it ain't gotta be Hillary. Whoever it is needs to have the guts to participate in modern politics. Whoever it is has got to be a bulldog, or a piranha Mad


That sure sounds like Hillary to me!! Big Grin

quote:
because Obama is content to absorb body blows and count on "the people" to reject McCain's negativity...


I hear your complaints about Obama taking the 'high road' in his campaign. I agree with you, but I also think veering away from that would be a mistake for him. It's one of the things a lot of people like about him. He's not 'down-in-the-dirt' and that's a good thing!!

Perhaps not effective for success (19), but good nonetheless! Smile

And, actually, Obama's non-offensive demeanor is typical Democrat whimpy-ness at it's very best. The Dems are punks and always have been when it comes to counteracting Republican viciousness ... Kerry did it with the Swiftboat thing ... Gore did it by conceding the election - and due justice of those Floridians right to have their votes counted with it .... the Democrat-led Congress's (especially the House's) refusal to investigate Bush & Cheney's obvious wrongdoings. The list goes on and on.

The Democrats have no backbone. Looks like Barack is lacking one too. But, that's Democrats-as-usual. Nothing new there. Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by EbonyRose:
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
For me, it ain't gotta be Hillary. Whoever it is needs to have the guts to participate in modern politics. Whoever it is has got to be a bulldog, or a piranha Mad


That sure sounds like Hillary to me!! Big Grin

quote:
because Obama is content to absorb body blows and count on "the people" to reject McCain's negativity...


I hear your complaints about Obama taking the 'high road' in his campaign. I agree with you, but I also think veering away from that would be a mistake for him. It's one of the things a lot of people like about him. He's not 'down-in-the-dirt' and that's a good thing!!

Perhaps not effective for success (19), but good nonetheless! Smile

And, actually, Obama's non-offensive demeanor is typical Democrat whimpy-ness at it's very best. The Dems are punks and always have been when it comes to counteracting Republican viciousness ... Kerry did it with the Swiftboat thing ... Gore did it by conceding the election - and due justice of those Floridians right to have their votes counted with it .... the Democrat-led Congress's (especially the House's) refusal to investigate Bush & Cheney's obvious wrongdoings. The list goes on and on.

The Democrats have no backbone. Looks like Barack is lacking one too. But, that's Democrats-as-usual. Nothing new there. Roll Eyes



I wouldn't say he doesn't have a backbone. He can be stubborn as hell on certain issues. I think he trusts his advisors perspectives a lil too much and in turn his advisors aren't as hip to the game as they believe themselves to be. Then again his campaign manager helped harold washington, and Deval Patrick...so maybe this high road thing will continue to work for him.

...somebody should whisper into Obama's ear that McCain is secretly a black man. He'll go into a shark-like frenzy on McCain's butt then! lol


daz
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
quote:
Originally posted by HonestBrother:
quote:
Originally posted by negrospiritual:
...somebody should whisper into Obama's ear that McCain is secretly a black man. He'll go into a shark-like frenzy on McCain's butt then! lol


daz



But ... but ... the man is pale and pasty ... and has no top lip. Eek


2 words: Michael Jackson



Michael Jackson wasn't born that way. Razz

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